Publications [#308385] of Mark C. Kruse

Papers Published
  1. The, CDF; collaborations, D; Aaltonen, T; Abazov, VM; Abbott, B; Acharya, BS; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, GD; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Gonzalez, BA; Alverson, G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, JA; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Avila, C; Azfar, F; Badaud, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, DV; Banerjee, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P et al., Combination of the top-quark mass measurements from the Tevatron collider, Phys. Rev. D, vol. 86 (July, 2012), pp. 092003 [doi] .

    Abstract:
    The top quark is the heaviest known elementary particle, with a mass about 40 times larger than the mass of its isospin partner, the bottom quark. It decays almost 100% of the time to a $W$ boson and a bottom quark. Using top-antitop pairs at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the CDF and {\dzero} collaborations have measured the top quark's mass in different final states for integrated luminosities of up to 5.8 fb$^{-1}$. This paper reports on a combination of these measurements that results in a more precise value of the mass than any individual decay channel can provide. It describes the treatment of the systematic uncertainties and their correlations. The mass value determined is $173.18 \pm 0.56 \thinspace ({\rm stat}) \pm 0.75 \thinspace ({\rm syst})$ GeV or $173.18 \pm 0.94$ GeV, which has a precision of $\pm 0.54%$, making this the most precise determination of the top quark mass.