Publications of G. Allan Johnson    :chronological  combined listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds292752,
   Author = {Paxinos, G and Watson, C and Calabrese, E and Badea, A and Johnson,
             G},
   Title = {An MRI/DTI Atlas of the Rat Brain},
   Pages = {224 pages},
   Publisher = {Elsevier Academic Press},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {May},
   ISBN = {978-0-12-417313-2},
   Abstract = {MRI/DTI Atlas of the Rat Brain offers two major enhancements
             when compared with earlier attempts to make MRI/DTI rat
             brain atlases. First, the spatial resolution at 25μm is
             considerably higher than previous data published. Secondly,
             the comprehensive set of MRI/DTI contrasts provided has
             enabled the authors to identify more than 80% of structures
             identified in The Rat Brain in Stereotaxic
             Coordinates.},
   Key = {fds292752}
}

@book{fds268793,
   Author = {Badea, A and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Analytical Cellular Pathology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {205-227},
   Booktitle = {Studies in Health Technology and Informatics},
   Publisher = {IOS Press Ebooks},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {0926-9630},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22142643},
   Abstract = {MRI, one of the major clinical imaging modalities, has
             gained an important role in studying small animal models,
             e.g., rats and mice. But imaging rodents comes with
             challenges, since the image resolution needs to be ~
             3000-times higher to resolve anatomical details at a level
             comparable to clinical imaging. A resolution on the order of
             100 microns or less redefines MR imaging as MR microscopy.
             We discuss in this chapter the basic components of the MR
             imaging chain, with a particular emphasis on small animal
             imaging demands: from hardware design to basic physical
             principles of MR image formation, and contrast mechanisms.
             We discuss special considerations of animal preparation for
             imaging, and staining methods to enhance contrast. Attention
             is given to factors that increase sensitivity, including
             exogenous contrast agents, high performance radiofrequency
             detectors, and advanced MR encoding sequences. Among these,
             diffusion tensor imaging and tractography add novel
             information on white matter tracts, helping to better
             understand important aspects of development and
             neurodegeneration. These developments open avenues for
             efficient phenotyping of small animal models, in vivo - to
             include anatomical as well as functional estimates, or
             ex-vivo - with exquisite anatomical detail. The need for
             higher resolution results in larger image arrays that need
             to be processed efficiently. We discuss image-processing
             approaches for quantitative characterization of animal
             cohorts, and building population atlases. High throughput is
             essential for these methods to become practical. We discuss
             current trends for increasing detector performance, the use
             of cryoprobes, as well as strategies for imaging multiple
             animals at the same time. Ultimately, the development of
             highly specific probes, with the possibility to be used in
             multimodal imaging, will offer new insights into histology.
             MRM, alone or in combination with other imaging modalities,
             will increase the knowledge of fundamental biological
             processes, help understanding the genetic basis of human
             diseases, and test pharmacological interventions.},
   Doi = {10.3233/ACP-2011-0050},
   Key = {fds268793}
}


%% Papers Published   
@article{fds132726,
   Title = {1. C.F. Beaulieu, X. Zhou, G.P. Cofer, G.A. Johnson.
             Diffusion-Weighted MR Microscopy with Fast Spin-Echo.
             Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 30, 201-206
             (1993).},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds132726}
}

@article{fds132716,
   Title = {1. Cho ZH, Ro YM. Multipoint K-Space Mapping Technique.
             Reviewed for Magn Reson. in Med.},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds132716}
}

@article{fds174087,
   Author = {GA Johnson and SJ Boukma and PA Platz},
   Title = {2-mercaptobenzothiazole, an inhibitor of dopamine
             beta-hydroxylase.},
   Journal = {The Journal of pharmacy and pharmacology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {710-2},
   Year = {1970},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0022-3573},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain Chemistry • Dopamine • Heart
             • Metaraminol • Mice • Mixed Function
             Oxygenases • Motor Activity • Myocardium •
             Norepinephrine • Rats • Thiazoles • analysis
             • antagonists & inhibitors* • drug effects •
             pharmacology • pharmacology*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174087}
}

@booklet{Utz87,
   Author = {UTZ, JA and HERFKENS, RJ and JOHNSON, CD and SHIMAKAWA, A and PELC, N and GLOVER, G and JOHNSON, GA and SPRITZER, CE},
   Title = {2-SECOND MR IMAGES - COMPARISON WITH SPIN-ECHO IMAGES IN 29
             PATIENTS},
   Journal = {AJR. American journal of roentgenology},
   Volume = {148},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {629-633},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0361-803X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1987G131300036&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Utz87}
}

@article{fds132727,
   Title = {2. H. Benveniste, G. Johnson, in "Microcirculatory Stasis in
             the Brain" (M. Tomita, Mchedlishvili, W. Roseblum, W.D.
             Heiss, Y. Fukuuchi, Ed.), p. 369-376, Excerpta Medica,
             Amsterdam, 1993.},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds132727}
}

@article{fds132717,
   Title = {2. Hafner S, Kuhn W. NMR Imaging of Water Contentin Chips.
             Reviewed for Magn. Reson. Imaging.},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds132717}
}

@booklet{Stern89,
   Author = {STERN, RL and CLINE, HE and JOHNSON, GA and RAVIN,
             CE},
   Title = {3-DIMENSIONAL IMAGING OF THE THORACIC CAVITY},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {282-288},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1989U232200004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198904000-00005},
   Key = {Stern89}
}

@booklet{Mellin94,
   Author = {MELLIN, AF and COFER, GP and SMITH, BR and SUDDARTH, SA and HEDLUND, LW and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {3-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETIC-RESONANCE MICROANGIOGRAPHY OF RAT
             NEUROVASCULATURE},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {199-205},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1994NZ79300007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.1910320208},
   Key = {Mellin94}
}

@booklet{Bone86,
   Author = {BONE, SN and JOHNSON, GA and THOMPSON, MB},
   Title = {3-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETIC-RESONANCE MICROSCOPY OF THE
             DEVELOPING CHICK-EMBRYO},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {782-787},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1986E347800003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198610000-00003},
   Key = {Bone86}
}

@booklet{Suddarth91,
   Author = {SUDDARTH, SA and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {3-DIMENSIONAL MR MICROSCOPY WITH LARGE ARRAYS},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {132-141},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1991EZ54700013&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.1910180114},
   Key = {Suddarth91}
}

@booklet{Johnson87e,
   Author = {JOHNSON, GA and THOMPSON, MB and DRAYER, BP},
   Title = {3-DIMENSIONAL MRI MICROSCOPY OF THE NORMAL
             RAT-BRAIN},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {351-365},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1987G775900005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.1910040406},
   Key = {Johnson87e}
}

@booklet{Johnson86a,
   Author = {JOHNSON, GA and THOMPSON, MB and DRAYER, BP},
   Title = {3-DIMENSIONAL MRI MICROSCOPY OF THE RAT-BRAIN},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {S25-S25},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1986E000900109&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Johnson86a}
}

@booklet{Macfall95,
   Author = {MACFALL, IS and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {3-DIMENSIONAL ROOT-GROWTH, TURNOVER AND TRANSPORT AS SEEN
             WITH MAGNETIC-RESONANCE MICROSCOPY},
   Journal = {Plant physiology},
   Volume = {108},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {31-31},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0032-0889},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1995RE28900117&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Macfall95}
}

@booklet{Lester99a,
   Author = {Lester, DS and Lyon, RC and McGregor, GN and Engelhardt, RT and Schmued,
             LC and Johnson, GA and Johannessen, JN},
   Title = {3-Dimensional visualization of lesions in rat brain using
             magnetic resonance imaging microscopy.},
   Journal = {NeuroReport},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {737-741},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0959-4965},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10208540},
   Abstract = {High-resolution (< 50 microm) magnetic resonance imaging
             microscopy (MRM) has been used to identify brain regions and
             localization of excitotoxin-induced lesions in fixed rat
             brains, subsequently confirmed using standard histology. The
             anatomical extent of lesions identified by MRM was identical
             to that seen in histological sections and various
             histopathological changes could be visualized. In contrast
             to the time involved in preparing and examining histological
             sections, lesions in intact brains could be rapidly
             identified and visualized in three dimensions by examining
             digitally generated sections in any plane. This study shows
             that MRM has tremendous potential as a prescreening tool for
             neurotoxicity and neuropathology. These observations suggest
             that MRM has the potential to affect pathology much as
             conventional MRI has influenced clinical
             imaging.},
   Key = {Lester99a}
}

@article{fds132794,
   Author = {DS Lester and RC Lyon and GN McGregor and RT Engelhardt and LC Schmued and GA Johnson and JN Johannessen},
   Title = {3-Dimensional visualization of lesions in rat brain using
             magnetic resonance imaging microscopy.},
   Journal = {Neuroreport, ENGLAND},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {737-41},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0959-4965},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Brain Diseases •
             Histocytochemistry • Image Processing,
             Computer-Assisted • Kainic Acid • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging • Microscopy • Neurotoxins
             • Rats • analogs & derivatives • chemically
             induced • pathology • pathology* •
             toxicity},
   Abstract = {High-resolution (< 50 microm) magnetic resonance imaging
             microscopy (MRM) has been used to identify brain regions and
             localization of excitotoxin-induced lesions in fixed rat
             brains, subsequently confirmed using standard histology. The
             anatomical extent of lesions identified by MRM was identical
             to that seen in histological sections and various
             histopathological changes could be visualized. In contrast
             to the time involved in preparing and examining histological
             sections, lesions in intact brains could be rapidly
             identified and visualized in three dimensions by examining
             digitally generated sections in any plane. This study shows
             that MRM has tremendous potential as a prescreening tool for
             neurotoxicity and neuropathology. These observations suggest
             that MRM has the potential to affect pathology much as
             conventional MRI has influenced clinical
             imaging.},
   Key = {fds132794}
}

@article{fds132714,
   Title = {3. J.C.M. Hsu, G.A. Johnson, W.M. Smith K.A. Reimer, R.E.
             Ideker. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Chronic Myocardial
             Infarcts in Formalin Fixed Human Autopsy Specimens.
             Circulation 89:2133-2140 (1993).},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds132714}
}

@article{fds268810,
   Author = {Liu, C and Li, W and Wu, B and Jiang, Y and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {3D fiber tractography with susceptibility tensor
             imaging.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {1290-1298},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1095-9572},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21867759},
   Keywords = {Algorithms* • Animals • Brain • Diffusion
             Tensor Imaging • Image Enhancement • Image
             Interpretation, Computer-Assisted • Imaging,
             Three-Dimensional • Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL
             • Nerve Fibers, Myelinated • Pattern Recognition,
             Automated • Reproducibility of Results •
             Sensitivity and Specificity • cytology* • methods
             • methods* • ultrastructure*},
   Abstract = {Gradient-echo MRI has revealed anisotropic magnetic
             susceptibility in the brain white matter. This magnetic
             susceptibility anisotropy can be measured and characterized
             with susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). In this study, a
             method of fiber tractography based on STI is proposed and
             demonstrated in the mouse brain. STI experiments of
             perfusion-fixed mouse brains were conducted at 7.0T. The
             magnetic susceptibility tensor was calculated for each voxel
             with regularization and decomposed into its eigensystem. The
             major eigenvector is found to be aligned with the underlying
             fiber orientation. Following the orientation of the major
             eigenvector, we are able to map distinctive fiber pathways
             in 3D. As a comparison, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and
             DTI fiber tractography were also conducted on the same
             specimens. The relationship between STI and DTI fiber tracts
             was explored with similarities and differences identified.
             It is anticipated that the proposed method of STI
             tractography may provide a new way to study white matter
             fiber architecture. As STI tractography is based on physical
             principles that are fundamentally different from DTI, it may
             also be valuable for the ongoing validation of DTI
             tractography.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.07.096},
   Key = {fds268810}
}

@article{fds268850,
   Author = {Driehuys, B and Walker, J and Pollaro, J and Cofer, GP and Mistry, N and Schwartz, D and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {3He MRI in mouse models of asthma.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {58},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {893-900},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17969115},
   Keywords = {Animals • Asthma • Disease Models, Animal* •
             Helium • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Mice •
             Mice, Inbred BALB C • Mice, Inbred C57BL •
             methods* • pathology*},
   Abstract = {In the study of asthma, a vital role is played by mouse
             models, because knockout or transgenic methods can be used
             to alter disease pathways and identify therapeutic targets
             that affect lung function. Assessment of lung function in
             rodents by available methods is insensitive because these
             techniques lack regional specificity. A more sensitive
             method for evaluating lung function in human asthma patients
             uses hyperpolarized (HP) (3)He MRI before and after
             bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine (MCh). We now
             report the ability to perform such (3)He imaging of MCh
             response in mice, where voxels must be approximately 3000
             times smaller than in humans and (3)He diffusion becomes an
             impediment to resolving the airways. We show
             three-dimensional (3D) images that reveal airway structure
             down to the fifth branching and visualize ventilation at a
             resolution of 125 x 125 x 1000 microm(3). Images of
             ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice acquired after MCh show both
             airway closure and ventilation loss. To also observe the MCh
             response in naive mice, we developed a non-slice-selective
             2D protocol with 187 x 187 microm(2) resolution that was
             fast enough to record the MCh response and recovery with
             12-s temporal resolution. The extension of (3)He MRI to
             mouse models should make it a valuable translational tool in
             asthma research.},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.21306},
   Key = {fds268850}
}

@article{06059673317,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Fubara, B and Hedlund, LW and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {4-D micro-CT of the mouse heart.},
   Journal = {Molecular imaging : official journal of the Society for
             Molecular Imaging},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {110-116},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1535-3508},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16105509},
   Keywords = {Computerized tomography;Cardiology;Photons;Motion
             control;Biological organs;Optical resolving
             power;Blood;},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: Demonstrate noninvasive imaging methods for in vivo
             characterization of cardiac structure and function in mice
             using a micro-CT system that provides high photon fluence
             rate and integrated motion control. MATERIALS AND METHODS:
             Simultaneous cardiac- and respiratory-gated micro-CT was
             performed in C57BL/6 mice during constant intravenous
             infusion of a conventional iodinated contrast agent
             (Isovue-370), and after a single intravenous injection of a
             blood pool contrast agent (Fenestra VC). Multiple phases of
             the cardiac cycle were reconstructed with contrast to noise
             and spatial resolution sufficient for quantitative
             assessment of cardiac function. RESULTS: Contrast
             enhancement with Isovue-370 increased over time with a
             maximum of approximately 500 HU (aorta) and 900 HU (kidney
             cortex). Fenestra VC provided more constant enhancement over
             3 hr, with maximum enhancement of approximately 620 HU
             (aorta) and approximately 90 HU (kidney cortex). The maximum
             enhancement difference between blood and myocardium in the
             heart was approximately 250 HU for Isovue-370 and
             approximately 500 HU for Fenestra VC. In mice with Fenestra
             VC, volumetric measurements of the left ventricle were
             performed and cardiac function was estimated by ejection
             fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac output. CONCLUSION:
             Image quality with Fenestra VC was sufficient for
             morphological and functional studies required for a
             standardized method of cardiac phenotyping of the
             mouse.},
   Key = {06059673317}
}

@article{fds157102,
   Author = {CT Badea and B Fubara and LW Hedlund and GA Johnson},
   Title = {4-D micro-CT of the mouse heart.},
   Journal = {Molecular imaging : official journal of the Society for
             Molecular Imaging, United States},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {110-6},
   ISSN = {1535-3508},
   Keywords = {Animals • Contrast Media • Heart • Iodine
             • Iopamidol • Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL
             • Tomography, X-Ray Computed* •
             radiography*},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: Demonstrate noninvasive imaging methods for in vivo
             characterization of cardiac structure and function in mice
             using a micro-CT system that provides high photon fluence
             rate and integrated motion control. MATERIALS AND METHODS:
             Simultaneous cardiac- and respiratory-gated micro-CT was
             performed in C57BL/6 mice during constant intravenous
             infusion of a conventional iodinated contrast agent
             (Isovue-370), and after a single intravenous injection of a
             blood pool contrast agent (Fenestra VC). Multiple phases of
             the cardiac cycle were reconstructed with contrast to noise
             and spatial resolution sufficient for quantitative
             assessment of cardiac function. RESULTS: Contrast
             enhancement with Isovue-370 increased over time with a
             maximum of approximately 500 HU (aorta) and 900 HU (kidney
             cortex). Fenestra VC provided more constant enhancement over
             3 hr, with maximum enhancement of approximately 620 HU
             (aorta) and approximately 90 HU (kidney cortex). The maximum
             enhancement difference between blood and myocardium in the
             heart was approximately 250 HU for Isovue-370 and
             approximately 500 HU for Fenestra VC. In mice with Fenestra
             VC, volumetric measurements of the left ventricle were
             performed and cardiac function was estimated by ejection
             fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac output. CONCLUSION:
             Image quality with Fenestra VC was sufficient for
             morphological and functional studies required for a
             standardized method of cardiac phenotyping of the
             mouse.},
   Key = {fds157102}
}

@article{fds132728,
   Title = {4. X. Zhou, G.P. Cofer S. A. Suddarth, G. A. Johnson. High
             Field MR Microscopy Using Fast Spin Echoes. Magn Reson Med
             30:60-67 (1993).},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds132728}
}

@article{fds268820,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Johnston, SM and Qi, Y and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {4D micro-CT for cardiac and perfusion applications with view
             under sampling.},
   Journal = {Physics in Medicine and Biology},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {3351-3369},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1361-6560},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21558587},
   Keywords = {Animals • Artifacts • Four-Dimensional Computed
             Tomography • Heart • Lung • Mice •
             Perfusion Imaging • Phantoms, Imaging • X-Ray
             Microtomography • methods* • radiography •
             radiography*},
   Abstract = {Micro-CT is commonly used in preclinical studies to provide
             anatomical information. There is growing interest in
             obtaining functional measurements from 4D micro-CT. We
             report here strategies for 4D micro-CT with a focus on two
             applications: (i) cardiac imaging based on retrospective
             gating and (ii) pulmonary perfusion using multiple contrast
             injections/rotations paradigm. A dual source micro-CT system
             is used for image acquisition with a sampling rate of 20
             projections per second. The cardiac micro-CT protocol
             involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent.
             Fast scanning of free breathing mice is achieved using
             retrospective gating. The ECG and respiratory signals are
             used to sort projections into ten cardiac phases. The
             pulmonary perfusion protocol uses a conventional contrast
             agent (Isovue 370) delivered by a micro-injector in four
             injections separated by 2 min intervals to allow for
             clearance. Each injection is synchronized with the rotation
             of the animal, and each of the four rotations is started
             with an angular offset of 22.5 from the starting angle of
             the previous rotation. Both cardiac and perfusion protocols
             result in an irregular angular distribution of projections
             that causes significant streaking artifacts in
             reconstructions when using traditional filtered
             backprojection (FBP) algorithms. The reconstruction involves
             the use of the point spread function of the micro-CT system
             for each time point, and the analysis of the distribution of
             the reconstructed data in the Fourier domain. This enables
             us to correct for angular inconsistencies via deconvolution
             and identify regions where data is missing. The missing
             regions are filled with data from a high quality but
             temporally averaged prior image reconstructed with all
             available projections. Simulations indicate that
             deconvolution successfully removes the streaking artifacts
             while preserving temporal information. 4D cardiac micro-CT
             in a mouse was performed with adequate image quality at
             isotropic voxel size of 88 µm and 10 ms temporal
             resolution. 4D pulmonary perfusion images were obtained in a
             mouse at 176 µm and 687 ms temporal resolution. Compared
             with FBP reconstruction, the streak reduction ratio is 70%
             and the contrast to noise ratio is 2.5 times greater in the
             deconvolved images. The radiation dose associated with the
             proposed methods is in the range of a typical micro-CT dose
             (0.17 Gy for the cardiac study and 0.21 Gy for the perfusion
             study). The low dose 4D micro-CT imaging presented here can
             be applied in high-throughput longitudinal studies in a wide
             range of applications, including drug safety and
             cardiopulmonary phenotyping.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1088/0031-9155/56/11/011},
   Key = {fds268820}
}

@article{fds268815,
   Author = {Guo, X and Johnston, SM and Qi, Y and Johnson, GA and Badea,
             CT},
   Title = {4D micro-CT using fast prospective gating.},
   Journal = {Physics in Medicine and Biology},
   Volume = {57},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {257-271},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1361-6560},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22156062},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cardiac-Gated Imaging Techniques •
             Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography • Heart •
             Mice • Phantoms, Imaging • Rats • Rats,
             Sprague-Dawley • Respiratory-Gated Imaging Techniques
             • Time Factors • methods* •
             radiography},
   Abstract = {Micro-CT is currently used in preclinical studies to provide
             anatomical information. But, there is also significant
             interest in using this technology to obtain functional
             information. We report here a new sampling strategy for 4D
             micro-CT for functional cardiac and pulmonary imaging. Rapid
             scanning of free-breathing mice is achieved with fast
             prospective gating (FPG) implemented on a field programmable
             gate array. The method entails on-the-fly computation of
             delays from the R peaks of the ECG signals or the peaks of
             the respiratory signals for the triggering pulses.
             Projection images are acquired for all cardiac or
             respiratory phases at each angle before rotating to the next
             angle. FPG can deliver the faster scan time of retrospective
             gating (RG) with the regular angular distribution of
             conventional prospective gating for cardiac or respiratory
             gating. Simultaneous cardio-respiratory gating is also
             possible with FPG in a hybrid retrospective/prospective
             approach. We have performed phantom experiments to validate
             the new sampling protocol and compared the results from FPG
             and RG in cardiac imaging of a mouse. Additionally, we have
             evaluated the utility of incorporating respiratory
             information in 4D cardiac micro-CT studies with FPG. A
             dual-source micro-CT system was used for image acquisition
             with pulsed x-ray exposures (80 kVp, 100 mA, 10 ms). The
             cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal
             blood pool contrast agent containing 123 mg I ml(-1)
             delivered via a tail vein catheter in a dose of 0.01 ml
             g(-1) body weight. The phantom experiment demonstrates that
             FPG can distinguish the successive phases of phantom motion
             with minimal motion blur, and the animal study demonstrates
             that respiratory FPG can distinguish inspiration and
             expiration. 4D cardiac micro-CT imaging with FPG provides
             image quality superior to RG at an isotropic voxel size of
             88 μm and 10 ms temporal resolution. The acquisition time
             for either sampling approach is less than 5 min. The
             radiation dose associated with the proposed method is in the
             range of a typical micro-CT dose (256 mGy for the cardiac
             study). Ignoring respiration does not significantly affect
             anatomic information in cardiac studies. FPG can deliver
             short scan times with low-dose 4D micro-CT imaging without
             sacrificing image quality. FPG can be applied in
             high-throughput longitudinal studies in a wide range of
             applications, including drug safety and cardiopulmonary
             phenotyping.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1088/0031-9155/57/1/257},
   Key = {fds268815}
}

@article{fds268783,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Johnston, SM and Lin, M and Hedlund, LW and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {4D micro-CT-based perfusion imaging in small
             animals},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
   Volume = {7258},
   Year = {2009},
   ISSN = {1605-7422},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.811213},
   Abstract = {Quantitative in-vivo imaging of lung perfusion in rodents
             can provide critical information for preclinical studies.
             However, the combined challenges of high temporal and
             spatial resolution have made routine quantitative perfusion
             imaging difficult in rodents. We have recently developed a
             dual tube/detector micro-CT scanner that is well suited to
             capture first-pass kinetics of a bolus of contrast agent
             used to compute perfusion information. Our approach is based
             on the paradigm that the same time density curves can be
             reproduced in a number of consecutive, small (i.e. 50μL )
             injections of iodinated contrast agent at a series of
             different angles. This reproducibility is ensured by the
             high-level integration of the imaging components of our
             system, with a micro-injector, a mechanical ventilator, and
             monitoring applications. Sampling is controlled through a
             biological pulse sequence implemented in LabVIEW. Image
             reconstruction is based on a simultaneous algebraic
             reconstruction technique implemented on a GPU. The
             capabilities of 4D micro-CT imaging are demonstrated in
             studies on lung perfusion in rats. We report 4D micro-CT
             imaging in the rat lung with a heartbeat temporal resolution
             of 140 ms and reconstructed voxels of 88 μm. The approach
             can be readily extended to a wide range of important
             preclinical models, such as tumor perfusion and
             angiogenesis, and renal function. © 2009
             SPIE.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.811213},
   Key = {fds268783}
}

@article{fds268700,
   Author = {Xie, L and Qi, Y and Subashi, E and Liao, G and Miller-DeGraff, L and Jetten, AM and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {4D MRI of polycystic kidneys from rapamycin-treated
             Glis3-deficient mice.},
   Journal = {Nmr in Biomedicine},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {546-554},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0952-3480},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nbm.3281},
   Abstract = {Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a life-threatening
             disease that leads to a grotesque enlargement of the kidney
             and significant loss of function. Several imaging studies
             with MRI have demonstrated that cyst size in polycystic
             kidneys can determine disease severity and progression. In
             the present study, we found that, although kidney volume and
             cyst volume decreased with drug treatment, renal function
             did not improve with treatment. Here, we applied dynamic
             contrast-enhanced MRI to study PKD in a Glis3 (GLI-similar
             3)-deficient mouse model. Cysts from this model have a wide
             range of sizes and develop at an early age. To capture this
             crucial stage and assess cysts in detail, we imaged during
             early development (3-17 weeks) and applied high
             spatiotemporal resolution MRI (125 × 125 × 125 cubic
             microns every 7.7 s). A drug treatment with rapamycin
             (also known as sirolimus) was applied to determine whether
             disease progression could be halted. The effect and synergy
             (interaction) of aging and treatment were evaluated using an
             analysis of variance (ANOVA). Structural measurements,
             including kidney volume, cyst volume and cyst-to-kidney
             volume ratio, changed significantly with age. Drug treatment
             significantly decreased these metrics. Functional
             measurements of time-to-peak (TTP) mean and TTP variance
             were determined. TTP mean did not change with age, whereas
             TTP variance increased with age. Treatment with rapamycin
             generally did not affect these functional metrics.
             Synergistic effects of treatment and age were not found for
             any measurements. Together, the size and volume ratio of
             cysts decreased with drug treatment, whereas renal function
             remained the same. The quantification of renal structure and
             function with MRI can comprehensively assess the
             pathophysiology of PKD and response to treatment.},
   Doi = {10.1002/nbm.3281},
   Key = {fds268700}
}

@article{fds174275,
   Author = {GA Johnson and EG Kim and SJ Boukma},
   Title = {5-hydroxyindole levels in rat brain after inhibition of
             dopamine -hydroxylase.},
   Journal = {The Journal of pharmacology and experimental
             therapeutics},
   Volume = {180},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {539-46},
   Year = {1972},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0022-3565},
   Keywords = {Administration, Oral • Animals • Brain •
             Brain Chemistry • Circadian Rhythm • Disulfiram
             • Dopamine beta-Hydroxylase • Hydroxyindoleacetic
             Acid • Injections, Intraperitoneal • Male •
             Methyltyrosines • Mixed Function Oxygenases •
             Monoiodotyrosine • Norepinephrine • Pargyline
             • Rats • Rats, Inbred Strains • Serotonin
             • Thiazoles • Thiourea • Time Factors •
             administration & dosage • analysis • analysis*
             • antagonists & inhibitors • antagonists &
             inhibitors* • biosynthesis • drug effects •
             enzymology* • pharmacology • pharmacology*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174275}
}

@article{fds132729,
   Title = {5. X. Zhou, Z. P. Liang, G.P. Cofer, C.F. Beaulieu, S.A.
             Suddarth, G.A. Johnson. Reduction of Ringing and Blurring
             Artifacts in Fast Spin-Echo Images. J Magn Reson Imag
             3:803-807 (1993).},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds132729}
}

@article{fds132715,
   Title = {6. M.M. Henson, O.W. Henson, S.L. Gewalt, J.L. Wilson, G. A.
             Johnson. Imaging the Cochlea by MRM. Hearing Research
             75:75-80 (1994).},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds132715}
}

@article{fds132730,
   Title = {7. J. MacFall, P. Spaine, R. Doudrick, G. Johnson.
             Alterations in Growth and Water Transport Processes in
             Fusiform Rust Galls of Pine as Determined by Magnetic
             Resonance Microsopy. Phytopathology 84:288-293
             (1994).},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds132730}
}

@article{fds132731,
   Title = {8. B.R. Smith, G.A. Johnson, E.V. Groman, E.A. Linney.
             Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Mouse Embryos. Proc. Nat.
             Acad. Sci. USA 91:3530-3533 (1994).},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds132731}
}

@article{fds174091,
   Author = {GA Johnson and AE Kimberly},
   Title = {A Comparative Review of Current Methods for the
             Determination of Organic Matter in Sewage.},
   Journal = {Public health papers and reports},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {Pt 2},
   Pages = {97-108},
   Year = {1905},
   Language = {ENG},
   Key = {fds174091}
}

@article{fds174249,
   Author = {GA Johnson and AE Kimberly},
   Title = {A Comparative Review of Current Methods for the
             Determination of Organic Matter in Sewage.},
   Journal = {Public health papers and reports},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {Pt 2},
   Pages = {97-108},
   Year = {1905},
   ISSN = {0737-8769},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174249}
}

@article{fds204264,
   Author = {GA Johnson and JN Bloom and L Szczotka-Flynn and D Zauner and RL
             Tomsak},
   Title = {A comparative study of resident performance on standardized
             training examinations and the american board of
             ophthalmology written examination.},
   Journal = {Ophthalmology},
   Volume = {117},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {2435-9},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1549-4713},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2010.03.056},
   Keywords = {Adult • Certification • Clinical Competence •
             Cohort Studies • Education, Medical, Graduate •
             Educational Measurement* • Female • Humans •
             Internship and Residency • Licensure • Male •
             Ophthalmology • United States • Young Adult •
             education* • standards • standards*},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationships between
             ophthalmology resident performance on the United States
             Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), the Ophthalmic
             Knowledge Assessment Program (OKAP) exam and the American
             Board of Ophthalmology written qualifying examination
             (ABO-WQE). METHODS: Cohort study. METHODS: We included 76
             residents from 15 consecutive training classes (1991-2006)
             at 1 ophthalmologic residency training program. METHODS:
             Numeric scores on the USMLE Step 1 and OKAP examinations
             during the 3 years of residency, and first attempt pass rate
             on the ABO-WQE were recorded for 76 residents. Age and
             gender were also noted. Spearman's rank correlations and
             univariate and multivariate logistic analyses were performed
             to determine relevant associations. METHODS: First-time
             attempt pass rate on the ABO-WQE and/or successful
             completion of the ABO-WQE within 3 years of graduation from
             the residency program. RESULTS: The ABO-WQE first-attempt
             pass rate was 72.6%, consistent with the national average.
             Resident USMLE scores were not significantly associated with
             ABO-WQE performance. The ABO-WQE pass rate was significantly
             associated with OKAP examination scores during the 3
             residency years (year 1: odds ratio [OR], 8.85 and 95%
             confidence interval [CI] 1.82-42.79; year 2: OR, 5.28 and
             95% CI, 1.15-25.27; year 3: OR, 11.08 and 95% CI,
             1.86-68.96). Passing the OKAP examinations in all 3 years
             during residency training was associated with 5.43-fold
             increased odds of passing the ABO-WQE and failing all 3 OKAP
             examinations was associated with >9-fold lower odds of
             passing the ABO-WQE on the first attempt. CONCLUSIONS: Our
             results suggest that OKAP examination performance is a
             predictor of a resident's success in passing the ABO-WQE on
             the first attempt, as well as within 3 years of graduation
             from an ophthalmologic training program. Awareness of this
             association may permit identification of residents at risk
             for failing the ABO-WQE and encourage educational
             remediation to prevent this failure.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ophtha.2010.03.056},
   Key = {fds204264}
}

@article{fds268739,
   Author = {Subashi, E and Moding, EJ and Cofer, GP and MacFall, JR and Kirsch, DG and Qi, Y and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {A comparison of radial keyhole strategies for high spatial
             and temporal resolution 4D contrast-enhanced MRI in small
             animal tumor models.},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {022304},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0094-2405},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23387766},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI has been widely
             used as a quantitative imaging method for monitoring tumor
             response to therapy. The simultaneous challenges of
             increasing temporal and spatial resolution in a setting
             where the signal from the much smaller voxel is weaker have
             made this MR technique difficult to implement in
             small-animal imaging. Existing protocols employed in
             preclinical DCE-MRI acquire a limited number of slices
             resulting in potentially lost information in the third
             dimension. This study describes and compares a family of
             four-dimensional (3D spatial + time), projection
             acquisition, radial keyhole-sampling strategies that support
             high spatial and temporal resolution. METHODS: The 4D method
             is based on a RF-spoiled, steady-state, gradient-recalled
             sequence with minimal echo time. An interleaved 3D radial
             trajectory with a quasi-uniform distribution of points in
             k-space was used for sampling temporally resolved datasets.
             These volumes were reconstructed with three different
             k-space filters encompassing a range of possible radial
             keyhole strategies. The effect of k-space filtering on
             spatial and temporal resolution was studied in a 5 mM
             CuSO(4) phantom consisting of a meshgrid with 350-μm
             spacing and in 12 tumors from three cell lines (HT-29, LoVo,
             MX-1) and a primary mouse sarcoma model (three
             tumors∕group). The time-to-peak signal intensity was used
             to assess the effect of the reconstruction filters on
             temporal resolution. As a measure of heterogeneity in the
             third dimension, the authors analyzed the spatial
             distribution of the rate of transport (K(trans)) of the
             contrast agent across the endothelium barrier for several
             different types of tumors. RESULTS: Four-dimensional radial
             keyhole imaging does not degrade the system spatial
             resolution. Phantom studies indicate there is a maximum 40%
             decrease in signal-to-noise ratio as compared to a fully
             sampled dataset. T1 measurements obtained with the
             interleaved radial technique do not differ significantly
             from those made with a conventional Cartesian spin-echo
             sequence. A bin-by-bin comparison of the distribution of the
             time-to-peak parameter shows that 4D radial keyhole
             reconstruction does not cause significant temporal blurring
             when a temporal resolution of 9.9 s is used for the
             subsamples of the keyhole data. In vivo studies reveal
             substantial tumor heterogeneity in the third spatial
             dimension that may be missed with lower resolution imaging
             protocols. CONCLUSIONS: Volumetric keyhole imaging with
             projection acquisition provides a means to increase
             spatiotemporal resolution and coverage over that provided by
             existing 2D Cartesian protocols. Furthermore, there is no
             difference in temporal resolution between the higher spatial
             resolution keyhole reconstruction and the undersampled
             projection data. The technique allows one to measure complex
             heterogeneity of kinetic parameters with isotropic,
             microscopic spatial resolution.},
   Doi = {10.1118/1.4774050},
   Key = {fds268739}
}

@article{fds268786,
   Author = {Guo, X and Johnston, SM and Johnson, GA and Badea,
             CT},
   Title = {A comparison of sampling strategies for dual energy
             micro-CT},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
   Volume = {8313},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {1605-7422},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.911548},
   Abstract = {Micro-CT has become a powerful tool for small animal
             research. Many micro-CT applications require exogenous
             contrast agents, which are most commonly based on iodine.
             Despite advancements in contrast agents, single-energy
             micro-CT is sometimes limited in the separation of two
             different materials that share similar grayscale intensity
             values as in the case of bone and iodine. Dual energy
             micro-CT offers a solution to this separation problem, while
             eliminating the need for pre-injection scanning. Various
             dual energy micro-CT sampling strategies are possible,
             including 1) single source sequential scanning, 2)
             simultaneous dual source acquisition, or 3) single source
             with kVp switching. But, no commercial micro-CT system
             exists in which all these sampling strategies have been
             implemented. This study reports on the implementation and
             comparison of these scanning techniques on the same small
             animal imaging system. Furthermore, we propose a new
             sampling strategy that combines dual source and kVp
             switching. Post-sampling and reconstruction, a simple
             two-material dual energy decomposition was applied to
             differentiate iodine from bone. The results indicate the
             time differences and the potential problems associated with
             each sampling strategy. Dual source scanning allows for the
             fastest acquisition, but is prone to errors in decomposition
             associated with scattering and imperfect geometric alignment
             of the two imaging chains. KVp switching prevents these
             types of artifacts, but requires more time for sampling. The
             novel combination between the dual source and kVp switching
             has the potential to reduce sampling time and provide better
             decomposition performance. © 2012 Copyright Society of
             Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.911548},
   Key = {fds268786}
}

@article{fds174294,
   Author = {TL Rutledge and SA Kamelle and TD Tillmanns and NS Gould and JD Wright and DE Cohn and TJ Herzog and JS Rader and MA Gold and GA Johnson and JL
             Walker, RS Mannel and DS McMeekin},
   Title = {A comparison of stages IB1 and IB2 cervical cancers treated
             with radical hysterectomy. Is size the real
             difference?},
   Journal = {Gynecologic oncology},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {70-6},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0090-8258},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2004.07.027},
   Keywords = {Adult • Aged • Disease-Free Survival • Female
             • Follow-Up Studies • Humans • Hysterectomy
             • Lymph Node Excision • Lymph Nodes • Middle
             Aged • Neoplasm Recurrence, Local • Neoplasm
             Staging • Risk Factors • Treatment Outcome •
             Uterine Cervical Neoplasms • adverse effects •
             methods • pathology • pathology* • surgery
             • surgery*},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To compare stages IB1 and IB2 cervical cancers
             treated with radical hysterectomy (RH) and to define
             predictors of nodal status and recurrence. METHODS: Patients
             with stage IB cervical cancers undergoing RH between 1990
             and 2000 were evaluated and clinicopathological variables
             were abstracted. The perioperative complication rate,
             estimated blood loss (EBL), and OR time were also tabulated.
             Variables were analyzed using X(2) and t tests. Disease-free
             survival (DFS) was calculated by Kaplan-Meier method.
             Multivariate analysis was performed via stepwise logistic
             regression. Cox-proportional hazards were used to identify
             independent predictors of recurrence. RESULTS: RH was
             performed on 109 stage IB1 and 86 stage IB2 patients. Mean
             age, EBL, and perioperative complication rates were similar.
             Overall, 38 patients (14 IB1 vs. 24 IB2) had positive nodes
             (P = 0.01) including 9 patients with positive para-aortic
             nodes (2 IB1 and 7 IB2). Parametrial involvement (PI) and
             outer 2/3 depth of invasion (DOI) were significantly more
             common in the IB2 tumors as well. Patients with IB2 disease
             received adjuvant radiation more frequently than IB1
             patients (52% vs. 37%, P = 0.04). Univariate predictors of
             nodal status included lymphovascular space involvement
             (LVSI) (P = 0.001), DOI (P = 0.011), PI (P = 0.001), and
             stage (P = 0.011). Multivariate analysis identified only
             LVSI (OR 6.4, CI 2.4-17, P = 0. 0002) and PI (OR 8, CI
             3.1-20, P = 0. 0001) as independent predictors of positive
             nodes. With a median follow-up of 35 months, estimates of
             DFS revealed tumor size (P = 0.008), nodal status (P =
             0.0004), LVSI (P = 0.002), PI (P = 0.004), and DOI (P =
             0.0004) as significant univariate predictors. Neoadjuvant
             chemotherapy, age, grade, histology, and adjuvant radiation
             were not associated with recurrence. The significant
             independent predictors of DFS were LVSI (ROR 5.7, CI 2-16, P
             = 0.0064) and outer 2/3 DOI (OR 5.8, CI 2-20, P = 0.0029).
             Neither tumor size nor nodal status was a significant
             predictor of DFS. CONCLUSIONS: The prognosis in stage IB
             cervical cancer seems to be most influenced by presence of
             LVSI and DOI and not by tumor size as the staging criteria
             would suggest. These factors are best determined
             pathologically after radical hysterectomy. This report
             contains the largest comparison of IB1 and IB2 patients
             managed by RH. Tumor size failed to predict recurrence or
             nodal status when stratified by LVSI, DOI, and PI. Treatment
             decisions based on tumor size alone should be
             reconsidered.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ygyno.2004.07.027},
   Key = {fds174294}
}

@booklet{Murad90,
   Author = {S. Murad and L. C. Walker and G. A. Johnson and S. R.
             Pinnell},
   Title = {A comparison of the inhibitory potential of minoxidil and
             its structural analogs toward lysyl hydroxylase in cultured
             fibroblasts},
   Journal = {Clinical Research},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {A667 -- A667},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {Murad90}
}

@booklet{Murad90a,
   Author = {S. Murad and L. C. Walker and G. A. Johnson and S. R.
             Pinnell},
   Title = {A comparison of the inhibitory potential of minoxidil and
             its structural analogs toward lysyl hydroxylase in cultured
             fibroblasts},
   Journal = {Journal Of Investigative Dermatology},
   Volume = {94},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {557 -- 557},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {Murad90a}
}

@booklet{Rogers00,
   Author = {P. Rogers and P. A. Hailey and G. A. Johnson and V. A. Dight and C. Read and A. Shingler and P. Savage and T. Roche and J. Mondry},
   Title = {A comprehensive and flexible approach to the
             automated-dissolution testing of pharmaceutical drug
             products incorporating direct UV-vis fiber-optic analysis,
             on-line fluorescence analysis, and off-line storage
             options},
   Journal = {Laboratory Robotics And Automation},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {12 -- 22},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Rogers00}
}

@booklet{Hedlund81,
   Author = {Hedlund, LW and Jones, DP and Effmann, EL and Johnson, GA and Bates, WM and Beck, JW and Wolfe, W and Putman, CE},
   Title = {A computed tomographic study of the dog lung during
             hemorrhagic shock and after resuscitation.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {466-472},
   Year = {1981},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7319752},
   Abstract = {A shock model was used to explore the capability of computed
             tomography (CT) to detect changes in lung density during
             hypovolemia and after resuscitation. The same level of the
             lower thorax was scanned repeatedly during base-line, shock
             (aortic pressure 60 mmHg), and after resuscitation with shed
             blood. The average baseline CT number (+/- SEM) for 5 areas
             of interest for four prone dogs was -754 +/- 16 (air =
             -1000, water = 0). This decreased 7.4% to -810 +/- 15 (P
             less than .05) during shock. After resuscitation CT density
             was -773 +/- 17 or 2.5% less than baseline (P greater than
             .1). A dorsal to ventral gradient of increasing CT density
             during baseline was maintained in all five areas during
             shock and post-resuscitation. From baseline to shock there
             were also significant changes in heart rate, mean aortic
             pressure, cardiac output, and vascular volume. Extravascular
             lung volume after resuscitation was equal to baseline
             volume. We conclude that CT is sufficiently sensitive to
             detect rapid physiological changes leading to increased or
             decreased lung density.},
   Key = {Hedlund81}
}

@article{fds132854,
   Author = {LW Hedlund and DP Jones and EL Effmann and GA Johnson and WM Bates and JW
             Beck, W Wolfe and CE Putman},
   Title = {A computed tomographic study of the dog lung during
             hemorrhagic shock and after resuscitation.},
   Journal = {Investigative radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {466-72},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   Keywords = {Animals • Dogs • Hemodynamic Processes • Lung
             • Resuscitation* • Shock, Hemorrhagic •
             Tomography, X-Ray Computed* • physiopathology •
             radiography*},
   Abstract = {A shock model was used to explore the capability of computed
             tomography (CT) to detect changes in lung density during
             hypovolemia and after resuscitation. The same level of the
             lower thorax was scanned repeatedly during base-line, shock
             (aortic pressure 60 mmHg), and after resuscitation with shed
             blood. The average baseline CT number (+/- SEM) for 5 areas
             of interest for four prone dogs was -754 +/- 16 (air =
             -1000, water = 0). This decreased 7.4% to -810 +/- 15 (P
             less than .05) during shock. After resuscitation CT density
             was -773 +/- 17 or 2.5% less than baseline (P greater than
             .1). A dorsal to ventral gradient of increasing CT density
             during baseline was maintained in all five areas during
             shock and post-resuscitation. From baseline to shock there
             were also significant changes in heart rate, mean aortic
             pressure, cardiac output, and vascular volume. Extravascular
             lung volume after resuscitation was equal to baseline
             volume. We conclude that CT is sufficiently sensitive to
             detect rapid physiological changes leading to increased or
             decreased lung density.},
   Key = {fds132854}
}

@booklet{Stude84,
   Author = {STUDE, R and HEDLUND, L and JOHNSON, GA and THOMPSON,
             WM},
   Title = {A CT-EVALUATION OF 3 HEPATOBILIARY CONTRAST
             AGENTS},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {S40-S40},
   Year = {1984},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1984TL42800179&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198409000-00184},
   Key = {Stude84}
}

@article{fds268697,
   Author = {Calabrese, E and Badea, A and Cofer, G and Qi, Y and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {A Diffusion MRI Tractography Connectome of the Mouse Brain
             and Comparison with Neuronal Tracer Data.},
   Journal = {Cerebral Cortex},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {4628-4637},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1047-3211},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/10325 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {Interest in structural brain connectivity has grown with the
             understanding that abnormal neural connections may play a
             role in neurologic and psychiatric diseases. Small animal
             connectivity mapping techniques are particularly important
             for identifying aberrant connectivity in disease models.
             Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging tractography can
             provide nondestructive, 3D, brain-wide connectivity maps,
             but has historically been limited by low spatial resolution,
             low signal-to-noise ratio, and the difficulty in estimating
             multiple fiber orientations within a single image voxel.
             Small animal diffusion tractography can be substantially
             improved through the combination of ex vivo MRI with
             exogenous contrast agents, advanced diffusion acquisition
             and reconstruction techniques, and probabilistic fiber
             tracking. Here, we present a comprehensive, probabilistic
             tractography connectome of the mouse brain at microscopic
             resolution, and a comparison of these data with a neuronal
             tracer-based connectivity data from the Allen Brain Atlas.
             This work serves as a reference database for future
             tractography studies in the mouse brain, and demonstrates
             the fundamental differences between tractography and
             neuronal tracer data.},
   Doi = {10.1093/cercor/bhv121},
   Key = {fds268697}
}

