Publications of John M. Mercer    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Papers Published   
@article{fds300298,
   Author = {Turck, CJ and Frazee, E and Kram, B and Daley, MJ and Day, SA and Horner,
             D and Lesch, C and Mercer, JM and Plewa, AM and Herout, P and Critical Care
             Pharmacotherapy Literature Update Group},
   Title = {Major publications in the critical care pharmacotherapy
             literature: February 2012 through February
             2013.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy},
   Volume = {71},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {68-77},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24352184},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: Recent impactful additions to the professional
             literature on the role of pharmacotherapy in treating the
             critically ill are summarized. SUMMARY: An unusually large
             number of updated practice guidelines and other publications
             with broad critical care pharmacotherapy ramifications
             appeared in the primary biomedical literature during the
             designated review period (February 2012-February 2013).
             Hundreds of relevant articles were evaluated by the Critical
             Care Pharmacotherapy Literature Update group (CCPLU), a
             national group of pharmacists who routinely monitor 25
             peer-reviewed journals for emerging evidence that pertains
             to rational medication use in the intensive care unit (ICU)
             setting. From among those articles, 64 were summarized for
             dissemination to CCPLU members; the 8 publications deemed to
             have the greatest utility for critical care practitioners,
             as determined by CCPLU through a voting process, were
             selected for inclusion in this review, with preference given
             to evidence meeting high standards of methodological
             quality. The summaries presented here include (1) important
             new recommendations on management of pain, agitation, and
             delirium in critically ill patients, (2) a comprehensive
             update of a practice guideline issued in 2008 by the
             Surviving Sepsis Campaign, (3) novel strategies for the
             prevention and/or treatment of hyperglycemia in critical
             care, and (4) reports on clinical trials of promising
             alternative methods of sedation for use in weaning patients
             from mechanical ventilation. CONCLUSION: This review
             provides synopses of practice guidelines and other recent
             additions to the professional literature pertaining to
             rational medication use in the ICU practice
             setting.},
   Doi = {10.2146/ajhp130303},
   Key = {fds300298}
}

@article{fds229109,
   Author = {Bennett, SM and Mercer, JM and Noor, MAF},
   Title = {Slip-sliding away: serial changes and homoplasy in repeat
             number in the Drosophila yakuba homolog of human cancer
             susceptibility gene BRCA2.},
   Journal = {PloS one},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {e11006},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1932-6203},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20543987},
   Abstract = {Several recent studies have examined the function and
             evolution of a Drosophila homolog to the human breast cancer
             susceptibility gene BRCA2, named dmbrca2. We previously
             identified what appeared to be a recent expansion in the
             RAD51-binding BRC-repeat array in the ancestor of Drosophila
             yakuba. In this study, we examine patterns of variation and
             evolution of the dmbrca2 BRC-repeat array within D. yakuba
             and its close relatives. We develop a model of how unequal
             crossing over may have produced the expanded form, but we
             also observe short repeat forms, typical of other species in
             the D. melanogaster group, segregating within D. yakuba and
             D. santomea. These short forms do not appear to be
             identical-by-descent, suggesting that the history of dmbrca2
             in the D. melanogaster subgroup has involved repeat unit
             contractions resulting in homoplasious forms. We conclude
             that the evolutionary history of dmbrca2 in D. yakuba and
             perhaps in other Drosophila species may be more complicated
             than can be inferred from examination of the published
             single genome sequences per species.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0011006},
   Key = {fds229109}
}

@article{fds229108,
   Author = {Siegel, SJ and Percopo, CM and Dyer, KD and Zhao, W and Roth, VL and Mercer, JM and Rosenberg, HF},
   Title = {RNase 1 genes from the family Sciuridae define a novel
             rodent ribonuclease cluster},
   Journal = {Mammalian Genome},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {11-12},
   Pages = {749-757},
   Year = {2009},
   ISSN = {0938-8990},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00335-009-9215-4},
   Abstract = {The RNase A ribonucleases are a complex group of
             functionally diverse secretory proteins with conserved
             enzymatic activity. We have identified novel RNase 1 genes
             from four species of squirrel (order Rodentia, family
             Sciuridae). Squirrel RNase 1 genes encode typical RNase A
             ribonucleases, each with eight cysteines, a conserved
             CKXXNTF signature motif, and a canonical His 12-Lys41-His119
             catalytic triad. Two alleles encode Callosciurus prevostii
             RNase 1, which include a Ser18↔ Pro, analogous to the
             sequence polymorphisms found among the RNase 1 duplications
             in the genome of Rattus exulans. Interestingly, although the
             squirrel RNase 1 genes are closely related to one another
             (77-95% amino acid sequence identity), the cluster as a
             whole is distinct and divergent from the clusters including
             RNase 1 genes from other rodent species. We examined the
             specific sites at which Sciuridae RNase 1s diverge from
             Muridae/Cricetidae RNase 1s and determined that the
             divergent sites are located on the external surface, with
             complete sparing of the catalytic crevice. The full
             significance of these findings awaits a more complete
             understanding of biological role of mammalian RNase 1s. ©
             2009 US Government.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00335-009-9215-4},
   Key = {fds229108}
}

