Publications of Seth G. Sanders

%% Papers Published   
@article{fds329539,
   Author = {Black, DA and Hsu, Y-C and Sanders, SG and Schofield, LS and Taylor,
             LJ},
   Title = {The Methuselah Effect: The Pernicious Impact of Unreported
             Deaths on Old-Age Mortality Estimates.},
   Journal = {Demography},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {2001-2024},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   Abstract = {We examine inferences about old-age mortality that arise
             when researchers use survey data matched to death records.
             We show that even small rates of failure to match
             respondents can lead to substantial bias in the measurement
             of mortality rates at older ages. This type of measurement
             error is consequential for three strands in the demographic
             literature: (1) the deceleration in mortality rates at old
             ages; (2) the black-white mortality crossover; and (3) the
             relatively low rate of old-age mortality among Hispanics,
             often called the "Hispanic paradox." Using the National
             Longitudinal Survey of Older Men matched to death records in
             both the U.S. Vital Statistics system and the Social
             Security Death Index, we demonstrate that even small rates
             of missing mortality matching plausibly lead to an
             appearance of mortality deceleration when none exists and
             can generate a spurious black-white mortality crossover. We
             confirm these findings using data from the National Health
             Interview Survey matched to the U.S. Vital Statistics
             system, a data set known as the "gold standard" (Cowper et
             al. 2002) for estimating age-specific mortality. Moreover,
             with these data, we show that the Hispanic paradox is also
             plausibly explained by a similar undercount.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13524-017-0623-x},
   Key = {fds329539}
}

@article{fds326774,
   Author = {Black, DA and Hsu, Y-C and Sanders, SG and Taylor,
             LJ},
   Title = {Combining forward and backward mortality
             estimation.},
   Journal = {Population Studies},
   Volume = {71},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {281-292},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   Abstract = {Demographers often form estimates by combining information
             from two data sources-a challenging problem when one or both
             data sources are incomplete. A classic example entails the
             construction of death probabilities, which requires death
             counts for the subpopulations under study and corresponding
             base population estimates. Approaches typically entail 'back
             projection', as in Wrigley and Schofield's seminal analysis
             of historical English data, or 'inverse' or 'forward
             projection' as used by Lee in his important reanalysis of
             that work, both published in the 1980s. Our paper shows how
             forward and backward approaches can be optimally combined,
             using a generalized method of moments (GMM) framework. We
             apply the method to the estimation of death probabilities
             for relatively small subpopulations within the United States
             (men born 1930-39 by state of birth by birth cohort by
             race), combining data from vital statistics records and
             census samples.},
   Doi = {10.1080/00324728.2017.1319496},
   Key = {fds326774}
}

@article{fds238571,
   Author = {Black, DA and Sanders, SG and Taylor, EJ and Taylor,
             LJ},
   Title = {The Impact of the Great Migration on Mortality of African
             Americans: Evidence from the Deep South.},
   Journal = {American Economic Review},
   Volume = {105},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {477-503},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0002-8282},
   Abstract = {The Great Migration-the massive migration of African
             Americans out of the rural South to largely urban locations
             in the North, Midwest, and West-was a landmark event in U.S.
             Our paper shows that this migration increased mortality of
             African Americans born in the early twentieth century South.
             This inference comes from an analysis that uses proximity of
             birthplace to railroad lines as an instrument for
             migration.},
   Doi = {10.1257/aer.20120642},
   Key = {fds238571}
}

@article{fds324868,
   Author = {Arcidiacono, P and Beauchamp, A and Hull, M and Sanders,
             S},
   Title = {Exploring the racial divide in education and the labor
             market through evidence from interracial
             families},
   Journal = {Journal of Human Capital},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {198-238},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   Abstract = {© 2015 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.
             We examine gaps between minorities and whites in education
             and labor market outcomes, controlling for many covariates
             including maternal race. Identification comes from different
             reported races within the family. Estimates show two
             distinct patterns. First, there are no significant
             differences in outcomes between black and white males with
             white mothers. Second, large differences persist between
             these groups and black males with black mothers. The
             patterns are insensitive to alternative measures of own race
             and school fixed effects. Our results suggest that
             discrimination is not occurring on the basis of child skin
             color but through mother-child channels such as dialect or
             parenting practices.},
   Doi = {10.1086/681957},
   Key = {fds324868}
}

@article{fds238568,
   Author = {Andersson, F and García-Pérez, M and Haltiwanger, J and McCue, K and Sanders, S},
   Title = {Workplace Concentration of Immigrants},
   Journal = {Demography},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {2281-2306},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0070-3370},
   Abstract = {Casual observation suggests that in most U.S. urban labor
             markets, immigrants have more immigrant coworkers than
             native-born workers do. While seeming obvious, this excess
             tendency to work together has not been precisely measured,
             nor have its sources been quantified. Using matched
             employer-employee data from the U.S. Census Bureau
             Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) database on
             a set of metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) with
             substantial immigrant populations, we find that, on average,
             37 % of an immigrant's coworkers are themselves immigrants;
             in contrast, only 14 % of a native-born worker's coworkers
             are immigrants. We decompose this difference into the
             probability of working with compatriots versus with
             immigrants from other source countries. Using human capital,
             employer, and location characteristics, we narrow the
             mechanisms that might explain immigrant concentration. We
             find that industry, language, and residential segregation
             collectively explain almost all the excess tendency to work
             with immigrants from other source countries, but they have
             limited power to explain work with compatriots. This large
             unexplained compatriot component suggests an important role
             for unmeasured country-specific factors, such as social
             networks.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13524-014-0352-3},
   Key = {fds238568}
}