@article{fds268695,
   Author = {Calabrese, E and Badea, A and Coe, CL and Lubach, GR and Shi, Y and Styner,
             MA and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {A diffusion tensor MRI atlas of the postmortem rhesus
             macaque brain.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {117},
   Pages = {408-416},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.05.072},
   Abstract = {The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is the most widely used
             nonhuman primate for modeling the structure and function of
             the brain. Brain atlases, and particularly those based on
             magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have become important
             tools for understanding normal brain structure, and for
             identifying structural abnormalities resulting from disease
             states, exposures, and/or aging. Diffusion tensor imaging
             (DTI)-based MRI brain atlases are widely used in both human
             and macaque brain imaging studies because of the unique
             contrasts, quantitative diffusion metrics, and diffusion
             tractography that they can provide. Previous MRI and DTI
             atlases of the rhesus brain have been limited by low
             contrast and/or low spatial resolution imaging. Here we
             present a microscopic resolution MRI/DTI atlas of the rhesus
             brain based on 10 postmortem brain specimens. The atlas
             includes both structural MRI and DTI image data, a detailed
             three-dimensional segmentation of 241 anatomic structures,
             diffusion tractography, cortical thickness estimates, and
             maps of anatomic variability among atlas specimens. This
             atlas incorporates many useful features from previous work,
             including anatomic label nomenclature and ontology, data
             orientation, and stereotaxic reference frame, and further
             extends prior analyses with the inclusion of high-resolution
             multi-contrast image data.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.05.072},
   Key = {fds268695}
}

@article{fds268754,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Johnston, S and Johnson, B and Lin, M and Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {A dual micro-CT system for small animal imaging - art. no.
             691342},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical
             Engineering},
   Volume = {6913},
   Pages = {91342-91342},
   Year = {2008},
   ISBN = {978-0-8194-7097-3},
   ISSN = {0277-786X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000256660300136&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.772303},
   Key = {fds268754}
}

@article{fds268814,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Johnston, S and Johnson, B and Lin, M and Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {A dual micro-CT system for small animal imaging.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical
             Engineering},
   Volume = {6913},
   Pages = {691342},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0277-786X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22049304},
   Abstract = {Micro-CT is a non-invasive imaging modality usually used to
             assess morphology in small animals. In our previous work, we
             have demonstrated that functional micro-CT imaging is also
             possible. This paper describes a dual micro-CT system with
             two fixed x-ray/detectors developed to address such
             challenging tasks as cardiac or perfusion studies in small
             animals. A two-tube/detector system ensures simultaneous
             acquisition of two projections, thus reducing scanning time
             and the number of contrast injections in perfusion studies
             by a factor of two. The system is integrated with software
             developed in-house for cardio-respiratory monitoring and
             gating. The sampling geometry was optimized for 88 microns
             in such a way that the geometric blur of the focal spot
             matches the Nyquist sample at the detector. A geometric
             calibration procedure allows one to combine projection data
             from the two chains into a single reconstructed volume.
             Image quality was measured in terms of spatial resolution,
             uniformity, noise, and linearity. The modulation transfer
             function (MTF) at 10% is 3.4 lp/mm for single detector
             reconstructions and 2.3 lp/mm for dual tube/detector
             reconstructions. We attribute this loss in spatial
             resolution to the compounding of slight errors in the
             separate single chain calibrations. The dual micro-CT system
             is currently used in studies for morphological and
             functional imaging of both rats and mice.},
   Language = {ENG},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.772303},
   Key = {fds268814}
}

@booklet{Zhou98,
   Author = {Zhou, X and Liang, ZP and Gewalt, SL and Cofer, GP and Lauterbur, PC and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {A fast spin echo technique with circular
             sampling.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {23-27},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9438433},
   Abstract = {This paper presents a fast spin echo (FSE) imaging method
             that employs circular sampling of k-space. The technique has
             been implemented on a 2 Tesla imaging system and validated
             on both phantoms and living animals. Experimental studies
             have shown that circular sampling can produce artifact-free
             FSE images without the need of phase correction. Although
             not fully explored, preliminary results also show that
             circular sampling may have advantages over the conventional
             rectilinear FSE in signal-to-noise ratio and imaging
             efficiency. A major disadvantage is the increased
             sensitivity to off-resonance effects. The authors expect
             that the FSE technique with circular sampling will find its
             applications in magnetic resonance microscopy,
             neuro-functional imaging, and real-time dynamic
             studies.},
   Key = {Zhou98}
}

@article{fds132829,
   Author = {X Zhou and ZP Liang and SL Gewalt and GP Cofer and PC Lauterbur and GA
             Johnson},
   Title = {A fast spin echo technique with circular
             sampling.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the
             Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of
             Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {23-7},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Echo-Planar Imaging • Image
             Processing, Computer-Assisted • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging • Models, Theoretical • Phantoms, Imaging*
             • Rats • Sensitivity and Specificity •
             anatomy & histology* • instrumentation • methods
             • methods*},
   Abstract = {This paper presents a fast spin echo (FSE) imaging method
             that employs circular sampling of k-space. The technique has
             been implemented on a 2 Tesla imaging system and validated
             on both phantoms and living animals. Experimental studies
             have shown that circular sampling can produce artifact-free
             FSE images without the need of phase correction. Although
             not fully explored, preliminary results also show that
             circular sampling may have advantages over the conventional
             rectilinear FSE in signal-to-noise ratio and imaging
             efficiency. A major disadvantage is the increased
             sensitivity to off-resonance effects. The authors expect
             that the FSE technique with circular sampling will find its
             applications in magnetic resonance microscopy,
             neuro-functional imaging, and real-time dynamic
             studies.},
   Key = {fds132829}
}

@booklet{Johnson82a,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {A generalization of n-matrices},
   Journal = {Linear Algebra And Its Applications},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {DEC},
   Pages = {201 -- 217},
   Year = {1982},
   Key = {Johnson82a}
}

@article{fds268872,
   Author = {de Lin, M and Ning, L and Badea, CT and Mistry, NN and Qi, Y and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {A high-precision contrast injector for small animal x-ray
             digital subtraction angiography.},
   Journal = {IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {1082-1091},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0018-9294},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18334400},
   Keywords = {Angiography, Digital Subtraction • Animals •
             Contrast Media • Equipment Design • Equipment
             Failure Analysis • Iopamidol • Mice •
             Microinjections • Radiographic Image Enhancement •
             Reproducibility of Results • Sensitivity and
             Specificity • administration & dosage •
             administration & dosage* • instrumentation* •
             methods • veterinary*},
   Abstract = {The availability of genetically altered animal models of
             human disease for basic research has generated great
             interest in new imaging methodologies. Digital subtraction
             angiography (DSA) offers an appealing approach to functional
             imaging in small animals because of the high spatial and
             temporal resolution, and the ability to visualize and
             measure blood flow. The micro-injector described here meets
             crucial performance parameters to ensure optimal vessel
             enhancement without significantly increasing the total blood
             volume or producing overlap of enhanced structures. The
             micro-injector can inject small, reproducible volumes of
             contrast agent at high flow rates with computer-controlled
             timing synchronized to cardiopulmonary activity. Iterative
             bench-top and live animal experiments with both rat and
             mouse have been conducted to evaluate the performance of
             this computer-controlled micro-injector, a first
             demonstration of a new device designed explicitly for the
             unique requirements of DSA in small animals. Injection
             protocols were optimized and screened for potential
             physiological impact. For the optimized protocols, we found
             that changes in the time-density curves for representative
             regions of interest in the thorax were due primarily to
             physiological changes, independent of micro-injector
             parameters.},
   Doi = {10.1109/TBME.2007.909541},
   Key = {fds268872}
}

@article{fds268703,
   Author = {Angeli, S and Befera, N and Peyrat, J-M and Calabrese, E and Johnson,
             GA and Constantinides, C},
   Title = {A high-resolution cardiovascular magnetic resonance
             diffusion tensor map from ex-vivo C57BL/6 murine
             hearts.},
   Journal = {Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance},
   Volume = {16},
   Pages = {77},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1097-6647},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-014-0077-x},
   Abstract = {The complex cardiac fiber structural organization and
             spatial arrangement of cardiomyocytes in laminar sheetlets
             contributes greatly to cardiac functional and contractile
             ejection patterns. This study presents the first
             comprehensive, ultra-high resolution, fully quantitative
             statistical tensor map of the fixed murine heart at
             isotropic resolution of 43 μm using diffusion tensor (DT)
             cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR).Imaging was
             completed in approximately 12 hours using a six-directional
             encoding scheme, in five ex vivo healthy C57BL/6 mouse
             hearts. The tensor map constructed from this data provides
             an average description of the murine fiber architecture
             visualized with fiber tractography, and its population
             variability, using the latest advances in image tensor
             analysis and statistics.Results show that non-normalized
             cardiac tensor maps are associated with mean fractional
             anisotropy of 0.25 ± 0.07 and mean diffusivity of 8.9
             ± 1.6 × 10⁻⁴mm²/s. Moreover, average
             mid-ventricular helical angle distributions ranged between
             -41 ± 3° and +52 ± 5° and were highly correlated
             with transmural depth, in agreement with prior published
             results in humans and canines. Calculated variabilities of
             local myocyte orientations were 2.0° and 1.4°. Laminar
             sheet orientation variability was found to be less stable at
             2.6°. Despite such variations, the murine heart seems to be
             highly structured, particularly when compared to canines and
             humans.This tensor map has the potential to yield an
             accurate mean representation and identification of common or
             unique features of the cardiac myocyte architecture, to
             establish a baseline standard reference of DTI indices, and
             to improve detection of biomarkers, especially in
             pathological states or post-transgenetic
             modifications.},
   Doi = {10.1186/s12968-014-0077-x},
   Key = {fds268703}
}

@booklet{Hurlston99,
   Author = {Hurlston, SE and Brey, WW and Suddarth, SA and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {A high-temperature superconducting Helmholtz probe for
             microscopy at 9.4 T.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1032-1038},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10332887},
   Abstract = {The design and operation of a high-temperature
             superconducting (HTS) probe for magnetic resonance
             microscopy (MRM) at 400 MHz are presented. The design of the
             probe includes a Helmholtz coil configuration and a stable
             open-cycle cooling mechanism. Characterization of coil
             operating parameters is presented to demonstrate the
             suitability of cryo-cooled coils for MRM. Specifically, the
             performance of the probe is evaluated by comparison of
             signal-to-noise (SNR) performance with that of a copper
             Helmholtz pair, analysis of B1 field homogeneity, and
             quantification of thermal stability. Images are presented to
             demonstrate the SNR advantage of the probe for typical MRM
             applications.},
   Key = {Hurlston99}
}

@article{fds132839,
   Author = {SE Hurlston and WW Brey and SA Suddarth and GA Johnson},
   Title = {A high-temperature superconducting Helmholtz probe for
             microscopy at 9.4 T.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the
             Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of
             Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1032-8},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   Keywords = {Algorithms • Aluminum Oxide • Animals •
             Artifacts • Cold • Copper • Equipment Design
             • Heat • Helium • Image Processing,
             Computer-Assisted • Magnetic Resonance Imaging •
             Mice • Microscopy • Phantoms, Imaging • Radio
             Waves • Ruthenium Compounds • Sensitivity and
             Specificity • Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
             • Thermal Conductivity • instrumentation •
             instrumentation*},
   Abstract = {The design and operation of a high-temperature
             superconducting (HTS) probe for magnetic resonance
             microscopy (MRM) at 400 MHz are presented. The design of the
             probe includes a Helmholtz coil configuration and a stable
             open-cycle cooling mechanism. Characterization of coil
             operating parameters is presented to demonstrate the
             suitability of cryo-cooled coils for MRM. Specifically, the
             performance of the probe is evaluated by comparison of
             signal-to-noise (SNR) performance with that of a copper
             Helmholtz pair, analysis of B1 field homogeneity, and
             quantification of thermal stability. Images are presented to
             demonstrate the SNR advantage of the probe for typical MRM
             applications.},
   Key = {fds132839}
}

@booklet{Black93,
   Author = {Black, RD and Early, TA and Roemer, PB and Mueller, OM and Mogro-Campero, A and Turner, LG and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {A high-temperature superconducting receiver for nuclear
             magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Science},
   Volume = {259},
   Number = {5096},
   Pages = {793-795},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0036-8075},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8430331},
   Abstract = {A high-temperature superconducting-receiver system for use
             in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy is described.
             The scaling behavior of sources of sample and receiver-coil
             noise is analyzed, and it is demonstrated that Johnson, or
             thermal, noise in the receiver coil is the factor that
             limits resolution. The behavior of superconductors in the
             environment of an NMR experiment is examined, and a
             prototypical system for imaging biological specimens is
             discussed. Preliminary spin-echo images are shown, and the
             ultimate limits of the signal-to-noise ratio of the probe
             are investigated.},
   Key = {Black93}
}

@article{fds132865,
   Author = {RD Black and TA Early and PB Roemer and OM Mueller and A Mogro-Campero and LG Turner and GA Johnson},
   Title = {A high-temperature superconducting receiver for nuclear
             magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Science (New York, N.Y.), UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {259},
   Number = {5096},
   Pages = {793-5},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0036-8075},
   Keywords = {Animals • Humans • Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
             • Models, Theoretical • instrumentation* •
             methods},
   Abstract = {A high-temperature superconducting-receiver system for use
             in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy is described.
             The scaling behavior of sources of sample and receiver-coil
             noise is analyzed, and it is demonstrated that Johnson, or
             thermal, noise in the receiver coil is the factor that
             limits resolution. The behavior of superconductors in the
             environment of an NMR experiment is examined, and a
             prototypical system for imaging biological specimens is
             discussed. Preliminary spin-echo images are shown, and the
             ultimate limits of the signal-to-noise ratio of the probe
             are investigated.},
   Key = {fds132865}
}

@article{fds174305,
   Author = {SC Walker and T Shin and GM Zaunbrecher and JE Romano and GA Johnson and FW
             Bazer, JA Piedrahita},
   Title = {A highly efficient method for porcine cloning by nuclear
             transfer using in vitro-matured oocytes.},
   Journal = {Cloning and stem cells},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {105-12},
   Year = {2002},
   ISSN = {1536-2302},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/153623002320253283},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cloning, Organism • Culture Techniques
             • Embryo Transfer • Female • Microsatellite
             Repeats • Nuclear Transfer Techniques* • Oocytes
             • Pregnancy • Sex Ratio • Swine •
             cytology* • genetics • genetics* •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {To date, the efficiency of pig cloning by nuclear transfer
             of somatic cell nuclei has been extremely low, with less
             than 1% of transferred embryos surviving to term. Even the
             utilization of complex procedures such as two rounds of
             nuclear transfer has not resulted in greater overall
             efficiencies. As a result, the applicability of the
             technology for the generation of transgenic and cloned
             animals has not moved forward rapidly. We report here a
             simple nuclear transfer protocol, utilizing commercially
             available in vitro-matured oocytes, that results in greater
             than 5% overall cloning efficiency. Of five recipients
             receiving nuclear transfer embryos produced with a fetal
             fibroblast cell line as nuclear donor, all five established
             pregnancies by day 28 (100%), and 4/5 (80%) went to term.
             Efficiencies for each transfer were 7% (9 piglets/128
             doublets transferred), 5% (5/100), 12% (7/59), and 6.6%
             (7/106). The overall efficiency in all recipients was 5.5%
             and in pregnant recipients 7.7%, with a total of 28 cloned
             piglets produced. With the average fusion rate being 58%,
             the percentage of fused doublets producing a live piglet
             approached 12%. The method described here can be undertaken
             by a single micromanipulator at a reasonable cost, and
             should facilitate the broad utilization of porcine cloning
             technology in transgenic and nontransgenic
             applications.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1089/153623002320253283},
   Key = {fds174305}
}

@article{fds174077,
   Author = {DJ Waldon and MF Kubicek and GA Johnson and AE Buhl},
   Title = {A HPLC-based chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay for
             assessing hair growth: comparison of the sensitivity of UV
             and fluorescence detection.},
   Journal = {European journal of clinical chemistry and clinical
             biochemistry : journal of the Forum of European Clinical
             Chemistry Societies},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {41-5},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0939-4974},
   Keywords = {Animals • Chloramphenicol O-Acetyltransferase •
             Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid* • Culture
             Techniques • Gene Expression • Hair •
             Keratins • Mice • Mice, Transgenic • Promoter
             Regions, Genetic • Sensitivity and Specificity •
             Spectrometry, Fluorescence • Spectrophotometry,
             Ultraviolet • analysis* • genetics •
             genetics* • growth & development*},
   Abstract = {In our attempt to measure hair growth by hair-specific
             markers, we used transgenic mice to express the
             chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene under the control of
             an ultrahigh sulphur keratin gene promoter. To quantitate
             expression of the keratin gene, we required a
             chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay which could measure
             enzyme activity in a single follicle and also could be used
             to assay a large number of samples without loss of
             sensitivity. We achieved this objective by utilizing a
             fluorescent substrate for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase.
             With HPLC-fluorescence detection, this substrate provides a
             sensitivity of less than 1 x 10(-13) mol, which is 1000
             times greater than that achievable with HPLC-UV detection in
             cultured follicles. Further, the assay was automated to
             facilitate the analysis of more than 100 samples/day. It
             should be possible to apply this fluorescent assay to a
             number of cell or tissue studies.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174077}
}

@booklet{Waldon93a,
   Author = {D. J. Waldon and M. F. Kubicek and G. A. Johnson and A. E.
             Buhl},
   Title = {A hplc-based chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay for
             assessing hair-growth - comparison of the sensitivity of uv
             and fluorescence detection},
   Journal = {European Journal Of Clinical Chemistry And Clinical
             Biochemistry},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {41 -- 45},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {Waldon93a}
}

@article{fds312813,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {A LabVIEW Platform for Preclinical Imaging Using Digital
             Subtraction Angiography and Micro-CT.},
   Journal = {Journal of Medical Engineering},
   Volume = {2013},
   Number = {581617},
   Pages = {581617},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/11992 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {CT and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) are ubiquitous
             in the clinic. Their preclinical equivalents are valuable
             imaging methods for studying disease models and treatment.
             We have developed a dual source/detector X-ray imaging
             system that we have used for both micro-CT and DSA studies
             in rodents. The control of such a complex imaging system
             requires substantial software development for which we use
             the graphical language LabVIEW (National Instruments,
             Austin, TX, USA). This paper focuses on a LabVIEW platform
             that we have developed to enable anatomical and functional
             imaging with micro-CT and DSA. Our LabVIEW applications
             integrate and control all the elements of our system
             including a dual source/detector X-ray system, a mechanical
             ventilator, a physiological monitor, and a power
             microinjector for the vascular delivery of X-ray contrast
             agents. Various applications allow cardiac- and
             respiratory-gated acquisitions for both DSA and micro-CT
             studies. Our results illustrate the application of DSA for
             cardiopulmonary studies and vascular imaging of the liver
             and coronary arteries. We also show how DSA can be used for
             functional imaging of the kidney. Finally, the power of 4D
             micro-CT imaging using both prospective and retrospective
             gating is shown for cardiac imaging.},
   Doi = {10.1155/2013/581617},
   Key = {fds312813}
}

@article{fds268870,
   Author = {Mukundan, S and Ghaghada, KB and Badea, CT and Kao, C-Y and Hedlund, LW and Provenzale, JM and Johnson, GA and Chen, E and Bellamkonda, RV and Annapragada, A},
   Title = {A liposomal nanoscale contrast agent for preclinical CT in
             mice.},
   Journal = {AJR. American journal of roentgenology},
   Volume = {186},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {300-307},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0361-803X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16423931},
   Keywords = {Animals • Contrast Media • Image Processing,
             Computer-Assisted • Liposomes • Mice •
             Radiography, Thoracic • Tomography, X-Ray Computed*
             • Triiodobenzoic Acids • chemistry •
             pharmacokinetics*},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to determine if an
             iodinated, liposomal contrast agent could be used for
             high-resolution, micro-CT of low-contrast, small-size
             vessels in a murine model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A
             second-generation, liposomal blood pool contrast agent
             encapsulating a high concentration of iodine (83-105 mg
             I/mL) was evaluated. A total of five mice weighing between
             20 and 28 g were infused with equivalent volume doses (500
             microL of contrast agent/25 g of mouse weight) and imaged
             with our micro-CT system for intervals of up to 240 min
             postinfusion. The animals were anesthetized, mechanically
             ventilated, and vital signs monitored allowing for
             simultaneous cardiac and respiratory gating of image
             acquisition. RESULTS: Initial enhancement of about 900 H in
             the aorta was obtained, which decreased to a plateau level
             of approximately 800 H after 2 hr. Excellent contrast
             discrimination was shown between the myocardium and cardiac
             blood pool (650-700 H). No significant nephrogram was
             identified, indicating the absence of renal clearance of the
             agent. CONCLUSION: The liposomal-based iodinated contrast
             agent shows long residence time in the blood pool, very high
             attenuation within submillimeter vessels, and no significant
             renal clearance rendering it an effective contrast agent for
             murine vascular imaging using a micro-CT
             scanner.},
   Doi = {10.2214/AJR.05.0523},
   Key = {fds268870}
}

@article{fds268784,
   Author = {Johnston, SM and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT},
   Title = {A material decomposition method for dual energy
             micro-CT},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
   Volume = {7258},
   Year = {2009},
   ISSN = {1605-7422},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.811673},
   Abstract = {The attenuation of x-rays in matter is dependent on the
             energy of the x-rays and the atomic composition of the
             matter. Attenuation measurements at multiple x-ray energies
             can be used to improve the identification of materials. We
             present a method to estimate the fractional composition of
             three materials in an object from x-ray CT measurements at
             two different energies. The energies can be collected from
             measurements from a single source-detector system at two
             points in time, or from a dual source-detector system at one
             point in time. This method sets up a linear system of
             equations from the measurements and finds the solution
             through a geometric construction of the inverse matrix
             equation. This method enables the estimation of the blood
             fraction within a region of living tissue in which blood
             containing an iodinated contrast agent is mixed with two
             other materials. We verified this method using x-ray CT
             simulations implemented in MATLAB, investigated the
             parameters needed to optimize the estimation, and then
             applied the method to a mouse model of lung cancer. A direct
             application of this method is the estimation of blood
             fraction in lung tumors in preclinical studies. This work
             was performed at the Duke Center for In Vivo Microscopy, an
             NCRR/NCI National Resource (P41 RR005959/U24 CA092656), and
             also supported by NCI R21 CA124584. ©2009
             SPIE.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.811673},
   Key = {fds268784}
}

@article{fds268847,
   Author = {Shofer, S and Badea, C and Auerbach, S and Schwartz, DA and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {A micro-computed tomography-based method for the measurement
             of pulmonary compliance in healthy and bleomycin-exposed
             mice.},
   Journal = {Experimental Lung Research (Informa)},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {3-4},
   Pages = {169-183},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0190-2148},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17558678},
   Keywords = {Animals • Bleomycin • Disease Models, Animal
             • Female • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
             • Lung • Lung Compliance* • Male • Mice
             • Mice, Inbred C57BL • Pulmonary Fibrosis •
             Reproducibility of Results • Time Factors •
             Tomography, X-Ray Computed • chemically induced •
             methods* • pathology • physiopathology •
             radiography*},
   Abstract = {Micro-computed tomography (microCT) is being increasingly
             used to examine small animal models of pulmonary injury. The
             authors have developed a microCT technique suitable for the
             determination of pulmonary compliance in injured mice. Lung
             volumes in normal mice were radiographically determined at
             end-inspiration and end-expiration and pulmonary compliance
             was calculated at 2 time points 2 weeks apart, whereas a
             second group of mice were given bleomycin and imaged 3 weeks
             following drug administration. Compliance measurements were
             validated using a commercially available ventilator system.
             MicroCT pulmonary compliance measurements are suitable for
             longitudinal measurements, and correlate with physiologic
             measurements of pulmonary compliance.},
   Doi = {10.1080/01902140701364458},
   Key = {fds268847}
}

@article{fds268854,
   Author = {Shofer, S and Badea, C and Qi, Y and Potts, E and Foster, WM and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {A micro-CT analysis of murine lung recruitment in
             bleomycin-induced lung injury.},
   Journal = {Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. :
             1985)},
   Volume = {105},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {669-677},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {8750-7587},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18566189},
   Keywords = {Animals • Antibiotics, Antineoplastic* •
             Bleomycin* • Collagen • Female • Image
             Processing, Computer-Assisted • Lung Compliance •
             Lung Diseases • Mice • Pulmonary Alveoli •
             Respiratory Function Tests • Respiratory Mechanics
             • Tidal Volume • Tomography, X-Ray Computed •
             chemically induced* • metabolism • pathology
             • pathology* • physiology •
             physiopathology},
   Abstract = {The effects of lung injury on pulmonary recruitment are
             incompletely understood. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has
             been a valuable tool in assessing changes in recruitment
             during lung injury. With the development of preclinical CT
             scanners designed for thoracic imaging in rodents, it is
             possible to acquire high-resolution images during the
             evolution of a pulmonary injury in living mice. We
             quantitatively assessed changes in recruitment caused by
             intratracheal bleomycin at 1 and 3 wk after administration
             using micro-CT in 129S6/SvEvTac mice. Twenty female mice
             were administered 2.5 U of bleomycin or saline and imaged
             with micro-CT at end inspiration and end expiration. Mice
             were extubated and allowed to recover from anesthesia and
             then reevaluated in vivo for quasi-static compliance
             measurements, followed by harvesting of the lungs for
             collagen analysis and histology. CT images were converted to
             histograms and analyzed for mean lung attenuation (MLA). MLA
             was significantly greater for bleomycin-exposed mice at week
             1 for both inspiration (P<0.0047) and exhalation (P<0.0377)
             but was not significantly different for week 3
             bleomycin-exposed mice. However, week 3 bleomycin-exposed
             mice did display significant increases in MLA shift from
             expiration to inspiration compared with either group of
             control mice (P<0.005), suggesting increased lung
             recruitment at this time point. Week 1 bleomycin-exposed
             mice displayed normal shifts in MLA with inspiration,
             suggesting normal lung recruitment despite significant
             radiographic and histological changes. Lung alveolar
             recruitment is preserved in a mouse model of
             bleomycin-induced parenchymal injury despite significant
             changes in radiographic and physiological
             parameters.},
   Doi = {10.1152/japplphysiol.00980.2007},
   Key = {fds268854}
}

@booklet{Johnson92b,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and H. S. Borovetz and J. L.
             Anderson},
   Title = {A model of pulsatile flow in a uniform deformable
             vessel},
   Journal = {Journal Of Biomechanics},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {91 -- 100},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {Johnson92b}
}

@article{fds174289,
   Author = {GA Johnson and HS Borovetz and JL Anderson},
   Title = {A model of pulsatile flow in a uniform deformable
             vessel.},
   Journal = {Journal of biomechanics},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {91-100},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0021-9290},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blood Circulation • Blood Flow Velocity
             • Blood Pressure • Blood Vessels • Carotid
             Arteries • Dogs • Models, Cardiovascular* •
             Movement • Regional Blood Flow • Rheology •
             Stress, Mechanical • anatomy & histology •
             physiology • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Simulations of blood flow in natural and artificial conduits
             usually require large computers for numerical solution of
             the Navier-Stokes equations. Often, physical insight into
             the fluid dynamics is lost when the solution is purely
             numerical. An alternative to solving the most general form
             of the Navier-Stokes equations is described here, wherein a
             functional form of the solution is assumed in order to
             simplify the required computations. The assumed forms for
             the axial pressure gradient and velocity profile are chosen
             such that conservation of mass is satisfied for fully
             established pulsatile flow in a straight, deformable vessel.
             The resulting equations are cast in finite-difference form
             and solved explicitly. Results for the limiting cases of
             rigid wall and zero applied pressure are found to be in good
             agreement with analytical solutions. Comparison with the
             experimental results of Klanchar et al. [Circ. Res. 66,
             1624-1635 (1990]) also shows good agreement. Application of
             the model to realistic physiological parameter values
             provides insight as to the influence of the pulsatile nature
             of the flow field on wall shear development in the presence
             of a moving wall boundary. Specifically, the model
             illustrates the dependence of flow rate and shear rate on
             the amplitude of the vessel wall motion and the phase
             difference between the applied pressure difference and the
             oscillations of the vessel radius. The present model can
             serve as a useful tool for experimentalists interested in
             quantifying the magnitude and character of velocity profiles
             and shearing forces in natural and artificial biologic
             conduits.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174289}
}

@article{fds268709,
   Author = {Clark, DP and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT},
   Title = {A multi-resolution approach to retrospectively-gated cardiac
             micro-CT reconstruction},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
   Volume = {9033},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780819498267},
   ISSN = {1605-7422},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2043044},
   Abstract = {In preclinical research, micro-CT is commonly used to
             provide anatomical information; however, there is
             significant interest in using this technology to obtain
             functional information in cardiac studies. The fastest
             acquisition in 4D cardiac micro-CT imaging is achieved via
             retrospective gating, resulting in irregular angular
             projections after binning the projections into phases of the
             cardiac cycle. Under these conditions, analytical
             reconstruction algorithms, such as filtered back projection,
             suffer from streaking artifacts. Here, we propose a novel,
             multi-resolution, iterative reconstruction algorithm
             inspired by robust principal component analysis which
             prevents the introduction of streaking artifacts, while
             attempting to recover the highest temporal resolution
             supported by the projection data. The algorithm achieves
             these results through a unique combination of the split
             Bregman method and joint bilateral filtration. We illustrate
             the algorithm’s performance using a
             contrast-enhanced, 2D slice through the MOBY mouse phantom
             and realistic projection acquisition and reconstruction
             parameters. Our results indicate that the algorithm is
             robust to under sampling levels of only 34 projections per
             cardiac phase and, therefore, has high potential in reducing
             both acquisition times and radiation dose. Another potential
             advantage of the multi-resolution scheme is the natural
             division of the reconstruction problem into a large number
             of independent sub-problems which can be solved in parallel.
             In future work, we will investigate the performance of this
             algorithm with retrospectively-gated, cardiac micro-CT data.
             © 2014 SPIE.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.2043044},
   Key = {fds268709}
}

@article{fds268795,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Calabrese, E and Badea, A and Paxinos, G and Watson,
             C},
   Title = {A multidimensional magnetic resonance histology atlas of the
             Wistar rat brain.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {1848-1856},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22634863},
   Abstract = {We have produced a multidimensional atlas of the adult
             Wistar rat brain based on magnetic resonance histology
             (MRH). This MR atlas has been carefully aligned with the
             widely used Paxinos-Watson atlas based on optical sections
             to allow comparisons between histochemical and immuno-marker
             data, and the use of the Paxinos-Watson abbreviation set.
             Our MR atlas attempts to make a seamless connection with the
             advantageous features of the Paxinos-Watson atlas, and to
             extend the utility of the data through the unique
             capabilities of MR histology: a) ability to view the brain
             in the skull with limited distortion from shrinkage or
             sectioning; b) isotropic spatial resolution, which permits
             sectioning along any arbitrary axis without loss of detail;
             c) three-dimensional (3D) images preserving spatial
             relationships; and d) widely varied contrast dependent on
             the unique properties of water protons. 3D diffusion tensor
             images (DTI) at what we believe to be the highest resolution
             ever attained in the rat provide unique insight into white
             matter structures and connectivity. The 3D isotropic data
             allow registration of multiple data sets into a common
             reference space to provide average atlases not possible with
             conventional histology. The resulting multidimensional atlas
             that combines Paxinos-Watson with multidimensional MRH
             images from multiple specimens provides a new, comprehensive
             view of the neuroanatomy of the rat and offers a
             collaborative platform for future rat brain
             studies.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.05.041},
   Key = {fds268795}
}

@booklet{Hall96,
   Author = {Hall, WL and Benveniste, H and Hedlund, LW and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {A new in vivo method for quantitative analysis of stroke
             lesions using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance
             microscopy},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {158-166},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996UQ76900002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1006/nimg.1996.0017},
   Key = {Hall96}
}

@article{fds132832,
   Author = {WL Hall and H Benveniste and LW Hedlund and GA Johnson},
   Title = {A new in vivo method for quantitative analysis of stroke
             lesions using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance
             microscopy.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {3 Pt 1},
   Pages = {158-66},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain Ischemia • Disease Models, Animal
             • Female • Magnetic Resonance Imaging* •
             Microscopy • Models, Neurological • Rats •
             Rats, Inbred F344 • Stroke Volume • diagnosis
             • methods* • pathology* •
             physiopathology},
   Abstract = {Using three-dimensional diffusion-weighted MR microscopy and
             a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia, we evaluated the
             statistical characteristics of two parameters: absolute
             stroke volumes and change in stroke volumes over 6 h of
             middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. In all rats, the
             absolute stroke volumes increased linearly over the 6-h MCA
             occlusion time period. On average, stroke volume growth rate
             was 2.1 +/- 0.5%/h. Sample size power analysis of our data
             demonstrated that to demonstrate a 10% reduction of the 6-h
             volumes, sample size per group would require 29 animals
             (these calculations are based on alpha = 0.05, beta = 0.20
             using normal approximation). A similar 30% reduction of
             stroke volume at 6 h poststroke (from approximately equal to
             200 to 140 mm3) would, in our "slope model," translate into
             a reduction of stroke growth rate from the normal + 11.25
             mm3/h (150 to 200 mm3 over 4 h) to 7 mm3/h (150 to 178 mm3
             over 4 h); power analysis in this case demonstrated that
             sample size is reduced to 15 animals per group (these
             calculations are based on alpha = 0.05, beta = 0.20 using
             normal approximation). We conclude that from a statistical
             standpoint our study demonstrates that stroke growth rate
             might be a more suitable parameter for evaluating the effect
             of treatment in both clinical and experimental stroke
             trials.},
   Key = {fds132832}
}

@booklet{Johnson98,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Hedlund, L and MacFall, J},
   Title = {A new window into the lung},
   Journal = {Physics World},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {35-38},
   Year = {1998},
   ISSN = {0953-8585},
   Key = {Johnson98}
}

@booklet{Todd01,
   Author = {M. D. Todd and G. A. Johnson and B. L. Althouse},
   Title = {A novel Bragg grating sensor interrogation system utilizing
             a scanning filter, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a 3 x 3
             coupler},
   Journal = {Measurement Science \& Technology},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {771 -- 777},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {Todd01}
}

@article{fds161597,
   Title = {A Petiet, GA Johnson, Active Staining of Mouse Embryos for
             Magnetic Resonance Microscopy. In: Hewitson Tim D & Darby
              Ian A (editors), Histology Protocols (Methods in Molecular
             Biology), Springer- Humana Press. Totowa, NJ. USA, in press,
             2009},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds161597}
}

@booklet{Godwin84a,
   Author = {Godwin, JD and Johnson, GA and Fram, EK},
   Title = {A phantom for testing ECG-gated computed tomography of the
             heart.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {279-283},
   Year = {1984},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6480305},
   Abstract = {A mechanical phantom has been built to evaluate
             electrocardiographically gated computed tomography of the
             heart. The phantom simulates the heart in terms of cyclic
             changes in chamber dimensions and wall thickness. Rate and
             excursion are variable, and the cavity of the chamber can be
             filled with liquid contrast media of different degrees of
             radio-opacity. Preliminary experiments with a prototypic
             gating system are described.},
   Key = {Godwin84a}
}

@article{fds132753,
   Author = {JD Godwin and GA Johnson and EK Fram},
   Title = {A phantom for testing ECG-gated computed tomography of the
             heart.},
   Journal = {Investigative radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {279-83},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   Keywords = {Electrocardiography* • Heart • Humans •
             Models, Structural* • Myocardial Contraction •
             Tomography, X-Ray Computed • methods* •
             radiography*},
   Abstract = {A mechanical phantom has been built to evaluate
             electrocardiographically gated computed tomography of the
             heart. The phantom simulates the heart in terms of cyclic
             changes in chamber dimensions and wall thickness. Rate and
             excursion are variable, and the cavity of the chamber can be
             filled with liquid contrast media of different degrees of
             radio-opacity. Preliminary experiments with a prototypic
             gating system are described.},
   Key = {fds132753}
}

@booklet{Look98,
   Author = {K. Y. Look and J. A. Blessing and B. E. Nelson and G. A.
             Johnson and W. C. Fowler and G. C. Reid},
   Title = {A phase II trial of isotretinoin and alpha interferon in
             patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the
             cervix - A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study},
   Journal = {American Journal Of Clinical Oncology-cancer Clinical
             Trials},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {591 -- 594},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {Look98}
}

@article{fds174221,
   Author = {KY Look and JA Blessing and BE Nelson and GA Johnson and WC Fowler Jr and GC Reid},
   Title = {A phase II trial of isotretinoin and alpha interferon in
             patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the
             cervix: a Gynecologic Oncology Group study.},
   Journal = {American journal of clinical oncology},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {591-4},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0277-3732},
   Keywords = {Adult • Aged • Antineoplastic Agents •
             Carcinoma, Squamous Cell • Drug Therapy, Combination
             • Female • Humans • Interferon-alpha •
             Isotretinoin • Keratolytic Agents • Middle Aged
             • Neoplasm Recurrence, Local • Uterine Cervical
             Neoplasms • administration & dosage • drug
             therapy* • therapeutic use*},
   Abstract = {From January 1993 through January 1996, 37 patients with
             unresectable squamous carcinoma of the cervix were entered
             on study and scheduled to receive oral isotretinoin 1 mg/kg
             per day with subcutaneous alpha interferon 6,000,000
             units/day. A course was defined as 4 continuous weeks of
             therapy. The mean number of four-course cycles delivered was
             1.8. One patient was ineligible because of wrong cell type
             and two were never treated. Thus, 34 patients were evaluable
             for toxicity. Eight patients were inevaluable for response.
             Five did not receive a complete 4-week course and three did
             not have additional tumor measurements; thus 26 were
             evaluable for response. Prior radiotherapy had been given to
             25 patients and prior chemotherapy to 23 patients. There was
             no grade 4 neutropenia. The incidence of Gynecologic
             Oncology Group (GOG) grade 3 granulocytopenia and
             thrombocytopenia was 8.8% and 5.8%, respectively. Six
             patients (17.6%) developed grade 3 or worse nausea and
             vomiting. Four (11.7%) patients developed grade 3 neurologic
             symptoms. There were no complete responses and one partial
             response. The overall response rate was 3.8% (95% confidence
             interval, 0.1-19.6%). In this pretreated population,
             isotretinoin and alpha interferon in the dose and schedule
             employed exhibit minimal activity.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174221}
}

@booklet{Johnson82f,
   Author = {JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO QUALITY ASSURANCE IN
             CT},
   Journal = {AJR. American journal of roentgenology},
   Volume = {139},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {427-427},
   Year = {1982},
   ISSN = {0361-803X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1982NY43600075&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Johnson82f}
}

@booklet{Banson92a,
   Author = {Banson, ML and Cofer, GP and Black, R and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {A probe for specimen magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {157-164},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1601608},
   Abstract = {One of the primary limits to spatial resolution in magnetic
             resonance (MR) microscopy is the limited signal. The purpose
             of this study is to build a radiofrequency (rf) probe for MR
             microscopy of fixed specimens at 300 MHz. The design
             criteria for the probe were (1) high sensitivity; (2) good
             rf homogeneity; (3) minimization of BO variations. All
             probes were Helmholtz pairs operating at 300 MHz. Coils were
             constructed from copper/Teflon/copper microwave substrate
             which eliminated susceptibility problems from solder and
             discrete capacitors. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was
             compared with a conventional solenoid. Phantoms of agar gels
             and saline-filled tubes were used to characterize the SNR
             and homogeneity. SNR measurements of the coil pairs showed a
             marked improvement (up to 60%) over that of the reference
             solenoid. The region of homogeneity was defined as a 10%
             variation in signal intensity. This correlated with the
             coil's inner diameter. Graphs of SNR versus diameter,
             separation, and copper foil width allowed for optimization
             of the structure. Using this coil, MR microscopy is now
             possible on small, fixed specimens with pixels as small as
             20 x 20 x 30 microns. Work is currently under way exploiting
             the SNR and homogeneity provided by this probe to determine
             the degree to which MR microscopy might add to the
             pathologists' diagnostic tools.},
   Key = {Banson92a}
}

@article{fds132799,
   Author = {ML Banson and GP Cofer and R Black and GA Johnson},
   Title = {A probe for specimen magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Investigative radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {157-64},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   Keywords = {Copper • Equipment Design • Evaluation Studies
             • Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy • Microscopy
             • Polytetrafluoroethylene • Sensitivity and
             Specificity • instrumentation •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {One of the primary limits to spatial resolution in magnetic
             resonance (MR) microscopy is the limited signal. The purpose
             of this study is to build a radiofrequency (rf) probe for MR
             microscopy of fixed specimens at 300 MHz. The design
             criteria for the probe were (1) high sensitivity; (2) good
             rf homogeneity; (3) minimization of BO variations. All
             probes were Helmholtz pairs operating at 300 MHz. Coils were
             constructed from copper/Teflon/copper microwave substrate
             which eliminated susceptibility problems from solder and
             discrete capacitors. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was
             compared with a conventional solenoid. Phantoms of agar gels
             and saline-filled tubes were used to characterize the SNR
             and homogeneity. SNR measurements of the coil pairs showed a
             marked improvement (up to 60%) over that of the reference
             solenoid. The region of homogeneity was defined as a 10%
             variation in signal intensity. This correlated with the
             coil's inner diameter. Graphs of SNR versus diameter,
             separation, and copper foil width allowed for optimization
             of the structure. Using this coil, MR microscopy is now
             possible on small, fixed specimens with pixels as small as
             20 x 20 x 30 microns. Work is currently under way exploiting
             the SNR and homogeneity provided by this probe to determine
             the degree to which MR microscopy might add to the
             pathologists' diagnostic tools.},
   Key = {fds132799}
}

@article{fds268757,
   Author = {Calabrese, E and Badea, A and Watson, C and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {A quantitative magnetic resonance histology atlas of
             postnatal rat brain development with regional estimates of
             growth and variability.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {71},
   Pages = {196-206},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23353030},
   Abstract = {There has been growing interest in the role of postnatal
             brain development in the etiology of several neurologic
             diseases. The rat has long been recognized as a powerful
             model system for studying neuropathology and the safety of
             pharmacologic treatments. However, the complex
             spatiotemporal changes that occur during rat
             neurodevelopment remain to be elucidated. This work
             establishes the first magnetic resonance histology (MRH)
             atlas of the developing rat brain, with an emphasis on
             quantitation. The atlas comprises five specimens at each of
             nine time points, imaged with eight distinct MR contrasts
             and segmented into 26 developmentally defined brain regions.
             The atlas was used to establish a timeline of morphometric
             changes and variability throughout neurodevelopment and
             represents a quantitative database of rat neurodevelopment
             for characterizing rat models of human neurologic
             disease.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.01.017},
   Key = {fds268757}
}

@booklet{Solomon03,
   Author = {D. Solomon and M. Schiffman and R. Tarone and E. E.
             Partridge and L. Kilgore and S. Hester and J. L. Walker and G. A. Johnson and A. Yadack and R. S. Guido and K.
             Mcintyre-seltman and R. P. Edwards and J. Gruss and N. B.
             Kiviat and L. Koutsky and C. Mao a},
   Title = {A randomized trial on the management of low-grade squamous
             intraepithelial lesion cytology interpretations},
   Journal = {American Journal Of Obstetrics And Gynecology},
   Volume = {188},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1393 -- 1400},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Solomon03}
}

@booklet{Bazer99,
   Author = {F. W. Bazer and G. A. Johnson and A. G. Stagg and K. M.
             Taylor and E. Gootwine and A. Gertler and T. E.
             Spencer},
   Title = {A servomechanism in the ovine uterus regulates endometrial
             gene expression.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {60},
   Pages = {150 -- 150},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {Bazer99}
}

@booklet{Johnson95a,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and D. A. Mortensen and A. R.
             Martin},
   Title = {A simulation of herbicide use based on weed
             spatial-distribution},
   Journal = {Weed Research},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {197 -- 205},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Johnson95a}
}

@booklet{Johnson96d,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and G. A. Livesay and S. L. Y. Woo and K. R.
             Rajagopal},
   Title = {A single integral finite strain viscoelastic model of
             ligaments and tendons},
   Journal = {Journal Of Biomechanical Engineering-transactions Of The
             Asme},
   Volume = {118},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {221 -- 226},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {Johnson96d}
}

@article{fds174112,
   Author = {GA Johnson and GA Livesay and SL Woo and KR Rajagopal},
   Title = {A single integral finite strain viscoelastic model of
             ligaments and tendons.},
   Journal = {Journal of biomechanical engineering},
   Volume = {118},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {221-6},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0148-0731},
   Keywords = {Adult • Aged • Aged, 80 and over • Animals
             • Dogs • Elasticity • Humans • Ligaments
             • Middle Aged • Models, Biological* •
             Nonlinear Dynamics • Patella • Stress, Mechanical
             • Tendons • Viscosity • physiology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {A general continuum model for the nonlinear viscoelastic
             behavior of soft biological tissues was formulated. This
             single integral finite strain (SIFS) model describes finite
             deformation of a nonlinearly viscoelastic material within
             the context of a three-dimensional model. The specific form
             describing uniaxial extension was obtained, and the idea of
             conversion from one material to another (at a microscopic
             level) was then introduced to model the nonlinear behavior
             of ligaments and tendons. Conversion allowed different
             constitutive equations to be used for describing a single
             ligament or tendon at different strain levels. The model was
             applied to data from uniaxial extension of younger and older
             human patellar tendons and canine medial collateral
             ligaments. Model parameters were determined from
             curve-fitting stress-strain and stress-relaxation data and
             used to predict the time-dependent stress generated by
             cyclic extensions.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174112}
}

