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Margaret E Sartor, Visiting Lecturer of Public Policy Studies and Research Associate, Center for Documentary Studies  

Office Location: 1317 W Pettigrew
Duke Box: 90802
Email Address: msartor@duke.edu
Web Page: http://margaretsartor.com/

Areas of Expertise

  • Media and Communications, Documentary Photography or Film

Education:
BA, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1981

Teaching (Fall 2014):

  • Ls 770.74, Selected topics Synopsis
    Perkins 318, M 06:15 PM-08:45 PM

Bio/Profile
Margaret Sartor currently teaches at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Her most recent book, the critically acclaimed Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets, and Growing Up in the 1970s (Bloomsbury USA, 2006) is a memoir of adolescence based on the diaries she kept as a girl. It tells a frank, poignant and often hilarious story, delving into the same emotional and geographic territory that Sartor has been depicting in photographs for almost two decades.

Sartor's photographs have appeared in a number of books, including In Their Mother's Eyes, (2001), Black: A Celebration of Culture, edited by Deborah Willis (2004), The Spirit of Family by Al and Tipper Gore (2002), and A New Life: Stories and Photographs from the Suburban South, edited by Alex Harris and Alice George (1996). Her photographs have been published in Aperture, DoubleTake, Esquire, Harpers, The New Yorker, The Oxford American, and The Washington Post Sunday Magazine. They are included in the permanent collections of The Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art and the North Carolina Museum of Art, as well as other museum and private collections.

As an editor, Sartor has published three books: Gertrude Blom: Bearing Witness, edited by Margaret Sartor and Alex Harris (1984), Their Eyes Meeting the World, by Robert Coles and edited by Margaret Sartor (1992), and What Was True: The Photographs and Notebooks of William Gedney, edited by Margaret Sartor and co-edited by Geoff Dyer (1999). What Was True was chosen as one of the "Top Ten Photography Books of 1999" by the Village Voice.

Sartor has curated exhibitions of photography at the International Center for Photography in New York, The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Margaret E Sartor