@article{fds238572,
   Author = {Israel, S and Caspi, A and Belsky, DW and Harrington, H and Hogan, S and Houts, R and Ramrakha, S and Sanders, S and Poulton, R and Moffitt,
             TE},
   Title = {Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human
             capital.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the
             United States of America},
   Volume = {111},
   Number = {48},
   Pages = {17087-17092},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0027-8424},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/9270 Duke open access
             repository},
   Abstract = {Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess
             whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring
             has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending
             and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers
             evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit
             scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are
             such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test
             if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also
             lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand)
             Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we
             examined the association between credit scores and
             cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that
             account for this association. We find that credit scores are
             negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk.
             Variation in household income was not sufficient to account
             for this association. Rather, individual differences in
             human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive
             ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and
             cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the
             correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease
             risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood
             antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes,
             behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first
             decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of
             the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease
             risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these
             findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial
             literacy, and early childhood interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.1409794111},
   Key = {fds238572}
}

@article{fds238573,
   Author = {Gorsuch, MM and Sanders, SG and Wu, B},
   Title = {Tooth loss in Appalachia and the Mississippi delta relative
             to other regions in the United States, 1999-2010.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Public Health},
   Volume = {104},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {e85-e91},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0090-0036},
   Abstract = {We examined regional variation in tooth loss in the United
             States from 1999 to 2010.We used 6 waves of the Behavioral
             Risk Factor Surveillance System and data on county
             characteristics to describe regional trends in tooth loss
             and decompose diverging trends into the parts explained by
             individual and county components.Appalachia and the
             Mississippi Delta had higher levels of tooth loss than the
             rest of the country in 1999. From 1999 to 2010, tooth loss
             declined in the United States. However, Appalachia did not
             converge toward the US average, and the Mississippi Delta
             worsened relative to the United States. Socioeconomic status
             explained the largest portion of differences between regions
             in 1999, but a smaller portion of the trends. The
             Mississippi Delta is aging more quickly than the rest of the
             country, which explains 17% of the disparity in the time
             trend.The disadvantage in tooth loss is persistent in
             Appalachia and growing in the Mississippi Delta. The
             increasing disparity is partly explained by changes in the
             age structure but is also associated with behavioral and
             environmental factors.},
   Doi = {10.2105/ajph.2013.301641},
   Key = {fds238573}
}

@misc{fds238569,
   Author = {Black, DA and Kolesnikova, N and Sanders, SG and Taylor,
             LJ},
   Title = {THE ROLE OF LOCATION IN EVALUATING RACIAL WAGE
             DISPARITY.},
   Journal = {Journal of Labor Economics},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {2-2},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0734-306X},
   Abstract = {A standard object of empirical analysis in labor economics
             is a modified Mincer wage function in which an individual's
             log wage is specified to be a function of education,
             experience, and an indicator variable identifying race. We
             analyze this approach in a context in which individuals live
             and work in different locations (and thus face different
             housing prices and wages). Our model provides a
             justification for the traditional approach, but with the
             important caveat that the regression should include
             location-specific fixed effects. Empirical analyses of men
             in U.S. labor markets demonstrate that failure to condition
             on location causes us to (i) overstate the decline in
             black-white wage disparity over the past 60 years, and (ii)
             understate racial and ethnic wage gaps that remain after
             taking into account measured cognitive skill differences
             that emerge when workers are young.},
   Doi = {10.1186/2193-8997-2-2},
   Key = {fds238569}
}

@article{fds238570,
   Author = {Black, DA and Kolesnikova, N and Sanders, SG and Taylor,
             LJ},
   Title = {Are Children “Normal”?},
   Journal = {Review of Economics and Statistics},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {21-33},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {March},
   Abstract = {We examine Becker's (1960) contention that children are
             “normal.” For the cross-section of non-Hispanic white
             married couples in the United States, we show that when we
             restrict comparisons to similarly educated women living in
             similarly expensive locations, completed fertility is
             positively correlated with the husband's income. The
             empirical evidence is consistent with children being
             “normal.” In an effort to show causal effects, we
             analyze the localized impact on fertility of the mid-1970s'
             increase in world energy prices, an exogenous shock that
             substantially increased men's incomes in the Appalachian
             coal-mining region. Empirical evidence for that population
             indicates that fertility increases with men's income. ©
             2013 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the
             Massachusetts Institute of Technology.},
   Key = {fds238570}
}

@article{fds214245,
   Author = {Dan Black and Natalia Kolesnikova and Seth Sanders and Lowell
             Taylor},
   Title = {Are Children Normal?},
   Journal = {Review of Economics and Statistics},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds214245}
}