@booklet{Johnson00c,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and S. V. Mantha and T. A.
             Day},
   Title = {A spectrofluorometric survey of UV-induced blue-green
             fluorescence in foliage of 35 species},
   Journal = {Journal Of Plant Physiology},
   Volume = {156},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {242 -- 252},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {Johnson00c}
}

@booklet{Johnson83a,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Ravin, CE},
   Title = {A survey of digital chest radiography.},
   Journal = {Radiologic Clinics of North America},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {655-664},
   Year = {1983},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0033-8389},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6361846},
   Abstract = {The problems of chest radiography as they relate to digital
             systems are described, the current approaches to these
             problems are reviewed, and the utility of digital chest
             radiography is demonstrated.},
   Key = {Johnson83a}
}

@article{fds132853,
   Author = {GA Johnson and CE Ravin},
   Title = {A survey of digital chest radiography.},
   Journal = {Radiologic clinics of North America, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {655-64},
   Year = {1983},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0033-8389},
   Keywords = {Humans • Methods • Radiographic Image Enhancement
             • Radiography, Thoracic* • Subtraction Technique*
             • Technology, Radiologic • Tomography, X-Ray
             Computed*},
   Abstract = {The problems of chest radiography as they relate to digital
             systems are described, the current approaches to these
             problems are reviewed, and the utility of digital chest
             radiography is demonstrated.},
   Key = {fds132853}
}

@article{fds268817,
   Author = {Bowden, DM and Johnson, GA and Zaborsky, L and Green, WDK and Moore, E and Badea, A and Dubach, MF and Bookstein, FL},
   Title = {A symmetrical Waxholm canonical mouse brain for
             NeuroMaps.},
   Journal = {Journal of Neuroscience Methods},
   Volume = {195},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {170-175},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1872-678X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21163300},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Brain Mapping* • Functional
             Laterality • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted •
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Mice • Mice, Inbred
             C57BL • Models, Neurological • anatomy &
             histology* • methods • methods*},
   Abstract = {NeuroMaps (2010) is a Web-based application that enables
             investigators to map data from macaque studies to a
             canonical atlas of the macaque brain. It currently serves as
             an image processor enabling them to create figures suitable
             for publication, presentation and archival purposes.
             Eventually it will enable investigators studying any of
             several species to analyze the overlap between their data
             and multimodality data mapped by others. The purpose of the
             current project was to incorporate the Waxholm canonical
             mouse brain (Harwylycz, 2009) into NeuroMaps. An enhanced
             gradient echo (T2*) magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the
             Waxholm canonical brain (Johnson et al., 2010) was warped to
             bring the irregular biological midplane of the MRI into line
             with the mathematically flat midsagittal plane of the
             Waxholm space. The left hemisphere was deleted and the right
             hemisphere reflected to produce a symmetrical 3D MR image.
             The symmetrical T2* image was imported into NeuroMaps. The
             map executing this warp was applied to four other voxellated
             volumes based on the same canonical specimen and maintained
             at the Center for In-Vitro Microscopy (CIVM): a T2-weighted
             MRI, a T1-weighted MRI, a segmented image and an image
             reconstructed from Nissl-stained histological sections of
             the specimen. Symmetric versions of those images were
             returned to the CIVM repository where they are made
             available to other laboratories. Utility of the symmetric
             atlas was demonstrated by mapping and comparing a number of
             cortical areas as illustrated in three conventional mouse
             brain atlases. The symmetric Waxholm mouse brain atlas is
             now accessible in NeuroMaps where investigators can map
             image data to standard templates over the Web and process
             them for publication, presentation and archival purposes:
             http://braininfo.rprc.washington.edu/MapViewData.aspx.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jneumeth.2010.11.028},
   Key = {fds268817}
}

@booklet{Johnson83b,
   Author = {JOHNSON, GA and DANIELEY, N and SUDDARTH, S and DUNNICK,
             NR},
   Title = {A SYSTEM FOR DIGITAL VIDEODENSITOMETRY},
   Journal = {AJR. American journal of roentgenology},
   Volume = {141},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1360-1361},
   Year = {1983},
   ISSN = {0361-803X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1983RT41800084&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Johnson83b}
}

@article{fds132740,
   Title = {A. LeFurgey, S. Gewalt, N. Wallace, D. Kopf, G.A. Johnson,
             P. Ingram.   Magnetic Resonance Microscoopy of the Adult
             Barnacle.  in "Proc.,  MicroCosmopolitan (14th Australian
             Conference on Electron Microscopy,  1st Meeting,
             International Union of Microbeam Analysis Societies, 9th
              Symposium of the Microscopical Society of Australia).
              Syndey, Australia,  1996," p. 105.},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132740}
}

@booklet{Griffin98,
   Author = {W. P. Griffin and E. B. Savage and R. E. Clark and J. J.
             Pacella and G. A. Johnson and J. A. Magovern and G. J.
             Magovern},
   Title = {AB-180 circulatory support system - Summary of development
             and phase I clinical trial},
   Journal = {Asaio Journal},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {M719 -- M724},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {Griffin98}
}

@article{fds174075,
   Author = {WP Griffin and EB Savage and RE Clark and JJ Pacella and GA Johnson and JA
             Magovern, GJ Magovern Sr},
   Title = {AB-180 circulatory support system: summary of development
             and phase I clinical trial.},
   Journal = {ASAIO journal (American Society for Artificial Internal
             Organs : 1992)},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {M719-24},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1058-2916},
   Keywords = {Feasibility Studies • Heart-Assist Devices* •
             Humans • Male • Middle Aged • Prosthesis
             Design},
   Abstract = {The AB-180 Circulatory Support System (AB-180 CSS; Cardiac
             Assist Technologies, Pittsburgh, PA) is a left ventricular
             assist system for investigational use in patients with
             postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock who are refractory to
             standard treatment with an intra-aortic balloon pump,
             pharmacologic treatment, or both. The intent of the AB-180
             CSS is to provide temporary (up to 14 days) mechanical
             circulatory support until the heart recovers adequate
             mechanical function. The system consists of a small
             implantable centrifugal pump and a controller. A unique
             infusion system produces a hydrodynamic bearing between
             rotational and stationary components of the AB-180 CSS pump.
             This infusion system also provides a source of heparin for
             localized anticoagulation. Extensive bench and animal work
             has illustrated anticoagulation requirements, established
             operating guidelines, and demonstrated safety and efficacy.
             An investigational device exemption has been granted for a
             Phase I, five patient feasibility study at Allegheny General
             Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. To date, the pump has
             been implanted in one patient. The results from this first
             case are presented here.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174075}
}

@booklet{Oliverio00,
   Author = {Oliverio, MI and Delnomdedieu, M and Best, CF and Li, P and Morris, M and Callahan, MF and Johnson, GA and Smithies, O and Coffman,
             TM},
   Title = {Abnormal water metabolism in mice lacking the type 1A
             receptor for ANG II},
   Journal = {American journal of physiology. Renal physiology},
   Volume = {278},
   Number = {1 47-1},
   Pages = {F75-F82},
   Year = {2000},
   ISSN = {0363-6127},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10644657},
   Abstract = {Mice lacking AT1(A) receptors for ANG II have a defect in
             urinary concentration manifested by an inability to increase
             urinary osmolality to levels seen in controls after
             thirsting. This defect results in extreme serum
             hypertonicity during water deprivation. In the basal state,
             plasma vasopressin levels are similar in wild-type controls
             and Agtr 1a -/- mice. Plasma vasopressin levels increase
             normally in the AT(1A) receptor-deficient mice after 24 h of
             water deprivation, suggesting that the defect in urine
             concentration is intrinsic to the kidney. Using magnetic
             resonance microscopy, we find that the absence of AT(1A)
             receptors is associated with a modest reduction in the
             distance from the kidney surface to the tip of the papilla.
             However, this structural abnormality seems to play little
             role in the urinary concentrating defect in Agtr 1a -/- mice
             since the impairment is largely reproduced in wild-type mice
             by treatment with an AT1-receptor antagonist. These studies
             demonstrate a critical role for the AT(1A) receptor in
             maintaining inner medullary structures in the kidney and in
             regulating renal water excretion.},
   Key = {Oliverio00}
}

@article{fds310029,
   Author = {Oliverio, MI and Delnomdedieu, M and Best, CF and Li, P and Morris, M and Callahan, MF and Johnson, GA and Smithies, O and Coffman,
             TM},
   Title = {Abnormal water metabolism in mice lacking the type 1A
             receptor for ANG II.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Physiology: Renal Physiology},
   Volume = {278},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {F75-F82},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1931-857X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10644657},
   Keywords = {Animals • Body Weight • Deamino Arginine
             Vasopressin • Female • Genotype • Kidney
             • Kidney Concentrating Ability • Losartan •
             Male • Mice • Osmolar Concentration •
             Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1 • Receptors, Angiotensin
             • Urine • Urodynamics • Vasopressins •
             Water • Water Deprivation • anatomy & histology
             • antagonists & inhibitors • blood •
             chemistry • deficiency* • drug effects •
             genetics • metabolism* • pharmacology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {Mice lacking AT(1A) receptors for ANG II have a defect in
             urinary concentration manifested by an inability to increase
             urinary osmolality to levels seen in controls after
             thirsting. This defect results in extreme serum
             hypertonicity during water deprivation. In the basal state,
             plasma vasopressin levels are similar in wild-type controls
             and Agtr1a -/- mice. Plasma vasopressin levels increase
             normally in the AT(1A) receptor-deficient mice after 24 h of
             water deprivation, suggesting that the defect in urine
             concentration is intrinsic to the kidney. Using magnetic
             resonance microscopy, we find that the absence of AT(1A)
             receptors is associated with a modest reduction in the
             distance from the kidney surface to the tip of the papilla.
             However, this structural abnormality seems to play little
             role in the urinary concentrating defect in Agtr1a -/- mice
             since the impairment is largely reproduced in wild-type mice
             by treatment with an AT(1)-receptor antagonist. These
             studies demonstrate a critical role for the AT(1A) receptor
             in maintaining inner medullary structures in the kidney and
             in regulating renal water excretion.},
   Key = {fds310029}
}

@booklet{Scribner00,
   Author = {D. R. Scribner and J. Baldwin and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Actinomycosis mimicking a pelvic malignancy - A case
             report},
   Journal = {Journal Of Reproductive Medicine},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {515 -- 518},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Scribner00}
}

@article{fds174257,
   Author = {DR Scribner Jr and J Baldwin and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Actinomycosis mimicking a pelvic malignancy. A case
             report.},
   Journal = {The Journal of reproductive medicine},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {515-8},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0024-7758},
   Keywords = {Abdominal Pain • Actinomycosis • Colorectal
             Neoplasms • Diagnosis, Differential • Female
             • Humans • Middle Aged • Uterine Diseases
             • complications • diagnosis • diagnosis*
             • etiology* • pathology •
             surgery},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Pelvic actinomycosis is difficult to diagnose
             preoperatively. The chronic infection is locally
             infiltrative and causes a profound induration of infected
             tissue planes. This induration, combined with absence of
             fever and leukocytosis, can mimic a pelvic malignancy. CASE:
             A 55-year-old woman was diagnosed with a pelvic mass after a
             two-month history of intermittent lower abdominal pain. The
             patient had had an intrauterine device for 12 years; it was
             removed two months prior to an exploratory laparotomy for
             the symptomatic mass. The mass was highly suggestive of
             colorectal cancer, with the rectosigmoid colon indurated and
             adherent to the uterus and sacrum. The induration of the
             colon extended caudally to within 3 cm of the anal verge. An
             abdominoperineal resection was performed along with a total
             abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and
             colostomy. Pathology revealed acute and chronic
             endometritis, left tuboovarian abscess and extensive, acute
             inflammation of the rectosigmoid colon without evidence of
             diverticuli. Actinomycosis was diagnosed based on the
             characteristic sulphur granules seen on hemotoxylin and
             eosin staining. CONCLUSION: Actinomycosis can mimic pelvic
             and abdominal malignancies. Surgeons should be aware of this
             infection to potentially spare women morbidity from
             excessive surgical procedures.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174257}
}

@booklet{Jaeger00,
   Author = {L. A. Jaeger and R. C. Burghardt and G. A. Johnson and F. W.
             Bazer},
   Title = {Activation of conceptus and maternal integrins by
             transforming growth factor beta latency associated
             peptide.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {62},
   Pages = {281 -- 281},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {Jaeger00}
}

@article{fds268838,
   Author = {Petiet, A and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Active staining of mouse embryos for magnetic resonance
             microscopy.},
   Journal = {Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)},
   Volume = {611},
   Pages = {141-149},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {1940-6029},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19960328},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Embryo, Mammalian •
             Formaldehyde • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Mice
             • Microscopy • Staining and Labeling • Tissue
             Fixation • chemistry • metabolism •
             metabolism* • methods • methods*},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance histology (MRH) has found considerable
             application in structural phenotyping in the mouse embryo.
             MRH employs the same fundamental principles as clinical MRI,
             albeit with spatial resolution up to six orders of magnitude
             higher than that in clinical studies. Critical to obtaining
             this enormous gain in resolution is the need to enhance the
             weak signal from these microscopic voxels. This has been
             accomplished through the use of active staining, a method to
             simultaneously fix the embryonic/fetal tissues, while
             reducing the spin lattice relaxation time (T1). We describe
             here the methods that allow one to balance the fixation,
             which reduces the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal,
             with the enhancement of signal derived from the reduction in
             T1. Methods are included to cover the ranges of embryonic
             specimens from E10.5 through E19.5.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1007/978-1-60327-345-9_11},
   Key = {fds268838}
}

@article{fds268699,
   Author = {Papp, EA and Leergaard, TB and Calabrese, E and Johnson, GA and Bjaalie,
             JG},
   Title = {Addendum to “Waxholm Space atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat
             brain” [NeuroImage 97 (2014) 374-386].},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {105},
   Pages = {561-562},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.10.017},
   Abstract = {The main focus of our original article was to describe the
             anatomical delineations constituting the first version of
             the WHS Sprague Dawley atlas, apply the Waxholm Space
             coordinate system, and publish the associated MRI/DTI
             template and segmentation volume in their original format.
             To increase usability of the dataset, we have recently
             shared an updated version of the volumetric image material
             (v1.01). The aims of this addendum are to inform about the
             improvements in the updated dataset, in particular related
             to navigation in the WHS coordinate system, and provide
             guidance for transforming coordinates acquired in the first
             version of the atlas.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.10.017},
   Key = {fds268699}
}

@booklet{Miyoshi89,
   Author = {K. Miyoshi and J. J. Pouch and S. A. Alterovitz and D. M.
             Pantic and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Adhesion, friction, and wear of plasma-deposited thin
             silicon-nitride films at temperatures to
             700-degrees-c},
   Journal = {Wear},
   Volume = {133},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {107 -- 123},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {Miyoshi89}
}

@article{fds311651,
   Author = {Vetreno, RP and Yaxley, R and Paniagua, B and Johnson, GA and Crews,
             FT},
   Title = {Adult rat cortical thickness changes across age and
             following adolescent intermittent ethanol
             treatment.},
   Journal = {Addiction Biology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {712-723},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1355-6215},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adb.12364},
   Abstract = {Human studies have established that adolescence is a period
             of brain maturation that parallels the development of adult
             behaviors. However, little is known regarding cortical
             development in the adult rat brain. We used magnetic
             resonance imaging (MRI) and histology to assess the impact
             of age on adult Wistar rat cortical thickness on postnatal
             day (P)80 and P220 as well as the effect of adolescent binge
             ethanol exposure on adult (P80) cortical thickness. MRI
             revealed changes in cortical thickness between P80 and P220
             that differ across cortical region. The adult P220 rat
             prefrontal cortex increased in thickness whereas cortical
             thinning occurred in both the cingulate and parietal
             cortices relative to young adult P80 rats. Histological
             analysis confirmed the age-related cortical thinning. In the
             second series of experiments, an animal model of adolescent
             intermittent ethanol (AIE; 5.0 g/kg, intragastrically, 20
             percent ethanol w/v, 2 days on/2 days off from P25 to
             P55) was used to assess the effects of alcohol on cortical
             thickness in young adult (P80) rats. MRI revealed that AIE
             resulted in region-specific cortical changes. A small region
             within the prefrontal cortex was significantly thinner
             whereas medial cortical regions were significantly thicker
             in young adult (P80) AIE-treated rats. The observed increase
             in cortical thickness was confirmed by histology. Thus, the
             rat cerebral cortex continues to undergo cortical thickness
             changes into adulthood, and adolescent alcohol exposure
             alters the young adult cortex that could contribute to brain
             dysfunction in adulthood.},
   Doi = {10.1111/adb.12364},
   Key = {fds311651}
}

@article{fds174230,
   Author = {GA Johnson and VR Gutti and SK Loyalka and KA O'Beirne 2nd and SK
             Cochran, HM Dale and GR Kracke},
   Title = {Albuterol metered dose inhaler performance under hyperbaric
             pressures.},
   Journal = {Undersea & hyperbaric medicine : journal of the Undersea and
             Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {55-63},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1066-2936},
   Keywords = {Aerosols • Albuterol • Analysis of Variance •
             Asthma • Bronchial Spasm • Bronchodilator Agents
             • Diving • Humans • Hyperbaric Oxygenation
             • Metered Dose Inhalers • Nanoparticles •
             Particle Size • Pressure* • Weights and Measures
             • administration & dosage* • adverse effects
             • chemistry • contraindications • etiology
             • physiology • physiopathology • standards*
             • therapy},
   Abstract = {The weight change per actuation and aerosol particle size
             and number delivered by albuterol metered dose inhalers
             (MDIs) were measured in a multiplace hyperbaric chamber at
             pressures ranging from one atmosphere absolute (1 ATA, 0
             feet of seawater, fsw, 101 kPa) to three ATA (66 fsw, 304
             kPa). Weight change per actuation by CFC
             (chlorofluorocarbon) and long canister HFA
             (hydrofluoroalkane) powered MDIs was 13 +/- 1% and 12 +/- 1%
             less, respectively, at 3 ATA compared to 1 ATA. However,
             weight change per actuation by short canister HFA MDIs was
             not significantly changed with pressure. The geometric mean
             diameters of nano particles from the CFC and short canister
             HFA MDIs decreased from 50 nm at 0 fsw to 32 nm at 66 fsw
             whereas the long canister HFA aerosol diameters were not
             affected. The numbers of nanometer size particles delivered
             at 66 fsw were only 4-7% of those delivered at 0 fsw for the
             CFC and long canister HFA MDIs whereas for the short
             canister MDIs it was 26%. We conclude that the weight change
             per actuation of albuterol and the sizes and numbers of
             aerosol particles emitted from albuterol MDIs actuated in a
             hyperbaric environment vary by canister type.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174230}
}

@booklet{Macfall94a,
   Author = {J. S. Macfall and P. Spaine and R. Doudrick and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Alterations in growth and water-transport processes in
             fusiform rust galls of pine, determined by
             magnetic-resonance microscopy},
   Journal = {Phytopathology},
   Volume = {84},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {288 -- 293},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Macfall94a}
}

@article{fds268771,
   Author = {Antonsen, BT and Jiang, Y and Veraart, J and Qu, H and Nguyen, HP and Sijbers, J and Hörsten, SV and Johnson, GA and Leergaard,
             TB},
   Title = {Altered diffusion tensor imaging measurements in aged
             transgenic Huntington disease rats},
   Journal = {Brain Structure and Function},
   Volume = {218},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {1-12},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {1863-2653},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00429-012-0427-0},
   Abstract = {Rodent models of Huntington disease (HD) are valuable tools
             for investigating HD pathophysiology and evaluating new
             therapeutic approaches. Non-invasive characterization of
             HD-related phenotype changes is important for monitoring
             progression of pathological processes and possible effects
             of interventions. The first transgenic rat model for HD
             exhibits progressive late-onset affective, cognitive, and
             motor impairments, as well as neuropathological features
             reflecting observations from HD patients. In this report, we
             contribute to the anatomical phenotyping of this model by
             comparing high-resolution ex vivo DTI measurements obtained
             in aged transgenic HD rats and wild-type controls. By region
             of interest analysis supplemented by voxel-based statistics,
             we find little evidence of atrophy in basal ganglia regions,
             but demonstrate altered DTI measurements in the dorsal and
             ventral striatum, globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus,
             substantia nigra, and hippocampus. These changes are largely
             compatible with DTI findings in preclinical and clinical HD
             patients. We confirm earlier reports that HD rats express a
             moderate neuropathological phenotype, and provide evidence
             of altered DTI measures in specific HD-related brain
             regions, in the absence of pronounced morphometric changes.
             © 2012 The Author(s).},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00429-012-0427-0},
   Key = {fds268771}
}

@article{fds174312,
   Author = {X Li and FW Bazer and H Gao and W Jobgen and GA Johnson and P Li, JR
             McKnight and MC Satterfield and TE Spencer and G Wu},
   Title = {Amino acids and gaseous signaling.},
   Journal = {Amino acids},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {65-78},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1438-2199},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00726-009-0264-5},
   Keywords = {Amino Acids • Animals • Carbon Monoxide •
             Cardiovascular Diseases • Energy Metabolism •
             Humans • Hydrogen Sulfide • Immune System Diseases
             • Nervous System Diseases • Nitric Oxide •
             Signal Transduction • Sulfur Dioxide •
             biosynthesis* • metabolism • metabolism* •
             physiology},
   Abstract = {Gases, such as nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO),
             hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), and sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) are
             known toxic pollutants in the air. However, they are now
             recognized as important signaling molecules synthesized in
             animals and humans from arginine, glycine (heme), and
             cysteine, respectively. At physiological levels, NO, CO, and
             SO(2) activate guanylyl cyclase to generate cGMP which
             elicits a variety of responses (including relaxation of
             vascular smooth muscle cells, hemodynamics,
             neurotransmission, and cell metabolism) via cGMP-dependent
             protein kinases. H(2)S is also a crucial regulator of both
             neurological function and endothelium-dependent relaxation
             through cGMP-independent mechanisms involving stimulation of
             membrane K(ATP) channels and intracellular cAMP signaling.
             Additionally, NO, CO, and H(2)S confer cytoprotective and
             immunomodulatory effects. Moreover, NH(3) is a major product
             of amino acid catabolism and profoundly affects the function
             of neurons and the vasculature through glutamine-dependent
             inhibition of NO synthesis. Emerging evidence shows that
             amino acids are not only precursors for these endogenous
             gases, but are also regulators of their production in a
             cell-specific manner. Thus, recent advances on gaseous
             signaling have greatly expanded our basic knowledge of amino
             acid biochemistry and nutrition. These exciting discoveries
             will aid in the design of new nutritional and
             pharmacological means to prevent and treat major health
             problems related to developmental biology and nutrient
             metabolism, including intrauterine growth restriction,
             preterm birth, aging, neurological disorders, cancer,
             obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00726-009-0264-5},
   Key = {fds174312}
}

@article{fds268720,
   Author = {Subashi, E and Choudhury, KR and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {An analysis of the uncertainty and bias in DCE-MRI
             measurements using the spoiled gradient-recalled echo pulse
             sequence.},
   Journal = {Medical physics},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {032301},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0094-2405},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1118/1.4865790},
   Abstract = {The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic
             contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI have been used in more than 100
             phase I trials and investigator led studies. A comparison of
             the absolute values of these quantities requires an
             estimation of their respective probability distribution
             function (PDF). The statistical variation of the DCE-MRI
             measurement is analyzed by considering the fundamental
             sources of error in the MR signal intensity acquired with
             the spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) pulse sequence.The variance
             in the SPGR signal intensity arises from quadrature
             detection and excitation flip angle inconsistency. The noise
             power was measured in 11 phantoms of contrast agent
             concentration in the range [0-1] mM (in steps of 0.1 mM) and
             in onein vivo acquisition of a tumor-bearing mouse. The
             distribution of the flip angle was determined in a uniform
             10 mM CuSO4 phantom using the spin echo double angle method.
             The PDF of a wide range of T1 values measured with the
             varying flip angle (VFA) technique was estimated through
             numerical simulations of the SPGR equation. The resultant
             uncertainty in contrast agent concentration was incorporated
             in the most common model of tracer exchange kinetics and the
             PDF of the derived pharmacokinetic parameters was studied
             numerically.The VFA method is an unbiased technique for
             measuringT1 only in the absence of bias in excitation flip
             angle. The time-dependent concentration of the contrast
             agent measured in vivo is within the theoretically predicted
             uncertainty. The uncertainty in measuring K(trans) with SPGR
             pulse sequences is of the same order, but always higher
             than, the uncertainty in measuring the pre-injection
             longitudinal relaxation time (T10). The lowest achievable
             bias/uncertainty in estimating this parameter is
             approximately 20%-70% higher than the bias/uncertainty in
             the measurement of the pre-injection T1 map. The fractional
             volume parameters derived from the extended Tofts model were
             found to be extremely sensitive to the variance in signal
             intensity. The SNR of the pre-injection T1 map indicates the
             limiting precision with which K(trans) can be
             calculated.Current small-animal imaging systems and pulse
             sequences robust to motion artifacts have the capacity for
             reproducible quantitative acquisitions with DCE-MRI. In
             these circumstances, it is feasible to achieve a level of
             precision limited only by physiologic variability.},
   Doi = {10.1118/1.4865790},
   Key = {fds268720}
}

@article{fds174264,
   Author = {GA Johnson and E Harrington},
   Title = {An apparatus for the simultaneous demineralization of
             fifty-four specimens.},
   Journal = {Stain technology},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {127-9},
   Year = {1977},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0038-9153},
   Keywords = {Evaluation Studies as Topic • Formic Acids •
             Histological Techniques • Specimen Handling •
             instrumentation*},
   Abstract = {An apparatus designed to demineralize 54 specimens
             simultaneously is described. A drum with built-in specimen
             holders rotates continuously through a bath of acid,
             allowing a free exchange of demineralizing fluid over the
             specimens. Individual specimens can be easily introduced or
             withdrawn from the apparatus without disturbing
             others.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174264}
}

@article{fds174195,
   Author = {GA JOHNSON},
   Title = {An arsine problem: engineering notes.},
   Journal = {American Industrial Hygiene Association quarterly},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {188-90},
   Year = {1953},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0096-820X},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174195}
}

@article{fds268752,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Cofer, GP and Gewalt, SL and Hedlund, LW and IEEE, and IEEE},
   Title = {An engineering approach to image-based phenotyping},
   Journal = {2002 IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON BIOMEDICAL IMAGING,
             PROCEEDINGS},
   Pages = {381-383},
   Year = {2002},
   ISBN = {0-7803-7584-X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000178000400095&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds268752}
}

@booklet{Halvorsen81,
   Author = {HALVORSEN, RA and WOODFIELD, S and ALLEN, SM and HEDLUNG, LW and JOHNSON, GA and THOMPSON, WM},
   Title = {AN EVALUATION OF CONTRAST AGENTS FOR CT OF THE HEPATOBILIARY
             SYSTEM},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {387-387},
   Year = {1981},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1981MK56200053&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198109000-00053},
   Key = {Halvorsen81}
}

@booklet{Johnson81,
   Author = {JOHNSON, GA and KOROBKIN, M and HEINZ, R},
   Title = {AN EVALUATION OF MULTIPLANAR IMAGING CAPABILITIES OF 4
             CURRENT CT SCANNERS},
   Journal = {AJR. American journal of roentgenology},
   Volume = {136},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1279-1279},
   Year = {1981},
   ISSN = {0361-803X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1981LU08900097&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Johnson81}
}

@article{fds268891,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and O'Foghludha, F},
   Title = {An experimental "trans-molybdenum" tube for
             mammography.},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {127},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {511-516},
   Year = {1978},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/644079},
   Keywords = {Fluorescence • Humans • Intubation •
             Mammography • Molybdenum • Radiation Dosage •
             instrumentation*},
   Abstract = {Possible mammographic advantages of "trans-molybdenum"
             anodes (atomic number greater than ZMo) are decreased dose
             because the fluorescent radiation is more penetrating, and
             increased useful output; contrast degradation is known to be
             tolerable. The output per mAs, the HVT in Al, and the
             penetration in Lucite were measured spectroscopically for an
             experimental Rh-anode tube and also for Mo- and W-anode
             mammographic tubes. The trans-molybdenum tube was shown to
             have output and dose advantages over Mo anodes, and output
             and contrast advantages over normal and selectively filtered
             W anodes. Possible applications in areas other than
             mammography are briefly discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1148/127.2.511},
   Key = {fds268891}
}

@booklet{Neiswanger87,
   Author = {L. Neiswanger and G. A. Johnson and V. P.
             Carey},
   Title = {An experimental-study of high rayleigh number mixed
             convection in a rectangular enclosure with restricted inlet
             and outlet openings},
   Journal = {Journal Of Heat Transfer-transactions Of The
             Asme},
   Volume = {109},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {446 -- 453},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {Neiswanger87}
}

@booklet{Johnson80d,
   Author = {JOHNSON, GA and FOGHLUDA, F},
   Title = {AN INVESTIGATION OF TRANSMOLYBDENUM FLUORESCENT ANODES FOR
             MAMMOGRAPHY},
   Journal = {AJR. American journal of roentgenology},
   Volume = {134},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {855-855},
   Year = {1980},
   ISSN = {0361-803X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1980JM11100062&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Johnson80d}
}

@article{fds268756,
   Author = {Calabrese, E and Johnson, GA and Watson, C},
   Title = {An ontology-based segmentation scheme for tracking postnatal
             changes in the developing rodent brain with
             MRI.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {67},
   Pages = {375-384},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23246176},
   Abstract = {The postnatal period of neurodevelopment has been implicated
             in a number of brain disorders including autism and
             schizophrenia. Rodent models have proven to be invaluable in
             advancing our understanding of the human brain, and will
             almost certainly play a pivotal role in future studies on
             postnatal neurodevelopment. The growing field of magnetic
             resonance microscopy has the potential to revolutionize our
             understanding of neurodevelopment, if it can be successfully
             and appropriately assimilated into the vast body of existing
             neuroscience research. In this study, we demonstrate the
             utility of a developmental neuro-ontology designed
             specifically for tracking regional changes in MR biomarkers
             throughout postnatal neurodevelopment. Using this
             ontological classification as a segmentation guide, we track
             regional changes in brain volume in rats between postnatal
             day zero and postnatal day 80 and demonstrate differential
             growth rates in axial versus paraxial brain regions. Both
             the ontology and the associated label volumes are provided
             as a foundation for future MR-based studies of postnatal
             neurodevelopment in normal and disease states.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.11.037},
   Key = {fds268756}
}

@booklet{Pals86,
   Author = {D. T. Pals and S. Thaisrivongs and J. A. Lawson and W. M.
             Kati and S. R. Turner and G. L. Degraaf and D. W. Harris and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {An orally active inhibitor of renin},
   Journal = {Hypertension},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1105 -- 1112},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {Pals86}
}

@article{fds174084,
   Author = {DT Pals and S Thaisrivongs and JA Lawson and WM Kati, SR Turner and GL
             DeGraaf, DW Harris and GA Johnson},
   Title = {An orally active inhibitor of renin.},
   Journal = {Hypertension},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1105-12},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0194-911X},
   Keywords = {Administration, Oral • Animals • Blood Pressure
             • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug • Heart Rate
             • Humans • Macaca fascicularis • Male •
             Oligopeptides • Rats • Rats, Inbred Strains •
             Renin • Renin-Angiotensin System • Sodium •
             antagonists & inhibitors* • drug effects •
             pharmacology* • physiology},
   Abstract = {A potent renin inhibitor, U-71038 (Boc-Pro-Phe-N-MeHis-Leu
             psi[CHOHCH2]Val-Ile-Amp), was tested for oral effectiveness.
             Enzyme kinetic studies indicated that U-71038 was a
             competitive inhibitor of hog renin with an inhibitor
             constant (Ki) value of 12 nM. Intravenous as well as oral
             administration of U-71038 to anesthetized, ganglion-blocked
             rats infused with hog renin elicited dose-related
             hypotensive responses. Intravenous administration of U-71038
             to conscious, sodium-depleted monkeys caused dose-related
             decreases of blood pressure and plasma renin activity
             without affecting heart rate. Similarly, the oral
             administration of U-71038 at 50 mg/kg to conscious,
             sodium-depleted monkeys elicited a pronounced hypotension
             and decrease in plasma renin activity that persisted for 5
             hours. The hypotensive responses elicited by intravenous and
             oral administration of U-71038 to hog renin-infused rats and
             sodium-depleted monkeys were shown to be due entirely to
             inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system. A comparison of
             the results obtained after the intravenous administration of
             U-71038 with the results obtained after the oral
             administration of U-71038 implied that at least 10% of the
             orally administered U-71038 must have been absorbed to cause
             the observed effects in hog renin-infused rats and
             sodium-depleted monkeys. The studies demonstrated that an
             inhibitor of renin with a long duration of action and with
             oral effectiveness is a feasible entity.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174084}
}

@booklet{Pals86a,
   Author = {D. T. Pals and S. Thaisrivongs and J. A. Lawson and W. M.
             Kati and S. R. Turner and G. L. Degraaf and D. W. Harris and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {An orally-active inhibitor of renin},
   Journal = {Hypertension},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {833 -- 833},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {Pals86a}
}

@booklet{Stafford80,
   Author = {M. L. Stafford and K. F. Guin and G. A. Johnson and L. A.
             Sanders and S. L. Rockey},
   Title = {Analysis of 1,4-dioxane in ethoxylated surfactants},
   Journal = {Journal Of The Society Of Cosmetic Chemists},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {281 -- 287},
   Year = {1980},
   Key = {Stafford80}
}

@booklet{Garlow02,
   Author = {J. E. Garlow and H. Ka and G. A. Johnson and R. C. Burghardt and L. A. Jaeger and F. W. Bazer},
   Title = {Analysis of osteopontin at the maternal-placental interface
             in pigs},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {66},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {718 -- 725},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Garlow02}
}

@article{fds174252,
   Author = {JE Garlow and H Ka and GA Johnson and RC Burghardt and LA Jaeger and FW
             Bazer},
   Title = {Analysis of osteopontin at the maternal-placental interface
             in pigs.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {66},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {718-25},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cell Membrane • Endometrium •
             Epithelial Cells • Female • Frozen Sections •
             In Situ Hybridization • Integrins • Oligopeptides
             • Osteopontin • Placenta • Pregnancy •
             RNA, Messenger • Sialoglycoproteins • Signal
             Transduction • Swine* • Trophoblasts • Uterus
             • analysis • analysis* • chemistry •
             chemistry* • genetics • metabolism •
             pharmacology • physiology},
   Abstract = {Noninvasive, epitheliochorial placentation in the pig
             follows a prolonged preimplantation period characterized by
             migration, spacing and elongation of conceptuses, and
             secretion of estrogen for maternal recognition of pregnancy.
             Osteopontin (OPN) is an extracellular matrix protein that
             binds integrins to promote cell-cell attachment and
             communication. OPN appears to play a key role in conceptus
             implantation and maintenance of pregnancy in sheep; however,
             a role for OPN in the porcine uterus has not been
             established. Therefore, this study examined OPN expression
             and function in the porcine uterus and conceptus
             (embryo/fetus and associated extraembryonic membranes).
             Northern and slot blot hybridization detected an increase in
             endometrial OPN expression between Days 25 and 30, and
             levels remained elevated through Day 85 of pregnancy. In
             situ hybridization localized OPN mRNA to discrete regions of
             the uterine luminal epithelium (LE) on Day 15 of pregnancy
             and to the entire LE thereafter. Glandular epithelial (GE)
             expression of OPN mRNA was first detected on Day 35 of
             pregnancy and increased through Day 85. Both 70- and 45-kDa
             forms of OPN protein were detected in cyclic and pregnant
             endometrium by Western blotting. OPN protein was localized
             to the LE and GE by immunofluorescence; however, only the
             70-kDa OPN was detected in uterine flushings. OPN protein
             was present along the entire uterine-placental interface
             after Day 30 of pregnancy. In addition, OPN mRNA and protein
             were localized to immune-like cells within the stratum
             compactum of the endometrium in both Day 9 cyclic and
             pregnant gilts. Incubation of OPN-coated microbeads with
             porcine trophectoderm and uterine luminal epithelial cells
             induced Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-dependent integrin activation and
             transmembrane accumulation of cytoskeletal molecules at the
             apical cell surface as assessed by immunofluorescence
             detection of talin or alpha-actinin as markers for focal
             adhesions. These results suggest that OPN, expressed by
             uterine epithelium and immune cells, may interact with
             receptors (i.e., integrins) on conceptus and uterus to
             promote conceptus development and signaling between these
             tissues as key contributors to attachment and placentation
             in the pig.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174252}
}

@article{fds268721,
   Author = {Ashton, JR and Befera, N and Clark, D and Qi, Y and Mao, L and Rockman, HA and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT},
   Title = {Anatomical and functional imaging of myocardial infarction
             in mice using micro-CT and eXIA 160 contrast
             agent.},
   Journal = {Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {161-168},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1555-4309},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cmmi.1557},
   Abstract = {Noninvasive small animal imaging techniques are essential
             for evaluation of cardiac disease and potential
             therapeutics. A novel preclinical iodinated contrast agent
             called eXIA 160 has recently been developed, which has been
             evaluated for micro-CT cardiac imaging. eXIA 160 creates
             strong contrast between blood and tissue immediately after
             its injection and is subsequently taken up by the myocardium
             and other metabolically active tissues over time. We focus
             on these properties of eXIA and show its use in imaging
             myocardial infarction in mice. Five C57BL/6 mice were imaged
             ~2 weeks after left anterior descending coronary artery
             ligation. Six C57BL/6 mice were used as controls.
             Immediately after injection of eXIA 160, an enhancement
             difference between blood and myocardium of ~340 HU enabled
             cardiac function estimation via 4D micro-CT scanning with
             retrospective gating. Four hours post-injection, the healthy
             perfused myocardium had a contrast difference of ~140 HU
             relative to blood while the infarcted myocardium showed no
             enhancement. These differences allowed quantification of
             infarct size via dual-energy micro-CT. In vivo micro-SPECT
             imaging and ex vivo triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC)
             staining provided validation for the micro-CT findings. Root
             mean squared error of infarct measurements was 2.7% between
             micro-CT and SPECT, and 4.7% between micro-CT and TTC. Thus,
             micro-CT with eXIA 160 can be used to provide both
             morphological and functional data for preclinical studies
             evaluating myocardial infarction and potential therapies.
             Further studies are warranted to study the potential use of
             eXIA 160 as a CT molecular imaging tool for other
             metabolically active tissues in the mouse.},
   Doi = {10.1002/cmmi.1557},
   Key = {fds268721}
}

@booklet{Bristow81,
   Author = {M. R. Bristow and W. A. Minobe and M. E. Billingham and J.
             B. Marmor and G. A. Johnson and B. M. Ishimoto and W. S.
             Sageman and J. R. Daniels},
   Title = {Anthracycline-associated cardiac and renal damage in rabbits
             - evidence for mediation by vasoactive substances},
   Journal = {Laboratory Investigation},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {157 -- 168},
   Year = {1981},
   Key = {Bristow81}
}

@article{fds174100,
   Author = {MR Bristow and WA Minobe and ME Billingham and JB Marmor and GA Johnson and BM Ishimoto and WS Sageman, JR Daniels},
   Title = {Anthracycline-associated cardiac and renal damage in
             rabbits. Evidence for mediation by vasoactive
             substances.},
   Journal = {Laboratory investigation; a journal of technical methods and
             pathology},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {157-68},
   Year = {1981},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0023-6837},
   Keywords = {Animals • Arteries • Cardiomyopathies •
             Catecholamines • Doxorubicin • Female •
             Histamine Antagonists • Histamine Release • Kidney
             Diseases • Myocardium • Rabbits •
             Vasoconstrictor Agents • Vasodilator Agents •
             adverse effects* • blood • chemically induced*
             • metabolism • pharmacology •
             pharmacology*},
   Abstract = {We tested the hypothesis that anthracycline-induced cardiac
             and renal damage is mediated by vasoactive substances. A
             1-minute exposure to 5 micrograms per ml. of doxorubicin
             (DXR, Adriamycin) produced cardiac histamine release in
             isolated rabbit hearts. Under conditions in which histamine
             uptake and metabolism were impaired, the administration of
             DXR, 2 mg. per kg., over 1 minute was associated with
             elevations in arterial histamine and catecholamines. The
             chronic weekly administration of DXR produced severe cardiac
             and renal damage. The administration of combined histaminic
             and adrenergic blockade with diphenhydramine, cimetidine,
             phentolamine, and propranolol (DCPP) pre- and immediately
             post-DXR resulted in near total protection against
             DXR-mediated cardiac damage and prevented the majority of
             the renal lesions. The combined administration of
             diphenhydramine, cimetidine, phentolamine, and propranolol
             did not appear to be acting by mechanisms other than
             blockade of vasoactive amine receptors as cardiac uptake of
             DXR and the DXR antitumor response were not altered by
             diphenhydramine, cimetidine, phentolamine, and propranolol.
             This study demonstrates that anthracycline-associated
             cardiac and renal toxicity may be mediated by vasoactive
             substances and that anthracycline cardiomyopathy is
             potentially preventable.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174100}
}

@booklet{Burvill95a,
   Author = {P. W. Burvill and G. A. Johnson and K. D. Jamrozik and C. S.
             Anderson and E. G. Stewartwynne and T. M. H.
             Chakera},
   Title = {Anxiety disorders after stroke - results from the perth
             community stroke study},
   Journal = {British Journal Of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {166},
   Pages = {328 -- 332},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Burvill95a}
}

@article{fds174259,
   Author = {PW Burvill and GA Johnson and KD Jamrozik and CS Anderson and EG
             Stewart-Wynne, TM Chakera},
   Title = {Anxiety disorders after stroke: results from the Perth
             Community Stroke Study.},
   Journal = {The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental
             science},
   Volume = {166},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {328-32},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0007-1250},
   Keywords = {Adaptation, Psychological • Adult • Aged •
             Agoraphobia • Anxiety Disorders • Cerebrovascular
             Disorders • Comorbidity • Cross-Sectional Studies
             • Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders
             • Depressive Disorder • Female • Follow-Up
             Studies • Humans • Incidence • Male •
             Middle Aged • Sick Role • Western Australia •
             diagnosis • epidemiology • epidemiology* •
             psychology},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: The prevalence of anxiety disorders in 294
             patients who survived to four months in the Perth Community
             Stroke Study (Perth, Australia), and a follow-up of these
             patients at 12 months, are presented. METHOD: Diagnoses are
             described both in the usual DSM hierarchic format and by a
             non-hierarchic approach. Adoption of the hierarchic approach
             alone greatly underestimates the prevalence of anxiety
             disorders. RESULTS: Most cases were of agoraphobia, and the
             remainder were generalised anxiety disorder. The prevalence
             of anxiety disorders alone was 5% in men and 19% in women;
             in community controls, it was 5% in men and 8% in women.
             Adopting a non-hierarchic approach to diagnosis gave a
             prevalence of 12% in men and 28% in women. When those who
             showed evidence of anxiety disorder before stroke were
             subtracted, the latter prevalence was 9% in men and 20% in
             women. CONCLUSION: One-third of the men and half of the
             women with post-stroke anxiety disorders showed evidence of
             either depression or an anxiety disorder at the time of the
             stroke. At 12 month follow-up of 49 patients with
             agoraphobia by a non-hierarchic approach, 51% had recovered,
             and equal proportions of the remainder had died or still had
             agoraphobia. The only major difference in outcome between
             those with anxiety disorder alone and those with comorbid
             depression was the greater mortality in the
             latter.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174259}
}

@booklet{Burg02,
   Author = {Burg, KJL and Delnomdedieu, M and Beiler, RJ and Culberson, CR and Greene, KG and Halberstadt, CR and Holder, WD and Loebsack, AB and Roland, WD and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Application of magnetic resonance microscopy to tissue
             engineering: a polylactide model.},
   Journal = {Journal of Biomedical Materials Research},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {380-390},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0021-9304},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12115463},
   Abstract = {Absorbable polymers are unique materials that find
             application as temporary scaffolds in tissue engineering.
             They are often extremely sensitive to histological
             processing and, for this reason, studying fragile,
             tissue-engineered constructs before implantation can be
             quite difficult. This research investigates the use of
             noninvasive imaging using magnetic resonance microscopy
             (MRM) as a tool to enhance the assessment of these cellular
             constructs. A series of cellular, polylactide constructs was
             developed and analyzed using a battery of tests, including
             MRM. Distribution of rat aortic smooth muscle cells within
             the scaffolds was compared as one example of a tissue
             engineering MRM application. Cells were loaded in varying
             amounts using static and dynamic methods. It was found that
             the cellular component was readily identified and the
             polymer microstructure readily assessed. Specifically, the
             MRM results showed a heterogeneous distribution of cells due
             to static loading and a homogenous distribution associated
             with dynamic loading, results that were not visible through
             biochemical tests, scanning electron microscopy, or
             histological evaluation independently. MRM also allowed
             differentiation between different levels of cellular
             loading. The current state of MRM is such that it is
             extremely useful in the refinement of polymer processing and
             cell seeding methods. This method has the potential, with
             technological advances, to be of future use in the
             characterization of cell-polymer interactions.},
   Doi = {10.1002/jbm.10146},
   Key = {Burg02}
}

