Evolutionary Anthropology Faculty Database
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Duke University

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Justin Ledogar, Assistant Research Professor

Justin Ledogar

I am a biological anthropologist who studies the functional morphology and evolution of the craniofacial complex and teeth in primates. My primary research interests focus on understanding the feeding biomechanics and dietary adaptations of fossil hominins and extant primate species, including modern humans.

Contact Info:
Office Location:  
Office Phone:  (919) 684-4250
Email Address: send me a message
Web Page:  http://justinledogar.weebly.com

Teaching (Fall 2019):

  • EVANTH 235L.001, PRIMATE ANATOMY Synopsis
    Bio Sci 155, TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM
  • EVANTH 235L.01L, PRIMATE ANATOMY Synopsis
    Bio Sci 119, Th 01:25 PM-02:40 PM
  • EVANTH 235L.02L, PRIMATE ANATOMY Synopsis
    Bio Sci 119, Th 03:05 PM-04:20 PM
Education:

Ph.D.State University of New York at Albany2015

Recent Publications   (More Publications)   (search)

  1. Bicknell, RDC; Ledogar, JA; Wroe, S; Gutzler, BC; Watson, WH; Paterson, JR, Computational biomechanical analyses demonstrate similar shell-crushing abilities in modern and ancient arthropods., Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 285 no. 1889 (October, 2018) [doi]  [abs]
  2. Mitchell, DR; Sherratt, E; Ledogar, JA; Wroe, S, The biomechanics of foraging determines face length among kangaroos and their relatives., Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 285 no. 1881 (June, 2018), pp. 20180845-20180845 [doi]  [abs]
  3. Neaux, D; Sansalone, G; Ledogar, JA; Heins Ledogar, S; Luk, THY; Wroe, S, Basicranium and face: Assessing the impact of morphological integration on primate evolution, Journal of Human Evolution, vol. 118 (May, 2018), pp. 43-55, Elsevier BV [doi]  [abs]
  4. Wroe, S; Parr, WCH; Ledogar, JA; Bourke, J; Evans, SP; Fiorenza, L; Benazzi, S; Hublin, J-J; Stringer, C; Kullmer, O; Curry, M; Rae, TC; Yokley, TR, Computer simulations show that Neanderthal facial morphology represents adaptation to cold and high energy demands, but not heavy biting., Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 285 no. 1876 (April, 2018), pp. 20180085-20180085, The Royal Society [doi]  [abs]
  5. Ledogar, JA; Luk, THY; Perry, JMG; Neaux, D; Wroe, S, Biting mechanics and niche separation in a specialized clade of primate seed predators., Plos One, vol. 13 no. 1 (January, 2018), pp. e0190689 [doi]  [abs]


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