@article{fds214246,
   Author = {Dan Black and S.G. Sanders},
   Title = {Inequality and Human Capital in Appalachia,
             1960–2000},
   Pages = {240},
   Booktitle = {Appalachian Legacy: Economic Opportunity After the War on
             Poverty},
   Publisher = {Brookings Institution Press},
   Editor = {James Ziliak},
   Year = {2012},
   Key = {fds214246}
}

@article{fds184894,
   Author = {Eduardo Fajnzylber and S.G. Sanders and V.J Hotz},
   Title = {An Economic Model of Amniocentesis Choice Advances in Life
             Course},
   Journal = {Advances in Life Course Research},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {11-26},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1040-2608},
   Key = {fds184894}
}

@article{fds238580,
   Author = {Fajnzylber, E and Hotz, VJ and Sanders, SG},
   Title = {An economic model of amniocentesis choice.},
   Journal = {Advances in Life Course Research},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {11-26},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21516255},
   Abstract = {Medical practitioners typically utilize the following
             protocol when advising pregnant women about testing for the
             possibility of genetic disorders with their fetus: Pregnant
             women over the age of 35 should be tested for Down syndrome
             and other genetic disorders, while for younger women, such
             tests are discouraged (or not discussed) as the test can
             cause a pregnancy to miscarry. The logic appears compelling.
             The rate at which amniocentesis causes a pregnancy to
             miscarry is constant while the rate of genetic disorder
             rises substantially over a woman's reproductive years. Hence
             the potential benefit from testing - being able to terminate
             a fetus that is known to have a genetic disorder - rises
             with maternal age. This article argues that this logic is
             incomplete. While the benefits to testing do rise with age,
             the costs rise as well. Undergoing an amniocentesis always
             entails the risk of inducing a miscarriage of a healthy
             fetus. However, these costs are lower at early ages, because
             there is a higher probability of being able to replace a
             miscarried fetus with a healthy birth at a later age. We
             develop and calibrate a dynamic model of amniocentesis
             choice to explore this tradeoff. For parameters that
             characterize realistic age patterns of chromosomal
             abnormalities, fertility rates and miscarriages following
             amniocentesis, our model implies a falling, rather than
             rising, rate of amniocentesis as women approach
             menopause.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.alcr.2010.08.001},
   Key = {fds238580}
}

@article{fds238581,
   Author = {Black, DA and Haviland, A and Sanders, SG and Taylor,
             LJ},
   Title = {Gender Wage Disparities among the Highly
             Educated.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Human Resources},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {630-659},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {Summer},
   ISSN = {0022-166X},
   url = {http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/43/3/630?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&author1=Sanders&andorexactfulltext=and&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&sortspec=relevance&resourcetype=HWCIT},
   Abstract = {In the U.S. college-educated women earn approximately 30
             percent less than their non-Hispanic white male
             counterparts. We conduct an empirical examination of this
             wage disparity for four groups of women-non-Hispanic white,
             black, Hispanic, and Asian-using the National Survey of
             College Graduates, a large data set that provides unusually
             detailed information on higher-level education.
             Nonparametric matching analysis indicates that among men and
             women who speak English at home, between 44 and 73 percent
             of the gender wage gaps are accounted for by such pre-market
             factors as highest degree and major. When we restrict
             attention further to women who have "high labor force
             attachment" (i.e., work experience that is similar to male
             comparables) we account for 54 to 99 percent of gender wage
             gaps. Our nonparametric approach differs from familiar
             regression-based decompositions, so for the sake of
             comparison we conduct parametric analyses as well.
             Inferences drawn from these latter decompositions can be
             quite misleading.},
   Doi = {10.3368/jhr.43.3.630},
   Key = {fds238581}
}

@article{fds184895,
   Author = {S.G. Sanders and D. Black and A. Haviland and L.
             Taylor},
   Title = {Gender Wage Differences Among the Highly
             Educated},
   Journal = {Journal of Human Resources},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds184895}
}

@article{fds238578,
   Author = {Black, DA and Sanders, SG and Taylor, LJ},
   Title = {The economics of lesbian and gay families},
   Journal = {The Journal of Economic Perspectives : a Journal of the
             American Economic Association},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {53-70},
   Publisher = {American Economic Association},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0895-3309},
   Doi = {10.1257/jep.21.2.53},
   Key = {fds238578}
}

@article{fds238598,
   Author = {Black, D and Haviland, A and Sanders, S and Taylor,
             L},
   Title = {Why do minority men earn less? A study of wage differentials
             among the highly educated},
   Journal = {The Review of Economics and Statistics},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {300-313},
   Publisher = {MIT Press - Journals},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0034-6535},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2000 Duke open access
             repository},
   Abstract = {We estimate wage gaps using nonparametric matching methods
             and detailed measures of field of study for university
             graduates. We find a modest portion of the wage gap is the
             consequence of measurement error in the Census education
             measure. For Hispanic and Asian men, the remaining gap is
             attributable to premarket factors - primarily differences in
             formal education and English language proficiency. For black
             men, only about one-quarter of the wage gap is explained by
             these same factors. For a subsample of black men born
             outside the South to parents with some college education,
             these factors do account for the entire wage gap. © 2006 by
             the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the
             Massachusetts Institute of Technology.},
   Doi = {10.1162/rest.88.2.300},
   Key = {fds238598}
}