@article{fds132755,
   Author = {KJ Burg and M Delnomdedieu and RJ Beiler and CR Culberson and KG Greene and CR Halberstadt and WD Holder and AB Loebsack and WD Roland and GA
             Johnson},
   Title = {Application of magnetic resonance microscopy to tissue
             engineering: a polylactide model.},
   Journal = {Journal of biomedical materials research, United
             States},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {380-90},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0021-9304},
   Keywords = {Absorbable Implants • Animals • Aorta •
             Biocompatible Materials • Cell Survival • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging* • Materials Testing •
             Microscopy • Muscle, Smooth, Vascular • Polyesters
             • Porosity • Rats • Tissue Engineering •
             cytology • instrumentation • instrumentation*
             • methods • methods*},
   Abstract = {Absorbable polymers are unique materials that find
             application as temporary scaffolds in tissue engineering.
             They are often extremely sensitive to histological
             processing and, for this reason, studying fragile,
             tissue-engineered constructs before implantation can be
             quite difficult. This research investigates the use of
             noninvasive imaging using magnetic resonance microscopy
             (MRM) as a tool to enhance the assessment of these cellular
             constructs. A series of cellular, polylactide constructs was
             developed and analyzed using a battery of tests, including
             MRM. Distribution of rat aortic smooth muscle cells within
             the scaffolds was compared as one example of a tissue
             engineering MRM application. Cells were loaded in varying
             amounts using static and dynamic methods. It was found that
             the cellular component was readily identified and the
             polymer microstructure readily assessed. Specifically, the
             MRM results showed a heterogeneous distribution of cells due
             to static loading and a homogenous distribution associated
             with dynamic loading, results that were not visible through
             biochemical tests, scanning electron microscopy, or
             histological evaluation independently. MRM also allowed
             differentiation between different levels of cellular
             loading. The current state of MRM is such that it is
             extremely useful in the refinement of polymer processing and
             cell seeding methods. This method has the potential, with
             technological advances, to be of future use in the
             characterization of cell-polymer interactions.},
   Key = {fds132755}
}

@article{fds268871,
   Author = {De Lin and M and Toncheva, G and Nguyen, G and Kim, S and Anderson-Evans,
             C and Johnson, GA and Yoshizumi, TT},
   Title = {Application of MOSFET detectors for dosimetry in small
             animal radiography using short exposure times.},
   Journal = {Radiation Research},
   Volume = {170},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {260-263},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0033-7587},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18666818},
   Keywords = {Equipment Design • Equipment Failure Analysis •
             Radiation Dosage • Radiographic Image Enhancement
             • Radiometry • Sensitivity and Specificity •
             Transducers* • Transistors* • instrumentation*
             • methods},
   Abstract = {Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) X-ray imaging for
             small animals can be used for functional phenotyping given
             its ability to capture rapid physiological changes at high
             spatial and temporal resolution. The higher temporal and
             spatial requirements for small-animal imaging drive the need
             for short, high-flux X-ray pulses. However, high doses of
             ionizing radiation can affect the physiology. The purpose of
             this study was to verify and apply metal oxide semiconductor
             field effect transistor (MOSFET) technology to dosimetry for
             small-animal diagnostic imaging. A tungsten anode X-ray
             source was used to expose a tissue-equivalent mouse phantom.
             Dose measurements were made on the phantom surface and
             interior. The MOSFETs were verified with thermoluminescence
             dosimeters (TLDs). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the
             MOSFET results agreed with the TLD results (bias, 0.0625).
             Using typical small animal DSA scan parameters, the dose
             ranged from 0.7 to 2.2 cGy. Application of the MOSFETs in
             the small animal environment provided two main benefits: (1)
             the availability of results in near real-time instead of the
             hours needed for TLD processes and (2) the ability to
             support multiple exposures with different X-ray techniques
             (various of kVp, mA and ms) using the same MOSFET. This
             MOSFET technology has proven to be a fast, reliable small
             animal dosimetry method for DSA imaging and is a good system
             for dose monitoring for serial and gene expression
             studies.},
   Doi = {10.1667/RR1328.1},
   Key = {fds268871}
}

@article{fds268881,
   Author = {Maronpot, RR and Sills, RC and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Applications of magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Toxicologic Pathology (Sage)},
   Volume = {32 Suppl 2},
   Pages = {42-48},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0192-6233},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15503663},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Fetus • Humans • Image
             Processing, Computer-Assisted • Imaging,
             Three-Dimensional • Magnetic Resonance Imaging* •
             Microscopy • Sulfur Oxides • Teratology •
             Urate Oxidase • genetics • metabolism •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enjoyed enormous
             clinical success since the first demonstration of the method
             more than 30 years ago. An increasing number of
             pharmaceutical manufacturers seeking new biomarkers for
             assessing drug efficacy and toxicity are turning to MRI. A
             specific application of MRI promises to revolutionize
             pathology for the basic scientist in the same way MRI has
             forever altered the standard of care in the clinical domain.
             More specifically, this application is the use of magnetic
             resonance microscopy (MRM) in conjunction with new staining
             methodologies that now make MRM routinely available to the
             widest range of investigators.},
   Doi = {10.1080/01926230490451707},
   Key = {fds268881}
}

@booklet{Yelbuz03,
   Author = {Yelbuz, TM and Zhang, XW and Choma, MA and Stadt, HA and Zdanowicz, M and Johnson, GA and Kirby, ML},
   Title = {Approaching cardiac development in three dimensions by
             magnetic resonance microscopy},
   Journal = {Circulation},
   Volume = {108},
   Number = {22},
   Pages = {E154-E155},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0009-7322},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000186894500017&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1161/01.CIR.0000102940.17908.CA},
   Key = {Yelbuz03}
}

@article{fds174168,
   Author = {RS Dhariwal and RK Fitch and CL Lavelle and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Artefacts observed on dental tissues during ion etching in a
             scanning electron microscope.},
   Journal = {Journal of anatomy},
   Volume = {122},
   Number = {Pt 1},
   Pages = {133-40},
   Year = {1976},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0021-8782},
   Keywords = {Dental Amalgam • Dental Enamel • Dental Materials
             • Dentin • Histological Techniques • Humans
             • Ions • Microscopy, Electron, Scanning •
             Tooth • methods* • ultrastructure •
             ultrastructure*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174168}
}

@booklet{Anderson93,
   Author = {C. S. Anderson and K. D. Jamrozik and P. W. Burvill and T.
             M. H. Chakera and G. A. Johnson and E. G.
             Stewartwynne},
   Title = {Ascertaining the true incidence of stroke - experience from
             the perth community stroke study, 1989-1990},
   Journal = {Medical Journal Of Australia},
   Volume = {158},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {80 -- 84},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {Anderson93}
}

@article{fds174290,
   Author = {CS Anderson and KD Jamrozik and PW Burvill and TM Chakera and GA
             Johnson, EG Stewart-Wynne},
   Title = {Ascertaining the true incidence of stroke: experience from
             the Perth Community Stroke Study, 1989-1990.},
   Journal = {The Medical journal of Australia},
   Volume = {158},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {80-4},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0025-729X},
   Keywords = {Adolescent • Adult • Age Factors • Aged
             • Aged, 80 and over • Cerebrovascular Disorders
             • Confidence Intervals • Female • Follow-Up
             Studies • Humans • Incidence • Ischemic
             Attack, Transient • Male • Middle Aged • Sex
             Factors • Western Australia • epidemiology •
             epidemiology* • mortality},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To determine the age and sex specific incidence,
             and case fatality of stroke in Perth, Western Australia.
             DESIGN AND SETTING: A population-based descriptive
             epidemiological study. SUBJECTS: All residents of a
             geographically defined segment of the Perth metropolitan
             area (population 138,708) who had a stroke or transient
             ischaemic attack between 20 February 1989 and 19 August
             1990, inclusive. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Definite acute
             "first-ever-in-a-lifetime" (first-ever) and recurrent stroke
             classified according to standard definitions and criteria.
             RESULTS: During the 18-month study period, 536 stroke events
             occurred among 492 patients, 69% of which were first-ever
             strokes. The crude annual event rate for all strokes was 258
             (95% confidence interval 231-285) per 100,000, and the
             overall case fatality at 28 days was 24% (95% CI, 20%-28%).
             The crude annual incidence for first-ever strokes was 178
             (95% CI, 156-200) per 100,000; 189 (95% CI, 157-221) per
             100,000 in males and 166 (95% CI, 136-196) per 100,000 in
             females. The corresponding rates, age-adjusted to the
             "world" population, were 132 (95% CI, 109-155) for males and
             77 (95% CI, 60-94) for females. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to
             mortality rates for ischaemic heart disease, the incidence
             of stroke in Australia appears little different from that
             for several other Western countries. For both males and
             females the incidence of stroke rises exponentially with
             increasing age. Although the sex-dependent difference in the
             risk of stroke is greatest in middle age, males are at
             greater risk of stroke even among the most elderly. To
             determine the incidence of stroke accurately,
             population-based studies of stroke need exhaustive and
             overlapping sources of case ascertainment. If only cases
             admitted to hospital had been used, we would have
             underestimated the rate of stroke among the most elderly by
             almost 40%. We estimate that approximately 37,000 people,
             about 50% of whom are over the age of 75, suffer a stroke
             each year in Australia.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174290}
}

@article{fds268719,
   Author = {Lee, C-L and Min, H and Befera, N and Clark, D and Qi, Y and Das, S and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT and Kirsch, DG},
   Title = {Assessing cardiac injury in mice with dual energy-microCT,
             4D-microCT, and microSPECT imaging after partial heart
             irradiation.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology,
             Physics},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {686-693},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0360-3016},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2013.11.238},
   Abstract = {To develop a mouse model of cardiac injury after partial
             heart irradiation (PHI) and to test whether dual energy
             (DE)-microCT and 4-dimensional (4D)-microCT can be used to
             assess cardiac injury after PHI to complement myocardial
             perfusion imaging using micro-single photon emission
             computed tomography (SPECT).To study cardiac injury from
             tangent field irradiation in mice, we used a small-field
             biological irradiator to deliver a single dose of 12 Gy
             x-rays to approximately one-third of the left ventricle (LV)
             of Tie2Cre; p53(FL/+) and Tie2Cre; p53(FL/-) mice, where 1
             or both alleles of p53 are deleted in endothelial cells.
             Four and 8 weeks after irradiation, mice were injected with
             gold and iodinated nanoparticle-based contrast agents, and
             imaged with DE-microCT and 4D-microCT to evaluate myocardial
             vascular permeability and cardiac function, respectively.
             Additionally, the same mice were imaged with microSPECT to
             assess myocardial perfusion.After PHI with tangent fields,
             DE-microCT scans showed a time-dependent increase in
             accumulation of gold nanoparticles (AuNp) in the myocardium
             of Tie2Cre; p53(FL/-) mice. In Tie2Cre; p53(FL/-) mice,
             extravasation of AuNp was observed within the irradiated LV,
             whereas in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53(FL/+) mice, AuNp
             were restricted to blood vessels. In addition, data from
             DE-microCT and microSPECT showed a linear correlation (R(2)
             = 0.97) between the fraction of the LV that accumulated AuNp
             and the fraction of LV with a perfusion defect. Furthermore,
             4D-microCT scans demonstrated that PHI caused a markedly
             decreased ejection fraction, and higher end-diastolic and
             end-systolic volumes, to develop in Tie2Cre; p53(FL/-) mice,
             which were associated with compensatory cardiac hypertrophy
             of the heart that was not irradiated.Our results show that
             DE-microCT and 4D-microCT with nanoparticle-based contrast
             agents are novel imaging approaches complementary to
             microSPECT for noninvasive assessment of the change in
             myocardial vascular permeability and cardiac function of
             mice in whom myocardial injury develops after
             PHI.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2013.11.238},
   Key = {fds268719}
}

@booklet{Qiu97,
   Author = {Qiu, HH and Cofer, GP and Hedlund, LW and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Automated feedback control of body temperature for small
             animal studies with MR microscopy.},
   Journal = {IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1107-1113},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0018-9294},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9353990},
   Abstract = {A temperature control system consisting of a thermistor,
             signal processor, and computer algorithm was developed for
             magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy of small live animals.
             With control of body temperature within +/- 0.2 degree C of
             the set point, heart rate is stabilized and, in turn,
             repetition time (TR) during cardiac-gated studies is less
             variable. Thus, image quality and resolution are
             improved.},
   Doi = {10.1109/10.641338},
   Key = {Qiu97}
}

@article{fds132756,
   Author = {HH Qiu and GP Cofer and LW Hedlund and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Automated feedback control of body temperature for small
             animal studies with MR microscopy.},
   Journal = {IEEE transactions on bio-medical engineering, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1107-13},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0018-9294},
   Keywords = {Animals • Body Temperature • Equipment Design
             • Feedback • Ferrets • Guinea Pigs •
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Mice • Microscopy
             • Models, Biological • Monitoring, Physiologic
             • Rats • Respiration, Artificial • Signal
             Processing, Computer-Assisted* • Thermometers* •
             instrumentation • methods • physiology*},
   Abstract = {A temperature control system consisting of a thermistor,
             signal processor, and computer algorithm was developed for
             magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy of small live animals.
             With control of body temperature within +/- 0.2 degree C of
             the set point, heart rate is stabilized and, in turn,
             repetition time (TR) during cardiac-gated studies is less
             variable. Thus, image quality and resolution are
             improved.},
   Key = {fds132756}
}

@booklet{Sherrier85a,
   Author = {SHERRIER, RH and SUDDARTH, SA and JOHNSON, GA and RAVIN,
             CE},
   Title = {AUTOMATED OBSERVER STUDIES ON A DIGITAL CHEST
             SYSTEM},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {S18-S18},
   Year = {1985},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1985ARG0500090&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Sherrier85a}
}

@article{fds268883,
   Author = {Ali, AA and Dale, AM and Badea, A and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Automated segmentation of neuroanatomical structures in
             multispectral MR microscopy of the mouse
             brain.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {425-435},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15908233},
   Keywords = {Algorithms • Animals • Anisotropy • Bayes
             Theorem • Brain • Image Processing,
             Computer-Assisted • Magnetic Resonance Imaging •
             Male • Markov Chains • Mice • Mice, Inbred
             C57BL • Models, Statistical • Reproducibility of
             Results • anatomy & histology* • methods* •
             physiology* • statistics & numerical
             data*},
   Abstract = {We present the automated segmentation of magnetic resonance
             microscopy (MRM) images of the C57BL/6J mouse brain into 21
             neuroanatomical structures, including the ventricular
             system, corpus callosum, hippocampus, caudate putamen,
             inferior colliculus, internal capsule, globus pallidus, and
             substantia nigra. The segmentation algorithm operates on
             multispectral, three-dimensional (3D) MR data acquired at
             90-microm isotropic resolution. Probabilistic information
             used in the segmentation is extracted from training datasets
             of T2-weighted, proton density-weighted, and
             diffusion-weighted acquisitions. Spatial information is
             employed in the form of prior probabilities of occurrence of
             a structure at a location (location priors) and the pairwise
             probabilities between structures (contextual priors).
             Validation using standard morphometry indices shows good
             consistency between automatically segmented and manually
             traced data. Results achieved in the mouse brain are
             comparable with those achieved in human brain studies using
             similar techniques. The segmentation algorithm shows
             excellent potential for routine morphological phenotyping of
             mouse models.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2005.04.017},
   Key = {fds268883}
}

@article{fds268864,
   Author = {Sharief, AA and Badea, A and Dale, AM and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Automated segmentation of the actively stained mouse brain
             using multi-spectral MR microscopy.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {136-145},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17933556},
   Keywords = {Algorithms • Animals • Artificial Intelligence*
             • Brain • Image Enhancement • Image
             Interpretation, Computer-Assisted • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging • Male • Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL
             • Microscopy • Pattern Recognition, Automated
             • Reproducibility of Results • Sensitivity and
             Specificity • Staining and Labeling • Subtraction
             Technique • cytology* • methods •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) has created new
             approaches for high-throughput morphological phenotyping of
             mouse models of diseases. Transgenic and knockout mice serve
             as a test bed for validating hypotheses that link genotype
             to the phenotype of diseases, as well as developing and
             tracking treatments. We describe here a Markov random fields
             based segmentation of the actively stained mouse brain, as a
             prerequisite for morphological phenotyping. Active staining
             achieves higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) thereby enabling
             higher resolution imaging per unit time than obtained in
             previous formalin-fixed mouse brain studies. The
             segmentation algorithm was trained on isotropic 43-mum T1-
             and T2-weighted MRM images. The mouse brain was segmented
             into 33 structures, including the hippocampus, amygdala,
             hypothalamus, thalamus, as well as fiber tracts and
             ventricles. Probabilistic information used in the
             segmentation consisted of (a) intensity distributions in the
             T1- and T2-weighted data, (b) location, and (c) contextual
             priors for incorporating spatial information. Validation
             using standard morphometric indices showed excellent
             consistency between automatically and manually segmented
             data. The algorithm has been tested on the widely used
             C57BL/6J strain, as well as on a selection of six
             recombinant inbred BXD strains, chosen especially for their
             largely variant hippocampus.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2007.08.028},
   Key = {fds268864}
}

@article{fds174293,
   Author = {GA Johnson and TR Hansen and KJ Austin and EA Van Kirk and WJ
             Murdoch},
   Title = {Baculovirus-insect cell production of bioactive
             choriogonadotropin-immunoglobulin G heavy-chain fusion
             proteins in sheep.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {68-73},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Base Sequence • Cell Line •
             Chorionic Gonadotropin • DNA Primers • DNA,
             Complementary • Immunoglobulin G • Immunoglobulin
             Heavy Chains • Male • Mice • Molecular
             Sequence Data • Nucleopolyhedrovirus • Recombinant
             Fusion Proteins • Sheep • Spodoptera • Testis
             • Testosterone • Tumor Cells, Cultured •
             biosynthesis • biosynthesis* • blood • drug
             effects • genetics • pathology •
             pharmacology},
   Abstract = {A hybrid cDNA encoding a fusion protein between the beta
             subunit of hCG (beta hCG) and constant domains of a mouse
             IgG heavy chain (CH1-3) was inserted into a baculovirus
             expression vector. Insect cells transfected with foreign DNA
             synthesized multimeric forms of fusion protein that
             inhibited hCG-induced steroid hormone secretion by mouse
             Leydig tumor cells. Leydig cells were lysed by beta
             hCG-CH1-3 in the presence of complement. Intravenous
             injection of beta hCG-CH1-3 in rams was associated with
             testicular mononuclear leukocyte infiltration, interstitial
             tissue damage, and a transient depression in circulatory
             testosterone (levels returned to normal within 2 wk). It
             appears that targeted cell-killing can be mediated by
             recombinant proteins composed of the receptor-binding moiety
             of hormones and truncated effector (Fc) regions of lethal
             antibodies.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174293}
}

@booklet{Johnson95c,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and T. R. Hansen and K. J. Austin and E. A.
             Vankirk and W. J. Murdoch},
   Title = {Baculovirus-insect cell production of bioactive
             choriogonadotropin-immunoglobulin-g heavy-chain fusion
             proteins in sheep},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {68 -- 73},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {Johnson95c}
}

@article{fds292756,
   Author = {Rajagopal, S and Kovacs, J and Badea, C and Johnson, GA and Rockman, HA and Piantadosi, CA and Lefkowitz, RJ},
   Title = {BETA-ARRESTINS REGULATE SIGNALING BY BONE MORPHOGENETIC
             PROTEIN TYPE II RECEPTOR IN PULMONARY ARTERIAL
             HYPERTENSION},
   Journal = {JACC - Journal of the American College of
             Cardiology},
   Volume = {57},
   Number = {14},
   Pages = {E2046-E2046},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0735-1097},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000291695102051&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds292756}
}

@article{fds174135,
   Author = {BM Markaverich and RR Roberts and MA Alejandro and GA Johnson and BS
             Middleditch, JH Clark},
   Title = {Bioflavonoid interaction with rat uterine type II binding
             sites and cell growth inhibition.},
   Journal = {Journal of steroid biochemistry},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1-6},
   Pages = {71-8},
   Year = {1988},
   ISSN = {0022-4731},
   Keywords = {Animals • Binding, Competitive • Breast Neoplasms
             • Cell Division • Cell Line • Cell Nucleus
             • Cytosol • Female • Flavonoids • Humans
             • Kinetics • Rats • Receptors, Estradiol
             • Receptors, Estrogen • Uterus • cytology
             • drug effects • metabolism • metabolism*
             • pharmacology*},
   Abstract = {Competition analysis with a number of known bioflavonoids
             demonstrated that these compounds (luteolin, quercetin,
             pelargonin) compete for [3H]estradiol binding to cytosol and
             nuclear type II sites in rat uterine preparations. The
             inhibition of [3H]estradiol binding to type II sites was
             specific and these bioflavonoids did not interact with the
             rat uterine estrogen receptor. Since estradiol stimulation
             of nuclear type II sites in the rat uterus is highly
             correlated with cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia, we
             assessed the effects of these compounds on the growth of
             MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in culture and on estradiol
             stimulation of uterine growth in the immature rat. The data
             demonstrated that addition of quercetin (5-10 micrograms/ml)
             to MCF-7 cell cultures resulted in a dose-dependent
             inhibition of cell growth (DNA/flask). This effect was
             reversible by removal of quercetin from the culture medium,
             or by the addition of 10 nM estradiol-17 beta to these cell
             cultures containing this bioflavonoid. Since estradiol-17
             beta (10 nM) stimulated nuclear type II sites and
             proliferation of MCF-7 cells, we believe bioflavonoid
             inhibition of MCF-7 cell growth may be mediated through an
             interaction with nuclear type II sites. This hypothesis was
             confirmed by in vivo studies which demonstrated that
             injection of luteolin or quercetin blocked estradiol
             stimulation of nuclear type II sites in the immature rat
             uterus and this correlated with an inhibition of uterine
             growth (wet and dry weight). These studies suggest
             bioflavonoids, through an interaction with type II sites,
             may be involved in cell growth regulation.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174135}
}

@booklet{Markaverich88a,
   Author = {B. M. Markaverich and R. R. Roberts and M. A. Alejandro and G. A. Johnson and B. S. Middleditch and J. H.
             Clark},
   Title = {Bioflavonoid interaction with rat uterine type-ii
             binding-sites and cell-growth inhibition},
   Journal = {Journal Of Steroid Biochemistry And Molecular
             Biology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1-6},
   Pages = {71 -- 78},
   Year = {1988},
   Key = {Markaverich88a}
}

@booklet{Spencer03,
   Author = {T. E. Spencer and R. C. Burghardt and G. A. Johnson and F.
             W. Bazer},
   Title = {Biology of progesterone and placental hormone actions on the
             uterus.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {68},
   Pages = {96 -- 97},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {Spencer03}
}

@booklet{Teixeira97,
   Author = {M. G. Teixeira and K. J. Austin and D. J. Perry and V. D.
             Dooley and G. A. Johnson and B. R. Francis and T. R.
             Hansen},
   Title = {Bovine granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 is secreted by the
             endometrium in response to interferon-tau
             (IFN-tau)},
   Journal = {Endocrine},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {31 -- 37},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {Teixeira97}
}

@article{fds174211,
   Author = {MG Teixeira and KJ Austin and DJ Perry and VD Dooley and GA Johnson and BR
             Francis, TR Hansen},
   Title = {Bovine granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 is secreted by the
             endometrium in response to interferon-tau
             (IFN-tau).},
   Journal = {Endocrine},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {31-7},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1355-008X},
   Keywords = {Amino Acid Sequence • Animals • Blotting, Western
             • Cattle • Chemokine CXCL6 • Chemokines
             • Chemokines, CXC* • Chromatography, Ion Exchange
             • Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel •
             Endometrium • Female • Interferon Type I •
             Molecular Sequence Data • Pregnancy Proteins •
             Sheep • immunology • metabolism*},
   Abstract = {Interferon-tau (IFN-tau) is secreted by the bovine conceptus
             and may regulate synthesis of uterine endometrial cytokines
             to provide an environment that is conductive to embryo
             development and implantation. Interferon-tau stimulates
             secretion of an 8-kDa uterine protein (P8) in the cow. P8
             was purified, digested to yield internal peptides, and
             partially sequenced to determine identity. Two internal
             peptides had 100% (13-mer) and 92% (12-mer) amino acid
             sequence identity with bovine granulocyte chemotactic
             protein-2 (bGCP-2). Bovine GCP-2 is an alpha-chemokine that
             acts primarily as a potent chemoattractant for granulocyte
             cells of the immune system. A peptide was synthesized based
             on a region of bGCP-2 that overlapped with a P8 peptide
             amino acid sequence, coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin,
             and used to generate high titer polyclonal antiserum in
             sheep. Western blots revealed that bGCP-2 was not released
             by endometrium from day 14 nonpregnant cows, but was
             released in response to 25 nM IFN-tau (p<0.05). Uterine
             GCP-2 exhibited high affinity to heparin agarose, a
             characteristic shared by all alpha chemokines. This is the
             first report describing presence of GCP-2 in the uterine
             endometrium and regulation by IFN-tau. The regulation of
             bGCP-2 by IFN-tau may have important implications for
             cytokine networking in the uterus during pregnancy. Also,
             the regulation of inflammation and angiogenesis by bGCP-2
             working together with other cytokines may be integral to
             establishing early pregnancy and implantation in the
             cow.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174211}
}

@article{fds204273,
   Author = {M Glaucia Teixeira and KJ Austin and DJ Perry and VD Dooley and GA
             Johnson, BR Francis and TR Hansen},
   Title = {Bovine granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 is secreted by the
             endometrium in response to interferon-tau
             (IFN-τ).},
   Journal = {Endocrine},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {31-7},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1355-008X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02738799},
   Abstract = {Interferon-tau (IFN-τ) is secreted by the bovine conceptus
             and may regulate synthesis of uterine endometrial cytokines
             to provide an environment that is conducive to embryo
             development and implantation. Interferon-τ stimulates
             secretion of an 8-kDa uterine protein (P8) in the cow. P8
             was purified, digested to yield internal peptides, and
             partially sequenced to determine identity. Two internal
             peptides had 100% (13-mer) and 92% (12-mer) amino acid
             sequence identity with bovine granulocyte chemotactic
             protein-2 (bGCP-2). Bovine GCP-2 is an α-chemokine that
             acts primarily as a potent chemoattractant for granulocyte
             cells of the immune system. A peptide was synthesized based
             on a region of bGCP-2 that overlapped with a P8 peptide
             amino acid sequence, coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin,
             and used to generate high titer polyclonal antiserum in
             sheep. Western blots revealed that bGCP-2 was not released
             by endometrium from day 14 nonpregnant cows, but was
             released in response to 25 nM IFN-τ (p<0.05). Uterine GCP-2
             exhibited high affinity to heparin agarose, a characteristic
             shared by all α chemokines. This is the first report
             describing presence of GCP-2 in the uterine endometrium and
             regulation by IFN-τ. The regulation of bGCP-2 by IFN-τ may
             have important implications for cytokine networking in the
             uterus during pregnancy. Also, the regulation of
             inflammation and angiogenesis by bGCP-2 working together
             with other cytokines may be integral to establishing early
             pregnancy and implantation in the cow.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF02738799},
   Key = {fds204273}
}

@booklet{Binelli01,
   Author = {M. Binelli and P. Subramaniam and T. Diaz and G. A. Johnson and T. R. Hansen and L. Badinga and W. W.
             Thatcher},
   Title = {Bovine interferon-tau stimulates the Janus kinase-signal
             transducer and activator of transcription pathway in bovine
             endometrial epithelial cells},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {654 -- 665},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {Binelli01}
}

@article{fds174175,
   Author = {M Binelli and P Subramaniam and T Diaz and GA Johnson and TR Hansen and L
             Badinga, WW Thatcher},
   Title = {Bovine interferon-tau stimulates the Janus kinase-signal
             transducer and activator of transcription pathway in bovine
             endometrial epithelial cells.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {654-65},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cattle • DNA-Binding Proteins •
             Dimerization • Electrophoresis • Endometrium
             • Epithelial Cells • Female • Immunoblotting
             • Immunohistochemistry • Interferon Type I •
             Janus Kinase 1 • Nuclear Proteins • Phenotype
             • Phosphorylation • Precipitin Tests •
             Pregnancy Proteins • Protein-Tyrosine Kinases •
             STAT1 Transcription Factor • Signal Transduction •
             Time Factors • Trans-Activators • cytology •
             drug effects • drug effects* • enzymology •
             genetics* • metabolism • metabolism* •
             pharmacology*},
   Abstract = {Trophoblastic bovine interferon-tau (bIFN-tau) suppresses
             luteolytic pulses of endometrial prostaglandin F(2alpha)
             (PGF(2alpha)) at the time of maternal recognition of
             pregnancy. This results in maintenance of the corpus luteum
             in cattle. The hypothesis that effects of bIFN-tau in the
             endometrium were through activation of the Janus kinase
             (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription
             (STAT) pathway of signal transduction was tested. Whole
             cell, cytosolic, and nuclear extracts from bovine
             endometrial cells treated with bIFN-tau were analyzed by
             immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and electrophoretic
             mobility shift assays in a series of dose- and
             time-dependency experiments. Bovine IFN-tau stimulated
             tyrosine phosphorylation, homo- and heterodimer formation,
             nuclear translocation, and DNA binding of STAT proteins 1,
             2, and 3. Moreover, bIFN-tau induced synthesis of
             interferon-regulatory factor. In conclusion, bIFN-tau
             stimulates the JAK-STAT pathway in the bovine endometrium.
             It is proposed that activation of the JAK-STAT pathway is
             involved in regulating the antiluteolytic effects of
             bIFN-tau.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174175}
}

@article{fds268766,
   Author = {Bug, W and Wong, WW and Gustafson, C and Johnson, GA and Martone, ME and Price, DL and Rosen, GD and Williams, RW and Zaslavsky, I and Nissanov,
             J},
   Title = {Brain atlasing tool interoperation: NeuroTerrain-Smart Atlas
             synergistic visualization and analysis environment},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the 3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on
             Neural Engineering},
   Pages = {280-283},
   Year = {2007},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/CNE.2007.369665},
   Abstract = {Many research efforts using anatomical image analysis have
             as their goal to identify biologically relevant objects
             present within the image data, to provide a means to
             quantitatively analyze these objects, to compare the
             distribution of those objects to other features, and finally
             to properly annotate the objects so as to be able share this
             analysis in an integrated informatics framework. The
             neuroinformatics tools designed to achieve these ends have
             been developed in a fragmented manner with each resource
             developing access to unique data sets and analytical
             capabilities, Their integration would enrich the
             neuroinformatic network enabling queries and analysis across
             a number of resources. A central objective of the Biomedical
             Informatics Research Network (BIRN) is to achieve this
             integration and we present here a demonstration of how two
             such tools - the NeuroTerrain Atlas/NetOStat client and the
             SMART Atlas - can expose their functionality via a re-usable
             interface, so as to promote interoperation of tools and
             data. © 2007 IEEE.},
   Doi = {10.1109/CNE.2007.369665},
   Key = {fds268766}
}

@article{fds132744,
   Title = {C. Zimmer,  S.C.J. Wright, R.T. Engelhardt, G.A. Johnson,
             X.O. Breakefield,  R. Weissleder.  Tumor cell endocytosi
             (TCE) imaging facilitates delineation  of the glioma-brain
             interface. (1996).},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132744}
}

@booklet{Johnson03a,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and M. M. Joyce and S. Lewis and J. F.
             Gonzalez and R. C. Burghardt and S. Woldesenbet and G. R.
             Newton},
   Title = {Caprine uterine and placental osteopontin (OPN) expression
             is distinct among epitheliochorial implanting
             species.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {68},
   Pages = {205 -- 206},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {Johnson03a}
}

@article{fds174218,
   Author = {MM Joyce and JF González and S Lewis and S Woldesenbet and RC
             Burghardt, GR Newton and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Caprine uterine and placental osteopontin expression is
             distinct among epitheliochorial implanting
             species.},
   Journal = {Placenta},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {2-3},
   Pages = {160-70},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0143-4004},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.placenta.2004.05.009},
   Keywords = {Animals • Epithelial Cells • Female •
             Gestational Age • Goats* • Molecular Probe
             Techniques • Nucleic Acid Hybridization •
             Osteopontin • Placenta • Pregnancy •
             Pregnancy, Animal • RNA, Messenger • Sheep •
             Sialoglycoproteins • Species Specificity • Swine
             • Uterus • genetics • metabolism •
             metabolism* • methods},
   Abstract = {Osteopontin (OPN) is the most highly up-regulated
             extracellular matrix/adhesion molecule in the uterus of
             humans and domestic animals as it becomes receptive to
             implantation. Studies in sheep and pigs have shown that OPN
             is a component of ovine and porcine histotroph characterized
             by a complex temporal and spatial pattern of uterine and
             conceptus expression involving immune, epithelial, and
             stromal cells. It is proposed that these expression events
             are orchestrated to contribute to conceptus attachment and
             placentation. However, differences in OPN expression between
             sheep and pigs have been detected that relate to differences
             in placentation. Therefore, this study examined OPN
             expression in the caprine uterus and conceptus to gain
             insight into mechanisms underlying OPN function(s) during
             pregnancy through comparative analysis of differences in
             placentation between pigs, sheep, and goats. Goats were
             hysterectomized (n = 5/day) on Days 5, 11, 13, 15, 17 or 19
             of the estrous cycle, and Days 5, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19 or 25
             of pregnancy. Slot-blot hybridization showed increases in
             endometrial OPN mRNA beginning on Day 17 of the estrous
             cycle and Day 19 of pregnancy. In situ hybridization
             localized OPN mRNA to endometrial glandular epithelium (GE),
             Day 25 myometrium, and cells scattered within the placenta
             hypothesized to be immune. Immunofluorescence microscopy
             detected OPN protein on the apical surface of endometrial
             lumenal epithelium (LE), in GE, and on conceptus (Tr).
             Western blot analysis detected primarily the native 70-kDa
             OPN protein in endometrial extracts from the estrous cycle
             and pregnancy, as well as in uterine flushings from pregnant
             goats. Co-induction of OPN and alpha-smooth muscle actin,
             but not desmin proteins, was observed in uterine stroma by
             Day 25 of pregnancy. OPN in cyclic GE, Day 25 myometrium,
             and desmin-negative endometrial stroma is unique and
             reflects subtle differences among superficial implanting
             species that correlate with the depth of Tr
             invasion.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.placenta.2004.05.009},
   Key = {fds174218}
}

@article{fds174300,
   Author = {TL Rutledge and MA Gold and DS McMeekin and WK Huh and MA Powell and SN
             Lewin, DG Mutch and GA Johnson and JL Walker and RS
             Mannel},
   Title = {Carcinosarcoma of the ovary-a case series.},
   Journal = {Gynecologic oncology},
   Volume = {100},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {128-32},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0090-8258},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2005.07.119},
   Keywords = {Adult • Aged • Aged, 80 and over •
             Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols •
             Carboplatin • Carcinosarcoma • Chemotherapy,
             Adjuvant • Cisplatin • Doxorubicin • Female
             • Follow-Up Studies • Humans • Ifosfamide
             • Middle Aged • Ovarian Neoplasms •
             Paclitaxel • Proportional Hazards Models •
             Retrospective Studies • Treatment Outcome •
             administration & dosage • drug therapy* •
             pathology • surgery* • therapeutic
             use*},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To evaluate our experience with ovarian
             carcinosarcoma and identify prognostic factors. METHODS:
             Thirty-one cases of ovarian carcinosarcoma were identified
             over a 6-year time period through tumor registry and
             pathology records. Fisher exact test and log rank using
             Kaplan-Meier method (P < 0.05) were used to compare
             variables with outcome. RESULTS: All 31 patients underwent
             initial surgical treatment with an appropriate staging
             procedure. Stage distribution: 1 stage I, 6 stage II, 23
             stage III, and 1 stage IV. The median follow-up was 28
             months. The median survival for the entire group was 21
             months. Early vs. advanced stage significantly influenced
             progression-free interval, P = 0.05. Nineteen patients were
             found to have stage IIIC disease and required debulking
             procedures. In patients with stage IIIC disease, presence of
             residual disease was associated with decreased overall
             survival, P = 0.03. 29 patients received adjuvant
             chemotherapy with 11 patients receiving ifosfamide/cisplatin
             and 16 patients receiving carboplatin/taxol.
             Progression-free interval was improved with the use of
             ifosfamide/cisplatin vs. carboplatin/taxol. The median PFI
             was 12 months in the carbo/taxol group and has not been
             reached in the ifos/cisplatin group (P = 0.005). The overall
             survival was also significantly improved with the use of
             ifosfamide/cisplatin, P = 0.03. In advanced stage patients,
             overall survival was not significantly influenced by type of
             adjuvant chemotherapy administered, P = 0.13. CONCLUSIONS:
             Ovarian carcinosarcoma has a poor overall prognosis with
             median survival rates reported in the literature ranging
             from 7-10 months. Our series, although limited by a small
             number of patients, exhibits a more encouraging median
             survival of 21 months for the overall group. Aggressive
             debulking to eliminate residual disease and the use of
             ifosfamide/cisplatin chemotherapy seem to be factors in this
             improved outcome.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ygyno.2005.07.119},
   Key = {fds174300}
}

@article{fds268856,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Hedlund, LW and Mackel, JFB and Mao, L and Rockman, HA and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Cardiac micro-computed tomography for morphological and
             functional phenotyping of muscle LIM protein null
             mice.},
   Journal = {Molecular imaging : official journal of the Society for
             Molecular Imaging},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {261-268},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1535-3508},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17711781},
   Keywords = {Animals • Calibration • Diastole •
             Echocardiography • Heart Ventricles • Mice •
             Mice, Inbred C57BL • Mice, Knockout • Muscle
             Proteins • Myocardium • Phenotype •
             Tomography, X-Ray Computed • deficiency* •
             metabolism* • methods*},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of
             micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for morphological and
             functional phenotyping of muscle LIM protein (MLP) null mice
             and to compare micro-CT with M-mode echocardiography. MLP
             null mice and controls were imaged using both micro-CT and
             M-mode echocardiography. For micro-CT, we used a
             custom-built scanner. Following a single intravenous
             injection of a blood pool contrast agent (Fenestra VC, ART
             Advanced Research Technologies, Saint-Laurent, QC) and using
             a cardiorespiratory gating, we acquired eight phases of the
             cardiac cycle (every 15 ms) and reconstructed
             three-dimensional data sets with 94-micron isotropic
             resolution. Wall thickness and volumetric measurements of
             the left ventricle were performed, and cardiac function was
             estimated. Micro-CT and M-mode echocardiography showed both
             morphological and functional aspects that separate MLP null
             mice from controls. End-diastolic and -systolic volumes were
             increased significantly three- and fivefold, respectively,
             in the MLP null mice versus controls. Ejection fraction was
             reduced by an average of 32% in MLP null mice. The data
             analysis shows that two imaging modalities provided
             different results partly owing to the difference in
             anesthesia regimens. Other sources of errors for micro-CT
             are also analyzed. Micro-CT can provide the four-dimensional
             data (three-dimensional isotropic volumes over time)
             required for morphological and functional phenotyping in
             mice.},
   Key = {fds268856}
}

@article{fds268829,
   Author = {Bucholz, E and Ghaghada, K and Qi, Y and Mukundan, S and Rockman, HA and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Cardiovascular phenotyping of the mouse heart using a 4D
             radial acquisition and liposomal Gd-DTPA-BMA.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {979-987},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1522-2594},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20373399},
   Keywords = {Algorithms • Analysis of Variance • Animals •
             Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena* • Contrast
             Media • Gadolinium DTPA • Imaging,
             Three-Dimensional • Liposomes • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging • Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL • Mice,
             Inbred DBA • Phenotype • chemistry •
             instrumentation • methods*},
   Abstract = {MR microscopy has enormous potential for small-animal
             cardiac imaging because it is capable of producing
             volumetric images at multiple time points to accurately
             measure cardiac function. MR has not been used as frequently
             as ultrasound to measure cardiac function in the small
             animal because the MR methods required relatively long scan
             times, limiting throughput. Here, we demonstrate
             four-dimensional radial acquisition in conjunction with a
             liposomal blood pool agent to explore functional differences
             in three populations of mice: six C57BL/6J mice, six DBA/2J
             mice, and six DBA/2J CSQ+ mice, all with the same
             gestational age and approximately the same weight.
             Cardiovascular function was determined by measuring both
             left ventricular and right ventricular end diastolic volume,
             end systolic volume, stroke volume, and ejection fraction.
             Statistical significance was observed in end diastolic
             volume, end systolic volume, and ejection fraction for left
             ventricular measurements between all three populations of
             mice. No statistically significant difference was observed
             in stroke volume in either the left or right ventricle for
             any of the three populations of mice. This study shows that
             MRI is capable of efficient, high-throughput,
             four-dimensional cardiovascular phenotyping of the
             mouse.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.22259},
   Key = {fds268829}
}

@booklet{Heinz84,
   Author = {HEINZ, ER and HERFKINS, R and JOHNSON, GA and DRAYER,
             BP},
   Title = {CAROTID-ARTERY IMAGING BY A 1.5-T MR SYSTEM},
   Journal = {American Journal of Neuroradiology},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {670-670},
   Year = {1984},
   ISSN = {0195-6108},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1984TG20900067&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Heinz84}
}

@article{fds174172,
   Author = {G Song and DW Bailey and KA Dunlap and RC Burghardt and TE Spencer and FW
             Bazer, GA Johnson},
   Title = {Cathepsin B, cathepsin L, and cystatin C in the porcine
             uterus and placenta: potential roles in endometrial/placental
             remodeling and in fluid-phase transport of proteins secreted
             by uterine epithelia across placental areolae.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {854-64},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1529-7268},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.109.080929},
   Abstract = {Cathepsins (CTSB and CTSL1) and their inhibitor, cystatin C
             (CST3), remodel uterine endometrium and placenta for
             transport of gases, micronutrients, and macromolecules
             essential for development and growth of the conceptus
             (embryo/fetus and placental membranes). We examined the
             temporal/spatial control of expression for CTSB, CTSL1, and
             CST3 mRNAs in endometria and placentae of pigs using three
             developmental models: 1) pigs were hysterectomized during
             the estrous cycle or pregnancy; 2) cyclic pigs were injected
             with estrogen to induce pseudopregnancy and were
             hysterectomized; and 3) pigs were ovariectomized, injected
             with progesterone, and hysterectomized. The abundance of
             CTSB, CTSL1, and CST3 mRNAs increased in endometrial
             epithelia during pregnancy and in response to exogenous
             progesterone but not estrogen. CST3 was also expressed in
             cells scattered within the stratum compactum stroma.
             Progesterone decreased epithelial but increased stromal
             compartment expression of CST3. CTSB increased in all
             chorionic epithelia, but CTSL1 was limited to chorionic
             epithelia that form areolae to absorb secretions from
             uterine glands. Based on the placental and endometrial
             distribution of CTSL1, we examined expression in the
             neonatal enterocytes known to transport immunoglobulins from
             colostrum. CTSL1 was also expressed in enterocytes of
             intestine from neonatal piglets. Therefore, CTSL1 is
             expressed by endometrial epithelia, placental areolae, and
             neonatal intestine, and it may function in the transport of
             macromolecules across these epithelia. Our results support
             the idea that reciprocal interactions between CSTL1, CTSB,
             and CST3 may be required to remodel endometrial and
             placental tissues for close apposition between maternal and
             fetal vasculatures and to facilitate transplacental
             transport of gases, micronutrients (amino acids, glucose),
             and macromolecules (proteins). Cysteine proteases and their
             inhibitors may also specifically modify proteins for
             successful utilization and fluid-phase transport across
             uterine, placental, and neonatal gut epithelia.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1095/biolreprod.109.080929},
   Key = {fds174172}
}

@booklet{Johnson87a,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Cbn wheel grinding},
   Journal = {Journal Of Metals},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {62 -- 63},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {Johnson87a}
}

@booklet{Benveniste99,
   Author = {Benveniste, HD and Kim, KR and Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA and Friedman,
             AH},
   Title = {Cerebral hemorrhage and edema following brain biopsy in
             rats: Significance of mean arterial blood
             pressure},
   Journal = {Anesthesiology},
   Volume = {91},
   Number = {3A},
   Pages = {U371-U371},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0003-3022},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000082480600839&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Benveniste99}
}

@article{fds174072,
   Author = {JD Tobias and GA Johnson and S Rehman and R Fisher and N
             Caron},
   Title = {Cerebral oxygenation monitoring using near infrared
             spectroscopy during one-lung ventilation in
             adults.},
   Journal = {Journal of minimal access surgery},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {104-107},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1998-3921},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Changes in oxygenation occur during one-lung
             ventilation (OLV) due to intrapulmonary shunt. Although
             arterial oxygenation is generally adequate, there are no
             studies evaluating the effect of these changes on cerebral
             oxygenation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cerebral oxygenation
             (rSO(2)), heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), oxygen
             saturation (SaO(2)), and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO(2))
             were prospectively monitored during OLV in adults. Cerebral
             oxygenation was monitored using near infrared spectroscopy.
             No clinical decisions were made based on the rSO2 value. BP
             and HR were the inspired oxygen concentration was adjusted
             as needed to maintain the SaO(2) >/= 95%. RESULTS: The study
             cohort included 40 adult patients. 18,562 rSO(2) values were
             collected during OLV. The rSO(2) was >/= baseline at 3,593
             of the 18,562 data points (19%). The rSO2 was 0-9 </=
             baseline in 7,053 (38%) of the readings, 10-19 </= baseline
             in 4,084 (22%) of the readings, and 20-29 </= baseline in
             3,898 (21%) of the readings. 2,599 (14%) of the rSO(2)
             values were less than 75% of the baseline value. Thirteen
             patients (32.5%) had at least one rSO2 value that was less
             than 75% of the baseline. Eight patients (20%) had rSO(2)
             values less than 75% of baseline for >/= 25% of the duration
             of OLV. These patients were older (63.7 +/- 10.2 vs 54.6 +/-
             9.8 years, P<0.025), weighed more (95.8 +/- 17.4 vs 82.6 +/-
             14.6 kgs, P=0.038), and were more likely to be ASA III vs II
             (7 of 8 versus 25 of 32, relative risk 1.75) than the
             remainder of the cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Significant changes in
             rSO2 occur during OLV for thoracic surgical procedures.
             Future studies are needed to determine the impact of such
             changes on the postoperative course of these
             patients.},
   Language = {ENG},
   Key = {fds174072}
}

