Publications of Gleb Finkelstein    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Papers Published   
@article{fds329564,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Amet, F},
   Title = {Superconductivity: When Andreev meets Hall},
   Journal = {Nature Physics},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {625-626},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphys4195},
   Doi = {10.1038/nphys4195},
   Key = {fds329564}
}

@article{fds329748,
   Author = {Draelos, A and Wei, MT and Seredinski, A and Ke, C and Watanabe, K and Taniguchi, T and Yamamoto, M and Tarucha, S and Borzenets, I and Amet,
             F and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Investigation of Supercurrent in the Quantum Hall Regime in
             Graphene Josephson Junctions},
   Journal = {Submitted to the Journal of Low Temperature
             Physics},
   Year = {2017},
   Key = {fds329748}
}

@article{fds329747,
   Author = {Zhang, G and Chung, C-H and Ke, CT and Lin, C-Y and Mebrahtu, H and Smirnov, AI and Finkelstein, G and Baranger, HU},
   Title = {Universal Nonequilibrium I-V Curve at an Interacting
             Impurity Quantum Critical Point},
   Journal = {arXiv},
   Year = {2017},
   Abstract = {The nonlinear I-V curve at an interacting quantum critical
             point (QCP) is typically out of reach theoretically. Here,
             however, we provide an analytical calculation of the I-V
             curve at a QCP under nonequilibrium conditions and,
             furthermore, present experimental results to which the
             theory is compared. The system is a quantum dot coupled to
             resistive leads: a spinless resonant level interacting with
             an ohmic electromagnetic environment. A two channel Kondo
             like QCP occurs when the level is on resonance and
             symmetrically coupled to the leads. Though similar to a
             resonant level in a Luttinger liquid, a key difference
             enables us to obtain the current at finite temperature and
             bias: because there are modes that do not initially couple
             to the environment, an analysis in terms of weak
             backscattering of non-interacting fermions coupled to a
             modified environment is possible. Drawing on dynamical
             Coulomb blockade theory, we then obtain an analytical
             expression for the nonlinear I-V curve. The agreement
             between our theoretical and experimental results is
             remarkable.},
   Key = {fds329747}
}

@article{fds322476,
   Author = {Borzenets, IV and Amet, F and Ke, CT and Draelos, AW and Wei, MT and Seredinski, A and Watanabe, K and Taniguchi, T and Bomze, Y and Yamamoto, M and Tarucha, S and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Ballistic Graphene Josephson Junctions from the Short to the
             Long Junction Regimes.},
   Journal = {Physical Review Letters},
   Volume = {117},
   Number = {23},
   Pages = {237002},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrevlett.117.237002},
   Abstract = {We investigate the critical current I_{C} of ballistic
             Josephson junctions made of encapsulated
             graphene-boron-nitride heterostructures. We observe a
             crossover from the short to the long junction regimes as the
             length of the device increases. In long ballistic junctions,
             I_{C} is found to scale as ∝exp(-k_{B}T/δE). The
             extracted energies δE are independent of the carrier
             density and proportional to the level spacing of the
             ballistic cavity. As T→0 the critical current of a long
             (or short) junction saturates at a level determined by the
             product of δE (or Δ) and the number of the junction's
             transversal modes.},
   Doi = {10.1103/physrevlett.117.237002},
   Key = {fds322476}
}

@article{fds322477,
   Author = {Ke, CT and Borzenets, IV and Draelos, AW and Amet, F and Bomze, Y and Jones, G and Craciun, M and Russo, S and Yamamoto, M and Tarucha, S and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Critical Current Scaling in Long Diffusive Graphene-Based
             Josephson Junctions.},
   Journal = {Nano Letters},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {4788-4791},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b00738},
   Abstract = {We present transport measurements on long, diffusive,
             graphene-based Josephson junctions. Several junctions are
             made on a single-domain crystal of CVD graphene and feature
             the same contact width of ∼9 μm but vary in length from
             400 to 1000 nm. As the carrier density is tuned with the
             gate voltage, the critical current in these junctions ranges
             from a few nanoamperes up to more than 5 μA, while the
             Thouless energy, ETh, covers almost 2 orders of magnitude.
             Over much of this range, the product of the critical current
             and the normal resistance ICRN is found to scale linearly
             with ETh, as expected from theory. However, the value of the
             ratio ICRN/ETh is found to be 0.1-0.2, which much smaller
             than the predicted ∼10 for long diffusive SNS
             junctions.},
   Doi = {10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b00738},
   Key = {fds322477}
}

@article{fds322478,
   Author = {Amet, F and Ke, CT and Borzenets, IV and Wang, J and Watanabe, K and Taniguchi, T and Deacon, RS and Yamamoto, M and Bomze, Y and Tarucha, S and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime.},
   Journal = {Science},
   Volume = {352},
   Number = {6288},
   Pages = {966-969},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aad6203},
   Abstract = {A promising route for creating topological states and
             excitations is to combine superconductivity and the quantum
             Hall (QH) effect. Despite this potential, signatures of
             superconductivity in the QH regime remain scarce, and a
             superconducting current through a QH weak link has been
             challenging to observe. We demonstrate the existence of a
             distinct supercurrent mechanism in encapsulated graphene
             samples contacted by superconducting electrodes, in magnetic
             fields as high as 2 tesla. The observation of a supercurrent
             in the QH regime marks an important step in the quest for
             exotic topological excitations, such as Majorana fermions
             and parafermions, which may find applications in
             fault-tolerant quantum computing.},
   Doi = {10.1126/science.aad6203},
   Key = {fds322478}
}

@article{fds322479,
   Author = {Zhang, X and Gutierrez, Y and Li, P and Barreda, AI and Watson, AM and Alcaraz De La Osa and R and Finkelstein, G and Gonzalez, F and Ortiz, D and Saiz, JM and Sanz, JM and Everitt, HO and Liu, J and Moreno,
             F},
   Title = {Plasmonics in the UV range with Rhodium nanocubes},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical
             Engineering},
   Volume = {9884},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781510601291},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2227674},
   Abstract = {© COPYRIGHT SPIE. Downloading of the abstract is permitted
             for personal use only. Plasmonics in the UV-range
             constitutes a new challenge due to the increasing demand to
             detect, identify and destroy biological toxins, enhance
             biological imaging, and characterize semiconductor devices
             at the nanometer scale. Silver and aluminum have an effcient
             plasmonic performance in the near UV region, but oxidation
             reduces its performance in this range. Recent studies point
             out rhodium as one of the most promising metals for this
             purpose: it has a good plasmonic response in the UV and, as
             gold in the visible, it presents a low tendency to
             oxidation. Moreover, its easy fabrication through chemical
             means and its potential for photocatalytic applications,
             makes this material very attractive for building plasmonic
             tools in the UV. In this work, we will show an overview of
             our recent collaborative research with rhodium nanocubes
             (NC) for Plasmonics in the UV.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.2227674},
   Key = {fds322479}
}

@article{fds329565,
   Author = {Amet, F and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Valleytronics: Could use a break},
   Journal = {Nature Physics},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {989-990},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphys3587},
   Doi = {10.1038/nphys3587},
   Key = {fds329565}
}

@article{fds245937,
   Author = {Li, J and Ke, C-T and Liu, K and Li, P and Liang, S and Finkelstein, G and Wang, F and Liu, J},
   Title = {Importance of diameter control on selective synthesis of
             semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.},
   Journal = {ACS Nano},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {8564-8572},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1936-0851},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn503265g},
   Abstract = {The coexistence of semiconducting and metallic single-walled
             carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) during synthesis is one of the
             major bottlenecks that prevent their broad application for
             the next-generation nanoelectronics. Herein, we present more
             understanding and demonstration of the growth of highly
             enriched semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs) with a narrow
             diameter distribution. An important fact discovered in our
             experiments is that the selective elimination of metallic
             SWNTs (m-SWNTs) from the mixed arrays grown on quartz is
             diameter-dependent. Our method emphasizes controlling the
             diameter distribution of SWNTs in a narrow range where
             m-SWNTs can be effectively and selectively etched during
             growth. In order to achieve narrow diameter distribution,
             uniform and stable Fe-W nanoclusters were used as the
             catalyst precursors. About 90% of as-prepared SWNTs fall
             into the diameter range 2.0-3.2 nm. Electrical measurement
             results on individual SWNTs confirm that the selectivity of
             s-SWNTs is ∼95%. The present study provides an effective
             strategy for increasing the purity of s-SWNTs via
             controlling the diameter distribution of SWNTs and adjusting
             the etchant concentration. Furthermore, by carefully
             comparing the chirality distributions of Fe-W-catalyzed and
             Fe-catalyzed SWNTs under different water vapor
             concentrations, the relationship between the
             diameter-dependent and electronic-type-dependent etching
             mechanisms was investigated.},
   Doi = {10.1021/nn503265g},
   Key = {fds245937}
}