@article{fds152963,
   Title = {Roth, VL & JM Mercer 2008. Differing rates of
             macroevolutionary diversification in arboreal squirrels.
             Current Science 95:857-86},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {October},
   Abstract = {Current diversity is the result of macroevolutionary
             processes of origination and extinction of lineages through
             time. Here we make use of a fossil-calibrated
             molecular-clock phylogeny of modern squirrel genera to
             estimate both rates of 'birth' and 'death', and the net rate
             of accumulation of lineages since the origin of the squirrel
             family (Sciuridae) 36 Ma. As a family, the Sciuridae have
             exhibited modest rates of diversification in comparison with
             other mammalian clades. Within the Sciuridae, lineages of
             squirrels have accumulated at higher rates in geographically
             localized subclades in the tropics of different continents.
             The rate is strikingly high in the Sciurini of South
             America, which first entered and radiated within that
             continent comparatively recently (less than 3 Ma). It is
             noteworthy that the most rapidly diversifying groups are
             also relatively young. Because extinctions lag behind
             originations, the effects of extinction are not yet
             detectable in relatively recent radiations. The balance of
             origination and extinction is fragile, and is likely to
             become more so if increases in extinction due to habitat
             destruction, climate change, and other human activity are
             not mitigated.},
   Key = {fds152963}
}

@article{fds229097,
   Author = {Roth, VL and Mercer, JM},
   Title = {Differing rates of macroevolutionary diversification in
             arboreal squirrels},
   Journal = {Current science},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {857-861},
   Year = {2008},
   ISSN = {0011-3891},
   Abstract = {Current diversity is the result of macroevolutionary
             processes of origination and extinction of lineages through
             time. Here we make use of a fossil-calibrated
             molecular-clock phylogeny of modern squirrel genera to
             estimate both rates of 'birth' and 'death', and the net rate
             of accumulation of lineages since the origin of the squirrel
             family (Sciuridae) 36 Ma. As a family, the Sciuridae have
             exhibited modest rates of diversification in comparison with
             other mammalian clades. Within the Sciuridae, lineages of
             squirrels have accumulated at higher rates in geographically
             localized subclades in the tropics of different continents.
             The rate is strikingly high in the Sciurini of South
             America, which first entered and radiated within that
             continent comparatively recently (less than 3 Ma). It is
             noteworthy that the most rapidly diversifying groups are
             also relatively young. Because extinctions lag behind
             originations, the effects of extinction are not yet
             detectable in relatively recent radiations. The balance of
             origination and extinction is fragile, and is likely to
             become more so if increases in extinction due to habitat
             destruction, climate change and other human activity are not
             mitigated.},
   Key = {fds229097}
}

@article{fds229110,
   Author = {Kronauer, DJC and Bergmann, PJ and Mercer, JM and Russell,
             AP},
   Title = {A phylogeographically distinct and deep divergence in the
             widespread Neotropical turnip-tailed gecko, Thecadactylus
             rapicauda.},
   Journal = {Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {431-437},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1055-7903},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15619453},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ympev.2004.10.009},
   Key = {fds229110}
}

@article{fds229113,
   Author = {Mercer, JM and Roth, VL},
   Title = {The effects of Cenozoic global change on squirrel
             phylogeny.},
   Journal = {Science},
   Volume = {299},
   Number = {5612},
   Pages = {1568-1572},
   Publisher = {American Association for the Advancement of
             Science},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12595609},
   Abstract = {By modifying habitats and creating bridges and barriers
             between landmasses, climate change and tectonic events are
             believed to have important consequences for diversification
             of terrestrial organisms. Such consequences should be most
             evident in phylogenetic histories of groups that are
             ancient, widespread, and diverse. The squirrel family
             (Sciuridae) is one of very few mammalian families endemic to
             Eurasia, Africa, and North and South America and is ideal
             for examining these issues. Through phylogenetic and
             molecular-clock analyses, we infer that arrival and
             diversification of squirrels in Africa, on Sunda Shelf
             islands, across Beringea, and across the Panamanian isthmus
             coincide in timing and location with multiple
             well-documented sea-level, tectonic, and paleontological
             events. These precise correspondences point to an important
             role for global change in the diversification of a major
             group of mammals.},
   Doi = {10.1126/science.1079705},
   Key = {fds229113}
}

