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Joel B. Rosch, Senior Research Scholar Research Associate, Center for Child and Family Policy  

Office Location: 212 Rubenstein Hall
Office Phone: (919) 613-9291
Duke Box: 90545
Email Address: jbrrosch@duke.edu

Areas of Expertise

  • Crime and Criminal Justice

Education:
Ph.D., University of Washington, 1980
M.A., University of Washington, 1970
B.A., Hobart College, 1969

Research Description:

Joel Rosch is a senior research scholar at the Center. His present research interests focus on the structure of service delivery systems and the framing of public dialogue about the effectiveness of public programs.

Rosch earned a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Washington. He has taught courses on law and society and on crime and public policy at various colleges and universities in both the U.S. and Japan. Rosch has published articles and delivered papers on policing, crime prevention, dispute resolution, general prevention policy, courts, corrections, crime trends, the politics of crime and punishment, and Japanese law.

Prior to coming to Duke, Rosch was a lead planner at the North Carolina Governor's Crime Commission, where he administered both the federal Children’s Justice Block Grant targeting child abuse and the Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant, where he worked with local communities to develop programs for court- involved youth. Rosch developed an interest in children’s issues while serving as the director of research and planning for the State Bureau of Investigation, where he represented law enforcement on a number of task forces, including the North Carolina Child Fatality Task Force and the North Carolina Child Death Review Team. These experiences lead to a broader interest in child policy.

Over the last decade, Rosch has been involved in the redesign of North Carolina’s juvenile justice system, the child protective service system, the child death review system, the substance abuse treatment system for adjudicated youth, the development of North Carolina's graduated driver's license system, the development of a substance abuse treatment system for juvenile offenders and the child mental health system. He is regularly called upon to assist agencies working with each of those systems and has helped public health, the courts, the office of juvenile justice and child protective services with grant applications to promote system integration.

Rosch helped found and was the first co-chair of the North Carolina State Collaborative, a coalition of public and private agencies working to establish a system of care for children and families. He also serves on the policy committee for the North Carolina chapter of the United Way.

Teaching (Spring 2015):

  • Childpol 495s.01, Capstone course: childpol cert Synopsis
    See instru, TuTh 04:40 PM-05:55 PM
  • Pubpol 790.02, Special topics in idp Synopsis
    Rubenstein 153, TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM

Representative Publications   (More Publications)

  1. J.B. Rosch with Cindy Lederman. "Creating a Legal and Organizational Context for Reducing Peer Contagion." Deviant Peer Influences in Programs for Youth: Problems and Solutions. Ed. Dodge, Dishion & Lansford New York, Guilford Publications, July, 2007
  2. J.B. Rosch with Jennifer Landsford. "Is Deviant Peer Contagion a Problem, and What Can Be Done?." Deviant Peer Influences in Programs for Youth: Problems and Solutions. Ed. Dodge, Dishion & Lansford New York, Guilford Publications, July, 2007
  3. J.B. Rosch. "Institutionalizing Mediation: The Evolution of the Civil Liberties Bureau in Japan." Law and Society Review 2 (1987).
  4. J.B. Rosch. "Deviant Peer Contagion: Findings from the Duke Executive Sessions on Deviant Peer Contagion." The Link 5.2 (Fall 2006). [pdf]
  5. J. B. Rosch with Allred, C., Markiewicz, J., Amaya-Jackson, L., Putnam, F., Saunders, B., Wilson, C., Kelly, A., Kolko, D., & Berliner, L.. "The Organizational Readiness and Capacity Assessment Index." UCLA-Duke National Center for Child Traumatic Strees, J. (2005).

Bio/Profile
Joel Rosch is a Senior Research Scientist at the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University where he is the coordinator of the practice core of Duke's NIDA funded Trans-disciplinary Substance Abuse Prevention Research Center, which is developing new substance abuse prevention science. He is also a Policy Associate with the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress, a joint Duke, UCLA initiative funded by SAMHSA and serves on the Policy Committee for the North Carolina chapter of United Way.

Joel has a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Washington. After teaching and doing research on law and society and crime and public policy in both the US and Japan, he developed an interest in children's issues while serving as a Director of Research and Planning for the State Bureau of Investigation, the state police agency in North Carolina, wehre he represented law enforcement on various task forces and study commissions dealing with children. While working for the state of North Carolina, Joel was involved in the redesign of North Carolina's Child Protective Service System, the Child Death Review System, the Juvenile Justice System, and the Child Mental Health System. He has recently begun helping North Carolina rethink the way the early childhood service system is structured. He also worked on the development of North Carolina's graduated driver's license system and North Carolina's system to assess and provide substance abuse treatment to juvenile offenders.

He has published articles and delivered papers on prevention policy, policing, crime prevention, dispute resolution, courts, corrections, crime trends, the politics of crime and punishment, and Japanese law. At present he is the co-chair of the North Carolina State Collaborative, a coalition of public and private agencies, that is trying to establish a System of Care for children and families. His present research interests focus on the structure of service delivery systems, and the framing of public dialogue about the effectiveness of public programs.

Joel B. Rosch