@article{fds245939,
   Author = {Liu, DE and Zheng, H and Finkelstein, G and Baranger,
             HU},
   Title = {Tunable quantum phase transitions in a resonant level
             coupled to two dissipative baths},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {085116},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1098-0121},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.89.085116},
   Abstract = {We study tunneling through a resonant level connected to two
             dissipative bosonic baths: one is the resistive environment
             of the source and drain leads, while the second comes from
             coupling to potential fluctuations on a resistive gate. We
             show that several quantum phase transitions (QPT) occur in
             such a model, transitions which emulate those found in
             interacting systems such as Luttinger liquids or Kondo
             systems. We first use bosonization to map this dissipative
             resonant level model to a resonant level in a Luttinger
             liquid, one with, curiously, two interaction parameters.
             Drawing on methods for analyzing Luttinger liquids at both
             weak and strong coupling, we obtain the phase diagram. For
             strong dissipation, a Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless QPT
             separates strong-coupling and weak-coupling (charge
             localized) phases. In the source-drain symmetric case, all
             relevant backscattering processes disappear at strong
             coupling, leading to perfect transmission at zero
             temperature. In fact, a QPT occurs as a function of the
             coupling asymmetry or energy of the resonant level: the two
             phases are (i) the system is cut into two disconnected
             pieces (zero transmission), or (ii) the system is a single
             connected piece with perfect transmission, except for a
             disconnected fractional degree of freedom. The latter arises
             from the competition between the two fermionic leads (source
             and drain), as in the two-channel Kondo effect.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.89.085116},
   Key = {fds245939}
}

@article{fds245938,
   Author = {Pilo-Pais, M and Watson, A and Demers, S and LaBean, TH and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {Surface-enhanced Raman scattering plasmonic enhancement
             using DNA origami-based complex metallic
             nanostructures.},
   Journal = {Nano Letters},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {2099-2104},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1530-6984},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl5003069},
   Abstract = {DNA origami is a novel self-assembly technique allowing one
             to form various two-dimensional shapes and position matter
             with nanometer accuracy. We use DNA origami templates to
             engineer surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates.
             Specifically, gold nanoparticles were selectively placed on
             the corners of rectangular origami and subsequently enlarged
             via solution-based metal deposition. The resulting
             assemblies exhibit "hot spots" of enhanced electromagnetic
             field between the nanoparticles. We observed a significant
             Raman signal enhancement from molecules covalently attached
             to the assemblies, as compared to control nanoparticle
             samples that lack interparticle hot spots. Furthermore,
             Raman molecules are used to map out the hot spots'
             distribution, as they are burned when experiencing a
             threshold electric field. Our method opens up the prospects
             of using DNA origami to rationally engineer and assemble
             plasmonic structures for molecular spectroscopy.},
   Doi = {10.1021/nl5003069},
   Key = {fds245938}
}

@article{fds245940,
   Author = {Mebrahtu, HT and Borzenets, IV and Zheng, H and Bomze, YV and Smirnov,
             AI and Florens, S and Baranger, HU and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {Observation of majorana quantum critical behaviour in a
             resonant level coupled to a dissipative environment},
   Journal = {Nature Physics},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {732-737},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1745-2473},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphys2735},
   Abstract = {A quantum phase transition is an abrupt change between two
             distinct ground states of a many-body system, driven by an
             external parameter. In the vicinity of the quantum critical
             point (QCP) where the transition occurs, a new phase may
             emerge that is determined by quantum fluctuations and is
             very different from either phase. In particular, a
             conducting system may exhibit non-Fermi-liquid behaviour.
             Although this scenario is well established theoretically,
             controllable experimental realizations are rare. Here, we
             experimentally investigate the nature of the QCP in a simple
             nanoscale system - a spin-polarized resonant level coupled
             to dissipative contacts. We fine-tune the system to the QCP,
             realized exactly on-resonance and when the coupling between
             the level and the two contacts is symmetric. Several
             anomalous transport scaling laws are demonstrated, including
             a striking non-Fermi-liquid scattering rate at the QCP,
             indicating fractionalization of the resonant level into two
             Majorana quasiparticles. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers
             Limited.},
   Doi = {10.1038/nphys2735},
   Key = {fds245940}
}

@article{fds245942,
   Author = {Borzenets, IV and Coskun, UC and Mebrahtu, HT and Bomze, YV and Smirnov,
             AI and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Phonon bottleneck in graphene-based Josephson junctions at
             millikelvin temperatures.},
   Journal = {Physical Review Letters},
   Volume = {111},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {027001},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23889431},
   Abstract = {We examine the nature of the transitions between the normal
             and superconducting branches in superconductor-graphene-superconductor
             Josephson junctions. We attribute the hysteresis between the
             switching (superconducting to normal) and retrapping (normal
             to superconducting) transitions to electron overheating. In
             particular, we demonstrate that the retrapping current
             corresponds to the critical current at an elevated
             temperature, where the heating is caused by the retrapping
             current itself. The superconducting gap in the leads
             suppresses the hot electron outflow, allowing us to further
             study electron thermalization by phonons at low temperatures
             (T≲1 K). The relationship between the applied power and
             the electron temperature was found to be P∝T3, which we
             argue is consistent with cooling due to electron-phonon
             interactions.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.027001},
   Key = {fds245942}
}

@article{fds245941,
   Author = {Chung, C-H and Le Hur and K and Finkelstein, G and Vojta, M and Woelfle,
             P},
   Title = {Nonequilibrium quantum transport through a dissipative
             resonant level},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {87},
   Number = {24},
   Pages = {245310},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1098-0121},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000320767700003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The resonant-level model represents a paradigmatic quantum
             system which serves as a basis for many other quantum
             impurity models.We provide a comprehensive analysis of the
             nonequilibrium transport near a quantum phase transition in
             a spinless dissipative resonant-level model, extending
             earlierwork [Phys. Rev. Lett 102, 216803 (2009)]. A detailed
             derivation of a rigorous mapping of our system onto an
             effective Kondo model is presented. A controlled
             energy-dependent renormalization-group approach is applied
             to compute the nonequilibrium current in the presence of a
             finite bias voltage V . In the linear-response regime V →
             0, the system exhibits as a function of the dissipative
             strength a localized-delocalized quantum transition of the
             Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) type. We address fundamental issues
             of the nonequilibrium transport near the quantum phase
             transition: Does the bias voltage play the same role as
             temperature to smear out the transition? What is the scaling
             of the nonequilibrium conductance near the transition? At
             finite temperatures, we show that the conductance follows
             the equilibrium scaling forV <T, while it obeys a distinct
             nonequilibrium profile forV >T. We furthermore provide
             different signatures of the transition in the
             finite-frequency current noise and ac conductance via a
             recently developed functional renormalization group (FRG)
             approach. The generalization of our analysis to
             nonequilibrium transport through a resonant level coupled to
             two chiral Luttinger liquid leads, generated by fractional
             quantum Hall edge states, is discussed. Our work on the
             dissipative resonant level has direct relevance to
             experiments on a quantum dot coupled to a resistive
             environment, such as H. Mebrahtu et al., [Nature (London)
             488, 61 (2012)].},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.87.245310},
   Key = {fds245941}
}

@article{fds245961,
   Author = {Mebrahtu, HT and Borzenets, IV and Liu, DE and Zheng, H and Bomze, YV and Smirnov, AI and Baranger, HU and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Quantum phase transition in a resonant level coupled to
             interacting leads.},
   Journal = {Nature},
   Volume = {488},
   Number = {7409},
   Pages = {61-64},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22859201},
   Abstract = {A Luttinger liquid is an interacting one-dimensional
             electronic system, quite distinct from the 'conventional'
             Fermi liquids formed by interacting electrons in two and
             three dimensions. Some of the most striking properties of
             Luttinger liquids are revealed in the process of electron
             tunnelling. For example, as a function of the applied bias
             voltage or temperature, the tunnelling current exhibits a
             non-trivial power-law suppression. (There is no such
             suppression in a conventional Fermi liquid.) Here, using a
             carbon nanotube connected to resistive leads, we create a
             system that emulates tunnelling in a Luttinger liquid, by
             controlling the interaction of the tunnelling electron with
             its environment. We further replace a single tunnelling
             barrier with a double-barrier, resonant-level structure and
             investigate resonant tunnelling between Luttinger liquids.
             At low temperatures, we observe perfect transparency of the
             resonant level embedded in the interacting environment, and
             the width of the resonance tends to zero. We argue that this
             behaviour results from many-body physics of interacting
             electrons, and signals the presence of a quantum phase
             transition. Given that many parameters, including the
             interaction strength, can be precisely controlled in our
             samples, this is an attractive model system for studying
             quantum critical phenomena in general, with wide-reaching
             implications for understanding quantum phase transitions in
             more complex systems, such as cold atoms and strongly
             correlated bulk materials.},
   Doi = {10.1038/nature11265},
   Key = {fds245961}
}

