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Walter Mignolo, William Hane Wannamaker Professor of Romance Studies and Professor of Cultural Anthropology and Romance Studies

Walter Mignolo
Office Location:  125B Friedl Building, Box 90670, Durham, NC 27708
Office Phone:  (919) 668-1949
Email Address:    send me a message
Web Page:   https://globalstudies.trinity.duke.edu/
Office Hours:   Tuesdays and Thursdays by appointment (between 1pm and 3 pm) 

Teaching (Fall 2019):

  • Lsgs 201.01, Intro to latino/a studies Synopsis
    Class bldg 136, TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM
  • Spanish 412s.01, Mayas, aztecs, and incas Synopsis
    Class bldg 106, TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM
  • Lit 690s.02, Special topics in literature Synopsis
    Class bldg 106, M 04:40 PM-07:10 PM
Education:
  • Ph.D. Ecole Des Hautes Etudes (France) 1974

Research Interests:

Global Coloniality, Critical Cosmopolitanism, Modern/Colonial World System

Representative Publications   (More Publications)

  1. Mignolo, W. The Darker Side of Western Modernity: Global Futures, Decolonial Options. Latin America Otherwise Duke University Press, 2011. 408 pages pp. (http://www.latamrob.com/archives/2551) [ViewProduct.php]  [abs]
  2. Mignolo, WALTER. Globalization and the Decolonial Option. Cultural Studies  vol. 21 no. 2-3 ( 2007.). [title~content=g776420754~db=all]
  3. Mignolo, W. The Idea of Latin America. Blackwell, 2005.
  4. Mignolo, WD. "The Geopolitics of Knowledge and the Colonial Difference." South Atlantic Quarterly  vol. 101 no. 1 (January, 2002): 57-96. [doi]
  5. Mignolo, WD. The Darker Side of the Renaissance: Literacy, Territoriality and Colonization. The University of Michigan Press, 1995.  [abs]
  6. Mignolo, WD. Epistemischer Ungehorsam. Rhetorik der Moderne, Logik der Kolonialität und Grammatik der Dekolonialität (German Translation). Verlag Turia + Kant, 2012. 210 pages pp. Translation into German of "Desobediencia Epistemica", published by Editorial del Signo, Buenos Aires, 2010. (Translated with an introduction, by Jens Katsner and Tom Waibel.) [pdf_3]  [abs]
  7. with Mignolo, WD; Tlostanova, M. Learning to Unlearn: Decolonial Reflections from Eurasia and the Americas. Ohio University Press, 2012. [pages/tlostanova%20learning.html]
  8. Mignolo, WD. El vuelco de la razón: diferencia colonial y pensamiento fronterizo. Ediciones del Signo and Center for Global Studies and the Humanities, Duke University, 2011. 182 pages pp. [available here]  [abs]
  9. Walter D. Mignolo. Loci of enunciation and imaginary constructions: The Case of (Latin) America. Poetics Today  vol. I & II no. 4 ( 1995.).
  10. Mignolo, WD. De la hermenéutica y la semiosis colonial al pensar descolonial. Abya Yala y Universidad Politecnica Salesiana, 2011. 145 pages pp. (A collection of five articles, in Spanish, from 1983 to 1995 that are the foundation of my major books since ¨The Darker Side of the Renaissance.¨ An introduction by Gustavo Verdesio explains the trajectory.)  [abs]
  11. Mignolo, WD. The idea of Latin America (Korean Translation). Editorial Greenbee, May, 2010. [articleView.html]
Walter D. Mignolo received his Doctorat de 3ème Cycle from the École des Hautes Études, Paris, in 1974. He has taught at the Université de Toulouse, Indiana University, and the University of Michigan. Among his books on textual and literary theories are Elementos para una teoría del texto literario (Barcelona, 1978) and Teoría del texto e interpretación de textos (Mexico, 1986). His current research focuses on global coloniality and the history of capitalism. His most recent book, Local Histories/Global Designs: Coloniality, Subaltern Knowledges and Border Thinking (Princeton U.P., 2000). He edited with an introduction Capitalismo y Geopolitica del Conocimiento: la Filosofia de la Liberacion en el Debate Intelectual Contemporaneo (Buenos Aires, 2001). His previous book, The Darker Side of the Renaissance: Literacy, Territoriality and Colonization (1995), was awarded the Katherine Singers Kovac Prize by the Modern Language Association. He co-edited with Elizabeth Hill Boone, Writing without Words: Alternative Literacies in Mesoamérica and the Andes (1994) with contributions from art historians, anthropologists, historians and cultural critics. He is founder and co-editor of Disposition (The University of Michigan) and co-founder and co-editor of Nepantla: Views from South, a journal published by Duke University Press. He has published in Comparative Studies in Society and History, L'Homme, Colonial Latin American Review, South Atlantic Quarterly, Renaissance Quarterly, Hispanic Issues, Poetics Today, Public Culture, Latin American Cultural Studies, etc.

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