Publications [#272089] of Kenneth A. Dodge

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Journal Articles

  1. Kaplow, JB; Hall, E; Koenen, KC; Dodge, KA; Amaya-Jackson, L. "Dissociation predicts later attention problems in sexually abused children." Child Abuse & Neglect 32.2 (2008): 261-275. [doi]
    (last updated on 2017/11/20)

    Abstract:
    Objective: The goals of this research are to develop and test a prospective model of attention problems in sexually abused children that includes fixed variables (e.g., gender), trauma, and disclosure-related pathways. Methods: At Time 1, fixed variables, trauma variables, and stress reactions upon disclosure were assessed in 156 children aged 8-13 years. At the Time 2 follow-up (8-36 months following the initial interview), 56 of the children were assessed for attention problems. Results: A path analysis involving a series of hierarchically nested, ordinary least squares multiple regression analyses indicated two direct paths to attention problems including the child's relationship to the perpetrator (β = .23) and dissociation measured immediately after disclosure (β = .53), while controlling for concurrent externalizing behavior (β = .43). Post-traumatic stress symptoms were only indirectly associated with attention problems via dissociation. Taken together, these pathways accounted for approximately 52% of the variance in attention problems and provided an excellent fit to the data. Conclusions: Children who report dissociative symptoms upon disclosure of CSA and/or were sexually abused by someone within their family are at an increased risk of developing attention problems. Practice implications: Findings from this study indicate that children who experienced sexual abuse at an earlier age, by someone within their family, and/or report symptoms of dissociation during disclosure are especially likely to benefit from intervention. Effective interventions should involve (1) providing emotion regulation and coping skills; and (2) helping children to process traumatic aspects of the abuse to reduce the cyclic nature of traumatic reminders leading to unmanageable stress and dissociation. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Kenneth A. Dodge