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Misha Angrist, Associate Professor of the Practice and Sanford School of Public Policy and Senior Fellow in the Duke Initiative for Science & Society of Duke Science & Society  

Office Location: Box 90222, North Building Room 237, Durham, NC 27708-0222
Office Phone: (919) 684-2872
Duke Box: 910141
Email Address: misha.angrist@duke.edu
Web Page: https://fds.duke.edu/db/Sanford/faculty/misha.angrist
Twitter: https://twitter.com/MishaAngrist
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/misha-angrist/b/175/82b

Areas of Expertise

  • Science, Access to health care

M.F.A., Bennington College, 2001
Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University, 1996
M.S., University of Cincinnati, 1990
B.A., Indiana University at Bloomington, 1985

Teaching (Fall 2016):

  • Scisoc 256.01, Science and society Synopsis
    North building 232, TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM
  • Bioethic 602s.01, Law, research and bioethics Synopsis
    See instru, Tu 03:05 PM-05:35 PM
  • Law 705.01, Bioethics and health law Synopsis
    Tba, Tu 03:05 PM-05:35 PM

Office Hours:
by appointment

Recent Publications   (More Publications)   (search)

  1. M Angrist. "Start me up: ways to encourage sharing of genomic information with research participants.." Nature reviews. Genetics 16.8 (August, 2015): 435-436. [doi]  [abs]
  2. M Angrist and L Jamal. "Living laboratory: whole-genome sequencing as a learning healthcare enterprise.." Clinical genetics 87.4 (April, 2015): 311-318. [doi]  [abs]
  3. M Angrist and L Jamal. "Living laboratory: Whole-genome sequencing as a learning healthcare enterprise." Clinical Genetics 87.4 (January, 2015): 311-318. [doi]  [abs]
  4. M Angrist and R Cook-Deegan. "Distributing the future: The weak justifications for keeping human genomic databases secret and the challenges and opportunities in reverse engineering them.." Applied & translational genomics 3.4 (December, 2014): 124-127. [doi]
  5. M Angrist. "The audacity of interpretation: Protecting patients or piling on?." Applied & translational genomics 3.3 (September, 2014): 68-69. [doi]


Misha Angrist is Associate Professor of the Practice at SSRI, a Senior Fellow in Science & Society, and Visiting Associate Professor of the Practice in the Sanford School of Public Policy as part of the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media & Democracy. He is the Associate Director of the Genome Sciences & Policy Certificate. He serves as the lead of the Public Impact & Engagement track for the MA in Bioethics & Science Policy and as a faculty mentor; he teaches in the MA program as well science writing for undergraduates. In his work, he explores the intersection of biology and society, especially as it relates to the governance of human participation in research and medicine. As the fourth participant in the Personal Genome Project, he was among the first to have his entire genome sequenced and made public. He chronicled this experience in his book, Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics. Angrist has an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars, an MS in genetic counseling from the University of Cincinnati, and a PhD in genetics from Case Western Reserve University.

Misha Angrist