@article{fds238597,
   Author = {Seltzer, JA and Bachrach, CA and Bianchi, SM and Bledsoe, CH and Casper,
             LM and Chase-Lansdale, PL and Diprete, TA and Hotz, VJ and Morgan, SP and Sanders, SG and Thomas, D},
   Title = {Explaining Family Change and Variation: Challenges for
             Family Demographers.},
   Journal = {Journal of Marriage and the Family},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {908-925},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0022-2445},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20376277},
   Abstract = {Twenty years ago, the National Institute of Child Health and
             Human Development (NICHD) issued a request for proposals
             that resulted in the National Survey of Families and
             Households (NSFH), a unique survey valuable to a wide range
             of family scholars. This paper describes the efforts of an
             interdisciplinary group of family demographers to build on
             the progress enabled by the NSFH and many other theoretical
             and methodological innovations. Our work, also supported by
             NICHD, will develop plans for research and data collection
             to address the central question of what causes family change
             and variation. We outline the group's initial assessments of
             orienting frameworks, key aspects of family life to study,
             and theoretical and methodological challenges for research
             on family change. Finally, we invite family scholars to
             follow our progress and to help develop this shared public
             good.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1741-3737.2005.00183.x},
   Key = {fds238597}
}

@article{fds238596,
   Author = {Black, DA and McKinnish, TG and Sanders, SG},
   Title = {Tight labor markets and the demand for education: Evidence
             from the coal boom and bust},
   Journal = {Ilr Review},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3-16},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2535 Duke open access
             repository},
   Abstract = {Human capital theory predicts that individuals acquire less
             schooling when the returns to schooling are small. To test
             this theory, the authors study the effect of the Appalachian
             coal boom on high school enrollments. During the 1970s, a
             boom in the coal industry increased the earnings of high
             school dropouts relative to those of graduates. During the
             1980s, the boom subsided and the earnings of dropouts
             declined relative to those of graduates. The authors find
             that high school enrollment rates in Kentucky and
             Pennsylvania declined considerably in the 1970s and
             increased in the 1980s in coal-producing counties relative
             to counties without coal. The estimates indicate that a
             long-term 10% increase in the earnings of low-skilled
             workers could decrease high school enrollment rates by as
             much as 5-7%-a finding with implications for policies aimed
             at improving low-skilled workers' employment and earnings,
             such as wage subsidies and minimum wage increases. © by
             Cornell University.},
   Doi = {10.1186/1476-5918-4-3},
   Key = {fds238596}
}

@article{fds238579,
   Author = {Hotz, VJ and McElroy, SW and Sanders, SG},
   Title = {Teenage childbearing and its life cycle consequences:
             Exploiting a natural experiment},
   Journal = {The Journal of Human Resources},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {683-715},
   Publisher = {University of Wisconsin Press},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {Summer},
   Abstract = {We exploit a "natural experiment" associated with human
             reproduction to identify the causal effect of teen
             childbearing on the socioeconomic attainment of teen
             mothers. We exploit the fact that some women who become
             pregnant experience a miscarriage and do not have a live
             birth. Using miscarriages an instrumental variable, we
             estimate the effect of teen mothers not delaying their
             childbearing on their subsequent attainment. We find that
             many of the negative consequences of teenage childbearing
             are much smaller than those found in previous studies. For
             most outcomes, the adverse consequences of early
             childbearing are short-lived. Finally, for annual hours of
             work and earnings, we find that a teen mother would have
             lower levels of each at older ages if they had delayed their
             childbearing. © 2005 by the Board of Regents of the
             University of Wisconsin System.},
   Doi = {10.3368/jhr.xl.3.683},
   Key = {fds238579}
}

@article{fds238575,
   Author = {Black, D and McKinnish, T and Sanders, S},
   Title = {The economic impact of the coal boom and
             bust},
   Journal = {The Economic Journal},
   Volume = {115},
   Number = {503},
   Pages = {449-476},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {April},
   Abstract = {In this paper, we examine the impact of the coal boom in the
             1970s and the subsequent coal bust in the 1980s on local
             labour markets in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West
             Virginia. We address two main questions in our analysis. How
             were non-mining sectors affected by the shocks to the mining
             sector? How did these effects differ between sectors
             producing local goods and those producing traded goods? We
             find evidence of modest employment spillovers into sectors
             with locally traded goods but not into sectors with
             nationally traded goods. © Royal Economic Society
             2005.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1468-0297.2005.00996.x},
   Key = {fds238575}
}

@article{fds238576,
   Author = {Black, D and Sanders, S and Taylor, L},
   Title = {Measurement of Higher Education in the Census and Current
             Population Survey},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Statistical Association},
   Volume = {98},
   Number = {463},
   Pages = {545-554},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {September},
   Abstract = {We examine measurement error in the reporting of higher
             education in the 1990 Decennial Census and the post-1991
             Current Population Survey (CPS). We document that
             measurement error in the reporting of higher education is
             prevalent in Census data. Further, these errors violate
             models of classical measurement error in important ways. The
             level of education is consistently reported as higher than
             it is (errors are not mean 0), errors in the reporting of
             education are correlated with covariates that appear in
             earnings regressions, and errors in the reporting of
             education appear correlated with the error term in a model
             of earnings determination. Thus, neither well-known results
             on classical measurement error nor recent models of
             nonclassical measurement error are likely valid when using
             Census and CPS data. We find some evidence that the
             measurement error is lower in the CPS than in the Census,
             presumably because first interviews are generally conducted
             in person.},
   Doi = {10.1198/016214503000000369},
   Key = {fds238576}
}