@article{fds229111,
   Author = {Zeng, Z-B and Liu, J and Stam, LF and Kao, C-H and Mercer, JM and Laurie,
             CC},
   Title = {Genetic architecture of a morphological shape difference
             between two Drosophila species},
   Journal = {Genetics},
   Volume = {154},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {299-310},
   Year = {2000},
   ISSN = {0016-6731},
   Abstract = {The size and shape of the posterior lobe of the male genital
             arch differs dramatically between Drosophila simulans and D.
             mauritiana. This difference can be quantified with a
             morphometric descriptor (PC1) based on elliptical Fourier
             and principal components analyses. The genetic basis of the
             interspecific difference in PC1 was investigated by the
             application of quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping
             procedures to segregating backcross populations. The
             parental difference (35 environmental standard deviations)
             and the heritability of PC1 in backcross populations
             (>90%) are both very large. The use of multiple interval
             mapping gives evidence for 19 different QTL. The greatest
             additive effect estimate accounts for 11.4% of the parental
             difference but could represent multiple closely linked QTL.
             Dominance parameter estimates vary among loci from
             essentially no dominance to complete dominance, and
             mauritiana alleles tend to be dominant over simulans
             alleles. Epistasis appears to be relatively unimportant as a
             source of variation. All but one of the additive effect
             estimates have the same sign, which means that one species
             has nearly all plus alleles and the other nearly all minus
             alleles. This result is unexpected under many evolutionary
             scenarios and suggests a history of strong directional
             selection acting on the posterior lobe.},
   Key = {fds229111}
}

@article{fds229112,
   Author = {Roth, VL and Mercer, JM},
   Title = {Morphometrics in development and evolution},
   Journal = {Integrative and Comparative Biology},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {801-810},
   Year = {2000},
   ISSN = {0003-1569},
   Abstract = {SYNOPSIS. Morphometric approaches facilitate the analysis of
             quantitative variation in form, typically becoming most
             useful for the study of organisms that have completed
             morphogenesis and arc at differing stages of growth. Recent
             conceptual and technical refinements in the characterization
             and comparison of forms have joined methodological
             innovations in molecular biology, embryology, and phytogeny
             reconstruction to advance the study of the evolution of
             development. Among the phenomena that have recently been
             examined morphometrically are developmental integration and
             heterochrony, discoveries that in turn raise deeper
             questions about the connections among disciplines and among
             levels of description: the relationship between morphometric
             variables and characters, between phenomenology and process,
             and the interplay (and evolutionary relevance) of genes and
             phenotypes. Morphometrics can continue to play a vital role
             in evolutionary studies of-development as its results
             generate questions both for its practitioners and for other
             sorts of biologists to explore.},
   Key = {fds229112}
}

@article{fds229107,
   Author = {Laurie, CC and True, JR and Liu, J and Mercer, JM},
   Title = {An introgression analysis of quantitative trait loci that
             contribute to a morphological difference between Drosophila
             simulans and D. mauritiana.},
   Journal = {Genetics},
   Volume = {145},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {339-348},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0016-6731},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9071588},
   Abstract = {Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana differ markedly in
             morphology of the posterior lobe, a male-specific genitalic
             structure. Both size and shape of the lobe can be quantified
             by a morphometric variable, PCl, derived from principal
             components and Fourier analyses. The genetic architecture of
             the species difference in PCl was investigated previously by
             composite interval mapping, which revealed largely additive
             inheritance, with a minimum of eight quantitative trait loci
             (QTL) affecting the trait. This analysis was extended by
             introgression of marked segments of the mauritiana third
             chromosome into a simulans background by repeated
             backcrossing. The two types of experiment are consistent in
             suggesting that several QTL on the third chromosome may have
             effects in the range of 10-15% of the parental difference
             and that all or nearly all QTL have effects in the same
             direction. Since the parental difference is large (30.4
             environmental standard deviations), effects of this
             magnitude can produce alternative homozygotes with little
             overlap in phenotype. However, these estimates may not
             reflect the effects of individual loci, since each interval
             or introgressed segment may contain multiple QTL. The
             consistent direction of allelic effects suggests a history
             of directional selection on the posterior
             lobe.},
   Key = {fds229107}
}