@article{fds204262,
   Author = {GA Johnson},
   Title = {Changes imposed on GPs make it harder to respond to
             patients' needs.},
   Journal = {BMJ (Clinical research ed.)},
   Volume = {343},
   Pages = {d7700},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {1468-5833},
   Keywords = {General Practice • Great Britain •
             Physician-Patient Relations* • Quality Assurance,
             Health Care* • State Medicine •
             standards*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds204262}
}

@article{fds204272,
   Author = {CL Gipson and GA Johnson and R Fisher and A Stewart and G Giles and JO
             Johnson, JD Tobias},
   Title = {Changes in cerebral oximetry during peritoneal insufflation
             for laparoscopic procedures.},
   Journal = {Journal of minimal access surgery},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {67-72},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0972-9941},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Changes in cardiac output may occur during
             insufflation for laparoscopic procedures. However, there are
             limited data regarding its potential effects on cerebral
             oxygenation. METHODS: Cerebral oxygenation (ScO(2)), end
             tidal CO(2), heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen
             saturation by pulse oximetry were recorded every 5 minutes
             prior to insufflation, during insufflation and after
             desufflation. Minute ventilation was increased to maintain
             normocapnia and the depth of anesthesia was adjusted or
             fluids/phenylephrine administered to maintain the blood
             pressure within 20% of the baseline. RESULTS: The cohort for
             the study included 70 adults for laparoscopic herniorrhaphy,
             gastric bypass or cholecystectomy. A total of 1004 ScO(2)
             values were obtained during laparoscopy. The ScO(2)
             decreased from the baseline in 758 of the 1004 data points.
             The ScO(2) was 0-9 less than the baseline in 47.8% of the
             values, 10-19 less than the baseline in 24.9% of the values
             and 20-29 less than the baseline in 26 values (2.6%).
             Eighty-two (8.2%) of the values were less than 80% of the
             baseline value, while 25 values (2.5%) were less than 75% of
             the baseline value. Twelve patients had at least one ScO(2)
             value that was less than 80% of the baseline and 6 had at
             least one ScO(2) value that was less than 75% of the
             baseline. Four patients of the cohort had ScO(2) values less
             than 80% of the baseline for more than 50% of the
             laparoscopic procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Although relatively
             uncommon, significant changes in cerebral oxygenation do
             occur in some patients during insufflation for laparoscopic
             surgery.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds204272}
}

@article{fds268711,
   Author = {Lipinski, RJ and Holloway, HT and O'Leary-Moore, SK and Ament, JJ and Pecevich, SJ and Cofer, GP and Budin, F and Everson, JL and Johnson, GA and Sulik, KK},
   Title = {Characterization of subtle brain abnormalities in a mouse
             model of Hedgehog pathway antagonist-induced cleft lip and
             palate.},
   Journal = {PloS one},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {e102603},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/11679 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {Subtle behavioral and cognitive deficits have been
             documented in patient cohorts with orofacial clefts (OFCs).
             Recent neuroimaging studies argue that these traits are
             associated with structural brain abnormalities but have been
             limited to adolescent and adult populations where brain
             plasticity during infancy and childhood may be a confounding
             factor. Here, we employed high resolution magnetic resonance
             microscopy to examine primary brain morphology in a mouse
             model of OFCs. Transient in utero exposure to the Hedgehog
             (Hh) signaling pathway antagonist cyclopamine resulted in a
             spectrum of facial dysmorphology, including unilateral and
             bilateral cleft lip and palate, cleft of the secondary
             palate only, and a non-cleft phenotype marked by midfacial
             hypoplasia. Relative to controls, cyclopamine-exposed
             fetuses exhibited volumetric differences in several brain
             regions, including hypoplasia of the pituitary gland and
             olfactory bulbs, hyperplasia of the forebrain septal region,
             and expansion of the third ventricle. However, in affected
             fetuses the corpus callosum was intact and normal division
             of the forebrain was observed. This argues that
             temporally-specific Hh signaling perturbation can result in
             typical appearing OFCs in the absence of
             holoprosencephaly--a condition classically associated with
             Hh pathway inhibition and frequently co-occurring with OFCs.
             Supporting the premise that some forms of OFCs co-occur with
             subtle brain malformations, these results provide a possible
             ontological basis for traits identified in clinical
             populations. They also argue in favor of future
             investigations into genetic and/or environmental modulation
             of the Hh pathway in the etiopathogenesis of orofacial
             clefting.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0102603},
   Key = {fds268711}
}

@booklet{Gerhards97,
   Author = {R. Gerhards and D. Y. Wysepester and D. Mortensen and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Characterizing spatial stability of weed populations using
             interpolated maps},
   Journal = {Weed Science},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {108 -- 119},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {Gerhards97}
}

@article{fds174299,
   Author = {MC DODD and NJ BIGLEY and GA JOHNSON and RH MCCLUER},
   Title = {CHEMICAL ASPECTS ON INHIBITORS OF RH-O(D)
             ANTIBODY.},
   Journal = {Nature},
   Volume = {204},
   Pages = {549-52},
   Year = {1964},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0028-0836},
   Keywords = {ANTIBODY FORMATION* • BRAIN CHEMISTRY* •
             CHEMISTRY* • EXPERIMENTAL LAB STUDY* •
             GANGLIOSIDES* • HEMAGGLUTINATION INHIBITION TESTS*
             • PEPTIDES* • PSEUDOMONAS* • RABBITS* •
             RH FACTORS*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174299}
}

@booklet{Maynor89,
   Author = {Maynor, CH and Charles, HC and Herfkens, RJ and Suddarth, SA and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Chemical shift imaging of atherosclerosis at 7.0
             Tesla.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {52-60},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2917823},
   Abstract = {Chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed on cadaveric
             atherosclerotic fibrous plaques, periaortic adipose tissue,
             and cholesterol standards using a 7.0 Tesla horizontal bore
             prototype imaging spectrometer. Proton spectroscopy of
             intact tissue and deuterated chloroform extracted samples
             was done at the equivalent field strength of 7.0 Tesla on a
             vertical bore spectrometer, including studies of temperature
             dependence and T2 relaxation measurements. Spectra obtained
             using CSI on the imaging magnet were comparable with those
             from the conventional vertical spectrometer. Fibrous plaques
             and adipose tissue had unique spectral features, differing
             in the ratios of their water and various fat components.
             Chloroform extractions revealed a typical cholesteric ester
             spectrum for the fibrous plaque in contrast to the
             triglyceride spectrum of the adipose tissue. These two
             tissues also had different T2 relaxation measurements of
             their major fat resonances, with fibrous plaques having a
             short T2 compared to adipose tissue (15.9 milliseconds vs.
             46.2 milliseconds). Temperature dependence studies showed
             that spectral signal intensity of the fat resonance of the
             fibrous plaque increased while linewidth decreased with
             increasing temperature from 24 degrees C to 37 degrees C.
             Atherosclerotic lesions may be studied at 7.0 Tesla, and NMR
             parameters defined in the present study may be used for
             further studies at other magnetic field strengths.},
   Key = {Maynor89}
}

@article{fds132789,
   Author = {CH Maynor and HC Charles and RJ Herfkens and SA Suddarth and GA
             Johnson},
   Title = {Chemical shift imaging of atherosclerosis at 7.0
             Tesla.},
   Journal = {Investigative radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {52-60},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   Keywords = {Adipose Tissue • Aged • Aorta • Aortic
             Diseases • Arteriosclerosis • Cholesterol Esters
             • Female • Humans • Magnetic Resonance
             Spectroscopy • Male • Middle Aged •
             Triglycerides • diagnostic use* • metabolism
             • pathology • pathology*},
   Abstract = {Chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed on cadaveric
             atherosclerotic fibrous plaques, periaortic adipose tissue,
             and cholesterol standards using a 7.0 Tesla horizontal bore
             prototype imaging spectrometer. Proton spectroscopy of
             intact tissue and deuterated chloroform extracted samples
             was done at the equivalent field strength of 7.0 Tesla on a
             vertical bore spectrometer, including studies of temperature
             dependence and T2 relaxation measurements. Spectra obtained
             using CSI on the imaging magnet were comparable with those
             from the conventional vertical spectrometer. Fibrous plaques
             and adipose tissue had unique spectral features, differing
             in the ratios of their water and various fat components.
             Chloroform extractions revealed a typical cholesteric ester
             spectrum for the fibrous plaque in contrast to the
             triglyceride spectrum of the adipose tissue. These two
             tissues also had different T2 relaxation measurements of
             their major fat resonances, with fibrous plaques having a
             short T2 compared to adipose tissue (15.9 milliseconds vs.
             46.2 milliseconds). Temperature dependence studies showed
             that spectral signal intensity of the fat resonance of the
             fibrous plaque increased while linewidth decreased with
             increasing temperature from 24 degrees C to 37 degrees C.
             Atherosclerotic lesions may be studied at 7.0 Tesla, and NMR
             parameters defined in the present study may be used for
             further studies at other magnetic field strengths.},
   Key = {fds132789}
}

@article{fds132773,
   Author = {GA Johnson and GW Dewald and WR Strand and RK Winkelmann},
   Title = {Chromosome studies in 17 patients with the Sézary
             syndrome.},
   Journal = {Cancer, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {2426-33},
   Year = {1985},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0008-543X},
   Keywords = {Adult • Aged • Chromosome Aberrations •
             Chromosomes • Female • Genetic Markers •
             Humans • Karyotyping • Male • Metaphase
             • Middle Aged • Sezary Syndrome • genetics*
             • mortality • pathology •
             ultrastructure*},
   Abstract = {Chromosome studies were done on phytohemagglutinin-stimulated
             peripheral blood from 17 patients with Sézary syndrome. A
             chromosomally abnormal clone was found in five patients:
             each patient had an abnormal chromosome 6 and four had an
             abnormal chromosome 1. Six patients without abnormal clones
             had more than 20% metaphases with random heteroploidy and
             sporadic structural anomalies. Only normal metaphases were
             seen in four patients, and no metaphases were found in two.
             Four of the five patients with an abnormal clone died, and
             their median survival from chromosome analysis was 6 months;
             only one of these patients died of lymphoma. The six
             patients with increased heteroploidy had long survivals and
             no apparent malignant process. Two of the four patients with
             normal metaphases died of malignant disease: one had
             lymphoma and the other squamous cell carcinoma. A third
             patient with normal chromosomes died of extensive visceral
             cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.},
   Key = {fds132773}
}

@booklet{Johnson85b,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and G. W. Dewald and W. R. Strand and R. K.
             Winkelmann},
   Title = {Chromosome-studies in 17 patients with the sezary
             syndrome},
   Journal = {Cancer},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {2426 -- 2433},
   Year = {1985},
   Key = {Johnson85b}
}

@booklet{Brau04,
   Author = {Brau, ACS and Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Cine magnetic resonance microscopy of the rat heart using
             cardiorespiratory-synchronous projection
             reconstruction.},
   Journal = {Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {31-38},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1053-1807},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15221806},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: To tailor a cardiac magnetic resonance (MR)
             microscopy technique for the rat that combines improvements
             in pulse sequence design and physiologic control to acquire
             high-resolution images of cardiac structure and function.
             MATERIALS AND METHODS: Projection reconstruction (PR) was
             compared to conventional Cartesian techniques in
             point-spread function simulations and experimental studies
             to evaluate its artifact sensitivity. Female Sprague-Dawley
             rats were imaged at 2.0 T using PR with direct encoding of
             the free induction decay. Specialized physiologic support
             and monitoring equipment ensured consistency of biological
             motion and permitted synchronization of imaging with the
             cardiac and respiratory cycles. RESULTS: The reduced
             artifact sensitivity of PR offered improved delineation of
             cardiac and pulmonary structures. Ventilatory
             synchronization further increased the signal-to-noise ratio
             by reducing inter-view variability. High-quality short-axis
             and long-axis cine images of the rat heart were acquired
             with 10-msec temporal resolution and microscopic spatial
             resolution down to 175 microm x 175 microm x 1 mm.
             CONCLUSION: Integrating careful biological control with an
             optimized pulse sequence significantly limits both the
             source and impact of image artifacts. This work represents a
             novel integration of techniques designed to support
             measurement of cardiac morphology and function in rodent
             models of cardiovascular disease.},
   Doi = {10.1002/jmri.20089},
   Key = {Brau04}
}

@article{fds132907,
   Author = {AC Brau and LW Hedlund and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Cine magnetic resonance microscopy of the rat heart using
             cardiorespiratory-synchronous projection
             reconstruction.},
   Journal = {Journal of magnetic resonance imaging : JMRI, United
             States},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {31-8},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1053-1807},
   Keywords = {Animals • Artifacts • Female • Image
             Processing, Computer-Assisted* • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging, Cine* • Microscopy • Myocardial
             Contraction* • Rats • Rats, Sprague-Dawley •
             Respiration* • methods},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: To tailor a cardiac magnetic resonance (MR)
             microscopy technique for the rat that combines improvements
             in pulse sequence design and physiologic control to acquire
             high-resolution images of cardiac structure and function.
             MATERIALS AND METHODS: Projection reconstruction (PR) was
             compared to conventional Cartesian techniques in
             point-spread function simulations and experimental studies
             to evaluate its artifact sensitivity. Female Sprague-Dawley
             rats were imaged at 2.0 T using PR with direct encoding of
             the free induction decay. Specialized physiologic support
             and monitoring equipment ensured consistency of biological
             motion and permitted synchronization of imaging with the
             cardiac and respiratory cycles. RESULTS: The reduced
             artifact sensitivity of PR offered improved delineation of
             cardiac and pulmonary structures. Ventilatory
             synchronization further increased the signal-to-noise ratio
             by reducing inter-view variability. High-quality short-axis
             and long-axis cine images of the rat heart were acquired
             with 10-msec temporal resolution and microscopic spatial
             resolution down to 175 microm x 175 microm x 1 mm.
             CONCLUSION: Integrating careful biological control with an
             optimized pulse sequence significantly limits both the
             source and impact of image artifacts. This work represents a
             novel integration of techniques designed to support
             measurement of cardiac morphology and function in rodent
             models of cardiovascular disease.},
   Key = {fds132907}
}

@booklet{Fleming01,
   Author = {J. A. G. W. Fleming and Y. Choi and G. A. Johnson and T. E.
             Spencer and F. W. Bazer},
   Title = {Cloning of the ovine estrogen receptor-alpha promoter and
             functional regulation by ovine interferon-tau},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {142},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {2879 -- 2887},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {Fleming01}
}

@article{fds174194,
   Author = {JA Fleming and Y Choi and GA Johnson and TE Spencer and FW
             Bazer},
   Title = {Cloning of the ovine estrogen receptor-alpha promoter and
             functional regulation by ovine interferon-tau.},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {142},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {2879-87},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0013-7227},
   Keywords = {Animals • Artificial Gene Fusion • Base Sequence
             • Cell Line, Transformed • Cloning, Molecular*
             • DNA-Binding Proteins • Electrophoresis •
             Endometrium • Enhancer Elements, Genetic •
             Epithelial Cells • Estrogen Receptor alpha •
             Female • Gene Deletion • Interferon Regulatory
             Factor-2 • Interferon Type I • Mutation •
             Pregnancy Proteins • Promoter Regions, Genetic •
             Receptors, Estrogen • Recombinant Proteins •
             Repressor Proteins* • Sheep • Thymidine Kinase
             • Transcription Factors* • Transcription, Genetic
             • cytology • drug effects • genetics •
             genetics* • metabolism • metabolism* •
             pharmacology • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Interferon-tau (IFNtau), the ruminant pregnancy recognition
             signal, inhibits transcription of the estrogen receptor
             alpha (ERalpha) gene in the endometrial lumenal epithelium
             of the sheep uterus, thereby abrogating production of
             luteolytic PGF(2alpha) pulses. The effects of IFNtau are
             mediated in part by IFN-stimulated response elements (ISREs)
             and IFN regulatory factor elements (IRFEs). The
             promoter/enhancer region of the ovine ERalpha gene was
             cloned, sequenced, and predicted to contain four IRFEs and
             one ISRE. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated
             that the -2110 IRFE bound only IRF-1, whereas the -1877 IRFE
             and the -1284 ISRE were functional in binding IRF-1 and
             IRF-2. IFNtau inhibited transcriptional activity of the
             2.7-kb ovine ERalpha promoter in transfection assays using
             ovine lumenal epithelium cells. Analyses of sequential
             5'-deletion mutants of the ovine ERalpha promoter indicated
             that the effects of IFNtau may be mediated by IRFEs as well
             as other elements. Overexpression of ovine IRF-2, but not
             IRF-1, inhibited transcriptional activity of several regions
             of the ovine ERalpha promoter containing an IRFE or an ISRE
             as well as some, but not all, regions lacking these
             elements.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174194}
}

@article{fds132916,
   Author = {GA Johnson and J Baker},
   Title = {Colonic perforation following mild trauma in a patient with
             Crohn's disease.},
   Journal = {The American journal of emergency medicine, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {340-1},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0735-6757},
   Keywords = {Adult • Colon • Crohn Disease • Humans •
             Intestinal Perforation • Male • complications*
             • etiology* • injuries* • pathology •
             surgery},
   Abstract = {A 26-year-old man with a history of Crohn's disease was
             struck in the abdomen by an opponent's shoulder while
             playing basketball. He presented to the emergency department
             3 hours later with the complaint of abdominal pain and was
             admitted to the hospital for observation. Nine hours after
             presentation a computed tomography scan showed he had
             pneumoperitoneum and then underwent laparotomy. A perforated
             segment of sigmoid colon with severe inflammatory disease
             was found and resected. The rest of his small and large
             bowels were otherwise unremarkable. His localized but severe
             inflammatory bowel disease predisposed him to bowel
             perforation with minimal trauma. This is the first report of
             a patient with inflammatory bowel disease and traumatic
             colon perforation; it is also the first report of a patient
             with a bowel perforation with minimal traumatic
             force.},
   Key = {fds132916}
}

@booklet{Johnson90a,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and J. Baker},
   Title = {Colonic perforation following mild trauma in a patient with
             crohns-disease},
   Journal = {American Journal Of Emergency Medicine},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {340 -- 341},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {Johnson90a}
}

@booklet{Fischer04,
   Author = {D. W. Fischer and R. G. Harvey and T. T. Bauman and S.
             Phillips and S. E. Hart and G. A. Johnson and J. J. Kells and P. Westra and J. Lindquist},
   Title = {Common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album) interference with
             corn across the northcentral United States},
   Journal = {Weed Science},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1034 -- 1038},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {Fischer04}
}

@article{fds174261,
   Author = {FW Bazer and TE Spencer and GA Johnson and RC Burghardt and G
             Wu},
   Title = {Comparative aspects of implantation.},
   Journal = {Reproduction (Cambridge, England)},
   Volume = {138},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {195-209},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1741-7899},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/REP-09-0158},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blastocyst • Embryo Implantation •
             Endometrium • Female • Gene Expression Regulation,
             Developmental* • Interferons • Pregnancy •
             Pregnancy, Animal • Primates • Progesterone •
             Rats • Species Specificity • Swine •
             metabolism • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Uterine receptivity to implantation of blastocysts in
             mammals includes hatching from zona pellucida, precontact
             with uterine luminal (LE) and superficial glandular (sGE)
             epithelia and orientation of blastocyst, apposition between
             trophectoderm and uterine LE and sGE, adhesion of
             trophectoderm to uterine LE/sGE, and, in some species,
             limited or extensive invasion into the endometrial stroma
             and induction of decidualization of stromal cells. These
             peri-implantation events are prerequisites for pregnancy
             recognition signaling, implantation, and placentation
             required for fetal-placental growth and development through
             the remainder of pregnancy. Although there is a range of
             strategies for implantation in mammals, a common feature is
             the requirement for progesterone (P(4)) to downregulate
             expression of its receptors in uterine epithelia and P(4)
             prior to implantation events. P(4) then mediates its effects
             via growth factors expressed by stromal cells in most
             species; however, uterine luminal epithelium may express a
             growth factor in response to P(4) and/or estrogens in
             species with a true epitheliochorial placenta. There is also
             compelling evidence that uterine receptivity to implantation
             involves temporal and cell-specific expression of interferon
             (IFN)-stimulated genes that may be induced directly by an
             IFN or induced by P(4) and stimulated by an IFN. These genes
             have many roles including nutrient transport, cellular
             remodeling, angiogenesis and relaxation of vascular tissues,
             cell proliferation and migration, establishment of an
             antiviral state, and protection of conceptus tissues from
             challenges by the maternal immune cells.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1530/REP-09-0158},
   Key = {fds174261}
}

@article{fds174139,
   Author = {GA Johnson and EG Kim and PA Platz and MM Mickelson},
   Title = {Comparative aspects of tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan
             hydroxylase inhibition: arterenones and dihydroxyphenylacetamide
             (H 22-54).},
   Journal = {Biochemical pharmacology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {403-10},
   Year = {1968},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0006-2952},
   Keywords = {Acetophenones • Adrenal Medulla • Amides •
             Animals • Brain • Cattle • Iron •
             Mast-Cell Sarcoma • Methyltyrosines • Mice •
             Mixed Function Oxygenases* • Norepinephrine •
             Phenylacetates* • Phenylalanine • Sarcoma,
             Experimental • Tritium • Tryptophan •
             Tyrosine • antagonists & inhibitors • enzymology
             • enzymology* • metabolism • pharmacology
             • pharmacology*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174139}
}

@article{fds174246,
   Author = {D Robertson and GA Johnson and RM Robertson and AS Nies and DG Shand and JA
             Oates},
   Title = {Comparative assessment of stimuli that release neuronal and
             adrenomedullary catecholamines in man.},
   Journal = {Circulation},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {637-43},
   Year = {1979},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0009-7322},
   Keywords = {Adolescent • Adrenal Medulla • Adult • Blood
             Specimen Collection • Caffeine • Catecholamines
             • Epinephrine • Female • Humans •
             Isometric Contraction • Male • Middle Aged •
             Neurons • Norepinephrine • Physical Stimulation
             • Posture • Pressoreceptors • Valsalva
             Maneuver • blood • pharmacology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {We assessed the release of neuronal and adrenomedullary
             catecholamines in response to various stimuli of the
             sympathetic nervous system in normal subjects. Plasma
             catecholamines and their urinary metabolites,
             normetanephrine and metanephrine, were measured. Sodium
             restriction increased supine plasma norepinephrine by 37%
             and ambulatory plasma norepinephrine by 22%, with urinary
             normetanephrine excretion increased 29%. The sodium
             restriction did not elevate plasma epinephrine or urinary
             metanephrine. The most potent stimuli of norepinephrine were
             treadmill exercise, orthostasis, caffeine, the cold pressor
             test, sodium restriction and handgrip exercise, in
             descending order. Plasma epinephrine was increased by
             caffeine, treadmill exercise, the cold pressor test,
             handgrip exercise and the Valsalva maneuver, in that order.
             Syncope resulted in profound changes in plasma epinephrine
             but only modest changes in plasma norepinephrine. We
             conclude that in man, there is frequent dissociation between
             the effects of different stimuli on neuronal and
             adrenomedullary catecholamine release.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174246}
}

@booklet{Macfall91,
   Author = {MACFALL, JS and JOHNSON, GA and KRAMER, PJ},
   Title = {COMPARATIVE WATER-UPTAKE BY ROOTS OF DIFFERENT AGES IN
             SEEDLINGS OF LOBLOLLY-PINE (PINUS-TAEDA L)},
   Journal = {New Phytologist},
   Volume = {119},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {551-560},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0028-646X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1991HA17900010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1469-8137.1991.tb01047.x},
   Key = {Macfall91}
}

@booklet{Wong92,
   Author = {W. W. Wong and L. L. Clarke and G. A. Johnson and M.
             Llaurador and P. D. Klein},
   Title = {Comparison of 2 elemental-analyzer gas-isotope-ratio
             mass-spectrometer systems in the simultaneous measurement of
             c-13/c-12 ratios and carbon content in organic-samples},
   Journal = {Analytical Chemistry},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {354 -- 358},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {Wong92}
}

@article{fds268715,
   Author = {Befera, NT and Badea, CT and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Comparison of 4D-MicroSPECT and MicroCT for murine cardiac
             function},
   Journal = {Molecular Imaging and Biology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {235-245},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1536-1632},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11307-013-0686-z},
   Abstract = {Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare a new
             generation of four-dimensional micro-single photon emission
             computed tomography (microSPECT) with microCT for the
             quantitative in vivo assessment of murine cardiac function.
             Procedures: Four-dimensional isotropic cardiac images were
             acquired from anesthetized normal C57BL/6 mice with either
             microSPECT (n = 6) or microCT (n = 6). One additional mouse
             with myocardial infarction (MI) was scanned with both
             modalities. Prior to imaging, mice were injected with either
             technetium tetrofosmin for microSPECT or a liposomal blood
             pool contrast agent for microCT. Segmentation of the left
             ventricle (LV) was performed using Vitrea (Vital Images)
             software, to derive global and regional function. Results:
             Measures of global LV function between microSPECT and
             microCT groups were comparable (e.g., ejection fraction = 71
             ± 6 % microSPECT and 68 ± 4 % microCT). Regional
             functional indices (wall motion, wall thickening, regional
             ejection fraction) were also similar for the two modalities.
             In the mouse with MI, microSPECT identified a large
             perfusion defect that was not evident with microCT.
             Conclusions: Despite lower spatial resolution, microSPECT
             was comparable to microCT in the quantitative evaluation of
             cardiac function. MicroSPECT offers an advantage over
             microCT in the ability to evaluate simultaneously myocardial
             radiotracer distribution and function, simultaneously.
             MicroSPECT should be considered as an alternative to microCT
             and magnetic resonance for preclinical cardiac imaging in
             the mouse. © 2013 World Molecular Imaging
             Society.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11307-013-0686-z},
   Key = {fds268715}
}

@article{fds268729,
   Author = {Befera, NT and Badea, CT and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Comparison of 4D-microSPECT and microCT for murine cardiac
             function.},
   Journal = {Molecular Imaging and Biology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {235-245},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24037175},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to compare a new
             generation of four-dimensional micro-single photon emission
             computed tomography (microSPECT) with microCT for the
             quantitative in vivo assessment of murine cardiac function.
             PROCEDURES: Four-dimensional isotropic cardiac images were
             acquired from anesthetized normal C57BL/6 mice with either
             microSPECT (n = 6) or microCT (n = 6). One additional mouse
             with myocardial infarction (MI) was scanned with both
             modalities. Prior to imaging, mice were injected with either
             technetium tetrofosmin for microSPECT or a liposomal blood
             pool contrast agent for microCT. Segmentation of the left
             ventricle (LV) was performed using Vitrea (Vital Images)
             software, to derive global and regional function. RESULTS:
             Measures of global LV function between microSPECT and
             microCT groups were comparable (e.g., ejection fraction = 71
             ± 6 % microSPECT and 68 ± 4 % microCT). Regional
             functional indices (wall motion, wall thickening, regional
             ejection fraction) were also similar for the two modalities.
             In the mouse with MI, microSPECT identified a large
             perfusion defect that was not evident with microCT.
             CONCLUSIONS: Despite lower spatial resolution, microSPECT
             was comparable to microCT in the quantitative evaluation of
             cardiac function. MicroSPECT offers an advantage over
             microCT in the ability to evaluate simultaneously myocardial
             radiotracer distribution and function, simultaneously.
             MicroSPECT should be considered as an alternative to microCT
             and magnetic resonance for preclinical cardiac imaging in
             the mouse.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11307-013-0686-z},
   Key = {fds268729}
}

@booklet{Staggs98,
   Author = {K. L. Staggs and K. J. Austin and G. A. Johnson and M. G.
             Teixeira and C. T. Talbott and V. A. Dooley and T. R.
             Hansen},
   Title = {Complex induction of bovine uterine proteins by
             interferon-tau},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {293 -- 297},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {August},
   Key = {Staggs98}
}

@article{fds132910,
   Author = {KL Staggs and KJ Austin and GA Johnson and MG Teixeira and CT Talbott and VA Dooley and TR Hansen},
   Title = {Complex induction of bovine uterine proteins by
             interferon-tau.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {293-7},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blotting, Western • Cattle • Cells,
             Cultured • Chemokine CXCL6 • Chemokines, CXC
             • Chromatography, Affinity • Endometrium •
             Epithelial Cells • Estrus • Female •
             Interferon Type I • Interferon Type I, Recombinant
             • Pregnancy • Pregnancy Proteins • Protein
             Biosynthesis* • Stimulation, Chemical • Ubiquitins
             • Uterus • biosynthesis • drug effects •
             metabolism • metabolism* • pharmacology •
             pharmacology* • physiology},
   Abstract = {Interferon-tau (IFN-tau) is released by the conceptus and
             induces two uterine proteins during early pregnancy:
             ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP) and granulocyte
             chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2). The present experiments were
             designed to determine whether detection (Western blot) of
             cytosolic UCRP and release of GCP-2 could be used to examine
             IFN-tau signal transduction in cultured endometrial explants
             and primary epithelial cells. Recombinant (r) type 1 IFNs
             (rboIFN-tau and rboIFN-alpha; 5, 25, 100 nM) induced UCRP,
             but only rboIFN-tau induced GCP-2 in explant culture.
             Recombinant boIFN-tau and conceptus secretory proteins
             containing native IFN-tau induced UCRP and GCP-2 in cultured
             primary epithelial cells. All concentrations of rboIFN-alpha
             (25, 50, 100 nM) induced UCRP, but only the highest
             concentration induced GCP-2 in cultured primary epithelial
             cells. Interestingly, phorbol ester (100, 500, 1000 ng/ml)
             induced GCP-2, but it had no effect on UCRP. Because type 1
             IFNs induce UCRP, IFN-tau probably interacts with the janus
             kinase (Jak)-associated IFN-alpha receptor to phosphorylate
             signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)
             and/or interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1). However,
             IFN-tau-specific induction of GCP-2 may involve a variant
             type 1 receptor subunit or activators of transcription that
             are associated with protein kinase C and the Jak/STAT/IRF-1
             pathway.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds132910}
}

@article{fds174148,
   Author = {B Govenar and M Freeman and DC Bergquist and GA Johnson and CR
             Fisher},
   Title = {Composition of a one-year-old Riftia pachyptila community
             following a clearance experiment: insight to succession
             patterns at deep-sea hydrothermal vents.},
   Journal = {The Biological bulletin},
   Volume = {207},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {177-82},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0006-3185},
   Keywords = {Animals • Biomass • Ecosystem* • Environment*
             • Invertebrates • Pacific Ocean • Population
             Dynamics • Species Specificity • growth &
             development*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174148}
}

@booklet{Brown87,
   Author = {Brown, JM and Fonteno, WC and Cassel, DK and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC ANALYSES OF WATER DISTRIBUTION IN THREE
             POROUS FOAM MEDIA.},
   Journal = {Soil Science Society of America Journal},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1121-1125},
   Year = {1987},
   Abstract = {Computer Assisted Tomography (CAT) is commonly used in
             diagnostic radiology to make nondestructive images and
             analyses of cross sections of the human body. CAT scanning
             may also be useful in imaging and measuring spatial
             distribution and changes in water distribution in porous
             media. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the
             details of CAT scanning that are of importance to the
             application of CAT scanning to porous media and to evaluate
             the use of the CAT scanner to measure the spatial
             distribution of water in three different porous media. The
             scanner's response to changes in the spatial distribution of
             water in three different porous phenolic foam materials
             after draining for 16 h was investigated. Water content
             distributions were successfully detected with good
             resolution on the x-ray image.},
   Key = {Brown87}
}

@article{fds268789,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Athreya, KK and Espinosa, G and Clark, D and Ghafoori, AP and Li, Y and Kirsch, DG and Johnson, GA and Annapragada, A and Ghaghada,
             KB},
   Title = {Computed tomography imaging of primary lung cancer in mice
             using a liposomal-iodinated contrast agent.},
   Journal = {PloS one},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {e34496},
   Year = {2012},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22485175},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: To investigate the utility of a liposomal-iodinated
             nanoparticle contrast agent and computed tomography (CT)
             imaging for characterization of primary nodules in
             genetically engineered mouse models of non-small cell lung
             cancer. METHODS: Primary lung cancers with mutations in
             K-ras alone (Kras(LA1)) or in combination with p53
             (LSL-Kras(G12D);p53(FL/FL)) were generated. A
             liposomal-iodine contrast agent containing 120 mg Iodine/mL
             was administered systemically at a dose of 16 µl/gm body
             weight. Longitudinal micro-CT imaging with
             cardio-respiratory gating was performed pre-contrast and at
             0 hr, day 3, and day 7 post-contrast administration.
             CT-derived nodule sizes were used to assess tumor growth.
             Signal attenuation was measured in individual nodules to
             study dynamic enhancement of lung nodules. RESULTS: A good
             correlation was seen between volume and diameter-based
             assessment of nodules (R(2)>0.8) for both lung cancer
             models. The LSL-Kras(G12D);p53(FL/FL) model showed rapid
             growth as demonstrated by systemically higher volume changes
             compared to the lung nodules in Kras(LA1) mice (p<0.05).
             Early phase imaging using the nanoparticle contrast agent
             enabled visualization of nodule blood supply. Delayed-phase
             imaging demonstrated significant differential signal
             enhancement in the lung nodules of LSL-Kras(G12D);p53(FL/FL)
             mice compared to nodules in Kras(LA1) mice (p<0.05)
             indicating higher uptake and accumulation of the
             nanoparticle contrast agent in rapidly growing nodules.
             CONCLUSIONS: The nanoparticle iodinated contrast agent
             enabled visualization of blood supply to the nodules during
             the early-phase imaging. Delayed-phase imaging enabled
             characterization of slow growing and rapidly growing nodules
             based on signal enhancement. The use of this agent could
             facilitate early detection and diagnosis of pulmonary
             lesions as well as have implications on treatment response
             and monitoring.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0034496},
   Key = {fds268789}
}

@booklet{Cassel90,
   Author = {Cassel, DK and Brown, JM and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Computer tomographic analysis of water distribution and flow
             in porous media},
   Journal = {Theoretical and Applied Climatology},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {223-228},
   Year = {1990},
   ISSN = {0177-798X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00865982},
   Abstract = {Computer tomography (CT) is the reconstruction by computer
             of a tomographic plane (slice) of an object. The tomograph
             is developed from multiple X-ray absorption measurements
             (scans) made around the periphery of the object. Recent
             research in soil science indicates that CT, which has been
             used in the medical field for 17 years, may find
             applications in assessing the degree of uniformity, or lack
             thereof, of soils and other porous media, in determining the
             flow paths of water and solutes through soils and porous
             materials, and in determing the flow paths of water and
             solutes to roots of plants. This paper discusses the general
             concept of CT, some of the capabilities associated with
             software used to format the CT readings into the desired
             images, and presents some CT scan data for several draining
             porous media. © 1990 Springer-Verlag.},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF00865982},
   Key = {Cassel90}
}

@article{fds268746,
   Author = {HEDLUND, L and JONES, D and EFFMANN, E and JOHNSON, GA and BATES, W and WOLFE, W and PUTMAN, C},
   Title = {COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHIC STUDY OF THE DOG LUNG DURING
             HEMORRHAGIC-SHOCK},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {369-369},
   Year = {1979},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1979HQ94500028&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds268746}
}

@booklet{Joyce04,
   Author = {M. M. Joyce and R. C. Burghardt and T. E. Spencer and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Conceptus secretory factors, other than estrogen, increase
             expression of interferon-stimulated genes in the porcine
             endometrium during pregnancy.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Pages = {211 -- 211},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {Joyce04}
}

@article{fds157088,
   Author = {TE Spencer and RC Burghardt and GA Johnson and FW
             Bazer},
   Title = {Conceptus signals for establishment and maintenance of
             pregnancy.},
   Journal = {Animal reproduction science},
   Volume = {82-83},
   Pages = {537-50},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0378-4320},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anireprosci.2004.04.014},
   Keywords = {Animals • Animals, Domestic • Corpus Luteum •
             Female • Fetus • Interferons • Pregnancy
             • Pregnancy Maintenance • Progesterone •
             Sheep • Signal Transduction* • Swine •
             Trophoblasts • metabolism • physiology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {Establishment and maintenance of pregnancy results from
             signaling by the conceptus (embryo/fetus and associated
             extraembryonic membranes) and requires progesterone produced
             by the corpus luteum. In most mammals, hormones produced by
             the trophoblast maintain progesterone production by acting
             directly or indirectly to maintain the corpus luteum. In
             domestic animals (ruminants and pigs), hormones from the
             trophoblast are antiluteolytic in that they act on the
             endometrium to prevent uterine release of luteolytic
             prostaglandin F2alpha. In cyclic and pregnant sheep,
             progesterone negatively autoregulates progesterone receptor
             gene expression in the endometrial luminal and superficial
             glandular epithelium. In cyclic sheep, loss of the
             progesterone receptor is closely followed by increases in
             epithelial estrogen receptors and then oxytocin receptors,
             allowing oxytocin to induce uterine release of luteolytic
             prostaglandin F2alpha pulses. In pregnant sheep, the
             conceptus trophoblast produces interferon tau that acts on
             the endometrium to inhibit transcription of the estrogen
             receptor alpha gene directly and the oxytocin receptor gene
             indirectly to abrogate development of the endometrial
             luteolytic mechanism. Subsequently, sequential, overlapping
             actions of progesterone, interferon tau, placental lactogen,
             and growth hormone comprise a hormonal servomechanism that
             regulates endometrial gland morphogenesis and terminal
             differentiated function to maintain pregnancy in sheep. In
             pigs, the conceptus trophoblast produces estrogen that
             alters the direction of prostaglandin F2alpha secretion from
             an endocrine to exocrine direction, thereby sequestering
             luteolytic prostaglandin F2alpha within the uterine lumen.
             Conceptus estrogen also increases expression of fibroblast
             growth factor 7 in the endometrial lumenal epithelium that,
             in turn, stimulates proliferation and differentiated
             functions of the trophectoderm, which expresses the
             fibroblast growth factor 7 receptor. Strategic manipulation
             of these physiological mechanisms may improve uterine
             capacity, conceptus survival, and reproductive
             health.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.anireprosci.2004.04.014},
   Key = {fds157088}
}

@article{fds174111,
   Author = {GA Johnson and FW Bazer and RC Burghardt and TE Spencer and G Wu and KJ
             Bayless},
   Title = {Conceptus-uterus interactions in pigs: endometrial gene
             expression in response to estrogens and interferons from
             conceptuses.},
   Journal = {Society of Reproduction and Fertility supplement},
   Volume = {66},
   Pages = {321-32},
   Year = {2009},
   Keywords = {Animals • Embryo Implantation • Embryo, Mammalian
             • Endometrium • Estrogens • Female •
             Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental • Interferons
             • Pregnancy • Swine • physiology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {This review highlights information on conceptus-uterus
             interactions in the pig with respect to uterine gene
             expression in response to estrogens and interferons (IFNs)
             secreted from elongating conceptuses. Pig conceptuses
             release estrogens for pregnancy recognition, but also
             secrete IFNs that do not appear to be antiluteolytic.
             Estrogens and IFNs induce expression of largely
             non-overlapping sets of genes, and evidence suggests that
             pig conceptuses orchestrate essential events of early
             pregnancy including pregnancy recognition signaling,
             implantation and secretion of histotroph by precisely
             controlling temporal and spatial (cell-specific) changes in
             uterine gene expression through initial secretion of
             estrogens, followed by cytokines including IFNG and IFND. By
             Day 12 of pregnancy, estrogens increase the expression of
             multiple genes in the uterine luminal epithelium including
             SPP1, STC1, IRF2 and STAT1 that likely have roles for
             implantation. By Day 15 of pregnancy, IFNs upregulate a
             large array of IFN responsive genes in the underlying stroma
             and glandular epithelium including ISG15, IRF1, STAT1, SLAs
             and B2M that likely have roles in uterine remodeling to
             support placentation.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174111}
}

@article{fds204271,
   Author = {D Srinivasan and N Muthukrishnan and GA Johnson and A Erazo-Oliveras and J Lim and EE Simanek and JP Pellois},
   Title = {Conjugation to the cell-penetrating peptide TAT potentiates
             the photodynamic effect of carboxytetramethylrhodamine.},
   Journal = {PloS one},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {e17732},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {1932-6203},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0017732},
   Keywords = {Amino Acid Sequence • Animals • Carotenoids •
             Cell Death • Cell Line • Cell Membrane • Cell
             Membrane Permeability • Cell-Penetrating Peptides
             • Drug Synergism • Endocytosis • Endosomes
             • Humans • Light • Molecular Sequence Data
             • Photochemotherapy* • Photolysis • Protein
             Processing, Post-Translational • Rhodamines •
             Singlet Oxygen • chemistry • drug effects •
             metabolism • metabolism* • pharmacology •
             radiation effects • therapeutic use*},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can transport
             macromolecular cargos into live cells. However, the cellular
             delivery efficiency of these reagents is often suboptimal
             because CPP-cargo conjugates typically remain trapped inside
             endosomes. Interestingly, irradiation of fluorescently
             labeled CPPs with light increases the release of the peptide
             and its cargos into the cytosol. However, the mechanism of
             this phenomenon is not clear. Here we investigate the
             molecular basis of the photo-induced endosomolytic activity
             of the prototypical CPPs TAT labeled to the fluorophore
             5(6)-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMR). RESULTS: We report
             that TMR-TAT acts as a photosensitizer that can destroy
             membranes. TMR-TAT escapes from endosomes after exposure to
             moderate light doses. However, this is also accompanied by
             loss of plasma membrane integrity, membrane blebbing, and
             cell-death. In addition, the peptide causes the destruction
             of cells when applied extracellularly and also triggers the
             photohemolysis of red blood cells. These photolytic and
             photocytotoxic effects were inhibited by hydrophobic singlet
             oxygen quenchers but not by hydrophilic quenchers.
             CONCLUSIONS: Together, these results suggest that TAT can
             convert an innocuous fluorophore such as TMR into a potent
             photolytic agent. This effect involves the targeting of the
             fluorophore to cellular membranes and the production of
             singlet oxygen within the hydrophobic environment of the
             membranes. Our findings may be relevant for the design of
             reagents with photo-induced endosomolytic activity. The
             photocytotoxicity exhibited by TMR-TAT also suggests that
             CPP-chromophore conjugates could aid the development of
             novel Photodynamic Therapy agents.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0017732},
   Key = {fds204271}
}

@booklet{Walker93a,
   Author = {L. C. Walker and S. Murad and A. G. Messenger and G. A.
             Johnson and S. R. Pinnell},
   Title = {Connective-tissue effects of minoxidil and its hydroxy
             derivatives on human dermal papilla cells in
             culture},
   Journal = {Clinical Research},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {A437 -- A437},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {Walker93a}
}

@booklet{Walker93,
   Author = {L. C. Walker and S. Murad and A. G. Messenger and G. A.
             Johnson and S. R. Pinnell},
   Title = {Connective-tissue effects of minoxidil and its hydroxy
             derivatives on human dermal papilla cells in
             culture},
   Journal = {Journal Of Investigative Dermatology},
   Volume = {100},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {552 -- 552},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {Walker93}
}

@article{fds268730,
   Author = {Clark, D and Badea, A and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT},
   Title = {Constructing a 4D murine cardiac micro-CT atlas for
             automated segmentation and phenotyping applications},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
   Volume = {8669},
   Year = {2013},
   ISSN = {1605-7422},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2007043},
   Abstract = {A number of investigators have demonstrated the potential of
             preclinical micro-CT in characterizing cardiovascular
             disease in mouse models. One major hurdle to advancing this
             approach is the extensive user interaction required to
             derive quantitative metrics from these 4D image arrays
             (space + time). In this work, we present: (1) a method for
             constructing an average anatomic cardiac atlas of the mouse
             based on 4D micro-CT images, (2) a fully automated approach
             for segmenting newly acquired cardiac data sets using the
             atlas, and (3) a quantitative characterization of atlasbased
             segmentation accuracy and consistency. Employing the
             deformable registration toolkit, ANTs, the construction of
             minimal deformation fields, and a novel adaptation of joint
             bilateral filtration, our atlas construction scheme was used
             to integrate 6, C57BL/6 cardiac micro-CT data sets, reducing
             the noise standard deviation from ~70 HU in the individual
             data sets to ~21 HU in the atlas data set. Using the
             segmentation tools in Atropos and our atlas-based
             segmentation, we were able to propagate manual labels to 5,
             C57BL/6 data sets not used in atlas construction. Average
             Dice coefficients and volume accuracies (respectively) over
             phases 1 (ventricular diastole), 3, and 5 (ventricular
             systole) of these 5 data sets were as follows: left
             ventricle, 0.96, 0.96; right ventricle, 0.89, 0.92; left
             atrium, 0.88, 0.89; right atrium, 0.86, 0.92; myocardium,
             0.90, 0.94. Once the atlas was constructed and segmented,
             execution of the proposed automated segmentation scheme took
             ~6.5 hours per data set, versus more than 50 hours required
             for a manual segmentation. © 2013 SPIE.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.2007043},
   Key = {fds268730}
}