@article{fds245959,
   Author = {Borzenets, IV and Yoon, I and Prior, MW and Donald, BR and Mooney, RD and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Ultra-sharp metal and nanotube-based probes for applications
             in scanning microscopy and neural recording (vol 111,
             074703, 2012)},
   Journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
   Volume = {112},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {074703},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0021-8979},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4739526},
   Abstract = {This paper discusses several methods for manufacturing
             ultra-sharp probes, with applications geared toward, but not
             limited to, scanning microscopy (STM, AFM) and
             intra-cellular recordings of neural signals. We present
             recipes for making tungsten, platinum/iridium alloy, and
             nanotube fibril tips. Electrical isolation methods using
             Parylene-C or PMMA are described. © 2012 American Institute
             of Physics.},
   Doi = {10.1063/1.4739526},
   Key = {fds245959}
}

@article{fds245945,
   Author = {Mebrahtu, H and Brozenets, I and Bomze, Y and Finkelstein, G and IOP},
   Title = {Observation of Unitary Conductance for Resonant Tunneling
             with Dissipation},
   Journal = {Journal of Physics},
   Volume = {400},
   Pages = {042007},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {1742-6588},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000314977100367&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/400/4/042007},
   Key = {fds245945}
}

@article{fds245956,
   Author = {Borzenets, IV and Yoon, I and Prior, MW and Donald, BR and Mooney, RD and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Erratum: Ultra-sharp metal and nanotube-based probes for
             applications in scanning microscopy and neural recording
             (Journal of Applied Physics (2012) 111 (074703))},
   Journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
   Volume = {112},
   Number = {2},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {0021-8979},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4739526},
   Doi = {10.1063/1.4739526},
   Key = {fds245956}
}

@article{fds245958,
   Author = {Yoon, I and Hamaguchi, K and Borzenets, IV and Finkelstein, G and Mooney, R and Donald, BR},
   Title = {Intracellular neural recording with pure carbon nanotube
             probes},
   Journal = {Nature Nanotechnology},
   Pages = {e65715},
   Year = {2012},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0065715},
   Abstract = {The computational complexity of the brain depends in part on
             a neuron’s capacity to integrate electrochemical
             information from vast numbers of synaptic inputs. The
             measurements of synaptic activity that are crucial for
             mechanistic understanding of brain function are also
             challenging because they require intracellular recording
             methods to detect and resolve millivolt scale synaptic
             potentials. Although glass electrodes are widely used for
             intracellular recordings, novel electrodes with superior
             mechanical and electrical properties are desirable because
             they could extend intracellular recording methods to
             challenging environments, including long term recordings in
             freely behaving animals. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can
             theoretically deliver this advance, but previous attempts
             have been limited to surface coating over a flat substrate
             or wires1,2, limiting their application to monolayer
             neuronal cultures. Here we show that a novel yet remarkably
             simple millimeter long electrode with a sub-micron tip,
             fabricated from self-entangled pure CNT can be used to
             obtain intracellular and extracellular recordings from
             vertebrate neurons in vitro and in vivo. This fabrication
             technology provides a new method for assembling
             intracellular electrodes from CNTs, affording a promising
             opportunity to harness nanotechnology for neuroscience
             applications.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0065715},
   Key = {fds245958}
}

@article{fds245960,
   Author = {Borzenets, IV and Coskun, UC and Mebrahtu, H and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {Pb-Graphene-Pb josephson junctions: Characterization in
             magnetic field},
   Journal = {IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1800104},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {1051-8223},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TASC.2012.2198472},
   Abstract = {We fabricate superconductor-graphene-superconductor
             Josephson junctions with superconducting regions made of
             lead (Pb). The critical current through graphene may be
             modulated by the external magnetic field; the resulting
             Fraunhofer interference pattern shows several periods of
             oscillations, suggesting that the junction is uniform.
             Deviations from the perfect Fraunhofer pattern are observed,
             and their cause is explained by a simulation that takes into
             account the sample design. © 2002-2011 IEEE.},
   Doi = {10.1109/TASC.2012.2198472},
   Key = {fds245960}
}

@article{fds245963,
   Author = {Borzenets, IV and Coskun, UC and Jones, SJ and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {Phase diffusion in graphene-based Josephson
             junctions.},
   Journal = {Physical Review Letters},
   Volume = {107},
   Number = {13},
   Pages = {137005},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22026894},
   Abstract = {We report on graphene-based Josephson junctions with
             contacts made from lead. The high transition temperature of
             this superconductor allows us to observe the supercurrent
             branch at temperatures up to ∼2 K, at which point we can
             detect a small, but nonzero, resistance. We attribute this
             resistance to the phase diffusion mechanism, which has not
             been yet identified in graphene. By measuring the resistance
             as a function of temperature and gate voltage, we can
             further characterize the nature of the electromagnetic
             environment and dissipation in our samples.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.137005},
   Key = {fds245963}
}

@article{fds304540,
   Author = {Li, P and Wu, PM and Bomze, Y and Borzenets, IV and Finkelstein, G and Chang, AM},
   Title = {Switching currents limited by single phase slips in
             one-dimensional superconducting Al nanowires.},
   Journal = {Physical Review Letters},
   Volume = {107},
   Number = {13},
   Pages = {137004},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22026893},
   Abstract = {An aluminum nanowire switches from superconducting to normal
             as the current is increased in an upsweep. The switching
             current (I(s)) averaged over upsweeps approximately follows
             the depairing critical current (I(c)) but falls below it.
             Fluctuations in I(s) exhibit three distinct regions of
             behaviors and are nonmonotonic in temperature: saturation
             well below the critical temperature T(c), an increase as
             T(2/3) at intermediate temperatures, and a rapid decrease
             close to T(c). Heat dissipation analysis indicates that a
             single phase slip is able to trigger switching at low and
             intermediate temperatures, whereby the T(2/3) dependence
             arises from the thermal activation of a phase slip, while
             saturation at low temperatures provides striking evidence
             that the phase slips by macroscopic quantum
             tunneling.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.137004},
   Key = {fds304540}
}

@article{fds245966,
   Author = {Pilo-Pais, M and Goldberg, S and Samano, E and Labean, TH and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Connecting the nanodots: programmable nanofabrication of
             fused metal shapes on DNA templates.},
   Journal = {Nano Letters},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {3489-3492},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21732612},
   Abstract = {We present a novel method for producing complex metallic
             nanostructures of programmable design. DNA origami
             templates, modified to have DNA binding sites with a
             uniquely coded sequence, were adsorbed onto silicon dioxide
             substrates. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with the cDNA
             sequence were then attached. These seed nanoparticles were
             later enlarged, and even fused, by electroless deposition of
             silver. Using this method, we constructed a variety of
             metallic structures, including rings, pairs of bars, and H
             shapes.},
   Doi = {10.1021/nl202066c},
   Key = {fds245966}
}

@article{fds245962,
   Author = {Li, P and Wu, PM and Bomze, Y and Borzenets, IV and Finkelstein, G and Chang, AM},
   Title = {Retrapping current, self-heating, and hysteretic
             current-voltage characteristics in ultranarrow
             superconducting aluminum nanowires},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {84},
   Number = {18},
   Pages = {184508},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {1098-0121},
   url = {http://prb.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v84/i18/e184508},
   Abstract = {Hysteretic I-V (current-voltage) curves are studied in
             narrow Al nanowires. The nanowires have a cross section as
             small as 50 nm2. We focus on the retrapping current in a
             down-sweep of the current, at which a nanowire re-enters the
             superconducting state from a normal state. The retrapping
             current is found to be significantly smaller than the
             switching current at which the nanowire switches into the
             normal state from a superconducting state during a current
             up-sweep. For wires of different lengths, we analyze the
             heat removal due to various processes, including electron
             and phonon processes. For a short wire 1.5μm in length,
             electronic thermal conduction is effective; for longer wires
             10μm in length, phonon conduction becomes important. We
             demonstrate that the measured retrapping current as a
             function of temperature can be quantitatively accounted for
             by the self-heating occurring in the normal portions of the
             nanowires to better than 20% accuracy. For the phonon
             processes, the extracted thermal conduction parameters
             support the notion of a reduced phase-space below three
             dimensions, consistent with the phonon thermal wavelength
             having exceeded the lateral dimensions at temperatures below
             ∼1.3 K. Nevertheless, surprisingly the best fit was
             achieved with a functional form corresponding to
             three-dimensional phonons, albeit requiring parameters far
             exceeding known values in the literature. © 2011 American
             Physical Society.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.84.184508},
   Key = {fds245962}
}