@article{fds238595,
   Author = {Sanders, SG and Black, D and McKinnish, T},
   Title = {Does the Availability of High-Wage Jobs for Low-Skilled Men
             Affects AFDC Expenditures: Evidence from Shocks to the Coal
             and Steel Industries},
   Journal = {Journal of the Public Economics},
   Volume = {87},
   Number = {9-10},
   Pages = {1919-1940},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {September},
   Abstract = {We study shocks to the coal and steel industries to measure
             the effect of long-term changes in demand for low-skilled
             workers on welfare expenditures. The coal and steel
             industries have historically paid high wages to low-skilled
             men. We find a substantial increase in welfare expenditures
             in response to the collapse of the steel and coal industries
             in the 1980s, and an even more substantial reduction in
             welfare expenditures during the coal boom of the 1970s.
             Additional analysis indicates the reduction in welfare
             expenditures during the coal boom is due in part to a
             decline in single-parent households. © 2002 Elsevier B.V.
             All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0047-2727(02)00014-2},
   Key = {fds238595}
}

@article{fds304430,
   Author = {Black, DA and McKinnish, TG and Sanders, SG},
   Title = {Does the availability of high-wage jobs for low-skilled men
             affect welfare expenditures? Evidence from shocks to the
             steel and coal industries},
   Journal = {Journal of Public Economics},
   Volume = {87},
   Number = {9-10},
   Pages = {1921-1942},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {September},
   Abstract = {We study shocks to the coal and steel industries to measure
             the effect of long-term changes in demand for low-skilled
             workers on welfare expenditures. The coal and steel
             industries have historically paid high wages to low-skilled
             men. We find a substantial increase in welfare expenditures
             in response to the collapse of the steel and coal industries
             in the 1980s, and an even more substantial reduction in
             welfare expenditures during the coal boom of the 1970s.
             Additional analysis indicates the reduction in welfare
             expenditures during the coal boom is due in part to a
             decline in single-parent households. © 2002 Elsevier B.V.
             All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0047-2727(02)00014-2},
   Key = {fds304430}
}

@article{fds238594,
   Author = {Black, DA and Sanders, S and Taylor, L},
   Title = {The economic reward for studying economics},
   Journal = {Economic Inquiry},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {365-377},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {July},
   Abstract = {Undergraduate advisors in economics departments suggest that
             the study of economics is good preparation for a variety of
             careers, including economics, consulting, analysis, and
             administration, and they argue that economics is a solid
             prelaw or pre-MBA major. In this article we provide some
             empirical evidence about each of these contentions. We find
             that among college graduates who do not earn advanced
             degrees, economics majors generally earn more than similar
             individuals with other majors. We show also that among
             individuals who pursue graduate degree programs in business
             and law, economics majors earn more than undergraduate
             majors in most other academic disciplines.},
   Doi = {10.1093/ei/cbg014},
   Key = {fds238594}
}

@article{fds238593,
   Author = {Sanders, SG and Black, D and Makar, H and Taylor,
             L},
   Title = {The Effect of Sexual Orientation on Earnings},
   Journal = {Industrial and Labor Relations Review},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {449-469},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {fds238593}
}

@article{fds238574,
   Author = {Nagin, DS and Rebitzer, JB and Sanders, S and Taylor,
             LJ},
   Title = {Monitoring, motivation, and management: The determinants of
             opportunistic behavior in a field experiment},
   Journal = {American Economic Review},
   Volume = {92},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {850-873},
   Publisher = {American Economic Association},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {September},
   Abstract = {Economic models of incentives in employment relationships
             are based on a specific theory of motivation: employees are
             "rational cheaters," who anticipate the consequences of
             their actions and shirk when the marginal benefits exceed
             costs. We investigate the "rational cheater model" by
             observing how experimentally induced variation in monitoring
             of telephone call center employees influences opportunism. A
             significant fraction of employees behave as the "rational
             cheater model" predicts. A substantial proportion of
             employees, however, do not respond to manipulations in the
             monitoring rate. This heterogeneity is related to variation
             in employee assessments of their general treatment by the
             employer. (JEL D2, J2, L2, L8, M12).},
   Doi = {10.1257/00028280260344498},
   Key = {fds238574}
}

@article{fds238590,
   Author = {Black, D and Gates, G and Sanders, S and Taylor, L},
   Title = {Why do gay men live in San Francisco?},
   Journal = {Journal of Urban Economics},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {54-76},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0094-1190},
   Abstract = {San Francisco is known both as one of America's loveliest
             cities and as home to an unusually large gay community. We
             argue that this overrepresentation of gays is not
             coincidental. Gay households face constraints that make
             having children more costly for them than for similar
             heterosexual households. This reduces lifetime demand for
             housing while freeing resources for allocation elsewhere.
             Therefore, gay men disproportionately sort into high-amenity
             locations. A ranking of metropolitan areas by their gay
             concentration finds high concentrations in America's most
             attractive cities. Regression analysis reveals that measures
             of local amenities predict gay location more strongly than
             does gay friendliness. © 2001 Elsevier Science.},
   Doi = {10.1006/juec.2001.2237},
   Key = {fds238590}
}