@article{fds229106,
   Author = {Liu, J and Mercer, JM and Stam, LF and Gibson, GC and Zeng, ZB and Laurie,
             CC},
   Title = {Genetic analysis of a morphological shape difference in the
             male genitalia of Drosophila simulans and D.
             mauritiana.},
   Journal = {Genetics},
   Volume = {142},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1129-1145},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0016-6731},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8846893},
   Abstract = {Two closely related species of Drosophila, D. simulans and
             D. mauritiana, differ markedly in morphology of the
             posterior lobe of the male genital arch. Both size and shape
             aspects of lobe variation can be quantified by a
             morphometric descriptor based on elliptical Fourier and
             principal components analyses. The genetic architecture of
             this quantitative trait (PC1) was investigated by
             hybridizing inbred lines to produce two backcross
             populations approximately 200 individuals each, which were
             analyzed jointly by a composite interval mapping procedure
             with the aid of 18 marker loci. The parental lines show a
             large difference in PC1 (30.4 environmental standard
             deviations), and the markers account for > 80% of the
             phenotypic variation in backcross populations. Eight of 15
             intervals analyzed show convincing evidence of quantitative
             trait loci (QTL), and the range of estimated QTL effects is
             5.7-15.9% of the parental difference (1.7-4.8 environmental
             standard deviations). These estimates may represent the
             joint effects of multiple QTL within a single interval
             (which averaged 23 cM in length). Although there is some
             evidence of partial dominance of mauritiana alleles and for
             epistasis, the pattern of inheritance is largely
             additive.},
   Key = {fds229106}
}

@article{fds229105,
   Author = {True, JR and Mercer, JM and Laurie, CC},
   Title = {Differences in crossover frequency and distribution among
             three sibling species of Drosophila.},
   Journal = {Genetics},
   Volume = {142},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {507-523},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0016-6731},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8852849},
   Abstract = {Comparisons of the genetic and cytogenetic maps of three
             sibling species of Drosophila reveal marked differences in
             the frequency and cumulative distribution of crossovers
             during meiosis. The maps for two of these species,
             Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans, have previously
             been described, while this report presents new map data for
             D. mauritiana, obtained using a set of P element markers. A
             genetic map covering nearly the entire genome was
             constructed by estimating the recombination fraction for
             each pair of adjacent inserts. The P-based genetic map of
             mauritiana is approximately 1.8 times longer than the
             standard melanogaster map. It appears that mauritiana has
             higher recombination along the entire length of each
             chromosome, but the difference is greates in
             centromere-proximal regions of the autosomes. The mauritiana
             autosomes show little or no centromeric recombinational
             suppression, a characteristic that is prominent in
             melanogaster. D. simulans appears to be intermediate both in
             terms of total map length and intensity of the autosomal
             centromeric effect. These interspecific differences in
             recombination have important evolutionary implications for
             DNA sequence organization and variability. In particular,
             mauritiana is expected to differ from melanogaster in
             patterns and amounts of sequence variation and transposon
             insertions.},
   Key = {fds229105}
}

@article{fds229104,
   Author = {Mercer, JM},
   Title = {Effective isotrophic dipole-dipole pair potential},
   Journal = {Molecular Physics},
   Volume = {69},
   Pages = {625-638},
   Year = {1990},
   Key = {fds229104}
}

@article{fds229103,
   Author = {Mercer, JM and Keyes, T},
   Title = {Expansion of the kinetic hierarchy for a massive particle:
             the Repeated Ring and Fokker-Planck equations},
   Journal = {Journal of Statistical Physics},
   Volume = {32},
   Pages = {35-51},
   Year = {1983},
   Key = {fds229103}
}

@article{fds229102,
   Author = {De la Mora and JF and Mercer, JM},
   Title = {A modified Fokker-Planck equation for the motion of Brownian
             particles in a non-uniform gas},
   Journal = {Physical Review A},
   Volume = {26},
   Pages = {2178-2185},
   Year = {1982},
   Key = {fds229102}
}

@article{fds229101,
   Author = {Keyes, and T, and Morita, T and Mercer, JM},
   Title = {Further developments of the approach of Peralta and Zwanzig.
             1. The drag on a sphere at high density},
   Journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
   Volume = {74},
   Pages = {5281-5286},
   Year = {1981},
   Key = {fds229101}
}

@article{fds300294,
   Author = {Fernandez de la Mora and J and Mercer, JM and Rosner, DE and Fenn,
             JB},
   Title = {Simplified kinetic treatment of heavy molecule velocity
             persistence effects: Application to species
             separation},
   Volume = {74},
   Pages = {617-626},
   Booktitle = {Rarefied Gas Dynamics: Progress in Astronautics and
             Aeronautics},
   Editor = {Fisher, SS},
   Year = {1981},
   Key = {fds300294}
}