@article{fds245964,
   Author = {Li, P and Wu, PM and Bomze, Y and Borzenets, IV and Finkelstein, G and Chang, AM},
   Title = {Single Phase Slip Limited Switching Current in 1-Dimensional
             Superconducting Al Nanowires},
   Journal = {Physical Review Letters},
   Volume = {107},
   Number = {13},
   Pages = {137004},
   Year = {2011},
   url = {http://prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v107/i13/e137004},
   Abstract = {An aluminum nanowire switches from superconducting to normal
             as the current is increased in an upsweep. The switching
             current (Is) averaged over upsweeps approximately follows
             the depairing critical current (Ic) but falls below it.
             Fluctuations in Is exhibit three distinct regions of
             behaviors and are nonmonotonic in temperature: saturation
             well below the critical temperature Tc, an increase as
             T^{2/3} at intermediate temperatures, and a rapid decrease
             close to Tc. Heat dissipation analysis indicates that a
             single phase slip is able to trigger switching at low and
             intermediate temperatures, whereby the T^{2/3} dependence
             arises from the thermal activation of a phase slip, while
             saturation at low temperatures provides striking evidence
             that the phase slips by macroscopic quantum
             tunneling.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.137004},
   Key = {fds245964}
}

@article{fds245965,
   Author = {Samano, EC and Pilo-Pais, M and Goldberg, S and Vogen, BN and Finkelstein, G and LaBean, TH},
   Title = {Self-Assembling DNA templates for programmed artificial
             biomineralization},
   Journal = {Soft Matter},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {3240-3245},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {1744-683X},
   url = {http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2011/SM/c0sm01318h},
   Abstract = {Complex materials with micron-scale dimensions and
             nanometre-scale feature resolution created via engineered
             DNA self-assembly represent an important new class of soft
             matter. These assemblies are increasingly being exploited as
             templates for the programmed assembly of functional
             inorganic materials that have not conventionally lent
             themselves to organization by molecular recognition
             processes. The current challenge is to apply these
             bioinspired DNA templates toward the fabrication of
             composite materials for use in electronics, photonics, and
             other fields of technology. This highlight focuses on
             methods we consider most useful for integration of DNA
             templated structures into functional composite
             nanomaterials, particularly, organization of preformed
             nanoparticles and metallization procedures. © The Royal
             Society of Chemistry 2011.},
   Doi = {10.1039/c0sm01318h},
   Key = {fds245965}
}

@article{fds245968,
   Author = {Bomze, Y and Borzenets, I and Mebrahtu, H and Makarovski, A and Baranger, HU and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Two-stage Kondo effect and Kondo-box level spectroscopy in a
             carbon nanotube},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {16},
   Pages = {161411R},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {1098-0121},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/4257 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {The concept of the "Kondo box" describes a single spin,
             antiferromagnetically coupled to a quantum dot with a finite
             level spacing. Here, a Kondo box is formed in a carbon
             nanotube interacting with a localized electron. We
             investigate the spins of its first few eigenstates and
             compare them to a recent theory. In an "open" Kondo-box,
             strongly coupled to the leads, we observe a nonmonotonic
             temperature dependence of the nanotube conductance, which
             results from a competition between the Kondo-box singlet and
             the "conventional" Kondo state that couples the nanotube to
             the leads. © 2010 The American Physical
             Society.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.82.161411},
   Key = {fds245968}
}

@article{fds245954,
   Author = {Zhukov, AA and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Dependence of transport through carbon nanotubes on local
             coulomb potential},
   Journal = {JETP Letters},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {212-215},
   Year = {2009},
   ISSN = {0021-3640},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1134/S0021364009040109},
   Abstract = {In this paper, we present the results of helium temperature
             transport measurements through carbon nanotubes using an AFM
             conductive tip as a mobile gate for creation of a local
             distributive Coulomb potential. In semiconducting nanotubes
             we observe shifting of the conductance peaks with changing
             of the AFM tip position. This result can be explained with a
             particle in the box quantum model. In high quality metallic
             nanotubes we observe that the local Coulomb potential does
             not destroy the fourfold degeneracy of the energy levels. ©
             2009 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1134/S0021364009040109},
   Key = {fds245954}
}

@article{fds245969,
   Author = {Bomze, Y and Mebrahtu, H and Borzenets, I and Makarovski, A and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Resonant tunneling in a dissipative environment},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {24},
   Pages = {241402R},
   Year = {2009},
   ISSN = {1098-0121},
   url = {http://scitation.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=PRBMDO000079000024241402000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes},
   Abstract = {We measure tunneling through a single quantum level in a
             carbon nanotube quantum dot connected to resistive metal
             leads. For the electrons tunneling to/from the nanotube, the
             leads serve as a dissipative environment, which suppresses
             the tunneling rate. In the regime of sequential tunneling,
             the height of the single-electron conductance peaks
             increases as the temperature is lowered, although it scales
             more weakly than the conventional T-1. In the resonant
             tunneling regime (temperature smaller than the level width),
             the peak width approaches saturation, while the peak height
             starts to decrease. Overall, the peak height shows a
             nonmonotonic temperature dependence. We associate this
             unusual behavior with the transition from the sequential to
             the resonant tunneling through a single quantum level in a
             dissipative environment. © 2009 The American Physical
             Society.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.79.241402},
   Key = {fds245969}
}

@article{fds304539,
   Author = {Park, SH and Finkelstein, G and LaBean, TH},
   Title = {Stepwise self-assembly of DNA tile lattices using dsDNA
             bridges.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Chemical Society},
   Volume = {130},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {40-41},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18072780},
   Abstract = {The simple helical motif of double-strand DNA (dsDNA) has
             typically been judged to be uninteresting for assembly in
             DNA-based nanotechnology applications. In this letter, we
             demonstrate construction of superstructures consisting of
             heterogeneous DNA motifs using dsDNA in conjunction with
             more complex, cross-tile building blocks. Incorporation of
             dsDNA bridges in stepwise assembly processes can be used for
             controlling length and directionality of superstructures and
             is analogous to the "reprogramming" of sticky-ends displayed
             on the DNA tiles. Two distinct self-assembled DNA lattices,
             fixed-size nanoarrays, and extended 2D crystals of
             nanotracks with nanobridges, are constructed and visualized
             by high-resolution, liquid-phase atomic force
             microscopy.},
   Doi = {10.1021/ja078122f},
   Key = {fds304539}
}

@article{fds245952,
   Author = {Coskun, UC and Mebrahtu, H and Huang, PB and Huang, J and Sebba, D and Biasco, A and Makarovski, A and Lazarides, A and Labean, TH and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Single-electron transistors made by chemical patterning of
             silicon dioxide substrates and selective deposition of gold
             nanoparticles},
   Journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
   Volume = {93},
   Number = {12},
   Year = {2008},
   ISSN = {0003-6951},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.2981705},
   Abstract = {We describe a method to pattern SiO2 surfaces with colloidal
             gold nanoparticles by e -beam lithography and selective
             nanoparticle deposition. The simple technique allows us to
             deposit nanoparticles in continuous straight lines, just one
             nanoparticle wide and many nanoparticles long. We contact
             the prepositioned nanoparticles with metal leads to form
             single electron transistors. The Coulomb blockade pattern
             surprisingly does not show the parasitic "offset charges" at
             low temperatures, indicating relatively little surface
             contamination. © 2008 American Institute of
             Physics.},
   Doi = {10.1063/1.2981705},
   Key = {fds245952}
}

@article{fds245970,
   Author = {Anders, FB and Logan, DE and Galpin, MR and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {Zero-bias conductance in carbon nanotube quantum
             dots},
   Journal = {Physical Review Letters},
   Volume = {100},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {086809},
   Year = {2008},
   ISSN = {0031-9007},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.086809},
   Abstract = {We present numerical renormalization group calculations for
             the zero-bias conductance of quantum dots made from
             semiconducting carbon nanotubes. These explain and reproduce
             the thermal evolution of the conductance for different
             groups of orbitals, as the dot-lead tunnel coupling is
             varied and the system evolves from correlated Kondo behavior
             to more weakly correlated regimes. For integer fillings N=1,
             2, 3 of an SU(4) model, we find universal scaling behavior
             of the conductance that is distinct from the standard SU(2)
             universal conductance, and concurs quantitatively with
             experiment. Our results also agree qualitatively with
             experimental differential conductance maps. © 2008 The
             American Physical Society.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.086809},
   Key = {fds245970}
}

@article{fds245971,
   Author = {Coskun, UC and Mebrahtu, H and Huang, P and Huang, J and Biasco, A and Makarovski, A and Lazarides, A and LaBean, T and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {Chemical patterning of silicon dioxide substrates for
             selective deposition of gold nanoparticles and fabrication
             of single-electron transistors},
   Journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
   Volume = {93},
   Pages = {123101},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds245971}
}