@booklet{Shengunther97,
   Author = {J. Shengunther and R. S. Mannel and J. L. Walker and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Construction of the ileocolonic continent urinary reservoir:
             Operative technique at the University of
             Oklahoma},
   Journal = {Journal Of Gynecologic Surgery},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {83 -- 88},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {Shengunther97}
}

@article{fds268742,
   Author = {Peterson, RA and Gabrielson, KL and Johnson, GA and Pomper, MG and Coatney, RW and Winkelmann, CT},
   Title = {Continuing Education Course #1: Non-Invasive Imaging as a
             Problem-Solving Tool and Translational Biomarker Strategy in
             Toxicologic Pathology},
   Journal = {Toxicologic Pathology (Sage)},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {267-272},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0192-6233},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000293379600029&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1177/0192623310390392},
   Key = {fds268742}
}

@article{fds268770,
   Author = {Bolon, B and Garman, RH and Gundersen, HJG and Johnson, GA and Kaufmann,
             W and Krinke, G and Little, PB and Makris, SL and Mellon, RD and Sulik, KK and Jensen, K},
   Title = {Continuing education course #3: current practices and future
             trends in neuropathology assessment for developmental
             neurotoxicity testing.},
   Journal = {Toxicologic Pathology (Sage)},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {289-293},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {1533-1601},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0192623310386247},
   Abstract = {The continuing education course on Developmental
             Neurotoxicity Testing (DNT) was designed to communicate
             current practices for DNT neuropathology, describe promising
             innovations in quantitative analysis and noninvasive
             imaging, and facilitate a discussion among experienced
             neuropathologists and regulatory scientists regarding
             suitable DNT practices. Conventional DNT neuropathology
             endpoints are qualitative histopathology and morphometric
             endpoints of particularly vulnerable sites (e.g., cerebral,
             cerebellar, or hippocampal thickness). Novel imaging and
             stereology measurements hold promise for automated analysis
             of factors that cannot be effectively examined in routinely
             processed specimens (e.g., cell numbers, fiber tract
             integrity). The panel recommended that dedicated DNT
             neuropathology data sets be acquired on a minimum of 8
             sections (for qualitative assessment) or 3 sections (for
             quantitative linear and stereological analyses) using a
             small battery of stains to examine neurons and myelin. Where
             guidelines permit discretion, immersion fixation is
             acceptable for younger animals (postnatal day 22 or
             earlier), and peripheral nerves may be embedded in paraffin.
             Frequent concerns regarding DNT data sets include
             false-negative outcomes due to processing difficulties
             (e.g., lack of concordance among sections from different
             animals) and insensitive analytical endpoints (e.g.,
             qualitative evaluation) as well as false-positive results
             arising from overinterpretation or misreading by
             inexperienced pathologists.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0192623310386247},
   Key = {fds268770}
}

@booklet{Halvorsen82,
   Author = {HALVORSEN, RA and WOODFIELD, S and HEDLUND, L and JOHNSON, GA and THOMPSON, WM},
   Title = {CONTRAST ENHANCEMENT OF THE HEPATOBILIARY SYSTEM DURING CT -
             A COMPARISON OF BILIARY AND VASCULAR AGENTS},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {S27-S27},
   Year = {1982},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1982PA96700126&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198207000-00134},
   Key = {Halvorsen82}
}

@booklet{Thompson83,
   Author = {THOMPSON, WM and STUDE, R and BATES, M and HEDLUND, L and JOHNSON,
             GA},
   Title = {CONTRAST ENHANCEMENT OF THE LIVER DURING CT - A COMPARISON
             OF BILIARY, VASCULAR AND RETICULOENDOTHELIAL
             AGENTS},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {S11-S11},
   Year = {1983},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1983QZ74200056&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198307000-00064},
   Key = {Thompson83}
}

@booklet{Stude87,
   Author = {R. A. Stude and L. W. Hedlund and G. A. Johnson and W. M.
             Thompson},
   Title = {Contrast enhancement of the liver evaluation by automated
             contiguous pixel search},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {132 -- 136},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {Stude87}
}

@article{fds268928,
   Author = {Stude, RA and Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA and Thompson,
             WM},
   Title = {Contrast enhancement of the liver. Evaluation by automated
             contiguous pixel search.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {132-136},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3030962},
   Keywords = {Animals • Contrast Media* • Diatrizoate Meglumine
             • Dogs • Ethiodized Oil • Liver •
             Radiographic Image Enhancement* • Tomography, X-Ray
             Computed* • diagnostic use • radiography*},
   Abstract = {Eight dogs were infused with one of three different contrast
             agents: meglumine diatrizoate, iosulamide meglumine, or an
             ethiodized oil emulsion (EOE 13). Image intensity in the
             liver was evaluated globally and regionally by means of an
             automated pixel sampling method to determine differences in
             the rate of enhancement produced by the three agents. The
             results of the automated method were compared with those of
             the standard manual cursor method. The automated method
             showed that liver parenchyma was enhanced uniformly by all
             three contrast agents. The maximum degree of enhancement
             (Mean +/- SEM) for the three agents was diatrizoate, 12.0
             +/- 3.5 Hounsfield units (HU); iosluamide, 21.3 +/- 3.5 HU;
             and EOE 13, 37.2 +/- 4.25 HU. With the manual cursor method,
             contrast enhancement was about 20% more than estimated by
             the automated method. The automated method is better for
             evaluating the magnitude and pattern of contrast agent
             enhancement of the entire liver, since the currently
             employed cursor technique requires multiple evaluations to
             evaluate the entire liver.},
   Key = {fds268928}
}

@article{fds268824,
   Author = {Howles, GP and Bing, KF and Qi, Y and Rosenzweig, SJ and Nightingale,
             KR and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Contrast-enhanced in vivo magnetic resonance microscopy of
             the mouse brain enabled by noninvasive opening of the
             blood-brain barrier with ultrasound.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {995-1004},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1522-2594},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20740666},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blood-Brain Barrier • Brain •
             Contrast Media • Fluorocarbons • Gadolinium DTPA
             • Image Enhancement • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
             • Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL • Microscopy
             • Sonication • anatomy & histology* •
             diagnostic use • diagnostic use* • metabolism*
             • methods • methods* • pharmacokinetics
             • pharmacokinetics* • radiation
             effects},
   Abstract = {The use of contrast agents for neuroimaging is limited by
             the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts entry into
             the brain. To administer imaging agents to the brain of
             rats, intracarotid infusions of hypertonic mannitol have
             been used to open the BBB. However, this technically
             challenging approach is invasive, opens only a limited
             region of the BBB, and is difficult to extend to mice. In
             this work, the BBB was opened in mice, using unfocused
             ultrasound combined with an injection of microbubbles. This
             technique has several notable features: it (a) can be
             performed transcranially in mice; (b) takes only 3 min and
             uses only commercially available components; (c) opens the
             BBB throughout the brain; (d) causes no observed histologic
             damage or changes in behavior (with peak-negative acoustic
             pressures of 0.36 MPa); and (e) allows recovery of the BBB
             within 4 h. Using this technique, Gadopentetate Dimeglumine
             (Gd-DTPA) was administered to the mouse brain parenchyma,
             thereby shortening T(1) and enabling the acquisition of
             high-resolution (52 × 52 × 100 micrometers(3)) images in
             51 min in vivo. By enabling the administration of both
             existing anatomic contrast agents and the newer
             molecular/sensing contrast agents, this technique may be
             useful for the study of mouse models of neurologic function
             and pathology with MRI.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.22411},
   Key = {fds268824}
}

@booklet{Sills04,
   Author = {Sills, RC and Morgan, DL and Herr, DW and Little, PB and George, NM and Ton, TV and Love, NE and Maronpot, RR and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Contribution of magnetic resonance microscopy in the 12-week
             neurotoxicity evaluation of carbonyl sulfide in Fischer 344
             rats},
   Journal = {Toxicologic Pathology},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {501-510},
   Year = {2004},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01926230490493918},
   Abstract = {In this carbonyl sulfide (COS) study, magnetic resonance
             microscopy (MRM) and detailed light microscopic evaluation
             effectively functioned in parallel to assure that the
             distribution and degree of pathology in the brain was
             accurately represented. MRM is a powerful imaging modality
             that allows for excellent identification of neuroanatomical
             structures coupled with the ability to acquire 200 or more
             cross-sectional images of the brain, and the ability to
             display them in multiple planes. F344 rats were exposed to
             200-600 ppm COS for up to 12 weeks. Prior to MRM, rats were
             anesthetized and cardiac perfused with McDowell Trump's
             fixative containing a gadolinium MR contrast medium. Fixed
             specimens were scanned at the Duke Center for In Vivo
             Microscopy on a 9.4 Tesla magnetic resonance system adapted
             explicitly for microscopic imaging. An advantage of MRM in
             this study was the ability to identify lesions in rats that
             appeared clinically normal prior to sacrifice and the
             opportunity to identify lesions in areas of the brain which
             would not be included in conventional studies. Other
             advantages include the ability to examine the brain in
             multiple planes (transverse, dorsal, sagittal) and obtain
             and save the MRM images in a digital format that allows for
             postexperimental data processing and manipulation. MRM
             images were correlated with neuroanatomical and
             neuropathological findings. All suspected MRM images were
             compared to corresponding H&amp;E slides. An important
             aspect of this study was that MRM was critical in defining
             our strategy for sectioning the brain, and for designing
             mechanistic studies (cytochrome oxidase evaluations) and
             functional assessments (electrophysiology studies) on
             specifically targeted anatomical sites following COS
             exposure.},
   Doi = {10.1080/01926230490493918},
   Key = {Sills04}
}

@article{fds132895,
   Author = {RC Sills and DL Morgan and DW Herr and PB Little and NM George and TV Ton and NE Love and RR Maronpot and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Contribution of magnetic resonance microscopy in the 12-week
             neurotoxicity evaluation of carbonyl sulfide in Fischer 344
             rats.},
   Journal = {Toxicologic pathology, United States},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {501-10},
   ISSN = {0192-6233},
   Keywords = {Administration, Inhalation • Air Pollutants •
             Animals • Brain • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
             • Female • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
             • Inhalation Exposure • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging* • Male • Microscopy • Neurotoxicity
             Syndromes • Rats • Rats, Inbred F344 •
             Recovery of Function • Sulfur Oxides •
             administration & dosage • drug effects* •
             etiology* • methods • pathology •
             toxicity*},
   Abstract = {In this carbonyl sulfide (COS) study, magnetic resonance
             microscopy (MRM) and detailed light microscopic evaluation
             effectively functioned in parallel to assure that the
             distribution and degree of pathology in the brain was
             accurately represented. MRM is a powerful imaging modality
             that allows for excellent identification of neuroanatomical
             structures coupled with the ability to acquire 200 or more
             cross-sectional images of the brain, and the ability to
             display them in multiple planes. F344 rats were exposed to
             200-600 ppm COS for up to 12 weeks. Prior to MRM, rats were
             anesthetized and cardiac perfused with McDowell Trump's
             fixative containing a gadolinium MR contrast medium. Fixed
             specimens were scanned at the Duke Center for In Vivo
             Microscopy on a 9.4 Tesla magnetic resonance system adapted
             explicitly for microscopic imaging. An advantage of MRM in
             this study was the ability to identify lesions in rats that
             appeared clinically normal prior to sacrifice and the
             opportunity to identify lesions in areas of the brain which
             would not be included in conventional studies. Other
             advantages include the ability to examine the brain in
             multiple planes (transverse, dorsal, sagittal) and obtain
             and save the MRM images in a digital format that allows for
             postexperimental data processing and manipulation. MRM
             images were correlated with neuroanatomical and
             neuropathological findings. All suspected MRM images were
             compared to corresponding H&E slides. An important aspect of
             this study was that MRM was critical in defining our
             strategy for sectioning the brain, and for designing
             mechanistic studies (cytochrome oxidase evaluations) and
             functional assessments (electrophysiology studies) on
             specifically targeted anatomical sites following COS
             exposure.},
   Key = {fds132895}
}

@booklet{Sills04a,
   Author = {Sills, RC and Morgan, DL and Maronpot, RR and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Contribution of magnetic resonance microscopy in the
             biologic and mechanistic assessment of carbonyl sulfide
             neurotoxicity in F344 rats},
   Journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
   Volume = {197},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {151-152},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0041-008X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000222348900052&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Sills04a}
}

@booklet{Shattuck97a,
   Author = {Shattuck, MD and Behringer, RP and Johnson, GA and Georgiadis,
             JG},
   Title = {Convection and flow in porous media. Part 1. Visualization
             by magnetic resonance imaging},
   Journal = {Journal of Fluid Mechanics},
   Volume = {332},
   Pages = {215-245},
   Year = {1997},
   Abstract = {We describe an experimental study of porous media convection
             (PMC) from onset to 8Rac. The goal of this work is to
             provide non-invasive imaging and high-precision heat
             transport measurements to test theories of convection in
             PMC. We obtain velocity information and visualize the
             convection patterns using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
             We study both ordered and disordered packings of
             mono-disperse spheres of diameter d = 3.204 ± 0.029 mm, in
             circular, rectangular, and hexagonal planforms. In general,
             the structure of the medium plays a role which is not
             predicted by theories which assume a homogeneous system.
             Disordered media are prepared by pouring mono-disperse
             spheres into the container. Large ordered regions of close
             packing for the spheres, with grain boundaries and isolated
             defects, characterize these media. The defects and grain
             boundaries play an important role in pattern formation in
             disordered media. Any deviation from close packing produces
             a region of larger porosity, hence locally larger
             permeability. The result is spatial variations in the
             Rayleigh number, Ra. We define the critical Ra, Rac, as the
             Rayleigh number at the onset of convection in the ordered
             regions. We find that stable localized convective regions
             exist around grain boundaries and defects at Ra &lt; Rac.
             These remain as pinning sites for the convection patterns in
             the ordered regions as Ra increases above Rac up to 5Rac,
             the highest Ra studied in the disordered media. In ordered
             media, spheres are packed such that the only deviations from
             close packing occur within a thin (&lt;d) region near the
             vertical walls. Stable localized convection begins at 0.5Rac
             in the wall regions but appears to play only a weak role in
             the pattern formation of the interior regions (bulk), since
             different stable patterns are observed in the bulk at the
             same Ra after each cycling of Ra below Rac, even for similar
             patterns of small rolls in the wall regions. The experiments
             provide a test of the following predictions for PMC: (i)
             that straight parallel rolls should be linearly stable for
             Rac &lt; Ra &lt; 5Rac; (ii) that at onset, the rolls should
             have a dimensionless wavevector qc = π; (iii) that at the
             upper end of this range rolls should lose stability to
             cross-rolls; (iv) that the initial slope of the Nusselt
             curve should be 2; (v) that there should be a rapid decay of
             vertical vorticity - hence no complex flows, such as those
             which occur for Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) within the
             nominal regime of stable parallel rolls. These predictions
             are in partial agreement with our findings for the bulk
             convection in the ordered media. We observe roll-like
             structures which relax rapidly to stable patterns between
             Rac and 5Rac. However we find a wavenumber which is 0.7π
             compared to π derived from linear stability theory. We find
             an asymmetry between the size of the upflowing regions and
             downflowing regions as Ra grows above Rac. The ratio of the
             volume of the upflowing to the volume of the downflowing
             regions decreases as Ra increases and leads to a novel
             time-dependent state, which does not consist of cross-rolls.
             This time-dependent state begins at 6Rac and is observed up
             to 8Rac, the largest Ra which we studied. It seems likely
             that the occurrence of this state is linked to departures
             from the Boussinesq approximation at higher Ra. We also find
             that the slope of the Nusselt curve is 0.7, which does not
             agree with the predicted value of 2.},
   Key = {Shattuck97a}
}

@article{fds174234,
   Author = {S Banerjee and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Coregionalized single- and multiresolution spatially varying
             growth curve modeling with application to weed
             growth.},
   Journal = {Biometrics},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {864-76},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0006-341X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1541-0420.2006.00535.x},
   Keywords = {Bayes Theorem • Biometry • Markov Chains •
             Models, Biological* • Models, Statistical* • Monte
             Carlo Method • Normal Distribution • Setaria Plant
             • growth & development*},
   Abstract = {Modeling of longitudinal data from agricultural experiments
             using growth curves helps understand conditions conducive or
             unconducive to crop growth. Recent advances in Geographical
             Information Systems (GIS) now allow geocoding of
             agricultural data that help understand spatial patterns. A
             particularly common problem is capturing spatial variation
             in growth patterns over the entire experimental domain.
             Statistical modeling in these settings can be challenging
             because agricultural designs are often spatially replicated,
             with arrays of subplots, and interest lies in capturing
             spatial variation at possibly different resolutions. In this
             article, we develop a framework for modeling spatially
             varying growth curves as Gaussian processes that capture
             associations at single and multiple resolutions. We provide
             Bayesian hierarchical models for this setting, where
             flexible parameterization enables spatial estimation and
             prediction of growth curves. We illustrate using data from
             weed growth experiments conducted in Waseca, Minnesota, that
             recorded growth of the weed Setaria spp. in a spatially
             replicated design.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1541-0420.2006.00535.x},
   Key = {fds174234}
}

@booklet{Monk94,
   Author = {B. J. Monk and J. A. Chapman and G. A. Johnson and B. K.
             Brightman and S. P. Wilczynski and M. J. Schell and H.
             Fan},
   Title = {Correlation of c-myc and her-2/neu amplification and
             expression with histopathologic variables in uterine corpus
             cancer},
   Journal = {American Journal Of Obstetrics And Gynecology},
   Volume = {171},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1193 -- 1198},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {Monk94}
}

@article{fds174109,
   Author = {BJ Monk and JA Chapman and GA Johnson and BK Brightman and SP
             Wilczynski, MJ Schell and H Fan},
   Title = {Correlation of C-myc and HER-2/neu amplification and
             expression with histopathologic variables in uterine corpus
             cancer.},
   Journal = {American journal of obstetrics and gynecology},
   Volume = {171},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1193-8},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0002-9378},
   Keywords = {Adenocarcinoma • Aged • Autoradiography •
             Blotting, Northern • Blotting, Southern • Female
             • Gene Amplification* • Gene Expression* •
             Genes, erbB-2* • Genes, myc* • Humans •
             Middle Aged • Uterine Neoplasms • genetics* •
             pathology • pathology*},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: Initial studies of protooncogenes in uterine
             corpus cancer have focused on a single aspect of the gene in
             question (deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, protein)
             or have studied a small number of patients. Therefore we
             evaluated c-myc and HER-2/neu gene amplification and
             ribonucleic acid overexpression in such malignancies and
             correlated these molecular changes with known pathologic
             risk factors. STUDY DESIGN: Quantitative Southern blot
             analysis for oncogene deoxyribonucleic acid was used to
             examine 37 tumors from patients with primary untreated
             uterine corpus cancer referred to the City of Hope National
             Medical Center. Six normal endometrial specimens were
             controls. Seventeen tumors were also examined by Northern
             blotting to assess increased ribonucleic expression.
             RESULTS: Histologic types included adenocarcinoma (n = 30),
             papillary serous adenocarcinoma (n = 2), adenosquamous
             carcinoma (n = 2), mixed mullerian sarcoma (n = 2), and
             leiomyosarcoma (n = 1). Carcinomas were stage I (n = 10), II
             (n = 18), or III (n = 6). Twenty-three had myometrial
             invasion of less than one third, six one third to two
             thirds, and eight deeper invasion (greater than two thirds).
             According to the criteria of the International Federation of
             Gynecology and Obstetrics stage was as follows: I (n = 22),
             II (n = 3), III (n = 7), and IV (n = 5). Ten (27%) and four
             (11%) tumors showed gene amplification of c-myc and
             HER-2/neu, respectively. Six demonstrated overexpression of
             either the c-myc or HER-2/neu gene. HER-2/neu gene
             amplification was associated more closely with
             overexpression. Stepwise logistic analysis demonstrated
             c-myc amplification to be associated with higher grade (p =
             0.01). CONCLUSION: In this referral population, c-myc
             activation is more common than HER-2/neu activation in
             uterine corpus cancer and is associated with tumors of
             higher grade.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174109}
}

@booklet{Scribner99,
   Author = {D. R. Scribner and R. S. Mannel and J. L. Walker and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Cost analysis of laparoscopy versus laparotomy for early
             endometrial cancer},
   Journal = {Gynecologic Oncology},
   Volume = {75},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {460 -- 463},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {Scribner99}
}

@article{fds174313,
   Author = {DR Scribner Jr and RS Mannel and JL Walker and GA
             Johnson},
   Title = {Cost analysis of laparoscopy versus laparotomy for early
             endometrial cancer.},
   Journal = {Gynecologic oncology},
   Volume = {75},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {460-3},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0090-8258},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/gyno.1999.5606},
   Keywords = {Aged • Costs and Cost Analysis • Endometrial
             Neoplasms • Female • Humans • Laparoscopy
             • Laparotomy • Lymph Node Excision • Neoplasm
             Staging • Retrospective Studies • economics*
             • pathology • surgery*},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine
             whether the cost associated with treatment of early stage
             endometrial cancer differs on the basis of the surgical
             approach. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed on
             a series of women with presumed early stage endometrial
             cancer treated between 5/96 and 1/99 at a single
             institution. The patients were grouped according to the
             surgical approach utilized. The first group consisted of 19
             patients who underwent laparoscopic assisted vaginal
             hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and
             laparoscopic pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection.
             The second group consisted of 17 patients who underwent a
             total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy,
             and pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection. The two
             groups were compared with a two-tailed Student t test.
             Variables analyzed included age, Quetelet index (QI),
             surgical stage, number of lymph nodes, surgical time,
             estimated blood loss, postoperative complications, number of
             days in the hospital, and costs. The cost analysis was
             divided into room and board, pharmacy, ancillary services,
             operating room equipment, operating room services, and
             anesthesia. RESULTS: Both groups were similar in age, QI,
             and distribution of stage. The laparoscopic group required
             more OR time (237 vs 157 min, P < 0.001); however, the
             number of lymph nodes, estimated blood loss, and
             postoperative complications were not significantly different
             between the groups. The laparoscopic group required
             significantly shorter hospitalization than the laparotomy
             group (3.7 vs 5.2 days, P < 0.001) resulting in less room
             and board ($299 vs $454, P < 0.001) as well as pharmacy
             costs ($443 vs $625, P < 0.02). The cost of anesthesia was
             higher in the laparoscopic group ($696 vs $444, P < 0.001)
             but the costs of OR equipment, OR services, and total costs
             were not statistically different between the groups.
             CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic surgical management of early stage
             endometrial cancer is feasible with minimal morbidity. The
             cost savings of early hospital discharge is offset by longer
             surgical time and higher anesthetic costs. The total costs
             for each surgical approach are not statistically different.
             The presumed advantages of less pain, early resumption of
             normal activities, and overall improvement of quality of
             life await further investigation.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1006/gyno.1999.5606},
   Key = {fds174313}
}

@booklet{Johnson93a,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and M. S. Defelice and Z. R.
             Helsel},
   Title = {Cover crop management and weed-control in corn
             (zea-mays)},
   Journal = {Weed Technology},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {425 -- 430},
   Year = {1993},
   Key = {Johnson93a}
}

@article{fds174145,
   Author = {GA Johnson and SJ Boukma and RA Lahti and J Mathews},
   Title = {Cyclic AMP and phosphodiesterase in synaptic vesicles from
             mouse brain.},
   Journal = {Journal of neurochemistry},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1387-92},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0022-3042},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Brain Chemistry* • Cattle
             • Cell Fractionation • Centrifugation, Density
             Gradient • Cyclic AMP • Male • Mice •
             Microscopy, Electron • Myocardium • Phosphoric
             Diester Hydrolases • Synaptic Vesicles • Tritium
             • analysis* • cytology • enzymology},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174145}
}

@article{fds174238,
   Author = {GA Johnson and SM Jalal},
   Title = {DDT-induced chromosomal damage in mice.},
   Journal = {The Journal of heredity},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {7-8},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0022-1503},
   Keywords = {Animals • Chromatids • Chromosome Aberrations*
             • Chromosomes • DDT • Mice • Mice,
             Inbred BALB C • Mutagens • drug effects •
             drug effects* • pharmacology*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174238}
}

@article{fds174292,
   Author = {LE Steadman and GA Johnson and EL Belden and WJ Murdoch},
   Title = {Decline in sialic acid composition of cellular membranes
             isolated from ovine corpora lutea during
             prostaglandin-induced luteolysis: apparent independence of
             autoimmune recognition.},
   Journal = {American journal of reproductive immunology (New York, N.Y.
             : 1989)},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-2},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1046-7408},
   Keywords = {Animals • Autoantibodies • Cell Membrane •
             Corpus Luteum • Dinoprost • Female •
             N-Acetylneuraminic Acid • Sheep • Sialic Acids
             • analysis • analysis* • drug effects •
             pharmacology* • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Sialic acid was quantified in plasma membranes of corpora
             lutea isolated during prostaglandin (PG) F2 alpha-induced
             luteolysis in sheep. Concentrations of sialic acid within
             membranes decreased after injection of PGF2 alpha, and
             before signs of luteal regression (i.e., a decline in tissue
             concentrations of progesterone) were manifested. Removal of
             residues of sialic acid from luteal membranes was not
             associated with cellular binding of gamma globulin, as
             monitored by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. We
             suggest that desialylation of luteal membranes could be an
             important aspect of the mechanism of luteolysis. Such a
             process does not appear to involve participation of
             autoantibody.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174292}
}

@booklet{Steadman89,
   Author = {L. E. Steadman and G. A. Johnson and E. L. Belden and W. J.
             Murdoch},
   Title = {Decline in sialic-acid composition of cellular membranes
             isolated from ovine corpora-lutea during
             prostaglandin-induced luteolysis - apparent independence of
             autoimmune recognition},
   Journal = {American Journal Of Reproductive Immunology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1 -- 2},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {Steadman89}
}

@article{fds132725,
   Title = {Delnomdedieu M, Hedlund LW, maronpot RR, Johson GA, MR
             microscopy and histopathology: Comparative approach to
             bromobenzene-induced hepatoxicity in the rat. hepatology 27;
             526-532 1998},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds132725}
}

@article{fds268788,
   Author = {Clark, D and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT},
   Title = {Denoising of 4D cardiac micro-CT data using median-centric
             bilateral filtration},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
   Volume = {8314},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {1605-7422},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.911478},
   Abstract = {Bilateral filtration has proven an effective tool for
             denoising CT data. The classic filter uses Gaussian domain
             and range weighting functions in 2D. More recently, other
             distributions have yielded more accurate results in specific
             applications, and the bilateral filtration framework has
             been extended to higher dimensions. In this study,
             brute-force optimization is employed to evaluate the use of
             several alternative distributions for both domain and range
             weighting: Andrew's Sine Wave, El Fallah Ford, Gaussian,
             Flat, Lorentzian, Huber's Minimax, Tukey's Bi-weight, and
             Cosine. Two variations on the classic bilateral filter,
             which use median filtration to reduce bias in range weights,
             are also investigated: median-centric and hybrid bilateral
             filtration. Using the 4D MOBY mouse phantom reconstructed
             with noise (stdev. ∼ 65 HU), hybrid bilateral filtration,
             a combination of the classic and median-centric filters,
             with Flat domain and range weighting is shown to provide
             optimal denoising results (PSNRs: 31.69, classic; 31.58
             median-centric; 32.25, hybrid). To validate these phantom
             studies, the optimal filters are also applied to in vivo, 4D
             cardiac micro-CT data acquired in the mouse. In a constant
             region of the left ventricle, hybrid bilateral filtration
             with Flat domain and range weighting is shown to provide
             optimal smoothing (stdev: original, 72.2 HU; classic, 20.3
             HU; median-centric, 24.1 HU; hybrid, 15.9 HU). While the
             optimal results were obtained using 4D filtration, the 3D
             hybrid filter is ultimately recommended for denoising 4D
             cardiac micro-CT data, because it is more computationally
             tractable and less prone to artifacts (MOBY PSNR: 32.05;
             left ventricle stdev: 20.5 HU). © 2012 SPIE.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.911478},
   Key = {fds268788}
}

@booklet{Todd01a,
   Author = {M. D. Todd and G. A. Johnson and S. T. Vohra},
   Title = {Depolyment of a fiber Bragg grating-based measurement system
             in a structural health monitoring application},
   Journal = {Smart Materials \& Structures},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {534 -- 539},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Todd01a}
}

@booklet{Hayes84,
   Author = {HAYES, CE and JOHNSON, GA and HERFKENS, RJ},
   Title = {DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR SMALL ANIMAL IMAGING IN A LARGE
             BORE MRI SYSTEM},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {S25-S25},
   Year = {1984},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1984TL42800118&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Hayes84}
}

@article{fds268848,
   Author = {Nouls, JC and Izenson, MG and Greeley, HP and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Design of a superconducting volume coil for magnetic
             resonance microscopy of the mouse brain.},
   Journal = {Journal of Magnetic Resonance},
   Volume = {191},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {231-238},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1090-7807},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18221901},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Electric Conductivity •
             Equipment Design • Equipment Failure Analysis •
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Magnetics • Mice
             • Microscopy • Transducers • cytology* •
             instrumentation* • methods* • veterinary •
             veterinary*},
   Abstract = {We present the design process of a superconducting volume
             coil for magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse brain at
             9.4T. The yttrium barium copper oxide coil has been designed
             through an iterative process of three-dimensional
             finite-element simulations and validation against room
             temperature copper coils. Compared to previous designs, the
             Helmholtz pair provides substantially higher B(1)
             homogeneity over an extended volume of interest sufficiently
             large to image biologically relevant specimens. A
             custom-built cryogenic cooling system maintains the
             superconducting probe at 60+/-0.1K. Specimen loading and
             probe retuning can be carried out interactively with the
             coil at operating temperature, enabling much higher
             through-put. The operation of the probe is a routine,
             consistent procedure. Signal-to-noise ratio in a mouse brain
             increased by a factor ranging from 1.1 to 2.9 as compared to
             a room-temperature solenoid coil optimized for mouse brain
             microscopy. We demonstrate images encoded at 10x10x20mum for
             an entire mouse brain specimen with signal-to-noise ratio of
             18 and a total acquisition time of 16.5h, revealing
             neuroanatomy unseen at lower resolution. Phantom
             measurements show an effective spatial resolution better
             than 20mum.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jmr.2007.12.018},
   Key = {fds268848}
}

@booklet{Zhou95,
   Author = {Zhou, X and Maronpot, RR and Hedlund, LW and Cofer, GP and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Detection of bromobenzene-induced hepatocellular necrosis
             using magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {853-857},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8598812},
   Abstract = {The authors used magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy to
             assess hepatic tissue damage induced by bromobenzene both in
             living rats and in fixed rat liver tissues. Experiments were
             conducted at 7 Tesla on three groups of Fisher rats treated
             with bromobenzene at a single dose of 68, 135, and 269
             mg/kg, respectively. Optical microscopy of hematoxylin and
             eosin stained sections showed liver damage only at the
             highest dose, whereas with MR microscopy, tissue alterations
             were detected at all three doses both in vivo and ex vivo.
             The contrast mechanism of the superior sensitivity of MR
             microscopy is believed to be related to the changes in local
             diffusion coefficients that accompany cellular degeneration
             and death, although other contrast mechanisms may also be
             involved. The superior sensitivity of MR microscopy, as
             demonstrated in this study, has many implications for
             potential use of MR techniques to perform in vivo
             histology.},
   Key = {Zhou95}
}

@article{fds132860,
   Author = {X Zhou and RR Maronpot and LW Hedlund and GP Cofer and GA
             Johnson},
   Title = {Detection of bromobenzene-induced hepatocellular necrosis
             using magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the
             Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of
             Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {853-7},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   Keywords = {Animals • Bromobenzenes • Dose-Response
             Relationship, Drug • Female • Image Processing,
             Computer-Assisted • Liver • Magnetic Resonance
             Spectroscopy • Necrosis • Rats • Rats, Inbred
             F344 • Sensitivity and Specificity • diagnostic
             use* • drug effects* • methods • pathology
             • toxicity*},
   Abstract = {The authors used magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy to
             assess hepatic tissue damage induced by bromobenzene both in
             living rats and in fixed rat liver tissues. Experiments were
             conducted at 7 Tesla on three groups of Fisher rats treated
             with bromobenzene at a single dose of 68, 135, and 269
             mg/kg, respectively. Optical microscopy of hematoxylin and
             eosin stained sections showed liver damage only at the
             highest dose, whereas with MR microscopy, tissue alterations
             were detected at all three doses both in vivo and ex vivo.
             The contrast mechanism of the superior sensitivity of MR
             microscopy is believed to be related to the changes in local
             diffusion coefficients that accompany cellular degeneration
             and death, although other contrast mechanisms may also be
             involved. The superior sensitivity of MR microscopy, as
             demonstrated in this study, has many implications for
             potential use of MR techniques to perform in vivo
             histology.},
   Key = {fds132860}
}

@article{fds269111,
   Author = {Chen, XJ and Hedlund, LW and Möller, HE and Chawla, MS and Maronpot,
             RR and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Detection of emphysema in rat lungs by using magnetic
             resonance measurements of 3He diffusion.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {97},
   Number = {21},
   Pages = {11478-11481},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0027-8424},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11027348},
   Keywords = {Animals • Emphysema • Helium • Humans •
             Lung • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Male •
             Rats • Rats, Inbred F344 • diagnosis* •
             pathology*},
   Abstract = {Emphysema is a pulmonary disease characterized by alveolar
             wall destruction, resulting in enlargement of gas exchange
             spaces without fibrosis. This condition is a part of chronic
             obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which causes 3.5% of
             deaths worldwide [Anonymous (1990) World Health Stat. Q.
             Special, 1-51] and contributes greatly to the global burden
             of disease [Murray, C. J. & Lopez, A. D. (1996) Science 274,
             740-743]. Alveolar regeneration has been shown in animal
             models and could have potential for clinical treatment of
             early-stage emphysema. However, current techniques for
             detection of emphysema are not sensitive at the initial
             stages. Early-stage human panacinar emphysema is modeled in
             elastase-treated animals. Here, we provide an in vivo
             imaging method for differentiating normal and emphysematous
             rat lungs by measuring the apparent diffusion coefficient
             (ADC) of hyperpolarized (3)He by using magnetic resonance
             imaging. These data show that the ADC is significantly
             larger in elastase-treated rats, indicating alveolar
             expansion. Whereas these rats were clinically asymptomatic,
             conventional histology confirmed presence of injury. Our
             results indicate that measurement of the hyperpolarized
             (3)He ADC can be a valuable research tool and has potential
             application in the clinical setting.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.97.21.11478},
   Key = {fds269111}
}

@booklet{Chen00,
   Author = {X. J. Chen and L. W. Hedlund and H. E. Moller and M. S.
             Chawla and R. R. Maronpot and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Detection of emphysema in rat lungs by using magnetic
             resonance measurements of He-3 diffusion},
   Journal = {Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The
             United States Of America},
   Volume = {97},
   Number = {21},
   Pages = {11478 -- 11481},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {October},
   Key = {Chen00}
}

@article{fds268798,
   Author = {Smith, WM and Hsu, JCM and Johnson, GA and Reimer, KA and Ideker,
             RE},
   Title = {Detection of infarcted tissue the heart by magnetic
             resonance imaging},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in
             Medicine and Biology},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {pt 1},
   Pages = {485-486},
   Year = {1993},
   Abstract = {Morphological analysis of myocardial infarct structure has
             demonstrated that there is probably an anatomical basis for
             the induction and maintenance of ventricular tachycardia.
             The further study of this phenomenon requires an efficient,
             accurate method for quantitative analysis of pathological
             anatomy. We have evaluated the ability of magnetic resonance
             imaging to distinguish between normal and infarcted tissue
             in formalin-fixed human hearts with distant myocardial
             infarctions.},
   Key = {fds268798}
}

@article{fds268897,
   Author = {Benveniste, H and Einstein, G and Kim, KR and Hulette, C and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Detection of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer's disease by
             magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {96},
   Number = {24},
   Pages = {14079-14084},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0027-8424},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10570201},
   Keywords = {Aged • Aged, 80 and over • Alzheimer Disease
             • Coloring Agents • Humans • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging • Middle Aged • Protons •
             Senile Plaques • methods • pathology*},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) theoretically provides
             the spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio needed to
             resolve neuritic plaques, the neuropathological hallmark of
             Alzheimer's disease (AD). Two previously unexplored MR
             contrast parameters, T2* and diffusion, are tested for
             plaque-specific contrast to noise. Autopsy specimens from
             nondemented controls (n = 3) and patients with AD (n = 5)
             were used. Three-dimensional T2* and diffusion MR images
             with voxel sizes ranging from 3 x 10(-3) mm(3) to 5.9 x
             10(-5) mm(3) were acquired. After imaging, specimens were
             cut and stained with a microwave king silver stain to
             demonstrate neuritic plaques. From controls, the alveus,
             fimbria, pyramidal cell layer, hippocampal sulcus, and
             granule cell layer were detected by either T2* or diffusion
             contrast. These structures were used as landmarks when
             correlating MRMs with histological sections. At a voxel
             resolution of 5.9 x 10(-5) mm(3), neuritic plaques could be
             detected by T2*. The neuritic plaques emerged as black,
             spherical elements on T2* MRMs and could be distinguished
             from vessels only in cross-section when presented in three
             dimension. Here we provide MR images of neuritic plaques in
             vitro. The MRM results reported provide a new direction for
             applying this technology in vivo. Clearly, the ability to
             detect and follow the early progression of amyloid-positive
             brain lesions will greatly aid and simplify the many
             possibilities to intervene pharmacologically in
             AD.},
   Key = {fds268897}
}

@booklet{Anderson93a,
   Author = {C. S. Anderson and K. D. Jamrozik and P. W. Burvill and T.
             M. H. Chakera and G. A. Johnson and E. G.
             Stewartwynne},
   Title = {Determining the incidence of different subtypes of stroke -
             results from the perth community stroke study,
             1989-1990},
   Journal = {Medical Journal Of Australia},
   Volume = {158},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {85 -- 89},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {Anderson93a}
}

@article{fds174307,
   Author = {CS Anderson and KD Jamrozik and PW Burvill and TM Chakera and GA
             Johnson, EG Stewart-Wynne},
   Title = {Determining the incidence of different subtypes of stroke:
             results from the Perth Community Stroke Study,
             1989-1990.},
   Journal = {The Medical journal of Australia},
   Volume = {158},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {85-9},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0025-729X},
   Keywords = {Adult • Aged • Aged, 80 and over • Cerebral
             Hemorrhage • Cerebral Infarction • Cerebrovascular
             Disorders • Female • Humans • Intracranial
             Embolism and Thrombosis • Male • Middle Aged
             • Western Australia • classification* •
             epidemiology • epidemiology*},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and case fatality of
             seven distinct subtypes of stroke in Perth, Western
             Australia. DESIGN AND SETTING: A population-based
             descriptive epidemiological study. SUBJECTS: All residents
             of a geographically defined segment of the Perth
             metropolitan area (estimated population 138,708 persons) who
             had a stroke or transient ischaemic attack between 20
             February 1989 and 19 August 1990, inclusive. MAIN OUTCOME
             MEASURES: The following subtypes of stroke were classified
             according to standard clinical, radiological and
             pathological criteria: types of cerebral infarction, namely,
             large artery (thrombotic) occlusive infarction (LAOI),
             cerebral embolic infarction (EMBI), lacunar infarction
             (LACI) and boundary zone infarction (BZI); primary
             intracerebral haemorrhage (PICH); subarachnoid haemorrhage
             (SAH); and stroke of undetermined cause. RESULTS: Over the
             18-month study period 536 stroke events were registered, of
             which 86% (95% confidence interval, 83%-89%) had a defined
             "pathological" diagnosis on the basis of computed
             tomographic scanning, magnetic resonance imaging or
             necropsy. Cerebral infarction accounted for 71% of cases
             (95% CI, 68%-75%), PICH 11% (95% CI, 9%-14%) and SAH 4% (95%
             CI, 2%-5%). The 382 cases of cerebral infarction included
             LAOI (in approximately 71%), EMBI (15%), LACI (10%) and BZI
             (5%). While the incidence of all subtypes of stroke
             increased with age, there were age and sex differences in
             their proportional frequency, management and prognosis:
             patients with PICH, SAH and EMBI were more likely to be
             admitted to hospital, and these conditions carried the
             highest early case fatality. Over all, the 28-day case
             fatality was 24% (95% CI, 20%-28%), but varied from 0 for
             LACI and BZI, to 37% (95% CI, 15%-59%) for SAH and 35% (CI,
             23%-47%) for PICH. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we found
             considerable differences in incidence rates, the effect of
             age and sex on incidence rates, and prognosis for the
             different subtypes of stroke. Hospital-based studies are
             likely to be selectively biased by emphasising strokes that
             are severe and require admission to hospital. These data
             have important implications in the design and evaluation of
             clinical trials of therapy for stroke.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174307}
}

@booklet{Johnson99a,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and R. C. Burghardt and G. R. Newton and F. W.
             Bazer and T. E. Spencer},
   Title = {Development and characterization of immortalized ovine
             endometrial cell lines},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1324 -- 1330},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {Johnson99a}
}

@article{fds174198,
   Author = {GA Johnson and RC Burghardt and GR Newton and FW Bazer and TE
             Spencer},
   Title = {Development and characterization of immortalized ovine
             endometrial cell lines.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1324-30},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blotting, Western • Cell Line •
             Cell Nucleus • DNA-Binding Proteins • Endocrine
             System • Endometrium • Female • Fluorescent
             Antibody Technique, Direct • Interferon Regulatory
             Factor-1 • Interferon Type I • Microscopy,
             Fluorescence • Paracrine Communication •
             Phosphoproteins • Pregnancy Proteins • Receptors,
             Estrogen • Receptors, Progesterone • Recombinant
             Proteins • Sheep • Signal Transduction •
             Transcription Factors • Ubiquitins • analogs &
             derivatives • biosynthesis • cytology* •
             metabolism • physiology},
   Abstract = {The objective of this study was to generate immortalized
             endometrial epithelial and stromal cell lines from the ovine
             uterus. Luminal (LE) and glandular epithelial (GE) cells and
             stromal (ST) cells were enzymatically isolated from the
             uterus of a Day 5 cyclic ewe (estrus on Day 0), and primary
             cultures were immortalized by transduction with a retroviral
             vector (LXSN-16E6E7) packaged by the amphotropic fibroblast
             line PA-317. Cells having integrated the vector were
             selected by resistance to the neomycin analogue G418
             (0.6-0.8 mg/ml). Surviving cells were maintained in complete
             culture medium containing G418 (0.1 mg/ml) and subcultured
             for more than 40 passages. Phase-contrast microscopy
             revealed that LE and GE cells exhibited a cobblestone
             morphology whereas immortalized ST cells were spindle
             shaped. The epithelial origin of LE and GE was confirmed by
             positive cytokeratin immunostaining, and ST cells were
             vimentin positive. All cell lines were negative for smooth
             muscle alpha-actin staining. Western blot analyses of cell
             extracts revealed the presence of signal transducers and
             activators of transcription (STAT) proteins 1, 2, and 3. In
             the LE cells, interferon tau (IFNtau) induced nuclear
             translocation of STAT proteins 1 and 2 and up-regulated
             several IFN-inducible genes, including STATs 1, 2, and 3 and
             ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP/ISG17). In the LE
             cell line, IFN regulatory factor one was transiently
             up-regulated and then down-regulated by IFNtau.
             Immunostaining revealed the presence of nuclear estrogen
             receptor and progesterone receptor in all cell lines. These
             ovine endometrial cell lines provide useful in vitro model
             systems for the study of hormone and cytokine action, signal
             transduction pathways, cell-cell interactions, and gene
             expression in specific cell types of the ovine
             endometrium.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174198}
}

@booklet{Spencer99b,
   Author = {T. E. Spencer and G. A. Johnson and R. C. Burghardt and J.
             A. G. W. Fleming and F. W. Bazer},
   Title = {Development and characterization of immortalized ovine
             endometrial cell lines.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {60},
   Pages = {142 -- 142},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {Spencer99b}
}

@booklet{Stern88,
   Author = {STERN, RL and CLINE, HE and JOHNSON, GA and RAVIN,
             CE},
   Title = {DEVELOPMENT OF A 3D RECONSTRUCTED-IMAGE SURGICAL PLANNING
             STATION},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {S60-S60},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1988Q574500240&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Stern88}
}

@booklet{Segars04,
   Author = {Segars, WP and Tsui, BMW and Frey, EC and Johnson, GA and Berr,
             SS},
   Title = {Development of a 4-D digital mouse phantom for molecular
             imaging research.},
   Journal = {Molecular Imaging and Biology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {149-159},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1536-1632},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15193249},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: We develop a realistic and flexible 4-D digital
             mouse phantom and investigate its usefulness in molecular
             imaging research. METHODS: Organ shapes were modeled with
             non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces based on
             high-resolution 3-D magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM)
             data. Cardiac and respiratory motions were modeled based on
             gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data obtained from
             normal mice. Pilot simulation studies in single-photon
             emission computed tomography (SPECT) and X-ray computed
             tomography (CT) were performed to demonstrate the utility of
             the phantom. RESULTS: NURBS are an efficient and flexible
             way to accurately model the anatomy and cardiac and
             respiratory motions for a realistic 4-D digital mouse
             phantom. The phantom is capable of producing realistic
             molecular imaging data from which imaging devices and
             techniques can be evaluated. CONCLUSION: The phantom
             provides a unique and useful tool in molecular imaging
             research. It can be used in the development of new imaging
             instrumentation, image acquisition strategies, and image
             processing and reconstruction methods.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.mibio.2004.03.002},
   Key = {Segars04}
}