@article{fds238591,
   Author = {Black, D and Daniel, K and Sanders, S},
   Title = {The Impact of Economic Conditions on Participation in
             Disability Programs: Evidence from the Coal Boom and
             Bust.},
   Journal = {American Economic Review},
   Volume = {92},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {27-50},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/2099 Duke open access
             repository},
   Abstract = {We examine the impact of the coal boom of the 1970's and the
             coal bust of the 1980's on disability program participation.
             These shocks provide clear evidence that as the value of
             labor-market participation increases, disability program
             participation falls. For the Disability Insurance program,
             the elasticity of payments with respect to local earnings is
             between -0.3 and -0.4 and for Supplemental Security Income
             the elasticity is between -0.4 and -0.7. Consistent with a
             model where qualifying for disability programs is costly,
             the relationship between economic conditions and program
             participation is much stronger for permanent than for
             transitory economic shocks.},
   Doi = {10.1257/000282802760015595},
   Key = {fds238591}
}

@article{fds238589,
   Author = {Black, D and Gates, G and Sanders, S and Taylor, L},
   Title = {Demographics of the gay and lesbian population in the United
             States: evidence from available systematic data
             sources.},
   Journal = {Demography},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {139-154},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {May},
   Abstract = {This work provides an overview of standard social science
             data sources that now allow some systematic study of the gay
             and lesbian population in the United States. For each data
             source, we consider how sexual orientation can be defined,
             and we note the potential sample sizes. We give special
             attention to the important problem of measurement error,
             especially the extent to which individuals recorded as gay
             and lesbian are indeed recorded correctly. Our concern is
             that because gays and lesbians constitute a relatively small
             fraction of the population, modest measurement problems
             could lead to serious errors in inference. In examining gays
             and lesbians in multiple data sets we also achieve a second
             objective: We provide a set of statistics about this
             population that is relevant to several current policy
             debates.},
   Doi = {10.2307/2648117},
   Key = {fds238589}
}

@article{fds238592,
   Author = {Black, D and McKinnish, T and Sanders, SG},
   Title = {Are We Understating the Impact of Economic Conditions on
             Welfare Rolls?},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {489-505},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {fds238592}
}

@article{fds238587,
   Author = {McKinnish, T and Sanders, S and Smith, J},
   Title = {Estimates of effective guarantees and tax rates in the AFDC
             program for the post-OBRA period},
   Journal = {The Journal of Human Resources},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {312-345},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {Spring},
   Abstract = {We employ the model used by Fraker, Moffitt, and Wolf (1985)
             to estimate effective tax rates and guarantees in the Aid to
             Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program for the
             years 1967-82 to produce comparable estimates for 1983-91.
             We compare this method of benefit prediction with other
             methods in the literature and clarify the interpretation of
             estimates generated using the Fraker, Moffitt, and Wolf
             model. We use our estimates for the period from 1983 to 1991
             to examine how effective AFDC tax rates and guarantee levels
             have changed over time and relative to nominal, or official,
             program parameters.},
   Doi = {10.2307/146348},
   Key = {fds238587}
}

@article{fds238588,
   Author = {Daponte, BO and Sanders, S and Taylor, L},
   Title = {Why do low-income households not use food stamps? Evidence
             from an experiment},
   Journal = {The Journal of Human Resources},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {612-628},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {Summer},
   Abstract = {This paper explores why many low-income households do not
             participate in the Food Stamp Program. By analyzing detailed
             income and asset data from a sample of low-income
             households, we find that many households that appear to be
             eligible for food stamps in fact are not eligible. By
             conducting an experiment designed to investigate the role of
             information on participation in the Food Stamp Program, we
             observe that ignorance about the program contributes to
             nonparticipation. However, there is evidence that knowledge
             about the program is endogenous-households generally avail
             themselves of information about the program when the
             anticipated benefits of doing so are large.},
   Doi = {10.2307/146382},
   Key = {fds238588}
}

@article{fds238586,
   Author = {Daponte, BO and Lewis, GH and Sanders, S and Taylor,
             L},
   Title = {Food pantry use among low-income households in Allegheny
             County, Pennsylvania},
   Journal = {Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {50-57},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   Abstract = {This study was conducted to understand why some low-income
             people use pantries and others do not. Telephone and
             face-to-face interviews were conducted with 400 adults
             living in households with an income below 185% of the
             poverty level. Households were selected from a preliminary
             screening of 25,000 households in Allegheny County,
             Pennsylvania and included 174 current pantry users and 226
             nonusers. Consistent with prior research, most households
             using food pantries report difficulty adequately feeding
             their families, and pantry use appears to be evolving into a
             chronic issue rather than one of short-term emergency. New
             pantry users are likely to remain pantry users for roughly 2
             years. Pantry use is highest among African-American
             households, single-headed households with children, and
             households with low levels of education. Regression analysis
             indicates, however, that pantry use is higher among these
             groups only because these households are generally the
             poorest. When variables for income and assets are entered
             into the regression equation, the only variable
             significantly related to the probability of using a pantry
             is whether or not the household owns a car.This latter
             finding underscores the importance of neighborhood-based
             pantries and localized food-distribution
             systems.},
   Key = {fds238586}
}