@article{fds229100,
   Author = {Keyes, T and Mercer, JM},
   Title = {Some considerations on the calculation of the velocity
             correlation function in the ring approximation, with
             application to the Lorentz gas},
   Journal = {Physica},
   Volume = {95A},
   Pages = {473-486},
   Year = {1979},
   Key = {fds229100}
}

@article{fds229099,
   Author = {Stanley, and WL, and Walters, GG and Mercer, JM},
   Title = {Lactase and other enzymes bound to chitin with
             gluteraldehyde},
   Journal = {Biotech. Bio.},
   Volume = {17},
   Pages = {315-326},
   Year = {1975},
   Key = {fds229099}
}


%% Book Chapters   
@misc{fds300297,
   Author = {Louise Roth and V and Mercer, JM},
   Title = {Themes and variation in sciurid evolution},
   Series = {Cambridge studies in morphology & molecules: new paradigms
             in evolutionary biology},
   Pages = {221-245},
   Booktitle = {Evolution of the Rodents: Advances in Phylogeny, Functional
             Morphology and Development},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {Cox, PG and Hautier, L},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781107360150},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107360150.009},
   Abstract = {© Cambridge University Press 2015. With a species diversity
             approaching 300 (Thorington and Hoffmann, 2005) and nearly
             worldwide in their distribution, squirrels are common and
             important elements of many ecological communities. The
             diurnal habits of most taxa together with their relative
             conformity in body plan make them familiar and easily
             recognized by both scientists and non-specialists. The
             squirrel family, Sciuridae, also has a long history of
             recognition by taxonomists as a coherent grouping, despite
             its comprising distinctive forms associated with use of
             different locomotor substrates (Table 8.1). At times,
             burrowing or gliding forms have been separated from the
             archetypal arboreal squirrels: Fischer de Waldheim (1817),
             the authority credited for naming the Sciuridae (Thorington
             and Hoffmann, 2005), advocated use of limb structure in
             recognizing groups of mammals, and accordingly, he removed
             flying squirrels (‘Petauristus’, Fischer de Waldheim,
             1817: p. 422) to another ‘Division’ apart from
             ‘Familia Sciuriorum’ (p. 408), even though Linnaeus had
             placed flying squirrels together with tree and some ground
             squirrels under SCIURUS (Linnaeus, 1758: pp. 63-64; see
             Table 8.1). Woodchucks and marmots have also posed something
             of a problem, to Linnaeus (1758:p. 60), who listed them
             under ‘MUS’, and to many subsequent authors who also set
             them apart from other sciurids. However, by late 1839
             (according to Brandt, 1855: p. 106, and Alston, 1876: p. 62)
             all of these animals had been combined by Waterhouse to form
             a version of Sciuridae that would be congruent with the
             modern concept of the family. Along the way, dormice
             (referred to as ‘Myoxus’) have often crept into lists of
             squirrels (e.g. Fischer de Waldheim, 1817, but not those of
             Linnaeus before him or Brandt subsequently), both their
             exclusion and their inclusion foreshadowing current views
             based on molecular evidence that dormice are distinct from
             sciurids but have closer affinities with them (plus
             aplodontids) than with other rodent families (e.g.
             Blanga-Kanfi et al., 2009; Churakov et al., 2010; Fabre et
             al., 2012).},
   Doi = {10.1017/CBO9781107360150.009},
   Key = {fds300297}
}

@misc{fds300295,
   Author = {Mercer, JM},
   Title = {Unequal crossing-over},
   Series = {2nd},
   Booktitle = {Sydney Brenner's Encyclopedia of Genetics},
   Publisher = {Elsevier},
   Editor = {Maloy, S and Hughes, K},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds300295}
}

@misc{fds300296,
   Author = {Mercer, JM},
   Title = {Cooperativity},
   Series = {2nd},
   Booktitle = {Sydney Brenner's Encyclopedia of Genetics},
   Publisher = {Elsevier},
   Editor = {Maloy, S and Hughes, K},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds300296}
}


%% Other   
@misc{fds30310,
   Author = {V. L. Roth and S. Unsicker and J. M. Mercer},
   Title = {Mandibles of rodents that have cheek pouches differ
             morphometrically from those of rodents that do
             not},
   Journal = {Poster: 7th International conference of Vertebrate
             Morphology},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {August},
   Key = {fds30310}
}