@article{fds245972,
   Author = {Park, SH and Finkelstein, G and Labean, TH},
   Title = {Stepwise Self-Assembly of DNA Tile Lattices Using dsDNA
             Bridges},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Chemical Society},
   Volume = {130},
   Number = {40-41},
   Pages = {40-41},
   Year = {2008},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18072780},
   Abstract = {The simple helical motif of double-strand DNA (dsDNA) has
             typically been judged to be uninteresting for assembly in
             DNA-based nanotechnology applications. In this letter, we
             demonstrate construction of superstructures consisting of
             heterogeneous DNA motifs using dsDNA in conjunction with
             more complex, cross-tile building blocks. Incorporation of
             dsDNA bridges in stepwise assembly processes can be used for
             controlling length and directionality of superstructures and
             is analogous to the "reprogramming" of sticky-ends displayed
             on the DNA tiles. Two distinct self-assembled DNA lattices,
             fixed-size nanoarrays, and extended 2D crystals of
             nanotracks with nanobridges, are constructed and visualized
             by high-resolution, liquid-phase atomic force
             microscopy.},
   Doi = {10.1021/ja078122f},
   Key = {fds245972}
}

@article{fds245973,
   Author = {Makarovski, A and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Su(4) mixed valence regime in carbon nanotube quantum
             dots},
   Journal = {Physica B: Condensed Matter},
   Volume = {403},
   Number = {5-9},
   Pages = {1555-1557},
   Year = {2008},
   ISSN = {0921-4526},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physb.2007.10.367},
   Abstract = {We study the evolution of conductance regimes in carbon
             nanotubes with doubly degenerate orbitals ("shells") by
             controlling the contact transparency within the same sample.
             For sufficiently open contacts, Kondo behavior is observed
             for 1, 2, and 3 electrons in the topmost shell. As the
             contacts are opened more, the sample enters the "mixed
             valence" regime, where different charge states are strongly
             hybridized by electron tunneling. Here, the conductance as a
             function of gate voltage shows pronounced modulations with a
             period of four electrons, and all single-electron features
             are washed away at low temperature. We successfully describe
             this behavior by a simple formula with no fitting
             parameters. Finally, we find a surprisingly small energy
             scale that controls the temperature evolution of conductance
             and the tunneling density of states in the mixed valence
             regime. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.physb.2007.10.367},
   Key = {fds245973}
}

@article{fds245975,
   Author = {Makarovski, A and Liu, J and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Evolution of transport regimes in carbon nanotube quantum
             dots.},
   Journal = {Physical Review Letters},
   Volume = {99},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {066801},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0031-9007},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17930850},
   Abstract = {We study the evolution of conductance regimes in carbon
             nanotubes with doubly degenerate orbitals (shells) by
             controlling the contact transparency within the same sample.
             For sufficiently open contacts, Kondo behavior is observed
             for 1, 2, and 3 electrons in the topmost shell. As the
             contacts are opened more, the sample enters the "mixed
             valence" regime, where different charge states are strongly
             hybridized by electron tunneling. Here, the conductance as a
             function of gate voltage shows pronounced modulations with a
             period of four electrons, and all single-electron features
             are washed away at low temperature. We successfully describe
             this behavior by a simple formula with no fitting
             parameters. Finally, we find a surprisingly small energy
             scale that controls the temperature evolution of conductance
             and the tunneling density of states in the mixed valence
             regime.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.066801},
   Key = {fds245975}
}

@article{fds245944,
   Author = {Makarovski, A and Liu, J and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Evolution of SU(4) transport regimes in carbon nanotube
             Quantum Dots},
   Journal = {4th Conference on Foundations of Nanoscience: Self-Assembled
             Architectures and Devices, FNANO 2007},
   Pages = {258-267},
   Year = {2007},
   Abstract = {Carbon nanotubes present an ideal system for investigating
             electronic transport at the nanoscale. In this paper, we
             study the evolution of conductance regimes through nanotube
             Quantum Dot by controlling the contact transparency in high
             quality samples with doubly degenerate orbitals ("shells").
             For sufficiently open contacts, Kondo behavior is observed
             for one, two, and three electrons in the topmost shell. As
             the contacts are opened even more, the sample enters the
             "Mixed Valence" regime, where different charge states are
             hybridized by electron tunneling. Here, the lowtemperature
             conductance as a function of gate voltage shows pronounced
             modulations with a period of four electrons. The hallmark of
             the new regime is the lack of single-electron features at
             low temperature, which are uncovered when the temperature is
             raised. Finally, we find that for one and three electrons
             occupying a shell the zero-bias features behave distinctly
             differently in magnetic field.© 2007 by ScienceTechnica,
             Inc.},
   Key = {fds245944}
}

@article{fds245974,
   Author = {Makarovski, A and Zhukov, A and Liu, J and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {Four-probe measurements of carbon nanotubes with narrow
             metal contacts},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {76},
   Number = {16},
   Pages = {R161405},
   Year = {2007},
   ISSN = {1098-0121},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.76.161405},
   Abstract = {We find that electrons in single-wall carbon nanotubes may
             propagate substantial distances (tens of nanometers) under
             metal contacts. We perform four-probe transport measurements
             of the nanotube conductance and observe significant
             deviations from the standard Kirchhoff's circuit rules. Most
             noticeably, injecting current between two neighboring
             contacts on one end of the nanotube induces a nonzero
             voltage difference between two contacts on the other end. ©
             2007 The American Physical Society.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.76.161405},
   Key = {fds245974}
}

@article{fds245976,
   Author = {Makarovski, A and Zhukov, A and Liu, J and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {SU(4) and SU(2) Kondo Effects in Carbon Nanotube Quantum
             Dots},
   Journal = {Physical Review B},
   Volume = {75},
   Number = {24},
   Pages = {R241407},
   Year = {2007},
   ISSN = {1098-0121},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.75.241407},
   Abstract = {We study the SU(4) Kondo effect in carbon nanotube quantum
             dots, where doubly degenerate orbitals form four-electron
             "shells." The SU(4) Kondo behavior is investigated for one,
             two, and three electrons in the topmost shell. While the
             Kondo state of two electrons is quenched by a magnetic
             field, in the case of an odd number of electrons two types
             of SU(2) Kondo effect may survive. Namely, the spin SU(2)
             state is realized in a magnetic field parallel to the
             nanotube (inducing primarily orbital splitting). Application
             of the perpendicular field (inducing Zeeman splitting)
             results in the orbital SU(2) Kondo effect. © 2007 The
             American Physical Society.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.75.241407},
   Key = {fds245976}
}

@article{fds245977,
   Author = {Prior, M and Makarovski, A and Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Low-temperature conductive tip atomic force microscope for
             carbon nanotube probing and manipulation},
   Journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
   Volume = {91},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {053112},
   Year = {2007},
   ISSN = {0003-6951},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.2759986},
   Abstract = {The authors describe conductive tip atomic force microscope
             used for imaging carbon nanotubes at low temperatures. The
             instrument allows them to measure the tip-nanotube
             conductance while performing the topographic scan of the
             nanotubes on a nonconductive Si O2 substrate. For nanotubes
             weakly coupled to the contacting electrode, they observe the
             Coulomb blockade pattern in the tip-nanotube conductance.
             They reversibly modified the conductance pattern by applying
             the tip pressure. © 2007 American Institute of
             Physics.},
   Doi = {10.1063/1.2759986},
   Key = {fds245977}
}

@article{fds304538,
   Author = {Makarovski, A and Zhukov, A and Liu, J and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {SU(2) and SU(4) Kondo effects in carbon nanotube quantum
             dots},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {75},
   Number = {24},
   Year = {2007},
   ISSN = {1098-0121},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.75.241407},
   Abstract = {We study the SU(4) Kondo effect in carbon nanotube quantum
             dots, where doubly degenerate orbitals form four-electron
             "shells." The SU(4) Kondo behavior is investigated for one,
             two, and three electrons in the topmost shell. While the
             Kondo state of two electrons is quenched by a magnetic
             field, in the case of an odd number of electrons two types
             of SU(2) Kondo effect may survive. Namely, the spin SU(2)
             state is realized in a magnetic field parallel to the
             nanotube (inducing primarily orbital splitting). Application
             of the perpendicular field (inducing Zeeman splitting)
             results in the orbital SU(2) Kondo effect. © 2007 The
             American Physical Society.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.75.241407},
   Key = {fds304538}
}