@article{fds132894,
   Author = {WP Segars and BM Tsui and EC Frey and GA Johnson and SS
             Berr},
   Title = {Development of a 4-D digital mouse phantom for molecular
             imaging research.},
   Journal = {Molecular imaging and biology : MIB : the official
             publication of the Academy of Molecular Imaging, United
             States},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {149-59},
   ISSN = {1536-1632},
   Keywords = {Animals • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted •
             Mice • Models, Anatomic* • Models, Animal* •
             Phantoms, Imaging* • Tomography, Emission-Computed,
             Single-Photon • Tomography, X-Ray Computed •
             anatomy & histology* • instrumentation •
             instrumentation* • physiology},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: We develop a realistic and flexible 4-D digital
             mouse phantom and investigate its usefulness in molecular
             imaging research. METHODS: Organ shapes were modeled with
             non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces based on
             high-resolution 3-D magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM)
             data. Cardiac and respiratory motions were modeled based on
             gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data obtained from
             normal mice. Pilot simulation studies in single-photon
             emission computed tomography (SPECT) and X-ray computed
             tomography (CT) were performed to demonstrate the utility of
             the phantom. RESULTS: NURBS are an efficient and flexible
             way to accurately model the anatomy and cardiac and
             respiratory motions for a realistic 4-D digital mouse
             phantom. The phantom is capable of producing realistic
             molecular imaging data from which imaging devices and
             techniques can be evaluated. CONCLUSION: The phantom
             provides a unique and useful tool in molecular imaging
             research. It can be used in the development of new imaging
             instrumentation, image acquisition strategies, and image
             processing and reconstruction methods.},
   Key = {fds132894}
}

@article{fds268840,
   Author = {Zhang, X and Badea, C and Jacob, M and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Development of a noncontact 3-D fluorescence tomography
             system for small animal in vivo imaging.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical
             Engineering},
   Volume = {7191},
   Pages = {nihpa106691},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0277-786X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19587837},
   Abstract = {Fluorescence imaging is an important tool for tracking
             molecular-targeting probes in preclinical studies. It offers
             high sensitivity, but nonetheless low spatial resolution
             compared to other leading imaging methods such CT and MRI.
             We demonstrate our methodological development in small
             animal in vivo whole-body imaging using fluorescence
             tomography. We have implemented a noncontact fluid-free
             fluorescence diffuse optical tomography system that uses a
             raster-scanned continuous-wave diode laser as the light
             source and an intensified CCD camera as the photodetector.
             The specimen is positioned on a motorized rotation stage.
             Laser scanning, data acquisition, and stage rotation are
             controlled via LabVIEW applications. The forward problem in
             the heterogeneous medium is based on a normalized Born
             method, and the sensitivity function is determined using a
             Monte Carlo method. The inverse problem (image
             reconstruction) is performed using a regularized iterative
             algorithm, in which the cost function is defined as a
             weighted sum of the L-2 norms of the solution image, the
             residual error, and the image gradient. The relative weights
             are adjusted by two independent regularization parameters.
             Our initial tests of this imaging system were performed with
             an imaging phantom that consists of a translucent plastic
             cylinder filled with tissue-simulating liquid and two
             thin-wall glass tubes containing indocyanine green. The
             reconstruction is compared to the output of a finite element
             method-based software package NIRFAST and has produced
             promising results.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.808199},
   Key = {fds268840}
}

@booklet{Ruwart90,
   Author = {M. J. Ruwart and S. K. Sharma and D. W. Harris and D. B.
             Lakings and B. D. Rush and K. F. Wilkinson and J. C.
             Cornette and D. B. Evans and J. M. Friis and K. J. Cook and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Development of a sensitive activity assay for high-volume
             evaluation of human renin inhibitory peptides in rat serum -
             results with u-71,038},
   Journal = {Pharmaceutical Research},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {407 -- 410},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {Ruwart90}
}

@article{fds174226,
   Author = {M Zeiler and R Leiser and GA Johnson and HR Tinneberg and C
             Pfarrer},
   Title = {Development of an in vitro model for bovine placentation: a
             comparison of the in vivo and in vitro expression of
             integrins and components of extracellular matrix in bovine
             placental cells.},
   Journal = {Cells, tissues, organs},
   Volume = {186},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {229-42},
   Year = {2007},
   ISSN = {1422-6421},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000107947},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cattle • Cells, Cultured •
             Cytoskeleton • Embryo, Mammalian • Extracellular
             Matrix* • Female • Humans • Integrins •
             Placenta* • Pregnancy • Protein Subunits •
             Trophoblasts • Uterus • chemistry • cytology
             • genetics • metabolism • metabolism* •
             physiology},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND/AIMS: Interaction of trophoblastic integrins with
             the extracellular matrix plays a role in embryo implantation
             and trophoblast invasion. The phenomenon of restricted
             trophoblast invasion, observed in the bovine
             epitheliochorial placenta offers intriguing conditions to
             study invasive processes. The migration of bovine
             trophoblast giant cells is accompanied by the expression of
             specific integrins and corresponding extracellular matrix
             ligands. METHODS: Primary cultures of different cell
             populations from cow placentomes were established and
             characterized, and in vitro phenotypes were compared with in
             vivo conditions by immunofluorescence. RESULTS: Propagated
             epithelial cells were positive for cytokeratin and vimentin,
             while fibroblasts contained alpha-smooth muscle actin,
             desmin and vimentin. Epithelial cells coexpressed integrin
             subunits alpha(6) and beta(1) with laminin, and fibroblast
             cells were positive for alpha(v), beta(3), fibronectin and
             laminin. In contrast to cells in vivo, cultured epithelial
             cells secreted fibronectin, while collagen IV was not
             detected. The occurrence of integrin subunits was confirmed
             at mRNA level by RT-PCR. CONCLUSION: We have established
             cell cultures isolated from maternal and fetal components of
             bovine placentomes expressing typical cytoskeletal filaments
             and integrin receptors also present in their in vivo
             counterparts. These bovine placentomal cells provide a
             suitable in vitro model for the study of cell-cell
             interactions.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1159/000107947},
   Key = {fds174226}
}

@booklet{Gray01,
   Author = {C. A. Gray and F. F. Bartol and B. J. Tarleton and A. A.
             Wiley and G. A. Johnson and F. W. Bazer and T. E.
             Spencer},
   Title = {Developmental biology of uterine glands},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1311 -- 1323},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {Gray01}
}

@article{fds174253,
   Author = {CA Gray and FF Bartol and BJ Tarleton and AA Wiley and GA Johnson and FW
             Bazer, TE Spencer},
   Title = {Developmental biology of uterine glands.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1311-23},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Endometrium • Estradiol • Female
             • Humans • Morphogenesis • Prolactin •
             Receptors, Estradiol • Receptors, Prolactin •
             Uterus • embryology • embryology* •
             physiology},
   Abstract = {All mammalian uteri contain endometrial glands that
             synthesize or transport and secrete substances essential for
             survival and development of the conceptus (embryo/fetus and
             associated extraembryonic membranes). In rodents, uterine
             secretory products of the endometrial glands are
             unequivocally required for establishment of uterine
             receptivity and conceptus implantation. Analyses of the
             ovine uterine gland knockout model support a primary role
             for endometrial glands and, by default, their secretions in
             peri-implantation conceptus survival and development.
             Uterine adenogenesis is the process whereby endometrial
             glands develop. In humans, this process begins in the fetus,
             continues postnatally, and is completed during puberty. In
             contrast, endometrial adenogenesis is primarily a postnatal
             event in sheep, pigs, and rodents. Typically, endometrial
             adenogenesis involves differentiation and budding of
             glandular epithelium from luminal epithelium, followed by
             invagination and extensive tubular coiling and branching
             morphogenesis throughout the uterine stroma to the
             myometrium. This process requires site-specific alterations
             in cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM)
             remodeling as well as paracrine cell-cell and cell-ECM
             interactions that support the actions of specific hormones
             and growth factors. Studies of uterine development in
             neonatal ungulates implicate prolactin, estradiol-17 beta,
             and their receptors in mechanisms regulating endometrial
             adenogenesis. These same hormones appear to regulate
             endometrial gland morphogenesis in menstruating primates and
             humans during reconstruction of the functionalis from the
             basalis endometrium after menses. In sheep and pigs,
             extensive endometrial gland hyperplasia and hypertrophy
             occur during gestation, presumably to provide increasing
             histotrophic support for conceptus growth and development.
             In the rabbit, sheep, and pig, a servomechanism is proposed
             to regulate endometrial gland development and differentiated
             function during pregnancy that involves sequential actions
             of ovarian steroid hormones, pregnancy recognition signals,
             and lactogenic hormones from the pituitary or placenta. That
             disruption of uterine development during critical
             organizational periods can alter the functional capacity and
             embryotrophic potential of the adult uterus reinforces the
             importance of understanding the developmental biology of
             uterine glands. Unexplained high rates of peri-implantation
             embryonic loss in humans and livestock may reflect defects
             in endometrial gland morphogenesis due to genetic errors,
             epigenetic influences of endocrine disruptors, and
             pathological lesions.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174253}
}

@booklet{Wu03,
   Author = {G. Y. Wu and J. T. Self and G. A. Johnson and F. W. Bazer and T. E. Spencer},
   Title = {Developmental changes in placental nitric oxide synthesis in
             pigs},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {68},
   Pages = {153 -- 153},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {Wu03}
}

@booklet{Kelly01,
   Author = {S. J. Kelly and M. Delnomdedieu and M. I. Oliverio and L. D.
             Williams and M. G. P. Saifer and M. R. Sherman and T. M.
             Coffman and G. A. Johnson and M. S. Hershfield},
   Title = {Diabetes insipidus in uricase-deficient mice: A model for
             evaluating therapy with poly(ethylene glycol)-modified
             uricase},
   Journal = {Journal Of The American Society Of Nephrology},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1001 -- 1009},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {Kelly01}
}

@article{fds269101,
   Author = {Kelly, SJ and Delnomdedieu, M and Oliverio, MI and Williams, LD and Saifer, MG and Sherman, MR and Coffman, TM and Johnson, GA and Hershfield, MS},
   Title = {Diabetes insipidus in uricase-deficient mice: a model for
             evaluating therapy with poly(ethylene glycol)-modified
             uricase.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Society of Nephrology :
             JASN},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1001-1009},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1046-6673},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11316859},
   Keywords = {Animals • Body Water • Diabetes Insipidus •
             Disease Models, Animal • Gout • Humans •
             Kidney Concentrating Ability • Mice • Mice, Inbred
             C57BL • Mice, Knockout • Polyethylene Glycols
             • Recombinant Proteins • Urate Oxidase • Uric
             Acid • deficiency* • drug therapy • drug
             therapy* • enzymology* • genetics •
             metabolism • pathology • physiopathology •
             therapeutic use • therapeutic use* •
             urine},
   Abstract = {Uricase-deficient mice develop uric acid nephropathy, with
             high mortality rates before weaning. Urate excretion was
             quantitated and renal function was better defined in this
             study, to facilitate the use of these mice as a model for
             evaluating poly(ethylene glycol)-modified recombinant
             mammalian uricases (PEG-uricase) as a potential therapy for
             gout and uric acid nephropathy. The uric acid/creatinine
             ratio in the urine of uricase-deficient mice ranges from 10
             to >30; on a weight basis, these mice excrete 20- to 40-fold
             more urate than do human subjects. These mice consistently
             develop a severe defect in renal concentrating ability,
             resulting in an approximately sixfold greater urine volume
             and a fivefold greater fluid requirement, compared with
             normal mice. This nephrogenic diabetes insipidus leads to
             dehydration and death of nursing mice but, with adequate
             water replacement, high urine flow protects adults from
             progressive renal damage. Treatment of uricase-deficient
             mice with PEG-uricase markedly reduced urate levels and,
             when initiated before weaning, preserved the renal
             architecture (as evaluated by magnetic resonance
             micros-copy) and prevented the loss of renal concentrating
             function. PEG-uricase was far more effective and less
             immunogenic than unmodified uricase. Retention of uricase in
             most mammals and its loss in humans and some other primates
             may reflect the evolution of renal function under different
             environmental conditions. PEG-uricase could provide an
             effective therapy for uric acid nephropathy and refractory
             gout in human patients.},
   Key = {fds269101}
}

@article{fds174151,
   Author = {X Li and FW Bazer and GA Johnson and RC Burghardt and DW Erikson and JW
             Frank, TE Spencer and I Shinzato and G Wu},
   Title = {Dietary Supplementation with 0.8% L-Arginine between Days 0
             and 25 of Gestation Reduces Litter Size in
             Gilts.},
   Journal = {The Journal of nutrition},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1541-6100},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/jn.110.121350},
   Abstract = {In this study, we determined the effects of l-arginine
             supplementation during early pregnancy on embryonic/fetal
             survival and growth in gilts. Gilts were housed individually
             in pens and fed twice daily 1 kg of a corn- and soybean
             meal-based diet supplemented with 0.0, 0.4, or 0.8%
             l-arginine (wt:wt) between d 0 and 25 of gestation (10
             gilts/treatment). The diets were made isonitrogenous by
             addition of appropriate amounts of l-alanine. At d 25 of
             gestation, gilts were fed l-alanine or l-arginine and
             hysterectomized 30 min later to obtain uteri and conceptuses
             (embryos and associated fetal membranes and fluids). Dietary
             supplementation with 0.4 or 0.8% l-arginine enhanced (P <
             0.05) its concentrations in maternal plasma (64 and 98%,
             respectively) as well as the vascularity of chorionic and
             allantoic membranes, compared with the control group.
             Reproductive performance [numbers of corpora lutea (CL) and
             fetuses, placental and fetal weights, and embryonic
             mortality] did not differ between the 0.4% Arg and control
             groups. However, supplementation with 0.8% l-arginine
             decreased (P < 0.05) uterine weight (-20%), total number of
             fetuses (-24%), CL number (-17%), total fetal weight (-34%),
             total volume of allantoic and amniotic fluids (-34 to 42%),
             concentrations of progesterone in maternal plasma (-33%), as
             well as total amounts of progesterone (-35%), estrone
             (-40%), and estrone sulfate (-37%) in allantoic fluid,
             compared with the control group. These results indicate that
             dietary supplementation with 0.8% l-arginine between d 0 and
             25 of gestation, while increasing placental vascularity,
             adversely affects the reproductive performance of
             gilts.},
   Language = {ENG},
   Doi = {10.3945/jn.110.121350},
   Key = {fds174151}
}

@article{fds174309,
   Author = {GA Johnson and EG Kim and W Veldkamp and R Russell},
   Title = {Difference in oral effectiveness of two tyrosine hydroxylase
             inhibitors.},
   Journal = {Biochemical pharmacology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {401-3},
   Year = {1967},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0006-2952},
   Keywords = {Animals • Body Weight • Brain • Brain
             Chemistry* • Dextroamphetamine • Diet •
             Dopamine • Eating • Enzymes • Male •
             Methyltyrosines • Mice • Movement •
             Norepinephrine • Oxidoreductases • Reserpine
             • Serotonin • Tyrosine • analysis • drug
             effects • pharmacology • pharmacology*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174309}
}

@booklet{Spencer99a,
   Author = {T. E. Spencer and A. G. Stagg and T. L. Ott and G. A.
             Johnson and W. S. Ramsey and F. W. Bazer},
   Title = {Differential effects of intrauterine and subcutaneous
             administration of recombinant ovine interferon tau on the
             endometrium of cyclic ewes},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {464 -- 470},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {August},
   Key = {Spencer99a}
}

@article{fds174157,
   Author = {TE Spencer and AG Stagg and TL Ott and GA Johnson and WS Ramsey and FW
             Bazer},
   Title = {Differential effects of intrauterine and subcutaneous
             administration of recombinant ovine interferon tau on the
             endometrium of cyclic ewes.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {464-70},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Antiviral Agents • Carrier Proteins
             • Endometrium • Female • GTP
             Phosphohydrolases • GTP-Binding Proteins • Gene
             Expression Regulation, Developmental • In Situ
             Hybridization • Injections, Subcutaneous •
             Interferon Type I • Leucine Zippers • Pregnancy
             • Pregnancy Proteins • Protein Biosynthesis •
             Proteins • Receptors, Estrogen • Receptors,
             Oxytocin • Recombinant Proteins • Sheep •
             Ubiquitins • Uterus • administration & dosage
             • administration & dosage* • analogs & derivatives
             • biosynthesis • drug effects* • genetics
             • pharmacology • pharmacology*},
   Abstract = {Interferon tau (IFNtau) is the antiluteolytic signal
             produced by the conceptus of ruminants. Intrauterine
             administration of recombinant ovine IFNtau suppresses
             expression of endometrial estrogen receptor (ER) and
             oxytocin receptor (OTR) in the luminal and superficial
             glandular epithelia to abrogate the production of luteolytic
             prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) pulses. Subcutaneous
             (s.c.) injections of recombinant ovine (o) IFNtau appear to
             extend the interestrous interval by altering uterine
             PGF(2alpha) response to oxytocin. The present study tested
             the hypothesis that antiluteolytic effects of roIFNtau
             injected into the uterine lumen (paracrine) or s.c.
             (endocrine) are equivalent in suppressing expression of
             endometrial ER and OTR and inducing uterine expression of
             type I IFN-regulated Mx and ubiquitin cross-reactive
             proteins (UCRP). Sixteen cyclic ewes were fitted with
             uterine catheters on Day 5 (Day 0 = estrus), were assigned
             randomly to receive treatment with control proteins or
             roIFNtau (2 x 10(7) antiviral units/day) by either
             intrauterine or s.c. injections from Days 11 to 15, and were
             ovariohysterectomized on Day 16. Results indicated that
             expression of ER and OTR mRNAs in endometrial epithelium was
             suppressed by intrauterine but not by s.c. injections of
             roIFNtau. Intrauterine injections of roIFNtau increased
             expression of Mx and UCRP mRNA in the endometrium.
             Subcutaneous injections of roIFNtau increased endometrial Mx
             mRNA levels but not UCRP mRNA. Unexpectedly, intrauterine
             and s.c. injections of roIFNtau were equally effective in
             inducing expression of Mx and UCRP mRNA in the corpus
             luteum. Although s.c. injections of roIFNtau induced Mx mRNA
             in the endometrial epithelium, s.c. injections of roIFNtau
             did not abrogate activation of the uterine luteolytic
             mechanism by suppressing epithelial ER and OTR expression.
             Therefore, results of this study failed to support the
             assumption that endocrine roIFNtau mimics antiluteolytic
             effects of paracrine IFNtau to improve pregnancy rates in
             sheep.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174157}
}

@booklet{Sherrier87a,
   Author = {Sherrier, RH and Chiles, C and Johnson, GA and Ravin,
             CE},
   Title = {Differentiation of benign from malignant pulmonary nodules
             with digitized chest radiographs.},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {162},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {645-649},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3809476},
   Abstract = {To assess whether it is possible to distinguish benign from
             malignant solitary pulmonary nodules with digital
             techniques, a retrospective study of 68 patients with proved
             solitary nodules was performed. The conventional chest
             radiograph for each patient was digitized to 2,048 X 2,048 X
             12 bits, and changes in the optical density within the
             nodule were analyzed. A number (the corrected gradient
             number) was then generated that reflected this variation.
             Striking differences were noted between 26 malignant nodules
             and 21 calcified granulomas. The technique was then applied
             to 21 benign nodules that had initially required thoracotomy
             or further study for diagnosis. In nine of these 21 patients
             (43%), the corrected gradient number allowed correct
             classification as a benign lesion.},
   Doi = {10.1148/radiology.162.3.3809476},
   Key = {Sherrier87a}
}

@article{fds132763,
   Author = {RH Sherrier and C Chiles and GA Johnson and CE Ravin},
   Title = {Differentiation of benign from malignant pulmonary nodules
             with digitized chest radiographs.},
   Journal = {Radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {162},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {645-9},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   Keywords = {Coin Lesion, Pulmonary • Diagnosis, Differential •
             Humans • Lung Neoplasms • Radiographic Image
             Enhancement • methods* • radiography •
             radiography*},
   Abstract = {To assess whether it is possible to distinguish benign from
             malignant solitary pulmonary nodules with digital
             techniques, a retrospective study of 68 patients with proved
             solitary nodules was performed. The conventional chest
             radiograph for each patient was digitized to 2,048 X 2,048 X
             12 bits, and changes in the optical density within the
             nodule were analyzed. A number (the corrected gradient
             number) was then generated that reflected this variation.
             Striking differences were noted between 26 malignant nodules
             and 21 calcified granulomas. The technique was then applied
             to 21 benign nodules that had initially required thoracotomy
             or further study for diagnosis. In nine of these 21 patients
             (43%), the corrected gradient number allowed correct
             classification as a benign lesion.},
   Key = {fds132763}
}

@booklet{Macfall91b,
   Author = {J. R. Macfall and J. H. Maki and G. A. Johnson and L.
             Hedlund and H. Benveniste and G. Copher},
   Title = {Diffusion microcirculation mri in the rat-brain},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance In Medicine},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {305 -- 310},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Macfall91b}
}

@article{fds268743,
   Author = {O'Leary-Moore, SK and Johnson, GA and Calabrese, E and Budin, F and Oguz, I and Styner, MA and Parnell, SE and Sulik,
             KK},
   Title = {DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGING (DTI)-BASED ANALYSIS OF FIBER TRACT
             ABNORMALITIES IN A MOUSE MODEL OF PRENATAL ALCOHOL
             EXPOSURE},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {36},
   Pages = {312A-312A},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0145-6008},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000304806002399&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds268743}
}

@article{fds268723,
   Author = {Calabrese, E and Du, F and Garman, RH and Johnson, GA and Riccio, C and Tong, LC and Long, JB},
   Title = {Diffusion tensor imaging reveals white matter injury in a
             rat model of repetitive blast-induced traumatic brain
             injury.},
   Journal = {Journal of Neurotrauma},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {938-950},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24392843},
   Abstract = {Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is one of the
             most common combat-related injuries seen in U.S. military
             personnel, yet relatively little is known about the
             underlying mechanisms of injury. In particular, the effects
             of the primary blast pressure wave are poorly understood.
             Animal models have proven invaluable for the study of
             primary bTBI, because it rarely occurs in isolation in human
             subjects. Even less is known about the effects of repeated
             primary blast wave exposure, but existing data suggest
             cumulative increases in brain damage with a second blast.
             MRI and, in particular, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), have
             become important tools for assessing bTBI in both clinical
             and preclinical settings. Computational statistical methods
             such as voxelwise analysis have shown promise in localizing
             and quantifying bTBI throughout the brain. In this study, we
             use voxelwise analysis of DTI to quantify white matter
             injury in a rat model of repetitive primary blast exposure.
             Our results show a significant increase in microstructural
             damage with a second blast exposure, suggesting that primary
             bTBI may sensitize the brain to subsequent
             injury.},
   Doi = {10.1089/neu.2013.3144},
   Key = {fds268723}
}

@article{fds268736,
   Author = {Calabrese, E and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance histology reveals
             microstructural changes in the developing rat
             brain.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {79},
   Pages = {329-339},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23648962},
   Abstract = {The postnatal period is a remarkably dynamic phase of brain
             growth and development characterized by large-scale
             macrostructural changes, as well as dramatic microstructural
             changes, including myelination and cortical layering. This
             crucial period of neurodevelopment is uniquely susceptible
             to a wide variety of insults that may lead to neurologic
             disease. MRI is an important tool for studying both normal
             and abnormal neurodevelopmental changes, and quantitative
             imaging strategies like diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allow
             visualization of many of the complex microstructural changes
             that occur during postnatal life. Diffusion tensor magnetic
             resonance histology (DT-MRH) provides particularly unique
             insight into cytoarchitectural changes in the developing
             brain. In this study, we used DT-MRH to track
             microstructural changes in the rat brain throughout normal
             postnatal neurodevelopment. We provide examples of diffusion
             tensor parameter changes in both white matter and gray
             matter structures, and correlate these changes with changes
             in cytoarchitecture. Finally, we provide a comprehensive
             database of image sets as a foundation for future studies
             using DT-MRH to characterize abnormal neurodevelopment in
             rodent models of neurodevelopmental disease.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.04.101},
   Key = {fds268736}
}

@booklet{Beaulieu93,
   Author = {Beaulieu, CF and Zhou, X and Cofer, GP and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Diffusion-weighted MR microscopy with fast
             spin-echo.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {201-206},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8366801},
   Abstract = {A diffusion-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging sequence
             for high-field MR microscopy was developed and
             experimentally validated in a phantom and in a live rat.
             Pulsed diffusion gradients were executed before and after
             the initial 180 degrees pulse in the FSE pulse train. This
             produced diffusion-related reductions in image signal
             intensity corresponding to gradient ("b") factors between
             1.80 and 1352 s/mm2. The degree of diffusion weighting was
             demonstrated to be independent of echo train length for
             experiments using trains up to 16 echoes long. Quantitative
             measurements on a phantom and on a live rat produced
             diffusion coefficients consistent with literature values.
             Importantly, the eight- to 16-fold increase in imaging
             efficiency with FSE was not accompanied by a significant
             loss of spatial resolution or contrast. This permits
             acquisition of in vivo three-dimensional data in time
             periods that are appropriate for evolving biological
             processes. The combination of accurate diffusion weighting
             and high spatial resolution provided by FSE makes the
             technique particularly useful for MR microscopy.},
   Key = {Beaulieu93}
}

@article{fds132826,
   Author = {CF Beaulieu and X Zhou and GP Cofer and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Diffusion-weighted MR microscopy with fast
             spin-echo.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the
             Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of
             Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {201-6},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   Keywords = {Animals • Diffusion • Image Processing,
             Computer-Assisted • Magnetic Resonance Imaging •
             Microscopy • Models, Structural • Rats •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {A diffusion-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging sequence
             for high-field MR microscopy was developed and
             experimentally validated in a phantom and in a live rat.
             Pulsed diffusion gradients were executed before and after
             the initial 180 degrees pulse in the FSE pulse train. This
             produced diffusion-related reductions in image signal
             intensity corresponding to gradient ("b") factors between
             1.80 and 1352 s/mm2. The degree of diffusion weighting was
             demonstrated to be independent of echo train length for
             experiments using trains up to 16 echoes long. Quantitative
             measurements on a phantom and on a live rat produced
             diffusion coefficients consistent with literature values.
             Importantly, the eight- to 16-fold increase in imaging
             efficiency with FSE was not accompanied by a significant
             loss of spatial resolution or contrast. This permits
             acquisition of in vivo three-dimensional data in time
             periods that are appropriate for evolving biological
             processes. The combination of accurate diffusion weighting
             and high spatial resolution provided by FSE makes the
             technique particularly useful for MR microscopy.},
   Key = {fds132826}
}

@article{fds269122,
   Author = {MacFall, JR and Maki, JH and Johnson, GA and Hedlund, L and Benveniste,
             H and Copher, G},
   Title = {Diffusion/microcirculation MRI in the rat
             brain.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {305-310},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1908936},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Carbon Dioxide •
             Cerebrovascular Circulation • Diffusion • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging* • Microcirculation • Rats
             • Rats, Inbred Strains • administration & dosage
             • anatomy & histology • blood supply •
             metabolism • pharmacokinetics •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {The CO2 fraction of an anesthetized rat's breathing mixture
             was changed (from 0 to 10%) to attempt to change the brain
             microcirculation and observe these changes in diffusion
             measurements of the neural tissue. Brain apparent diffusion
             coefficients were measured to be (0.71 +/- 0.01) X 10(-3)
             mm2/s before sacrifice and (0.39 +/- 0.01) X 10(-3) mm2/s
             after sacrifice. Multiple diffusion components were
             observed, consistent with flowing material, but the extra
             components did not increase with increased CO2. It is
             proposed that the additional components may be due to
             extracellular, extravascular water such as
             CSF.},
   Key = {fds269122}
}

@article{fds268821,
   Author = {Hawrylycz, M and Baldock, RA and Burger, A and Hashikawa, T and Johnson,
             GA and Martone, M and Ng, L and Lau, C and Larson, SD and Nissanov, J and Puelles, L and Ruffins, S and Verbeek, F and Zaslavsky, I and Boline,
             J},
   Title = {Digital atlasing and standardization in the mouse
             brain.},
   Journal = {PLoS computational biology},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {e1001065},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1553-7358},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21304938},
   Keywords = {Anatomy, Artistic • Animals • Atlases as Topic
             • Brain • Computational Biology • Male •
             Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL • Models, Anatomic*
             • Models, Neurological • anatomy & histology*
             • standards • statistics & numerical
             data},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pcbi.1001065},
   Key = {fds268821}
}

@booklet{Vandemark97,
   Author = {Vandemark, RM and Fay, ME and Porter, FR and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Digital image-intensifier radiography at a level I trauma
             center.},
   Journal = {AJR. American journal of roentgenology},
   Volume = {168},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {944-946},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0361-803X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9124145},
   Doi = {10.2214/ajr.168.4.9124145},
   Key = {Vandemark97}
}

@article{fds174203,
   Author = {RM Vandemark and ME Fay and FR Porter and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Digital image-intensifier radiography at a level I trauma
             center.},
   Journal = {AJR. American journal of roentgenology},
   Volume = {168},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {944-6},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0361-803X},
   Keywords = {Humans • Pelvis • Radiographic Image Enhancement
             • Radiography, Thoracic • Spinal Injuries •
             Spine • Trauma Centers • Wounds and Injuries
             • injuries • instrumentation* •
             radiography},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174203}
}

@booklet{Dunnick85,
   Author = {N. R. Dunnick and K. K. Ford and G. A. Johnson and J. C.
             Gunnells},
   Title = {Digital intravenous subtraction angiography for
             investigating renovascular hypertension - comparison with
             hypertensive urography},
   Journal = {Southern Medical Journal},
   Volume = {78},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {690 -- 693},
   Year = {1985},
   Key = {Dunnick85}
}

@article{fds132748,
   Author = {NR Dunnick and KK Ford and GA Johnson and JC Gunnells},
   Title = {DIgital intravenous subtraction angiography for
             investigating renovascular hypertension: comparison with
             hypertensive urography.},
   Journal = {Southern medical journal, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {78},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {690-3},
   Year = {1985},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0038-4348},
   Keywords = {Adolescent • Adult • Aged • Female •
             Humans • Hypertension • Hypertension, Renovascular
             • Male • Middle Aged • Renal Artery •
             Renin • Subtraction Technique* • Urography* •
             blood • diagnosis • radiography •
             radiography*},
   Abstract = {We used digital intravenous subtraction angiography (DSA) to
             evaluate 105 patients with suspected renovascular
             hypertension. Unilateral renal artery stenoses were
             identified in 14 patients, two of whom had previously had
             contralateral nephrectomy. In addition, one of three renal
             transplant recipients was found to have stenosis of the
             nutrient artery. Bilateral renal artery stenosis was
             demonstrated by DSA in three patients. Of the 88 patients
             who had concomitant minute sequence (hypertensive) urography
             (HIVP) delayed excretion suggested a renal artery lesion in
             only 8 patients. In the group of 88 patients, HIVP was able
             to detect renal artery stenosis in only 50% (eight of the
             16) of patients whose stenosis was detected by DSA. When the
             patients with a single kidney are excluded, HIVP showed 62%
             (eight of 13) of the lesions detected by DSA. There were no
             significant complications in the patients examined by either
             modality. DSA has replaced HIVP as the screening examination
             for renovascular causes of hypertension in our
             institution.},
   Key = {fds132748}
}

@booklet{Johnson81e,
   Author = {JOHNSON, GA and FORD, KK and HEINZ, R},
   Title = {DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY USING THE QUANTEX DS-20},
   Journal = {AJR. American journal of roentgenology},
   Volume = {136},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1274-1274},
   Year = {1981},
   ISSN = {0361-803X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1981LU08900069&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Johnson81e}
}

@booklet{Johnson81,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Ford, K and Heinz, R},
   Title = {DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY USING THE QUANTEX DS-20.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical
             Engineering},
   Volume = {273},
   Pages = {114-119},
   Year = {1981},
   Key = {Johnson81}
}

@article{fds292751,
   Author = {Spiliopoulos, D and Kagadis, GC and Karnabatidis, D and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT},
   Title = {Digital Subtracted Angiography of Small Animals},
   Pages = {67-75},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of Small Animal Imaging: Preclinical Imaging,
             Therapy, and Applications},
   Publisher = {Taylor & Francis Books, Inc., CRC Press},
   Editor = {Kagadis, GC and Ford, NL and Loudos, GK and Karnabatidis,
             D},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {March},
   ISBN = {1466555688},
   Key = {fds292751}
}

@booklet{Sherrier84,
   Author = {SHERRIER, RH and JOHNSON, GA and RAVIN, CE and SUDDARTH,
             SA},
   Title = {DIGITAL SYNTHESIS OF LUNG NODULES},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {S49-S49},
   Year = {1984},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1984TL42800213&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198409000-00219},
   Key = {Sherrier84}
}

@booklet{Sherrier85,
   Author = {Sherrier, RH and Johnson, GA and Suddarth, SA and Chiles, C and Hulka,
             C and Ravin, CE},
   Title = {Digital synthesis of lung nodules.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {933-937},
   Year = {1985},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3841098},
   Abstract = {Studies evaluating observer accuracy and visual perception
             of pulmonary nodules usually are based upon test films
             obtained from clinical practice in patients with proven
             pulmonary nodules. Unfortunately, such nodules do not always
             occur in the optimal size and location to facilitate
             testing. Such studies would be enhanced by the ability to
             place nodules of desired size and location on chest
             radiographs. This report describes a method of placing a
             computer-generated (synthesized) nodule on a digitized chest
             radiograph. To demonstrate the similarity of these
             synthesized nodules to real nodules, each digitized
             radiograph with a computer-generated nodule was paired with
             a digitized chest radiograph of a patient with a clinically
             proven pulmonary nodule. A total of 22 pairs of chest
             radiographs were then shown to 13 radiologists, who were
             asked to distinguish the synthesized nodule from the real
             nodule. With this two alternative forced-choice test, the
             radiologists were only able to distinguish the synthesized
             nodule in 51% of the cases, strongly suggesting that
             computer generated nodules may be used to simulate real
             pulmonary nodules in future tests of nodule
             detection.},
   Key = {Sherrier85}
}

@article{fds132843,
   Author = {RH Sherrier and GA Johnson and SA Suddarth and C Chiles and C Hulka and CE
             Ravin},
   Title = {Digital synthesis of lung nodules.},
   Journal = {Investigative radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {933-7},
   Year = {1985},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   Keywords = {Coin Lesion, Pulmonary • Humans • Lung Neoplasms
             • Radiography, Thoracic • Software • methods*
             • radiography*},
   Abstract = {Studies evaluating observer accuracy and visual perception
             of pulmonary nodules usually are based upon test films
             obtained from clinical practice in patients with proven
             pulmonary nodules. Unfortunately, such nodules do not always
             occur in the optimal size and location to facilitate
             testing. Such studies would be enhanced by the ability to
             place nodules of desired size and location on chest
             radiographs. This report describes a method of placing a
             computer-generated (synthesized) nodule on a digitized chest
             radiograph. To demonstrate the similarity of these
             synthesized nodules to real nodules, each digitized
             radiograph with a computer-generated nodule was paired with
             a digitized chest radiograph of a patient with a clinically
             proven pulmonary nodule. A total of 22 pairs of chest
             radiographs were then shown to 13 radiologists, who were
             asked to distinguish the synthesized nodule from the real
             nodule. With this two alternative forced-choice test, the
             radiologists were only able to distinguish the synthesized
             nodule in 51% of the cases, strongly suggesting that
             computer generated nodules may be used to simulate real
             pulmonary nodules in future tests of nodule
             detection.},
   Key = {fds132843}
}

@article{fds268753,
   Author = {Perez, BA and Ghafoori, AP and Johnston, SM and Jeffords, LB and Kim, Y and Badea, CT and Johnson, GA and Kirsch, DG},
   Title = {Dissecting the Mechanism of Tumor Response to Radiation
             Therapy with Primary Lung Cancers in Mice},
   Journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology,
             Physics},
   Volume = {75},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {S537-S537},
   Year = {2009},
   ISSN = {0360-3016},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000270573602102&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds268753}
}

@booklet{Godwin82,
   Author = {Godwin, JD and Speckman, JM and Fram, EK and Johnson, GA and Putman, CE and Korobkin, M and Breiman, RS},
   Title = {Distinguishing benign from malignant pulmonary nodules by
             computed tomography.},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {144},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {349-351},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7089288},
   Abstract = {Investigators have been able to distinguish benign pulmonary
             nodules from malignant ones in about two-thirds of the cases
             studied by detecting high computed tomography (CT) numbers
             (attributed to microscopic calcifications) within many
             benign nodules. This paper reports a similar analysis on a
             series of 22 benign and 14 malignant pulmonary nodules.
             Although about one-third of the benign nodules gave high CT
             numbers, all but one of the nodules diagnosed as benign by
             CT could also be diagnosed by detection of calcification on
             plain radiographs or conventional tomograms.},
   Doi = {10.1148/radiology.144.2.7089288},
   Key = {Godwin82}
}

@article{fds132824,
   Author = {JD Godwin and JM Speckman and EK Fram and GA Johnson and CE Putman and M
             Korobkin, RS Breiman},
   Title = {Distinguishing benign from malignant pulmonary nodules by
             computed tomography.},
   Journal = {Radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {144},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {349-51},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   Keywords = {Calcinosis • Coin Lesion, Pulmonary • Humans
             • Lung Neoplasms • Technology, Radiologic •
             Tomography, X-Ray Computed* • radiography*},
   Abstract = {Investigators have been able to distinguish benign pulmonary
             nodules from malignant ones in about two-thirds of the cases
             studied by detecting high computed tomography (CT) numbers
             (attributed to microscopic calcifications) within many
             benign nodules. This paper reports a similar analysis on a
             series of 22 benign and 14 malignant pulmonary nodules.
             Although about one-third of the benign nodules gave high CT
             numbers, all but one of the nodules diagnosed as benign by
             CT could also be diagnosed by detection of calcification on
             plain radiographs or conventional tomograms.},
   Key = {fds132824}
}

@booklet{Veres91,
   Author = {VERES, JS and COFER, GP and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {DISTINGUISHING PLANT-TISSUES WITH MAGNETIC-RESONANCE
             MICROSCOPY},
   Journal = {American journal of botany},
   Volume = {78},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1704-1711},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0002-9122},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1991GY25000009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2444849},
   Key = {Veres91}
}

@article{fds325756,
   Author = {Wetzel, AW and Pomerantz, S and Nave, D and Meixner, W and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Distributed multiuser visualization of time varying
             anatomical data},
   Journal = {Proceedings - Applied Imagery Pattern Recognition
             Workshop},
   Volume = {2001-January},
   Pages = {109-114},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {0769512453},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/AIPR.2001.991211},
   Abstract = {© 2001 IEEE. We describe a networked environment for
             navigating and visualizing 3-dimensional anatomical data
             with extensions for time varying volumes. The Duke Center
             for In Vivo Microscopy (CIVM) has been capturing volumetric
             data of mice using magnetic resonance microscopy. Current
             data sets are 51Z3 with 16 bit precision per voxel at an
             isotropic resolution of 50 microns. A new instrument will
             provide larger 512 ∗ 512 ∗ 2048 volumes. Because
             magnetic resonance imaging is nondestructive, both rapid
             time series and longer interval developmental series can be
             taken from living specimens. Our work builds on techniques
             put in place at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center and the
             University of Michigan for navigating Visible Human data
             using a client-server implementation, but applied to CIVM
             mouse data. Extension of the system to 4-dimensional data
             sets involves changes to compressed data representations and
             client viewing mechanisms. An essential aspect of the mouse
             studies is to facilitate comparison between different
             specimens, or even the same specimen over time, for studies
             of morphologic phenotype expression in gene
             knockouts.},
   Doi = {10.1109/AIPR.2001.991211},
   Key = {fds325756}
}

@booklet{Al-ramadan02,
   Author = {S. Y. Al-ramadan and G. A. Johnson and L. A. Jaeger and S.
             P. Brinsko and R. C. Burghardt},
   Title = {Distribution of integrin subunits, MUC-1, and osteopontin in
             equine uterine epithelium and conceptuses during early
             pregnancy.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {66},
   Pages = {323 -- 323},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {Al-ramadan02}
}

@booklet{Helson80a,
   Author = {L. Helson and A. Majeranowski and C. Helson and M. Schwartz and G. A. Johnson and J. Nisselbaum},
   Title = {Dopa decarboxylase (ddc) and tryptophan decarboxylase(tdc)
             in neuroectodermal tumors - 2 separate enzymes},
   Journal = {Proceedings Of The American Association For Cancer
             Research},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {MAR},
   Pages = {322 -- 322},
   Year = {1980},
   Key = {Helson80a}
}

@booklet{Helson80,
   Author = {L. Helson and G. A. Johnson and R. Smith},
   Title = {Dopa metabolism in neuro-blastoma},
   Journal = {Medical And Pediatric Oncology},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {317 -- 322},
   Year = {1980},
   Key = {Helson80}
}

@article{fds174104,
   Author = {L Helson and GA Johnson and R Smith},
   Title = {DOPA metabolism in neuroblastoma.},
   Journal = {Medical and pediatric oncology},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {317-22},
   Year = {1980},
   ISSN = {0098-1532},
   Keywords = {Adolescent • Bone Neoplasms • Brain Neoplasms
             • Child • Dihydroxyphenylalanine • False
             Negative Reactions • Female • Humans •
             Leukemia • Lymphoma • Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
             • Neuroblastoma • Time Factors •
             Vanilmandelic Acid • blood • cerebrospinal fluid
             • metabolism • metabolism* •
             urine},
   Abstract = {Blood plasma samples from 60 neuroblastoma patients prior
             to, during, and following treatment were studied for their
             content of circulating DOPA using a radioenzymatic assay.
             Normal values were established from children who were
             tumor-free or had other nonneurogenic tumors. The highest
             plasma DOPA concentration in tumor-free or nonneuroblastoma
             controls was 5.3 ng/ml with a mean of 2.15 ng/ml. Most
             neuroblastoma patients (28/31) with active disease had DOPA
             values above this level. Only one out of 30 "successfully"
             treated patients without evidence of disease was encountered
             with an abnormally high level. In treated patients, elevated
             values forewarned of impending clinical recurrence or
             persistent tumor. Cerebrospinal fluid DOPA levels in one
             patient with cerebral neuroblastoma were extraordinarily
             high and suggests that this assay may prove useful to
             distinguish neuroblastoma from other central neuroectodermal
             or metastatic tumors. Plasma DOPA appears to be a reliable
             predictive and diagnostic test for neuroblastoma.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174104}
}

@article{fds174247,
   Author = {PF Von Voigtlander and SJ Boukma and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Dopaminergic denervation supersensitivity and dopamine
             stimulated adenyl cyclase activity.},
   Journal = {Neuropharmacology},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1081-6},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0028-3908},
   Keywords = {Adenylate Cyclase • Animals • Apomorphine •
             Corpus Striatum • Cyclic AMP • Dopamine •
             Dose-Response Relationship, Drug • Hydroxydopamines
             • Male • Methyltyrosines • Mice • Nerve
             Endings • Receptors, Drug • Stimulation, Chemical
             • Sympathectomy • biosynthesis • drug effects
             • enzymology • metabolism • metabolism*
             • pharmacology • pharmacology* •
             physiology},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174247}
}

@article{fds268734,
   Author = {Bhavane, R and Badea, C and Ghaghada, KB and Clark, D and Vela, D and Moturu, A and Annapragada, A and Johnson, GA and Willerson, JT and Annapragada, A},
   Title = {Dual-energy computed tomography imaging of atherosclerotic
             plaques in a mouse model using a liposomal-iodine
             nanoparticle contrast agent},
   Journal = {Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {285-294},
   Year = {2013},
   ISSN = {1941-9651},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.112.000119},
   Abstract = {Background-The accumulation of macrophages in inflamed
             atherosclerotic plaques has long been recognized. In an
             attempt to develop an imaging agent for detection of
             vulnerable plaques, we evaluated the feasibility of a
             liposomaliodine nanoparticle contrast agent for computed
             tomography imaging of macrophage-rich atherosclerotic
             plaques in a mouse model. Methods and Results-Liposomal-iodine
             formulations varying in particle size and polyethylene
             glycol coating were fabricated and shown to stably
             encapsulate the iodine compound. In vitro uptake studies
             using optical and computed tomography imaging in the RAW
             264.7 macrophage cell line identified the formulation that
             promoted maximal uptake. Dual-energy computed tomography
             imaging using this formulation in apolipoprotein E-deficient
             (ApoE-/-) mice (n=8) and control C57BL/6 mice (n=6) followed
             by spectral decomposition of the dual-energy images enabled
             imaging of the liposomes localized in the plaque. Imaging
             cytometry confirmed the presence of liposomes in the plaque
             and their colocalization with a small fraction (≈2%) of
             the macrophages in the plaque. Conclusions-The results
             demonstrate the feasibility of imaging macrophage-rich
             atherosclerotic plaques using a liposomaliodine nanoparticle
             contrast agent and dual-energy computed tomography. © 2013
             American Heart Association, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.112.000119},
   Key = {fds268734}
}