@article{fds147301,
   Author = {S.G. Sanders and R.A. Miller},
   Title = {Human Capital Development and Welfare Participation},
   Journal = {Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public
             Policy},
   Volume = {46},
   Pages = {1-47},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {fds147301}
}

@article{fds238585,
   Author = {Hotz, VJ and Mullin, CH and Sanders, SG},
   Title = {Bounding Causal Effects Using Data from a Contaminated
             Natural Experiment: Analysing the Effects of Teenage
             Childbearing},
   Journal = {Review of Economic Studies},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {575-603},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {January},
   Abstract = {In this paper, we consider what can be learned about causal
             effects when one uses a contaminated instrumental variable.
             In particular, we consider what inferences can be made about
             the causal effect of teenage childbearing on a teen mother's
             subsequent outcomes when we use the natural experiment of
             miscarriages to form an instrumental variable for teen
             births. Miscarriages might not meet all of the conditions
             required for an instrumental variable to identify such
             causal effects for all of the observations in our sample.
             However, it is an appropriate instrumental variable for some
             women, namely those pregnant women who experience a random
             miscarriage. Although information from typical data sources
             does not allow one to identify these women, we show that one
             can adapt results from Horowitz and Manski (1995) on
             identification with data from contaminated samples to
             construct informative bounds on the causal effect of teenage
             childbearing. We use these bounds to re-examine the effects
             of early chilbearing on the teen mother's subsequent
             educational and labour market attainment as considered in
             Hotz, McElroy and Sanders (1995a, 1995b). Consistent with
             their study, these bounds indicate that women who have
             births as teens have higher labour market earnings and hours
             worked compared to what they would have attained if their
             childbearing had been delayed.},
   Doi = {10.2307/2971732},
   Key = {fds238585}
}

@article{fds238584,
   Author = {Sanders, SG and Duleep, HO},
   Title = {Empirical Regularities Across Cultures: The Effect of
             Children on Women's Work},
   Journal = {Journal of Human Resources},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {328-347},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {Spring},
   Key = {fds238584}
}

@article{fds324869,
   Author = {Hotz, VJ and Miller, RA and Sanders, S and Smith,
             J},
   Title = {A simulation estimator for dynamic models of discrete
             choice},
   Journal = {Review of Economic Studies},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {265-289},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   Abstract = {This paper analyses a new estimator for the structural
             parameters of dynamic models of discrete choice. Based on an
             inversion theorem due to Hotz and Miller (1993), which
             establishes the existence of a one-to-one mapping between
             the conditional valuation functions for the dynamic problem
             and their associated conditional choice probabilities, we
             exploit simulation techniques to estimate models which do
             not possess terminal states. In this way our Conditional
             Choice Simulation (CCS) estimator complements the
             Conditional Choice Probability (CCP) estimator of Hotz and
             Miller (1993). Drawing on work in empirical process theory
             by Pakes and Pollard (1989), we establish its large sample
             properties, and then conduct a Monte Carlo study of Rust’s
             (1987) model of bus engine replacement to compare its small
             sample properties with those of Maximum Likelihood (ML). ©
             1994 The Review of Economic Studies Limited.},
   Doi = {10.2307/2297981},
   Key = {fds324869}
}

@article{fds238583,
   Author = {Sanders, SG and Duleep, HO},
   Title = {The Decision to Work by Married Immigrant Women: Evidence
             from Asian Women},
   Journal = {Industrial and Labor Relations Review},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {677-690},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {fds238583}
}

@article{fds238582,
   Author = {DULEEP, HO and SANDERS, S},
   Title = {Discrimination at the Top: American‐Born Asian and White
             Men},
   Journal = {Industrial Relations},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {416-432},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {January},
   Abstract = {Asians are perceived as doing very well, and, indeed, the
             average earnings of several Asian groups exceed those of
             whites. However, although entering well‐paying positions,
             Asians may be prevented from further advancement by an
             invisible “glass ceiling.” Using microdata from the 1980
             census to examine the economic status of American‐born men
             in five Asian groups, we find that the average Asian man
             earns as much as non‐Hispanic white men, but, adjusting
             for occupation and industry, highly educated Asian men in
             all five groups earn less than their white counterparts.
             Copyright © 1992, Wiley Blackwell. All rights
             reserved},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1468-232X.1992.tb00318.x},
   Key = {fds238582}
}


%% Edited Volumes   
@misc{fds200042,
   Author = {S.G. Sanders},
   Title = {Crime and the family: Lessons from teenage
             childbearing},
   Booktitle = {Controlling Crime: Strategies and Tradeoffs},
   Publisher = {NBER},
   Editor = {Philip J. Cook and Jens Ludwig and Justin McCrary},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds200042}
}