@article{fds245950,
   Author = {Park, SH and Prior, MW and LaBean, TH and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {Optimized fabrication and electrical analysis of silver
             nanowires templated on DNA molecules},
   Journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {3},
   Year = {2006},
   ISSN = {0003-6951},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.2234282},
   Abstract = {We report on the electrical conductivity measurement of
             silver nanowires templated on native X-bacteriophage and
             synthetic double-stranded DNA molecules. After an
             electroless chemical deposition, the metallized DNA wires
             have a diameter down to 15 nm and are among the thinnest
             metallic nanowires available to date. Two-terminal I-V
             measurements demonstrating various conduction behaviors are
             presented. DNA templated functional nanowires may, in the
             near future, be targeted to connect at specific locations on
             larger-scale circuits and represent a potential breakthrough
             in the self-assembly of nanometer-scale structures for
             electronics layout. © 2006 American Institute of
             Physics.},
   Doi = {10.1063/1.2234282},
   Key = {fds245950}
}

@article{fds245967,
   Author = {Makarovski, A and An, L and Liu, J and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {Persistent orbital degeneracy in carbon nanotubes},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {15},
   Pages = {155431},
   Year = {2006},
   ISSN = {1098-0121},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.74.155431},
   Abstract = {The quantum-mechanical orbitals in carbon nanotube quantum
             dots are doubly degenerate over a large number of states. We
             argue that this experimental observation indicates that
             electrons are reflected without mode mixing at the
             nanotube-metal contacts. Two electrons occupying a pair of
             degenerate orbitals ("shell") are found to form a triplet
             state starting from zero magnetic field. Finally, we observe
             unexpected low-energy excitations at complete filling of a
             four-electron shell. © 2006 The American Physical
             Society.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.74.155431},
   Key = {fds245967}
}

@article{fds245978,
   Author = {Park, SH and Prior, MW and LaBean, TH and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {Silver nanowires templated on DNA molecules},
   Journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
   Volume = {89},
   Pages = {033901},
   Year = {2006},
   Abstract = {We report on the electrical conductivity measurement of
             silver nanowires templated on native &#955;-bacteriophage
             and synthetic double- stranded DNA molecules. After an
             electroless chemical deposition, the metallized DNA wires
             have a diameter down to 15 nm, which are among the thinnest
             metallic nanowires available to date. Two-terminal I-V
             measurements demonstrating various conduction behaviors are
             presented. DNA-templated functionalized nanowires represent
             a potential breakthrough in the self-assembly of
             nanometer-scale structures for electronics-layout because
             they can be targeted to connect at specific locations on
             larger-scale circuits.},
   Key = {fds245978}
}

@article{fds245979,
   Author = {Park, SH and Barish, R and Li, H and Reif, JH and Finkelstein, G and Yan,
             H and Labean, TH},
   Title = {Three-helix bundle DNA tiles self-assemble into 2D lattice
             or 1D templates for silver nanowires.},
   Journal = {Nano Letters},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {693-696},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1530-6984},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15826110},
   Abstract = {We present a DNA nanostructure, the three-helix bundle
             (3HB), which consists of three double helical DNA domains
             connected by six immobile crossover junctions such that the
             helix axes are not coplanar. The 3HB motif presents a
             triangular cross-section with one helix lying in the groove
             formed by the other two. By differential programming of
             sticky-ends, 3HB tiles can be arrayed in two distinct
             lattice conformations: one-dimensional filaments and
             two-dimensional lattices. Filaments and lattices have been
             visualized by high-resolution, tapping mode atomic force
             microscopy (AFM) under buffer. Their dimensions are shown to
             be in excellent agreement with designed structures. We also
             demonstrate an electroless chemical deposition for
             fabricating metallic nanowires templated on self-assembled
             filaments. The metallized nanowires have diameters down to
             20 nm and display Ohmic current-voltage characteristic.},
   Doi = {10.1021/nl050108i},
   Key = {fds245979}
}

@article{fds245943,
   Author = {Park, SH and Li, H and Yan, H and Reif, JH and Finkelstein, G and LaBean,
             TH},
   Title = {Self-assembled 1D DNA nanostructures as templates for silver
             nanowires},
   Journal = {2nd Conference on Foundations of Nanoscience: Self-Assembled
             Architectures and Devices, FNANO 2005},
   Pages = {193-196},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds245943}
}

@article{fds245992,
   Author = {Park, SH and Yan, H and Reif, JH and LaBean, TH and Finkelstein,
             G},
   Title = {Electronic nanostructures templated on self-assembled DNA
             scaffolds},
   Journal = {Nanotechnology},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {S525-S527},
   Year = {2004},
   url = {http://www.phy.duke.edu/~gleb/Pdf_FILES/nanotech.pdf},
   Abstract = {We report on the self-assembly of one- and two-dimensional
             DNA scaffolds, which serve as templates for the targeted
             deposition of ordered nanoparticles and molecular arrays.
             The DNA nanostructures are easy to reprogram, and we
             demonstrate two distinct conformations: sheets and tubes.
             The DNA tubes and individual DNA molecules are metallized in
             solution to produce ultra-thin metal wires.},
   Doi = {10.1088/0957-4484/15/10/005},
   Key = {fds245992}
}

@article{fds245993,
   Author = {Yan, H and Park, SH and Finkelstein, G and Reif, JH and LaBean,
             TH},
   Title = {DNA-templated self-assembly of protein arrays and highly
             conductive nanowires.},
   Journal = {Science},
   Volume = {301},
   Number = {5641},
   Pages = {1882-1884},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14512621},
   Abstract = {A DNA nanostructure consisting of four four-arm junctions
             oriented with a square aspect ratio was designed and
             constructed. Programmable self-assembly of 4 x 4 tiles
             resulted in two distinct lattice morphologies: uniform-width
             nanoribbons and two-dimensional nanogrids, which both
             display periodic square cavities. Periodic protein arrays
             were achieved by templated self-assembly of streptavidin
             onto the DNA nanogrids containing biotinylated
             oligonucleotides. On the basis of a two-step metallization
             procedure, the 4 x 4 nanoribbons acted as an excellent
             scaffold for the production of highly conductive,
             uniform-width, silver nanowires.},
   Doi = {10.1126/science.1089389},
   Key = {fds245993}
}

@article{fds245998,
   Author = {Tessmer, SH and Finkelstein, G and Glicofridis, PI and Ashoori,
             RC},
   Title = {Modeling Subsurface Charge Accumulation Images of a Quantum
             Hall Liquid},
   Journal = {Phys. Rev. B},
   Volume = {66},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {125308},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0163-1829},
   Abstract = {Subsurface charge accumulation imaging is a cryogenic
             scanning probe technique that has recently been used to
             spatially probe incompressible strips formed in a
             two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at high magnetic
             fields. In this paper, we present a detailed numerical
             modeling of these data. At a basic level, the method
             produces results that agree well with the predictions of
             models based on simple circuit elements. Moreover, the
             modeling method is sufficiently advanced to simulate
             spatially resolved measurements. By comparing directly the
             simulations to the experimentally measured data, we can
             extract quantitatively local electronic features of the
             2DES. In particular, we deduce the electron density of
             states inside the incompressible strips and electrical
             resistance across them.},
   Key = {fds245998}
}

@article{fds245999,
   Author = {Glicofridis, PI and Finkelstein, G and Ashoori, RC and Shayegan,
             M},
   Title = {Determination of the Resistance across Incompressible Strips
             through Imaging of Charge Motion},
   Journal = {Phys. Rev. B},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {121312},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0163-1829},
   Abstract = {Using charge-accumulation imaging, we measure the charge
             flow across an incompressible strip and follow its evolution
             with magnetic field. The strip runs parallel to the edge of
             a gate deposited on the sample and forms at positions where
             an exact number of integer Landau levels is filled. An RC
             model of charging fits the data well and enables us to
             determine the resistance across the strip. Surprisingly, we
             find that the strip becomes more resistive as its width
             decreases.},
   Key = {fds245999}
}

@article{fds246000,
   Author = {Zheng, B and Lu, C and Gu, G and Makarovski, A and Finkelstein, G and Liu,
             J},
   Title = {Efficient CVD Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on
             Surfaces Using Carbon Monoxide Precursor},
   Journal = {Nano Letters},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {895-898},
   Year = {2002},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl025634d},
   Abstract = {Single Walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were grown directly
             on flat substrates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD)
             method with carbon monoxide and hydrogen mixture as feeding
             gas. Comparing with other CVD methods, this new approach
             yields higher efficiency and more reproducible results in
             obtaining high quality SWNTs separated as individual
             nanotubes on substrates. Such samples can be used to
             fabricate nanodevices directly with no further purification
             or dispersion. Important factors that affect the nanotube
             growth and possible mechanisms are also discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1021/nl025634d},
   Key = {fds246000}
}

