Evolutionary Anthropology Faculty Database
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Brian Hare, Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology and Member of Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Faculty Network Member of Duke Institute for Brain Sciences and Associate of the Duke Initiative for Science & Society

Brian Hare

What is human about our mind and brain and how did it get that way? Brian Hare leads the The Hominoid Psychology Research Group (www.3chimpsduke.com) which compares the psychology of hominoids (human and non-human apes). Specifically, we seek to identify which features our social problem-solving abilities have evolved since humans, bonobos, and chimpanzees shared a common ancestor. In addition, we compare the psychology of various primates (e.g. lemurs) and non-primates (e.g. dogs) to identify cases of psychological convergence. Such cases of convergence may provide a unique opportunity to infer how human-like social skills evolved. We conduct our non-invasive behavioral research in accredited African sanctuaries, The Duke Lemur Center and accredited zoos. In addition, we study the cognition of domestic dogs and other canids at the Duke Canine Cognition Center (www.dukedogs.com) where people bring their pet dogs in to participate in some of the problem solving games we present to great apes and children. We are hoping to understand more about the effect of domestication on dog cognition, identify breed differences in problem solving skills and generally understand the skills and limits of dog cognition in order to help us understand how we might help dogs be more effective companion animals (e.g. for disabled people, detection of substances, etc.).

Contact Info:
Office Location:  004 Bio Sci Bldg, Durham, NC 27708
Office Phone:  (919) 660-7292
Email Address: send me a message
Web Pages:  http://www.3chimpsduke.com
http://www.dukedogs.com

Education:

Sofia Kovalevskaja AwardAlexander von Humboldt Foundation2004
Ph.D.Harvard University2004
M.A.Harvard University2000
B.A.Emory University1998
Research Interests: Human Cognitive Evolution

Keywords:

Adult • Africa • Age Factors • Altruism • Animals • Ape • Appetitive Behavior • Attention • Behavior, Animal • Behavioral Research • Biological Evolution • Bonobo • Brain • Chimpanzee • Chimpanzees • Cognition • Congo • Conservation of Natural Resources • Cooperative Behavior • Decision Making • Democratic Republic of the Congo • Diet • Dog • Domestication • Ecology • Emotions • Endangered Species • Energy Metabolism • Environment • Executive Function • Eye Movements • Feeding Behavior • Female • Food • Food Preferences • Helping Behavior • Hominidae • Humans • Imitative Behavior • Inhibition (Psychology) • Learning • Leisure Activities • Lemurs • Life Cycle Stages • Linear Models • Male • Mass Media • Memory • Models, Psychological • Models, Statistical • Motivation • Orangutans • Orientation • Pan paniscus • Pan troglodytes • Perception • Pets • Phylogeny • Primates • Psychology • Psychology, Comparative • Psychomotor Performance • Questionnaires • Reward • Risk-Taking • Science • Selection, Genetic • Sexual Behavior • Social Behavior • Social Perception • Space Perception • Species Specificity • Theory of Mind • Time Factors

Curriculum Vitae
Current Ph.D. Students  

Recent Publications   (More Publications)   (search)

  1. Krupenye, C; Hare, B, Bonobos Prefer Individuals that Hinder Others over Those that Help., Current Biology, vol. 28 no. 2 (January, 2018), pp. 280-286.e5 [doi]  [abs]
  2. Hare, B, Domestication experiments reveal developmental link between friendliness and cognition, Journal of Bioeconomics (December, 2017), pp. 1-5 [doi]  [abs]
  3. Tan, J; Ariely, D; Hare, B, Bonobos respond prosocially toward members of other groups., Scientific Reports, vol. 7 no. 1 (November, 2017), pp. 14733 [doi]  [abs]
  4. MacLean, EL; Herrmann, E; Suchindran, S; Hare, B, Individual differences in cooperative communicative skills are more similar between dogs and humans than chimpanzees, Animal Behaviour, vol. 126 (April, 2017), pp. 41-51 [doi]  [abs]
  5. Hare, B, Survival of the Friendliest: Homo sapiens Evolved via Selection for Prosociality., Annual Review of Psychology, vol. 68 (January, 2017), pp. 155-186 [doi]  [abs]


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