Publications [#277730] of Sherman A. James

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Journal Articles

  1. Subramanyam, MA; James, SA; Diez-Roux, AV; Hickson, DA; Sarpong, D; Sims, M; Jr, THA; Wyatt, SB. "Socioeconomic status, John Henryism and blood pressure among African-Americans in the Jackson Heart Study." Social Science & Medicine 93 (Fall, 2013): 139-146. [Gateway.cgi], [doi]
    (last updated on 2022/08/14)

    Abstract:
    John Henryism connotes a strong behavioral predisposition to engage in effortful, active coping with difficult social and economic stressors. This behavioral predisposition is measured by the 12 item John Henryism Scale for Active Coping (JHAC). The John Henry hypothesis predicts that the well-known inverse socioeconomic status (SES)-blood pressure association will be stronger among persons who score high rather than low on the JHAC. We tested this hypothesis in a large African American cohort using baseline data from the Jackson Heart Study. Unlike previous studies, we used multiple indicators of SES: income, education, occupation, childhood SES and cumulative SES. Because the hypothesis is most relevant for adults still in the labor force, we excluded retired participants, yielding a sample size of 3978. Gender-specific Poisson regression models for hypertension adjusting for age, John Henryism, SES, and a John Henryism-SES interaction term, were fit to examine associations. Separate models were fit for each SES indicator. We found some evidence that John Henryism modified the association between income and hypertension in men: low income was associated with higher prevalence of hypertension in men who scored high on John Henryism (prevalence ratio (PR) for low vs. high income tertile 1.12), but with lower hypertension prevalence among men who scored low on John Henryism (PR 0.85, one sided P value for multiplicative interaction <0.05). For women, the association of low income with higher hypertension prevalence was stronger at lower than higher levels of John Henryism (PR 1.27 and 1.06 at low and high levels of John Henryism respectively, P value<0.05). There was no evidence that John Henryism modified the associations of hypertension with other SES indicators in men or women. The modest support of the John Henryism Hypothesis in men only, adds to the literature on this subject, but underscores questions regarding the gender, spatial, socioeconomic and historical contexts in which the hypothesis is valid.

Sherman A. James