%% Papers Submitted   
@misc{fds214247,
   Author = {Fredrik Andersson and Monica Garcia-Perez and John Haltiwanger and Kristin McCue and Seth Sanders},
   Title = {Workplace Concentration of Immigrants},
   Journal = {Revise and Resubmit at Demography},
   Year = {2012},
   Key = {fds214247}
}

@misc{fds214248,
   Author = {Dan Black and Yu-Chieh Hsu and Seth Sanders and Lowell
             Taylor},
   Title = {Forward and Backward Estimates of Mortality},
   Journal = {Revise and Resubmit at Demography},
   Year = {2012},
   Key = {fds214248}
}

@article{fds214249,
   Author = {Dan Black and Seth Sanders and Evan Taylor and Lowell
             Taylor},
   Title = {The Impact of the Great Migration on Mortality of
             African},
   Journal = {Revise and Resubmitt at the American Economic
             Review},
   Year = {2012},
   Key = {fds214249}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds349323,
   Author = {Hotz, VJ and McElroy, SW and Sanders, SG},
   Title = {The impacts of teenage childbearing on the mothers and the
             consequences of those impacts for government},
   Pages = {55-94},
   Booktitle = {Kids Having Kids: Economic Costs and Social Consequences of
             Teen Pregnancy},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781138321328},
   Abstract = {© 1997 The Urban Institute. All rights reserved. The
             everyday hardships of teen motherhood come into public
             consciousness through media attention to and the prevalence
             of teen childbearing throughout the United States. The
             apparent adverse consequences of teen motherhood have become
             an important issue in the current debate over reforming the
             US welfare system. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
             (NLSY) is a nationally representative sample of young men
             and women who were 14 to 21 years old in 1979. Thus, the
             teenage years of women in our study occurred between 1970
             and 1985. The NLSY yields data on annual benefits received
             from Aid to Families with Dependent Children and food
             stamps, as well as the benefits from other social programs,
             including Supplemental Security Income and General
             Assistance. Teen mothers come from much more disadvantaged
             backgrounds than do women who delay childbearing. Failure to
             delay childbearing, though much smaller than suggested by
             the earlier comparisons, has a negative and lasting effect
             on a teen mother's marriage prospects.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780429452635-3},
   Key = {fds349323}
}

@misc{fds326508,
   Author = {Kranton, RE and Sanders, SG},
   Title = {Groupy versus non-groupy social preferences: Personality,
             region, and political party},
   Journal = {American Economic Review},
   Volume = {107},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {65-69},
   Publisher = {American Economic Association},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   Doi = {10.1257/aer.p20171096},
   Key = {fds326508}
}

@misc{fds347332,
   Author = {Black, D and Gates, G and Sanders, S and Taylor, L},
   Title = {Demographics of the gay and lesbian population in The United
             States: Evidence from available systematic data
             sources},
   Pages = {61-92},
   Booktitle = {Queer Economics: A Reader},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {0415771692},
   Abstract = {© 2008 Editorial matter and selection, Joyce Jacobsen and
             Adam Zeller; individual chapters, the contributors. THE
             EMERGENCE OF SOLID demographic studies describing the gay
             and lesbian population marks an important change for social
             science research. Historically, few sizable surveys of this
             population were available, and many previous surveys that
             provided large samples of gays and lesbians utilized
             “convenience sampling,” as in samples drawn from readers
             of particular magazines or newspapers, or responses
             solicited from Internet sites or in gay bars. Researchers
             have been properly reluctant to draw general inferences
             about the gay and lesbian population from these samples.
             Recently, however, a number of scholars have begun to study
             economic and social issues in the gay and lesbian population
             using sizable samples with known propert ies - samples drawn
             from the General Social Survey, the National Health and
             Social Life Survey, and the 1990 U.S. census.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203939451-14},
   Key = {fds347332}
}

@misc{fds147306,
   Author = {S.G. Sanders and V.J. Hotz and S. McElroy},
   Title = {The Impact of Teenage Childbearing on the Mothers and the
             Consequences of those Impacts for Government},
   Booktitle = {Kids Having Kids: Economic Cost and Social Consequences of
             Teen Pregnancy},
   Editor = {Rebecca Maynard},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds147306}
}


%% Other   
@misc{fds147308,
   Author = {S.G. Sanders and V.J. Hotz and S. McElroy},
   Title = {The Costs and Consequences of Teenage Childbearing for
             Mothers},
   Journal = {Chicago Policy Review},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {55-94},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds147308}
}

@misc{fds147309,
   Author = {S.G. Sanders and D. Black and K. Daniel},
   Title = {The Rise and Fall of King Coal},
   Journal = {Kentucky Annual Economic Report},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds147309}
}

@misc{fds147310,
   Author = {S.G. Sanders and B. Daponte and G. Lewis and L.
             Taylor},
   Title = {An Examination of Food Pantry Use},
   Journal = {United Way},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {fds147310}
}

@misc{fds147311,
   Author = {S.G. Sanders and V. J. Hotz},
   Title = {Bounding Treatment Effects in Experimental Evaluations
             Subject to Post-Randomization Treatment Choice},
   Journal = {Bulletin of the International Statistical Institute, 49th
             Session},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds147311}
}