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Publications [#361963] of Jichun Xie

Papers Published

  1. DiMarco, AV; Qin, X; McKinney, BJ; Garcia, NMG; Van Alsten, SC; Mendes, EA; Force, J; Hanks, BA; Troester, MA; Owzar, K; Xie, J; Alvarez, JV, APOBEC Mutagenesis Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth through Induction of T cell-Mediated Antitumor Immune Responses., Cancer Immunol Res, vol. 10 no. 1 (January, 2022), pp. 70-86 [doi]
    (last updated on 2022/07/02)

    Abstract:
    The APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases is one of the most common endogenous sources of mutations in human cancer. Genomic studies of tumors have found that APOBEC mutational signatures are enriched in the HER2 subtype of breast cancer and are associated with immunotherapy response in diverse cancer types. However, the direct consequences of APOBEC mutagenesis on the tumor immune microenvironment have not been thoroughly investigated. To address this, we developed syngeneic murine mammary tumor models with inducible expression of APOBEC3B. We found that APOBEC activity induced antitumor adaptive immune responses and CD4+ T cell-mediated, antigen-specific tumor growth inhibition. Although polyclonal APOBEC tumors had a moderate growth defect, clonal APOBEC tumors were almost completely rejected, suggesting that APOBEC-mediated genetic heterogeneity limits antitumor adaptive immune responses. Consistent with the observed immune infiltration in APOBEC tumors, APOBEC activity sensitized HER2-driven breast tumors to anti-CTLA-4 checkpoint inhibition and led to a complete response to combination anti-CTLA-4 and anti-HER2 therapy. In human breast cancers, the relationship between APOBEC mutagenesis and immunogenicity varied by breast cancer subtype and the frequency of subclonal mutations. This work provides a mechanistic basis for the sensitivity of APOBEC tumors to checkpoint inhibitors and suggests a rationale for using APOBEC mutational signatures and clonality as biomarkers predicting immunotherapy response in HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancers.

 

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