@article{fds304536,
   Author = {Glicofridis, PI and Finkelstein, G and Ashoori,
             RC},
   Title = {Determination of the resistance across incompressible strips
             through imaging of charge motion},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1213121-1213124},
   Year = {2002},
   ISSN = {0163-1829},
   Abstract = {Using charge-accumulation imaging, we measure the charge
             flow across an incompressible strip and follow its evolution
             with magnetic field. The strip runs parallel to the edge of
             a gate deposited on the sample and forms at positions where
             an exact number of integer Landau levels is filled. An RC
             model of charging fits the data well and enables us to
             determine the resistance across the strip. Surprisingly, we
             find that the strip becomes more resistive as its width
             decreases.},
   Key = {fds304536}
}

@article{fds304537,
   Author = {Tessmer, SH and Finkelstein, G and Glicofridis, PI and Ashoori,
             RC},
   Title = {Modeling subsurface charge accumulation images of a quantum
             hall liquid},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {66},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1253081-1253086},
   Year = {2002},
   ISSN = {0163-1829},
   Abstract = {Subsurface charge accumulation imaging is a cryogenic
             scanning probe technique that has recently been used to
             spatially probe incompressible strips formed in a
             two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at high magnetic
             fields. In this paper, we present a detailed numerical
             modeling of these data. At a basic level, the method
             produces results that agree well with the predictions of
             models based on simple circuit elements. Moreover, the
             modeling method is sufficiently advanced to simulate
             spatially resolved measurements. By comparing directly the
             simulations to the experimentally measured data, we can
             extract quantitatively local electronic features of the
             2DES. In particular, we deduce the electron density of
             states inside the incompressible strips and electrical
             resistance across them.},
   Key = {fds304537}
}

@article{fds245995,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Glicofridis, PI and Tessmer, SH and Ashoori, RC and Melloch, MR},
   Title = {Imaging of Low Compressibility Strips in the Quantum Hall
             Liquid},
   Journal = {Phys. Rev. B},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {24},
   Pages = {R16 323},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0163-1829},
   Abstract = {Using subsurface charge accumulation scanning microscopy, we
             image strips of low compressibility corresponding to several
             integer quantum Hall filling factors. We study in detail the
             strips at Landau level filling factors ν=2 and 4. The
             observed strips appear significantly wider than predicted by
             theory. We present a model accounting for the discrepancy by
             considering a disorder-induced nonzero density of states in
             the cyclotron gap. ©2000 The American Physical
             Society.},
   Key = {fds245995}
}

@article{fds304535,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Glicofridis, PI and Tessmer, SH and Ashoori, RC and Melloch, MR},
   Title = {Imaging of low-compressibility strips in the quantum Hall
             liquid},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {24},
   Pages = {R16323-R16326},
   Year = {2000},
   ISSN = {0163-1829},
   Abstract = {Using subsurface charge accumulation scanning microscopy, we
             image strips of low compressibility corresponding to several
             integer quantum Hall filling factors. We study in detail the
             strips at Landau level filling factors ν=2 and 4. The
             observed strips appear significantly wider than predicted by
             theory. We present a model accounting for the discrepancy by
             considering a disorder-induced nonzero density of states in
             the cyclotron gap. ©2000 The American Physical
             Society.},
   Key = {fds304535}
}

@article{fds245996,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Glicofridis, PI and Ashoori, RC and Shayegan,
             M},
   Title = {Topographic mapping of the quantum hall liquid using a
             few-electron bubble},
   Journal = {Science},
   Volume = {289},
   Number = {5476},
   Pages = {90-94},
   Year = {2000},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.289.5476.90},
   Abstract = {A scanning probe technique was used to obtain a
             high-resolution map of the random electrostatic potential
             inside the quantum Hall liquid. A sharp metal tip, scanned
             above a semiconductor surface, sensed charges in an embedded
             twodimensional (2D) electron gas. Under quantum Hall effect
             conditions, applying a positive voltage to the tip locally
             enhanced the 2D electron density and created a 'bubble' of
             electrons in an otherwise unoccupied Landau revel as the tip
             scanned along the sample surface, the bubble followed
             underneath. The tip sensed the motions of single electrons
             entering or leaving the bubble in response to changes in the
             local 2D electrostatic potential.},
   Doi = {10.1126/science.289.5476.90},
   Key = {fds245996}
}

@article{fds245997,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Glicofridis, PI and Tessmer, SH and Ashoori, RC and Melloch, MR},
   Title = {Imaging the low compressibility strips formed by the Quantum
             Hall liquid in a smooth potential gradient},
   Journal = {Physica E: Low-Dimensional Systems and Nanostructures},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {251-254},
   Year = {2000},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1386-9477(99)00131-9},
   Abstract = {The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the quantum Hall
             regime close to integer filling factors was studied. In a
             smooth potential gradient, low-compressibility strips
             corresponding to integer Landau level filling factors are
             observed. These strips turn out to be significantly wider
             than predicted by theory, which does not include the
             disorder potential. The width of the strip is determined by
             a low, but finite density of states between the Landau
             levels.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S1386-9477(99)00131-9},
   Key = {fds245997}
}

@article{fds245994,
   Author = {Glasberg, S and Finkelstein, G and Shtrikman, H and Bar-Joseph,
             I},
   Title = {Comparative study of the negatively and positively charged
             excitons in GaAs quantum wells},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {16},
   Pages = {R10425-R10428},
   Year = {1999},
   Abstract = {We compare the photoluminescence spectra of the negatively
             and positively charged excitons in GaAs quantum wells. We
             use a structure which enables us to observe both complexes
             within the same sample. We find that their binding energy
             and Zeeman splitting are very similar at zero magnetic
             field, but evolve very differently at high fields. We
             discuss the implications of these observations on our
             understanding of the charge excitons structure in high
             magnetic fields. ©1999 The American Physical
             Society.},
   Key = {fds245994}
}

@booklet{Finkelstein98a,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G},
   Title = {Gustav Magnus and his house: Commissioned by the Deutsche
             Physikalische Gesellschaft},
   Journal = {Technology And Culture},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {568-569},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {Finkelstein98a}
}

@article{fds245946,
   Author = {Ciulin, V and Finkelstein, G and Haacke, S and Ganière, J-D and Umansky, V and Bar-Joseph, I and Deveaud, B},
   Title = {Dynamics of charged excitons in GaAs quantum wells under
             high magnetic field},
   Journal = {Physica B: Condensed Matter},
   Volume = {256-258},
   Pages = {466-469},
   Year = {1998},
   Abstract = {We report on time-resolved photoluminescence studies of
             charged and neutral excitons in a modulation doped GaAs
             quantum well under resonant excitation and high magnetic
             field. The radiative lifetime of the charged exciton is
             rather short, 60 ps at zero field, and is found to increase
             by a factor of ∼2 up to 7 T. The short lifetimes suggest
             that, under magnetic field, the exciton bound in the trion
             is delocalized. © 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights
             reserved.},
   Key = {fds245946}
}

@booklet{Finkelstein98c,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Shtrikman, H and Bar-Joseph,
             I},
   Title = {Shakeup processes in a two-dimensional electron gas in
             GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells at high magnetic
             fields},
   Journal = {Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk},
   Volume = {168},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {121-123},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {Finkelstein98c}
}

@booklet{Finkelstein98b,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Shtrikman, H and Bar-Joseph,
             I},
   Title = {Shake-up processes of a two-dimensional electron gas in
             GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells at high magnetic
             fields},
   Journal = {Physica B: Condensed Matter},
   Volume = {249-251},
   Pages = {575-579},
   Year = {1998},
   Abstract = {Shake-up processes in the photoluminescence spectra of a
             two-dimensional electron gas in a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well
             at high magnetic fields are studied at a range of filling
             factors. We find that when the electrons occupy only the
             lowest Landau level these processes are strongly suppressed.
             A peculiar dependence of a giant 'zeroth' shake-up line on
             temperature and filling factor is reported. © 1998 Elsevier
             Science B.V. All rights reserved.},
   Key = {Finkelstein98b}
}

@booklet{Finkelstein98,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Umansky, V and Bar-Joseph, I and Ciulin, V and Haacke, S and Ganière, J-D and Deveaud, B},
   Title = {Charged exciton dynamics in GaAs quantum
             wells},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {58},
   Number = {19},
   Pages = {12637-12640},
   Year = {1998},
   Abstract = {We study the dynamics of the charged and neutral excitons in
             a modulation-doped GaAs quantum well by time-resolved
             photoluminescence under a resonant excitation. The radiative
             lifetime of the charged exciton is found to be surprisingly
             short, 60 ps. This time is temperature independent between 2
             and 10 K, and increases by a factor of 2 at 6 T. We discuss
             our findings in view of present theories of exciton
             radiative decay. © 1998 The American Physical
             Society.},
   Key = {Finkelstein98}
}

@booklet{Barjoseph97,
   Author = {I. Barjoseph and G. Finkelstein},
   Title = {Trions in GaAs quantum wells},
   Journal = {Compound Semiconductors 1996},
   Series = {INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS CONFERENCE SERIES},
   Number = {155},
   Pages = {711 -- 716},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {Barjoseph97}
}

@booklet{Finkelstein97,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Shtrikman, H and Bar-Joseph,
             I},
   Title = {Mechanism of shakeup processes in the photoluminescence of a
             two-dimensional electron gas at high magnetic
             fields},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {16},
   Pages = {10326-10331},
   Year = {1997},
   Abstract = {We observe shakeup processes in the photoluminescence
             spectra of a two-dimensional electron gas in a
             GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum well at high magnetic fields. We
             find that when the electrons occupy only the lowest Landau
             level these processes are strongly suppressed. We show that
             this behavior can be accounted for by first-principles
             calculations. We use the same considerations to explain the
             giant intensity of the shakeup line, which appears just
             below the main luminescence line.},
   Key = {Finkelstein97}
}

@booklet{Finkelstein96b,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Shtrikman, H and Bar-Joseph,
             I},
   Title = {Negatively and positively charged excitons in
             GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum
             wells},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {R1709-R1712},
   Year = {1996},
   Abstract = {We report the observation of the positively charged exciton
             and of the triplet state of the negatively charged exciton
             in modulation doped GaAs quantum wells. Applying a gate
             voltage at high magnetic fields we find that the
             photoluminescence line of the two-dimensional electron gas
             smoothly transforms into a negatively charged exciton and
             not into a neutral exciton. The Zeeman splitting of this
             line exhibits an abrupt change at the metal-insulator
             transition.},
   Key = {Finkelstein96b}
}

@booklet{Finkelstein96,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Shtrikman, H and Bar-Joseph,
             I},
   Title = {Optical spectroscopy of neutral and charged excitons in
             GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells in high magnetic
             fields},
   Journal = {Surface Science},
   Volume = {361-362},
   Number = {1-3},
   Pages = {357-362},
   Year = {1996},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0039-6028(96)00421-9},
   Abstract = {We implement optical spectroscopy to study charged excitons
             in modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. We report the
             first observation of the positively charged exciton and of
             the triplet state of the negatively charged exciton.
             Applying a gate voltage at high magnetic fields, we
             investigate the transition between metallic and insulating
             states. We find that while the photoluminescence line of the
             metallic two-dimensional electron gas transforms smoothly
             into a negatively charged exciton, the Zeeman splitting of
             this line exhibits an abrupt change at the metal-insulator
             transition.},
   Doi = {10.1016/0039-6028(96)00421-9},
   Key = {Finkelstein96}
}

@booklet{Finkelstein96a,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Shtrikman, H and Bar-Joseph,
             I},
   Title = {Shakeup processes in the recombination spectra of negatively
             charged excitons},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {19},
   Pages = {12593-12596},
   Year = {1996},
   Abstract = {We report on shakeup processes in the luminescence spectra
             of a negatively charged exciton (X-) at moderate magnetic
             fields. These processes manifest themselves as a series of
             low-energy satellite peaks emerging from the negatively
             charged exciton line. We analyze the dependence of the X-
             energy on magnetic field. We conclude that at magnetic
             fields above ∼ 1 T the X- structure can be viewed as an
             electron at the lowest Landau level bound to an
             exciton.},
   Key = {Finkelstein96a}
}

@booklet{Barjoseph95,
   Author = {Barjoseph, I and Finkelstein, G and Barad, S and Shtrikman, H and Levinson, Y},
   Title = {4-wave-mixing in modulation-doped gaas quantum-wells under
             strong magnetic-fields},
   Journal = {Physica Status Solidi B-basic Research},
   Volume = {188},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {457-463},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Barjoseph95}
}

@article{fds322480,
   Author = {Bar-Joseph, I and Finkelstein, G and Bar-Ad, S and Shtrikman, H and Levinson, Y},
   Title = {Four-wave mixing in modulation-doped GaAs quantum wells
             under strong magnetic fields},
   Journal = {Physica Status Solidi (B) Basic Solid State
             Physics},
   Volume = {188},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {457-463},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pssb.2221880143},
   Doi = {10.1002/pssb.2221880143},
   Key = {fds322480}
}

@booklet{Finkelstein95a,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Shtrikman, H and Bar-Joseph,
             I},
   Title = {Optical spectroscopy of a two-dimensional electron gas near
             the metal-insulator transition},
   Journal = {Physical Review Letters},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {976-979},
   Year = {1995},
   Abstract = {We report on optical measurements of a two-dimensional
             electron gas near the metal-insulator transition. We observe
             the appearance of excitons and negatively charged excitons,
             X-, at the onset of the transition. The fact that these
             excitons appear at a relatively large average electron
             density shows that transition is induced by localization of
             single electrons in the electrostatic potential fluctuations
             of the remote ionized donors.},
   Key = {Finkelstein95a}
}

@booklet{Finkelstein95,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Bar-Joseph, I},
   Title = {Charged excitons in GaAs quantum wells},
   Journal = {Nuovo Cimento della Societa Italiana di Fisica D - Condensed
             Matter, Atomic, Molecular and Chemical Physics,
             Biophysics},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {11-12},
   Pages = {1239-1245},
   Year = {1995},
   ISSN = {0392-6737},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02457195},
   Abstract = {We implement optical spectroscopy to study charged excitons
             (trions) in modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. We
             observe for the first time several new trions: the
             positively charged exciton, the light-hole negatively
             charged exciton and the triplet state of the negatively
             charged exciton. © 1995 Società Italiana di
             Fisica.},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF02457195},
   Key = {Finkelstein95}
}

@booklet{Barad94,
   Author = {Bar-Ad, S and Bar-Joseph, I and Finkelstein, G and Levinson,
             Y},
   Title = {Biexcitons in short-pulse optical experiments in strong
             magnetic fields in GaAs quantum wells},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {24},
   Pages = {18375-18381},
   Year = {1994},
   ISSN = {0163-1829},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.50.18375},
   Abstract = {We present time-resolved differential-absorption data for
             GaAs quantum wells, in which temporal oscillations
             originating in a biexcitonic pairing appear. We interpret
             the oscillations within a four-level model of the
             exciton-biexciton system, and discuss the cases of
             homogeneously and inhomogeneously broadened exciton
             absorption lines. Our differential absorption measurements
             in high magnetic fields normal to the quantum wells layers
             show that both the oscillations frequency and phase depend
             on the strength and direction of the magnetic field. The
             frequency change corresponds to the exciton Zeeman splitting
             in our samples. These findings are in excellent agreement
             with the predictions of the model, and thus verify its
             validity. © 1994 The American Physical Society.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.50.18375},
   Key = {Barad94}
}

@booklet{Finkelstein93,
   Author = {Finkelstein, G and Bar-Ad, S and Carmel, O and Bar-Joseph, I and Levinson, Y},
   Title = {Biexcitonic effects in transient nonlinear optical
             experiments in quantum wells},
   Journal = {Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials
             Physics},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {19},
   Pages = {12964-12967},
   Year = {1993},
   ISSN = {0163-1829},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.47.12964},
   Abstract = {We present a model for the nonlinear optical response of
             quantum wells, which includes biexcitons. We show that
             within this model, the interaction of two laser pulses,
             mediated by the nonlinear susceptibility, results in
             oscillations and in coupling between σ+ and σ- excitons.
             This explains the temporal behavior of the differential
             absorption and four-wave mixing in recent experiments [Phys.
             Rev. Lett. 68, 349 (1992); 68, 1880 (1992)]. The
             oscillations have a frequency equal to the biexciton binding
             energy, and are different from known interference and
             quantum beat phenomena. © 1993 The American Physical
             Society.},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.47.12964},
   Key = {Finkelstein93}
}


%% Papers Submitted   
@article{fds245936,
   Author = {Watson, AM and Zhang, X and Alcaraz de la Osa and R and Marcos Sanz and J and González, F and Moreno, F and Finkelstein, G and Liu, J and Everitt,
             HO},
   Title = {Rhodium nanoparticles for ultraviolet plasmonics.},
   Journal = {Nano Letters},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {1095-1100},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1530-6984},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl5040623},
   Abstract = {The nonoxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium is introduced
             for ultraviolet plasmonics. Planar tripods of 8 nm Rh
             nanoparticles, synthesized by a modified polyol reduction
             method, have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance
             near 330 nm. By attaching p-aminothiophenol, local
             field-enhanced Raman spectra and accelerated photodamage
             were observed under near-resonant ultraviolet illumination,
             while charge transfer simultaneously increased fluorescence
             for up to 13 min. The combined local field enhancement and
             charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward
             plasmonically enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis.},
   Doi = {10.1021/nl5040623},
   Key = {fds245936}
}