@article{fds268738,
   Author = {Moding, EJ and Clark, DP and Qi, Y and Li, Y and Ma, Y and Ghaghada, K and Johnson, GA and Kirsch, DG and Badea, CT},
   Title = {Dual-energy micro-computed tomography imaging of
             radiation-induced vascular changes in primary mouse
             sarcomas},
   Journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology,
             Physics},
   Volume = {85},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1353-1359},
   Year = {2013},
   ISSN = {0360-3016},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.09.027},
   Abstract = {Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on
             primary tumor vasculature using dual-energy (DE)
             micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials:
             Primary sarcomas were generated with mutant Kras and p53.
             Unirradiated tumors were compared with tumors irradiated
             with 20 Gy. A liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was
             administered 1 day after treatment, and mice were imaged
             immediately after injection (day 1) and 3 days later (day 4)
             with DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess
             tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used
             to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and
             tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor
             vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated
             histologically by use of CD31 immunofluorescence and
             fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results: Radiation treatment
             significantly decreased tumor growth from day 1 to day 4
             (P&lt;.05). There was a positive correlation between CT
             measurement of tumor FBV on day 1 and extravasated iodine on
             day 4 with microvascular density (MVD) on day 4 (R2=0.53)
             and dextran accumulation (R2=0.63) on day 4, respectively.
             Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV
             significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE
             micro-CT (0.070 vs 0.091, P&lt;.05). Both dextran and
             liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased
             significantly after irradiation, with dextran fractional
             area increasing 5.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration
             increasing 4.0-fold. Conclusions: DE micro-CT is an
             effective tool for noninvasive assessment of vascular
             changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular
             permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of
             radiation treatment. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.09.027},
   Key = {fds268738}
}

@article{fds268806,
   Author = {Moding, EJ and Clark, DP and Qi, Y and Li, Y and Ma, Y and Ghaghada, K and Johnson, GA and Kirsch, DG and Badea, CT},
   Title = {Dual-energy micro-computed tomography imaging of
             radiation-induced vascular changes in primary mouse
             sarcomas.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Radiation: Oncology - Biology -
             Physics},
   Volume = {85},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1353-1359},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23122984},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on
             primary tumor vasculature using dual-energy (DE)
             micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). METHODS AND MATERIALS:
             Primary sarcomas were generated with mutant Kras and p53.
             Unirradiated tumors were compared with tumors irradiated
             with 20 Gy. A liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was
             administered 1 day after treatment, and mice were imaged
             immediately after injection (day 1) and 3 days later (day 4)
             with DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess
             tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used
             to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and
             tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor
             vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated
             histologically by use of CD31 immunofluorescence and
             fluorescently-labeled dextrans. RESULTS: Radiation treatment
             significantly decreased tumor growth from day 1 to day 4
             (P<.05). There was a positive correlation between CT
             measurement of tumor FBV on day 1 and extravasated iodine on
             day 4 with microvascular density (MVD) on day 4 (R(2)=0.53)
             and dextran accumulation (R(2)=0.63) on day 4, respectively.
             Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV
             significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE
             micro-CT (0.070 vs 0.091, P<.05). Both dextran and
             liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased
             significantly after irradiation, with dextran fractional
             area increasing 5.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration
             increasing 4.0-fold. CONCLUSIONS: DE micro-CT is an
             effective tool for noninvasive assessment of vascular
             changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular
             permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of
             radiation treatment.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.09.027},
   Key = {fds268806}
}

@article{fds268785,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Johnston, SM and Qi, Y and Ghaghada, K and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Dual-energy micro-CT imaging for differentiation of iodine-
             and gold-based nanoparticles},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
   Volume = {7961},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {1605-7422},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.878043},
   Abstract = {Spectral CT imaging is expected to play a major role in the
             diagnostic arena as it provides material decomposition on an
             elemental basis. One fascinating possibility is the ability
             to discriminate multiple contrast agents targeting different
             biological sites. We investigate the feasibility of dual
             energy micro-CT for discrimination of iodine (I) and gold
             (Au) contrast agents when simultaneously present in the
             body. Simulations and experiments were performed to measure
             the CT enhancement for I and Au over a range of voltages
             from 40-to-150 kVp using a dual source micro-CT system. The
             selected voltages for dual energy micro-CT imaging of Au and
             I were 40 kVp and 80 kVp. On a massconcentration basis, the
             relative average enhancement of Au to I was 2.75 at 40 kVp
             and 1.58 at 80 kVp. We have demonstrated the method in a
             preclinical model of colon cancer to differentiate vascular
             architecture and extravasation. The concentration maps of Au
             and I allow quantitative measure of the bio-distribution of
             both agents. In conclusion, dual energy micro-CT can be used
             to discriminate probes containing I and Au with immediate
             impact in pre-clinical research. © 2011
             SPIE.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.878043},
   Key = {fds268785}
}

@article{fds268714,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Befera, N and Clark, D and Qi, Y and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Dual-energy micro-CT imaging of pulmonary airway
             obstruction: Correlation with micro-SPECT},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
   Volume = {9038},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780819498311},
   ISSN = {1605-7422},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2043094},
   Abstract = {To match recent clinical dual energy (DE) CT studies
             focusing on the lung, similar developments for DE micro-CT
             of the rodent lung are required. Our group has been actively
             engaged in designing pulmonary gating techniques for micro-
             CT, and has also introduced the first DE micro-CT imaging
             method of the rodent lung. The aim of this study was to
             assess the feasibility of DE micro-CT imaging for the
             evaluation of airway obstruction in mice, and to compare the
             method with micro single photon emission computed tomography
             (micro-SPECT) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated
             albumin ( 99m Tc-MAA). The results suggest that the induced
             pulmonary airway obstruction causes either atelectasis, or
             air-trapping similar to asthma or chronic bronchitis.
             Atelectasis could only be detected at early time points in
             DE micro-CT images, and is associated with a large increase
             in blood fraction and decrease in air fraction. Air trapping
             had an opposite effect with larger air fraction and
             decreased blood fraction shown by DE micro-CT. The decrease
             in perfusion to the hypoventilated lung (hypoxic
             vasoconstriction) is also seen in micro-SPECT. The proposed
             DE micro-CT technique for imaging localized airway
             obstruction performed well in our evaluation, and provides a
             higher resolution compared to micro-SPECT. Both DE micro-CT
             and micro-SPECT provide critical, quantitative lung
             biomarkers for image-based anatomical and functional
             information in the small animal. The methods are readily
             linked to clinical methods allowing direct comparison of
             preclinical and clinical results. © 2014
             SPIE.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.2043094},
   Key = {fds268714}
}

@article{fds268698,
   Author = {Subashi, E and Qi, Y and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR microscopy identifies regions
             of therapeutic response in a preclinical model of colorectal
             adenocarcinoma.},
   Journal = {Medical physics},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {2482-2488},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0094-2405},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1118/1.4917525},
   Abstract = {A typical dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI study often
             compares the derived pharmacokinetic parameters on manually
             selected tumor regions or over the entire tumor volume.
             These measurements include domains where the interpretation
             of the biomarkers may be unclear (such as in necrotic
             areas). Here, the authors describe a technique for
             increasing the sensitivity and specificity of DCE-MRI by
             identifying tumor regions with a variable response to
             therapy.Two cohorts (n = 8/group) of nu/nu mice with LS-174T
             implanted in the mammary fat pad were imaged at five time
             points over four weeks. The treatment/control group received
             bevacizumab/saline at a dose of 5 mg/kg or 5 ml/kg twice
             weekly; imaging experiments were performed weekly. MR images
             were acquired at an isotropic resolution of 156 μm(3)(2.4
             nl) and with a sampling rate of 9.9 s. The histogram of the
             time-to-peak (TTP) was used to identify two (fast- and
             slow-enhancing) regions based on a threshold of TTP = 1000
             s. The regions were correlated with histology, and the
             effect of therapy was locally examined.Tumors in the
             treatment group had a significantly longer doubling time.
             The regions defined by thresholding the TTP histogram
             identified two distinct domains correlating significantly
             with tumor permeability and microvessel density. In the
             fast-enhancing region, the mean permeability constant
             (K(trans)) was significantly lower in the treatment group at
             day 9; in the slow-enhancing region, K(trans) was not
             different between the control and treatment groups. At day
             9, the relative volume of the fast-enhancing region was
             significantly lower in the treatment group, while that of
             the slow-enhancing region was significantly higher.Two
             regions with distinct kinetic parameters were identified
             based on the histogram of TTP. The effect of bevacizumab, as
             measured by a decrease in K(trans), was confined to one of
             these regions. High spatiotemporal resolution MR studies may
             contribute unique insights into the response of the tumor
             microenvironment to therapy.},
   Doi = {10.1118/1.4917525},
   Key = {fds268698}
}

@article{fds292754,
   Author = {Xie, L and Layton, AT and Wang, N and Larson, PEZ and Zhang, JL and Lee,
             VS and Liu, C and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative susceptibility
             mapping with ultrashort echo time MRI for evaluating renal
             function.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Physiology: Renal Physiology},
   Volume = {310},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {F174-F182},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1931-857X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajprenal.00351.2015},
   Abstract = {Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can provide key insight
             into renal function. DCE MRI is typically achieved through
             an injection of a gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent,
             which has desirable T1 quenching and tracer kinetics.
             However, significant T2* blooming effects and signal voids
             can arise when Gd becomes very concentrated, especially in
             the renal medulla and pelvis. One MRI sequence designed to
             alleviate T2* effects is the ultrashort echo time (UTE)
             sequence. In the present study, we observed T2* blooming in
             the inner medulla of the mouse kidney, despite using UTE at
             an echo time of 20 microseconds and a low dose of 0.03
             mmol/kg Gd. We applied quantitative susceptibility mapping
             (QSM) and resolved the signal void into a positive
             susceptibility signal. The susceptibility values [in parts
             per million (ppm)] were converted into molar concentrations
             of Gd using a calibration curve. We determined the
             concentrating mechanism (referred to as the concentrating
             index) as a ratio of maximum Gd concentration in the inner
             medulla to the renal artery. The concentrating index was
             assessed longitudinally over a 17-wk course (3, 5, 7, 9, 13,
             17 wk of age). We conclude that the UTE-based DCE method is
             limited in resolving extreme T2* content caused by the
             kidney's strong concentrating mechanism. QSM was able to
             resolve and confirm the source of the blooming effect to be
             the large positive susceptibility of concentrated Gd. UTE
             with QSM can complement traditional magnitude UTE and offer
             a powerful tool to study renal pathophysiology.},
   Doi = {10.1152/ajprenal.00351.2015},
   Key = {fds292754}
}

@booklet{Chen04,
   Author = {Chen, BT and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Dynamic lung morphology of methacholine-induced
             heterogeneous bronchoconstriction.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1080-1086},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15508158},
   Abstract = {Hyperpolarized (HP) 3helium (3He) dynamic MRI was used to
             investigate airway response in rats following intravenous
             (i.v.) bolus administration of a contractile agent,
             methacholine (MCh). The method provides direct visualization
             of the ventilated regions within the lung. Heterogeneous
             bronchoconstriction following the i.v. MCh injection was
             evident using this technique. These 3He dynamic lung images
             revealed that the inspired fresh air was shunted to the
             less-constricted regions after the MCh challenge in a
             similar manner as described by Laplace's relationship for
             the stability between adjacent alveoli. The airways in the
             more-constricted regions became nearly closed, resulting in
             air trapping, while the airways in the less-constricted
             regions remained effectively open, leading to overinflation.
             These data suggest a lung model of airway constriction
             partitioned into ventilated and nonventilated regions. These
             nonventilated regions are heterogeneously distributed in the
             lung and this distribution cannot be deduced from
             spirometric measurement of the whole lung. We demonstrate
             that a combination of functional 3He images and anatomical
             1H images provide an effective method to diagnose regional
             lung abnormalities in rats.},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.20251},
   Key = {Chen04}
}

@article{fds132914,
   Author = {BT Chen and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Dynamic lung morphology of methacholine-induced
             heterogeneous bronchoconstriction.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the
             Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of
             Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, United States},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1080-6},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   Keywords = {Animals • Bronchoconstriction* • Female •
             Helium • Injections, Intravenous • Isotopes •
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Methacholine Chloride
             • Rats • Rats, Sprague-Dawley • Respiratory
             System • administration & dosage • diagnostic use
             • drug effects* • methods* •
             pharmacology*},
   Abstract = {Hyperpolarized (HP) 3helium (3He) dynamic MRI was used to
             investigate airway response in rats following intravenous
             (i.v.) bolus administration of a contractile agent,
             methacholine (MCh). The method provides direct visualization
             of the ventilated regions within the lung. Heterogeneous
             bronchoconstriction following the i.v. MCh injection was
             evident using this technique. These 3He dynamic lung images
             revealed that the inspired fresh air was shunted to the
             less-constricted regions after the MCh challenge in a
             similar manner as described by Laplace's relationship for
             the stability between adjacent alveoli. The airways in the
             more-constricted regions became nearly closed, resulting in
             air trapping, while the airways in the less-constricted
             regions remained effectively open, leading to overinflation.
             These data suggest a lung model of airway constriction
             partitioned into ventilated and nonventilated regions. These
             nonventilated regions are heterogeneously distributed in the
             lung and this distribution cannot be deduced from
             spirometric measurement of the whole lung. We demonstrate
             that a combination of functional 3He images and anatomical
             1H images provide an effective method to diagnose regional
             lung abnormalities in rats.},
   Key = {fds132914}
}

@booklet{Johnson97b,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Cates, G and Chen, XJ and Cofer, GP and Driehuys, B and Happer, W and Hedlund, LW and Saam, B and Shattuck, MD and Swartz,
             J},
   Title = {Dynamics of magnetization in hyperpolarized gas MRI of the
             lung.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {66-71},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9211381},
   Abstract = {The magnetization in hyperpolarized gas (HP) MRI is
             generated by laser polarization that is independent of the
             magnet and imaging process. As a consequence, there is no
             equilibrium magnetization during the image acquisition. The
             competing processes of gas inflow and depolarization of the
             spins lead to large changes in signal as one samples
             k-space. A model is developed of dynamic changes in
             polarization of hyperpolarized 3He during infusion and in
             vivo imaging of the lung and verified experimentally in a
             live guinea pig. Projection encoding is used to measure the
             view-to-view variation with temporal resolution < 4 ms.
             Large excitation angles effectively sample the magnetization
             in the early stages of inflow, highlighting larger airways,
             while smaller excitation angles produce images of the more
             distal spaces. The work provides a basis for pulse sequences
             designed to effectively exploit HP MRI in the
             lung.},
   Key = {Johnson97b}
}

@article{fds132844,
   Author = {GA Johnson and G Cates and XJ Chen and GP Cofer and B Driehuys and W
             Happer, LW Hedlund and B Saam, MD Shattuck and J
             Swartz},
   Title = {Dynamics of magnetization in hyperpolarized gas MRI of the
             lung.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the
             Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of
             Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {66-71},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   Keywords = {Animals • Guinea Pigs • Helium • Isotopes
             • Lung • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Male
             • Respiration • anatomy & histology* •
             diagnostic use* • methods*},
   Abstract = {The magnetization in hyperpolarized gas (HP) MRI is
             generated by laser polarization that is independent of the
             magnet and imaging process. As a consequence, there is no
             equilibrium magnetization during the image acquisition. The
             competing processes of gas inflow and depolarization of the
             spins lead to large changes in signal as one samples
             k-space. A model is developed of dynamic changes in
             polarization of hyperpolarized 3He during infusion and in
             vivo imaging of the lung and verified experimentally in a
             live guinea pig. Projection encoding is used to measure the
             view-to-view variation with temporal resolution < 4 ms.
             Large excitation angles effectively sample the magnetization
             in the early stages of inflow, highlighting larger airways,
             while smaller excitation angles produce images of the more
             distal spaces. The work provides a basis for pulse sequences
             designed to effectively exploit HP MRI in the
             lung.},
   Key = {fds132844}
}

@booklet{Kodali03,
   Author = {K. Kodali and C. M. Davitt and G. A. Johnson and T. L.
             Ott},
   Title = {Dynamin family member and antiviral protein, Mx,
             co-localizes with autocrine motility factor receptor in an
             ovine uterine lumenal epithelial cell line.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {68},
   Pages = {181 -- 181},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {Kodali03}
}

@booklet{Lindquist98,
   Author = {J. L. Lindquist and J. A. Dieleman and D. A. Mortensen and G. A. Johnson and D. Y. Wyse-pester},
   Title = {Economic importance of managing spatially heterogeneous weed
             populations},
   Journal = {Weed Technology},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {7 -- 13},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {Lindquist98}
}

@article{fds174258,
   Author = {GA Johnson and RA Lahti and TL Lemke and RV Heinzelman},
   Title = {Effect of alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptophan ethyl ester upon
             tissue norepinephrine levels in rats and
             mice.},
   Journal = {Biochemical pharmacology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {1593-600},
   Year = {1969},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0006-2952},
   Keywords = {5-Hydroxytryptophan • Adrenal Glands • Animals
             • Brain • Brain Chemistry • Esters •
             Mice • Mixed Function Oxygenases • Myocardium
             • Norepinephrine • Rats • Time Factors •
             Tyrosine • administration & dosage • analysis
             • analysis* • enzymology • metabolism •
             pharmacology • pharmacology*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174258}
}

@booklet{Baker85,
   Author = {C. A. Baker and D. W. Harris and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Effect of atriopeptin-ii on cyclic-nucleotide production in
             tissue-culture cells},
   Journal = {Federation Proceedings},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1108 -- 1108},
   Year = {1985},
   Key = {Baker85}
}

@article{fds174178,
   Author = {SA Warnke and SY Chen and DL Wyse and GA Johnson and PM
             Porter},
   Title = {Effect of Rotation Crops on Heterodera glycines Population
             Density in a Greenhouse Screening Study.},
   Journal = {Journal of nematology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {391-8},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0022-300X},
   Abstract = {Crop rotation is a common means of reducing pathogen
             populations in soil. Several rotation crops have been shown
             to reduce soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)
             populations, but a comprehensive study of the optimal crops
             is needed. A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the
             effect of growth and decomposition of 46 crops on population
             density of H. glycines. Crops were sown in soil infested
             with H. glycines. Plants were maintained until 75 days after
             planting, when the soil was mixed, a sample of the soil
             removed to determine egg density, and shoots and roots
             chopped and mixed into the soil. After 56 days, soil samples
             were again taken for egg counts, and a susceptible soybean
             ('Sturdy') was planted in the soil as a bioassay to
             determine egg viability. Sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea),
             forage pea (Pisum sativum), lab-lab bean (Lablab purpureus),
             Illinois bundleflower (Desman-thus illinoensis), and alfalfa
             (Medicago sativa) generally resulted in smaller egg
             population density in soil or number of cysts formed on
             soybean in the bioassay than the fallow control. Sunn hemp
             most consistently showed the lowest numbers of eggs and
             cysts. As a group, legumes resulted in lower egg population
             densities than monocots, Brassica species, and other
             dicots.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174178}
}

@booklet{Johnson02b,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and T. R. Hoverstad},
   Title = {Effect of row spacing and herbicide application timing on
             weed control and grain yield in corn (Zea
             mays)},
   Journal = {Weed Technology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {548 -- 553},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {Johnson02b}
}

@booklet{Stahl99,
   Author = {L. A. B. Stahl and G. A. Johnson and D. L. Wyse and D. D.
             Buhler and J. L. Gunsolus},
   Title = {Effect of tillage on timing of Setaria spp. emergence and
             growth},
   Journal = {Weed Science},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {563 -- 570},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {Stahl99}
}

@booklet{Johnson81a,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Ravin, CE},
   Title = {Effect of vertical cassette holder design and construction
             on scatter-to-primary radiation ratios.},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {138},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {461-464},
   Year = {1981},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7455131},
   Abstract = {This paper analyzes the contribution to scattered radiation
             at the film plane by individual components of a conventional
             wall-mounted cassette holder. With grid technique, scatter
             from the front panel of the cassette holder is effectively
             reduced, but considerable scatter reaches the film plane
             from the automatic exposure control pickup interposed
             between the grid and the film cassette. With air-gap
             technique (grid removed), the front panel of the cassette
             holder and the automatic exposure control pickup contribute
             equally to increased scattered radiation at the film plane.
             The contribution to the total scatter from the air-gap
             positioning plate is less significant.},
   Doi = {10.1148/radiology.138.2.7455131},
   Key = {Johnson81a}
}

@article{fds132769,
   Author = {GA Johnson and CE Ravin},
   Title = {Effect of vertical cassette holder design and construction
             on scatter-to-primary radiation ratios.},
   Journal = {Radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {138},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {461-4},
   Year = {1981},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   Keywords = {Humans • Radiography • Scattering, Radiation*
             • Technology, Radiologic • instrumentation*},
   Abstract = {This paper analyzes the contribution to scattered radiation
             at the film plane by individual components of a conventional
             wall-mounted cassette holder. With grid technique, scatter
             from the front panel of the cassette holder is effectively
             reduced, but considerable scatter reaches the film plane
             from the automatic exposure control pickup interposed
             between the grid and the film cassette. With air-gap
             technique (grid removed), the front panel of the cassette
             holder and the automatic exposure control pickup contribute
             equally to increased scattered radiation at the film plane.
             The contribution to the total scatter from the air-gap
             positioning plate is less significant.},
   Key = {fds132769}
}

@article{fds325755,
   Author = {O'Leary-Moore, SK and Godin, EA and Parnell, SE and Dehart, DB and Ament, JJ and Johnson, GA and Styner, M and Sulik,
             KK},
   Title = {EFFECTS OF ACUTE GESTATIONAL DAY 10 ETHANOL EXPOSURE ON THE
             DEVELOPING MOUSE BRAIN: A HIGH-RESOLUTION MAGNETIC RESONANCE
             MICROSCOPY STUDY},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {132A-132A},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {fds325755}
}

@article{8407765,
   Author = {Mai, W. and Badea, C.T. and Wheeler, C.T. and Hedlund, L.W. and Johnson, G.A.},
   Title = {Effects of breathing and cardiac motion on spatial
             resolution in the microscopic imaging of
             rodents},
   Journal = {Magn. Reson. Med. (USA)},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {858 - 65},
   Year = {2005},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mrm.20400},
   Keywords = {biomedical MRI;cardiovascular system;diagnostic
             radiography;pneumodynamics;surgery;},
   Abstract = {One can acquire high-resolution pulmonary and cardiac images
             in live rodents with MR microscopy by synchronizing the
             image acquisition to the breathing cycle across multiple
             breaths, and gating to the cardiac cycle. The precision with
             which one can synchronize image acquisition to the motion
             defines the ultimate resolution limit that can be attained
             in such studies. The present work was performed to evaluate
             how reliably the pulmonary and cardiac structures return to
             the same position from breath to breath and beat to beat
             across the prolonged period required for MR microscopy.
             Radiopaque beads were surgically glued to the abdominal
             surface of the diaphragm and on the cardiac ventricles of
             anesthetized, mechanically ventilated rats. We evaluated the
             range of motion for the beads (relative to a reference
             vertebral bead) using digital microradiography with two
             specific biological gating methods: 1) ventilation
             synchronous acquisition, and 2) both ventilation synchronous
             and cardiac-gated acquisitions. The standard deviation (SD)
             of the displacement was &mu;m100 &mu;m, which is comparable
             to the resolution limit for in vivo MRI imposed by
             signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) constraints. With careful
             control of motion, its impact on resolution can be limited.
             This work provides the first quantitative measure of the
             motion-imposed resolution limits for in vivo
             imaging},
   Key = {8407765}
}

@article{fds268882,
   Author = {Maï, W and Badea, CT and Wheeler, CT and Hedlund, LW and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Effects of breathing and cardiac motion on spatial
             resolution in the microscopic imaging of
             rodents.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {858-865},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15799053},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cardiovascular Physiology* • Diaphragm
             • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Male •
             Myocardial Contraction • Rats • Rats, Inbred F344
             • Reproducibility of Results • Tungsten •
             methods* • physiology* • radiography},
   Abstract = {One can acquire high-resolution pulmonary and cardiac images
             in live rodents with MR microscopy by synchronizing the
             image acquisition to the breathing cycle across multiple
             breaths, and gating to the cardiac cycle. The precision with
             which one can synchronize image acquisition to the motion
             defines the ultimate resolution limit that can be attained
             in such studies. The present work was performed to evaluate
             how reliably the pulmonary and cardiac structures return to
             the same position from breath to breath and beat to beat
             across the prolonged period required for MR microscopy.
             Radiopaque beads were surgically glued to the abdominal
             surface of the diaphragm and on the cardiac ventricles of
             anesthetized, mechanically ventilated rats. We evaluated the
             range of motion for the beads (relative to a reference
             vertebral bead) using digital microradiography with two
             specific biological gating methods: 1) ventilation
             synchronous acquisition, and 2) both ventilation synchronous
             and cardiac-gated acquisitions. The standard deviation (SD)
             of the displacement was < or =100 microm, which is
             comparable to the resolution limit for in vivo MRI imposed
             by signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) constraints. With careful
             control of motion, its impact on resolution can be limited.
             This work provides the first quantitative measure of the
             motion-imposed resolution limits for in vivo
             imaging.},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.20400},
   Key = {fds268882}
}

@article{fds268777,
   Author = {Mai, W and Badea, CT and Wheeler, CT and Hedlund, LW and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Effects of breathing motion on the spatial resolution in
             microscopic imaging techniques of rodents},
   Journal = {2004 2nd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging:
             Macro to Nano},
   Volume = {1},
   Pages = {472-475},
   Year = {2004},
   ISBN = {0780383885},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance microscopy is capable of producing
             high-resolution pulmonary images in live rodents by
             synchronizing the image acquisition across multiple breaths.
             The precision with which one can control motion will
             probably define the resolution limit that can be attained in
             such studies. This work was performed to evaluate how
             reliably the respiratory structures return to the same
             position from breath to breath each time data are acquired.
             Radio-opaque beads were surgically glued on the diaphragm of
             anesthetized, mechanically ventilated rats. Their range of
             motion (relative to a reference vertebral bead) was
             evaluated using digital micro-radiography with two specific
             biological pulse sequences: (1) ventilation synchronous
             acquisition, and (2) both ventilation synchronous and
             cardiac gated acquisition. The standard deviation of the
             displacement was on the order of, or less than 100 microns,
             which is comparable to the resolution limit for in vivo
             magnetic resonance imaging imposed by signal to noise
             constraints. With careful control of motion, its impact on
             resolution can be limited. This work provides the first
             quantitative measure of the motion imposed resolution limits
             for in vivo imaging. ©2004 IEEE.},
   Key = {fds268777}
}

@article{fds325752,
   Author = {Parnell, SE and Holloway, HT and Paniagua, B and Oguz, I and Styner, MA and Johnson, GA and Sulik, KK},
   Title = {EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EARLY GESTATIONAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE ON THE
             DEVELOPING BRAIN: A MAGNETIC RESONANCE MICROSCOPY
             STUDY},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {36},
   Pages = {279A-279A},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {fds325752}
}

@booklet{Sherrier88a,
   Author = {Sherrier, RH and Chiles, C and Wilkinson, WE and Johnson, GA and Ravin,
             CE},
   Title = {Effects of image processing on nodule detection rates in
             digitized chest radiographs: ROC study of observer
             performance.},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {166},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {447-450},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3336719},
   Abstract = {To evaluate the effects of image processing in digitized
             chest radiographs when high-resolution images are used, an
             examination was done in which the detection of pulmonary
             nodules in unprocessed digitized chest radiographs was
             compared with that in images that had undergone processing
             with two methods, adaptive filtration and histogram
             equalization. The processing techniques have been optimized
             in previous work to selectively enhance the retrocardiac and
             subdiaphragmatic areas without significant alteration of
             detail in the lung. Eight observers were shown 150 test
             radiographs (50 unprocessed, 50 processed with adaptive
             filtration, 50 processed with histogram equalization)
             containing 150 nodules. The results indicate a statistically
             significant (P less than .03) difference, with highest
             observer performance in the chest radiographs processed with
             adaptive filtration (median area under ROC curve = 0.78),
             compared with unprocessed images (median = 0.68) and chest
             radiographs processed with histogram equalization (median =
             0.62). Performance in the lung was not significantly
             different. Adaptive filtration applied to selectively
             enhance underexposed areas of film images may improve nodule
             detection. Histogram equalization provided no improvement in
             performance.},
   Doi = {10.1148/radiology.166.2.3336719},
   Key = {Sherrier88a}
}

@article{fds132873,
   Author = {RH Sherrier and C Chiles and WE Wilkinson and GA Johnson and CE
             Ravin},
   Title = {Effects of image processing on nodule detection rates in
             digitized chest radiographs: ROC study of observer
             performance.},
   Journal = {Radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {166},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {447-50},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   Keywords = {Coin Lesion, Pulmonary • Filtration • Humans
             • Lung Neoplasms • ROC Curve* • Radiographic
             Image Enhancement • methods • methods* •
             radiography*},
   Abstract = {To evaluate the effects of image processing in digitized
             chest radiographs when high-resolution images are used, an
             examination was done in which the detection of pulmonary
             nodules in unprocessed digitized chest radiographs was
             compared with that in images that had undergone processing
             with two methods, adaptive filtration and histogram
             equalization. The processing techniques have been optimized
             in previous work to selectively enhance the retrocardiac and
             subdiaphragmatic areas without significant alteration of
             detail in the lung. Eight observers were shown 150 test
             radiographs (50 unprocessed, 50 processed with adaptive
             filtration, 50 processed with histogram equalization)
             containing 150 nodules. The results indicate a statistically
             significant (P less than .03) difference, with highest
             observer performance in the chest radiographs processed with
             adaptive filtration (median area under ROC curve = 0.78),
             compared with unprocessed images (median = 0.68) and chest
             radiographs processed with histogram equalization (median =
             0.62). Performance in the lung was not significantly
             different. Adaptive filtration applied to selectively
             enhance underexposed areas of film images may improve nodule
             detection. Histogram equalization provided no improvement in
             performance.},
   Key = {fds132873}
}

@booklet{Stewart00,
   Author = {M. D. Stewart and G. A. Johnson and R. C. Burghardt and C.
             A. Vyhlidal and S. H. Safe and F. W. Bazer and T. E.
             Spencer},
   Title = {Effects of interferon tau on short- and long-term activation
             of STAT proteins in immortalized ovine uterine luminal
             epithelial cells.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {62},
   Pages = {118 -- 118},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {Stewart00}
}

@article{fds180938,
   Author = {DW Bailey and KA Dunlap and DW Erikson and AK Patel and FW Bazer and RC
             Burghardt, GA Johnson},
   Title = {Effects of long-term progesterone exposure on porcine
             uterine gene expression: progesterone alone does not induce
             secreted phosphoprotein 1 (osteopontin) in glandular
             epithelium.},
   Journal = {Reproduction (Cambridge, England)},
   Volume = {140},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {595-604},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1741-7899},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/REP-10-0169},
   Abstract = {Pigs experience significant conceptus loss near
             mid-gestation, correlating with increasing glandular
             epithelial (GE) development and secretory activity. Secreted
             phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1, osteopontin) increases in GE between
             days 30 and 40 of pregnancy and is expressed in the GE of
             day 90 pseudopregnant pigs, suggesting that progesterone
             (P(4)) from corpora lutea is responsible for induction of
             SPP1 in GE. In this study, pigs were ovariectomized and
             treated daily with P(4) to assess effects of 40 days of P(4)
             exposure on SPP1, P(4) receptor (PGR), uteroferrin (ACP5),
             and fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) expression in porcine
             endometria. PGR mRNA decreased in pigs injected with P(4)
             compared with pigs injected with corn oil (CO), and PGRs
             were downregulated in the luminal epithelium (LE) and GE.
             ACP5 mRNA increased in pigs injected with P(4) compared with
             pigs injected with CO, and ACP5 was induced in the GE of
             P(4)-treated pigs. FGF7 mRNA increased in pigs injected with
             P(4) compared with pigs injected with CO, and FGF7 was
             induced in the LE and GE of P(4)-treated pigs. SPP1 mRNA was
             not different between pigs injected with P(4) compared with
             pigs injected with CO, and SPP1 was not present in the GE of
             P(4)-treated pigs. Therefore, long-term P(4), in the absence
             of ovarian and/or conceptus factors, does not induce SPP1
             expression in GE. We hypothesize that a servomechanism
             involving sequential effects of multiple hormones and
             cytokines, similar to those for sheep and humans, is
             required for GE differentiation and function, including the
             synthesis and secretion of SPP1.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1530/REP-10-0169},
   Key = {fds180938}
}

@article{fds180940,
   Author = {DW Bailey and KA Dunlap and JW Frank and DW Erikson and BG White and FW
             Bazer, RC Burghardt and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Effects of long-term progesterone on developmental and
             functional aspects of porcine uterine epithelia and
             vasculature: progesterone alone does not support development
             of uterine glands comparable to that of pregnancy.},
   Journal = {Reproduction (Cambridge, England)},
   Volume = {140},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {583-94},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1741-7899},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/REP-10-0170},
   Abstract = {In pigs, endometrial functions are regulated primarily by
             progesterone and placental factors including estrogen.
             Progesterone levels are high throughout pregnancy to
             stimulate and maintain secretion of histotroph from uterine
             epithelia necessary for growth, implantation, placentation,
             and development of the conceptus (embryo and its
             extra-embryonic membranes). This study determined effects of
             long-term progesterone on development and histoarchitecture
             of endometrial luminal epithelium (LE), glandular epithelium
             (GE), and vasculature in pigs. Pigs were ovariectomized
             during diestrus (day 12), and then received daily injections
             of either corn oil or progesterone for 28 days. Prolonged
             progesterone treatment resulted in increased weight and
             length of the uterine horns, and thickness of the
             endometrium and myometrium. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of
             GE were not evident, but LE cell height increased,
             suggesting elevated secretory activity. Although GE
             development was deficient, progesterone supported increased
             endometrial angiogenesis comparable to that of pregnancy.
             Progesterone also supported alterations to the apical and
             basolateral domains of LE and GE. Dolichos biflorus
             agglutinin lectin binding and α(v) integrin were
             downregulated at the apical surfaces of LE and GE.
             Claudin-4, α(2)β(1) integrin, and vimentin were increased
             at basolateral surfaces, whereas occludins-1 and -2,
             claudin-3, and E-cadherin were unaffected by progesterone
             treatment indicating structurally competent trans-epithelial
             adhesion and tight junctional complexes. Collectively, the
             results suggest that progesterone affects LE, GE, and
             vascular development and histoarchitecture, but in the
             absence of ovarian or placental factors, it does not support
             development of GE comparable to pregnancy. Furthermore, LE
             and vascular development are highly responsive to the
             effects of progesterone.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1530/REP-10-0170},
   Key = {fds180940}
}

@booklet{Gibson83,
   Author = {J. K. Gibson and J. A. Gifford and P. F. Kane and G. L.
             Degraaf and F. G. Robinson and J. P. Hansen and D. W. Harris and G. A. Johnson and H. S. Greenberg and D. W.
             Ducharme},
   Title = {Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on
             myocardial healing after myocardial-infarction},
   Journal = {Federation Proceedings},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {633 -- 633},
   Year = {1983},
   Key = {Gibson83}
}

@booklet{Spencer00,
   Author = {T. E. Spencer and G. A. Johnson and M. D. Stewart and M. M.
             Joyce and C. A. Gray and K. M. Taylor and A. Gertler and E.
             Gootwine and F. W. Bazer},
   Title = {Effects of ovine placental lactogen and growth hormone on
             ovine endometrial function.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {62},
   Pages = {264 -- 264},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {Spencer00}
}

@booklet{Lee00,
   Author = {C. K. Lee and R. L. Weaks and G. A. Johnson and F. W. Bazer and J. A. Piedrahita},
   Title = {Effects of protease inhibitors and antioxidants on in vitro
             survival of porcine primordial germ cells},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {887 -- 897},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {Lee00}
}

@article{fds174143,
   Author = {CK Lee and RL Weaks and GA Johnson and FW Bazer and JA
             Piedrahita},
   Title = {Effects of protease inhibitors and antioxidants on In vitro
             survival of porcine primordial germ cells.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {887-97},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Acetylcysteine • Animals • Antioxidants •
             Apoptosis • Cell Survival • Cells, Cultured •
             DNA Fragmentation • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
             • Fetus • Germ Cells • In Situ Nick-End
             Labeling • Microscopy, Electron • Protease
             Inhibitors • Swine • administration & dosage
             • alpha-Macroglobulins • cytology • drug
             effects • drug effects* • pharmacology •
             pharmacology* • physiology*},
   Abstract = {One of the problems associated with in vitro culture of
             primordial germ cells (PGCs) is the large loss of cells
             during the initial period of culture. This study
             characterized the initial loss and determined the
             effectiveness of two classes of apoptosis inhibitors,
             protease inhibitors, and antioxidants on the ability of
             porcine PGCs to survive in culture. Results from electron
             microscopic analysis and in situ DNA fragmentation assay
             indicated that porcine PGCs rapidly undergo apoptosis when
             placed in culture. Additionally, alpha(2)-macroglobulin, a
             protease inhibitor and cytokine carrier, and
             N:-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, increased the survival of
             PGCs in vitro. While other protease inhibitors tested did
             not affect survival of PGCs, all antioxidants tested
             improved survival of PGCs (P: < 0.05). Further results
             indicated that the beneficial effect of the antioxidants was
             critical only during the initial period of culture. Finally,
             it was determined that in short-term culture, in the absence
             of feeder layers, antioxidants could partially replace the
             effect(s) of growth factors and reduce apoptosis.
             Collectively, these results indicate that the addition of
             alpha(2)-macroglobulin and antioxidants can increase the
             number of PGCs in vitro by suppressing apoptosis.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174143}
}

@booklet{Spencer99,
   Author = {T. E. Spencer and A. Gray and G. A. Johnson and K. M. Taylor and A. Gertler and E. Gootwine and T. L. Ott and F. W.
             Bazer},
   Title = {Effects of recombinant ovine interferon tau, placental
             lactogen, and growth hormone on the ovine
             uterus},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1409 -- 1418},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {Spencer99}
}

@article{fds174304,
   Author = {TE Spencer and A Gray and GA Johnson and KM Taylor and A Gertler and E
             Gootwine, TL Ott and FW Bazer},
   Title = {Effects of recombinant ovine interferon tau, placental
             lactogen, and growth hormone on the ovine
             uterus.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1409-18},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Corpus Luteum • Endometrium •
             Female • Gene Expression • Glycoproteins •
             Growth Hormone • Interferon Type I • Ki-67 Antigen
             • Ovariectomy • Placental Lactogen •
             Pregnancy Proteins • RNA, Messenger • Receptors,
             Estrogen • Receptors, Oxytocin • Receptors,
             Progesterone • Recombinant Proteins • Serpins*
             • Sheep* • analysis • chemistry • drug
             effects • genetics • pharmacology •
             pharmacology* • physiology • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Studies were conducted to determine effects of intrauterine
             administration of recombinant ovine interferon tau (IFNtau),
             placental lactogen (PL), and growth hormone (GH) on
             endometrial function. In the first study, administration of
             IFNtau to cyclic ewes for one period (Days 11-15) resulted
             in an interestrous interval (IEI) of approximately 30 days,
             whereas administration for two periods (Days 11-15 and Days
             21-25) extended the IEI to greater than 50 days.
             Administration of IFNtau from Days 11 to 15 and of PL or GH
             from Days 21 to 25 failed to extend the IEI more than for
             IFNtau alone. In the second study, effects of IFNtau, PL,
             and GH on endometrial differentiation and function were
             determined in ovariectomized ewes receiving ovarian steroid
             replacement therapy. Endometrial expression of mRNAs for
             estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and
             oxytocin receptor (OTR) were not affected by PL or GH
             treatment; however, uterine milk protein mRNA levels and
             stratum spongiosum gland density were increased by both PL
             and GH treatments. Collectively, results indicated that 1)
             PL and GH do not regulate endometrial PR, ER, and OTR
             expression or affect corpus luteum life span; 2)
             down-regulation of epithelial PR expression is requisite for
             progesterone induction of secretory gene expression in
             uterine glandular epithelium; 3) effects of PL and GH on
             endometrial function require IFNtau; and 4) PL and GH
             regulate endometrial gland proliferation and perhaps
             differentiated function.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174304}
}

@booklet{Johnson01b,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and M. D. Stewart and C. A. Gray and Y. Choi and R. C. Burghardt and L. Y. Yu-lee and F. W. Bazer and T.
             E. Spencer},
   Title = {Effects of the estrous cycle, pregnancy, and interferon tau
             on 2 ',5 '-oligoadenylate synthetase expression in the ovine
             uterus},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1392 -- 1399},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {Johnson01b}
}

@article{fds174204,
   Author = {GA Johnson, MD Stewart and CA Gray and Y Choi and RC Burghardt and LY
             Yu-Lee, FW Bazer and TE Spencer},
   Title = {Effects of the estrous cycle, pregnancy, and interferon tau
             on 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase expression in the ovine
             uterus.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1392-9},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase • Animals • Cell
             Line • Endometrium • Estrus • Female •
             Gene Expression* • Interferon Type I • Pregnancy
             • Pregnancy Proteins • Recombinant Proteins •
             Sheep • Uterus • administration & dosage •
             drug effects • genetics* • metabolism •
             metabolism* • pharmacology • pharmacology* •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {The enzymes which comprise the 2',5'-oligoadenylate
             synthetase (OAS) family are interferon (IFN) stimulated
             genes which regulate ribonuclease L antiviral responses and
             may play additional roles in control of cellular growth and
             differentiation. This study characterized OAS expression in
             the endometrium of cyclic and pregnant ewes as well as
             determined effects of IFNtau and progesterone on OAS
             expression in cyclic or ovariectomized ewes and in
             endometrial epithelial and stromal cell lines. In cyclic
             ewes, low levels of OAS protein were detected in the
             endometrial stroma (S) and glandular epithelium (GE). In
             early pregnant ewes, OAS expression increased in the S and
             GE on Day 15. OAS expression in the lumenal epithelium (LE)
             was not detected in uteri from either cyclic or pregnant
             ewes. Intrauterine administration of IFNtau stimulated OAS
             expression in the S and GE, and this effect of IFNtau was
             dependent on progesterone. Ovine endometrial LE, GE, and S
             cell lines responded to IFNtau with induction of OAS
             proteins. In all three cell lines, the 40/46-kDa OAS forms
             were induced by IFNtau, whereas the 100-kDa OAS form
             appeared to be constitutively expressed and not affected by
             IFNtau. The 69/71-kDa OAS forms were induced by IFNtau in
             the S and GE cell lines, but not in the LE. Collectively,
             these results indicate that OAS expression in the
             endometrial S and GE of the early pregnant ovine uterus is
             directly regulated by IFNtau from conceptus and requires the
             presence of progesterone.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174204}
}

@article{fds326004,
   Author = {Wolbarsht, ML and O'Foghludha, FA and Sliney, DH and Guy, AW and Jr,
             AAS and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {ELECTROMAGNETIC EMISSION FROM VISUAL DISPLAY UNITS: A
             NON-HAZARD.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation
             Engineers},
   Volume = {229},
   Pages = {187-195},
   Year = {1980},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.958802},
   Abstract = {An analysis of the electromagnetic emissions of an IBM Model
             3277 visual display unit showed no hazardous levels in any
             portion of the spectrum. The actual level of emission was
             measured throughout the spectrum from low frequency radio
             waves through x-radiations, extending from 10 KHz through 10
             GHz, then 0. 2 to 10 mu m, and from 5 to over 40 kev. In
             many parts of the spectrum, the level of emission was below
             the sensitivity of available instrumentation. In the radio
             frequency range, including the microwave region,
             measurements were also made on black and white and color TV
             sets for the purpose of comparison.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.958802},
   Key = {fds326004}
}

@booklet{Johnson99d,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and K. J. Austin and A. M. Collins and W. J.
             Murdoch and T. R. Hansen},
   Title = {Endometrial ISG17 mRNA and a related mRNA are induced by
             interferon-tau and localized to glandular epithelial and
             stromal cells from pregnant cows},
   Journal = {Endocrine},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {243 -- 252},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Johnson99d}
}

@article{fds174237,
   Author = {GA Johnson and KJ Austin and AM Collins and WJ Murdoch and TR
             Hansen},
   Title = {Endometrial ISG17 mRNA and a related mRNA are induced by
             interferon-tau and localized to glandular epithelial and
             stromal cells from pregnant cows.},
   Journal = {Endocrine},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {243-52},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1355-008X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02738623},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blotting, Northern • Cattle • Cell
             Line • Endometrium • Epithelial Cells •
             Female • In Situ Hybridization • Interferon Type I
             • Nuclear Proteins • Pregnancy • Pregnancy
             Proteins • RNA, Messenger • Recombinant Proteins
             • Stromal Cells • Tissue Distribution •
             analysis • biosynthesis* • chemistry •
             genetics* • metabolism* • pharmacology •
             pharmacology*},
   Abstract = {The interferon stimulated gene product, ISG17, conjugates to
             bovine uterine proteins in response to conceptus-derived
             interferon (IFN)-tau. The objectives of the present
             experiments were to examine induction of ISG17 (0.65 kb) and
             a related 2.5 kb mRNA in response to IFN-tau and pregnancy
             using Northern blotting procedures, and to determine cell
             types in the endometrium that expressed ISG17 mRNA using in
             situ hybridization. RNA was isolated from endometrial
             explants or from bovine endometrial (BEND) cells cultured in
             the absence (control) or presence of 25 nM recombinant (r)
             bolFN-tau for 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, or 48 h. The major ISG17 0.65
             kb mRNA and a minor 2.5 kb mRNA were induced (p<0.05) after
             6 h (explants) or 3 h (BEND cells) treatment with
             rboIFN-tau. Both mRNAs were present in endometrium from day
             18 pregnant cows, but were absent in endometrium from
             nonpregnant cows. The ISG17 mRNA was localized to stromal
             and glandular epithelial cells on d 18 of pregnancy. The 2.5
             kb mRNA may encode a novel ISG17 homolog, or a unique
             polyISG17 repeat that is similar in structure to the
             polyubiquitin genes. Because ISG17 mRNA is induced in
             stromal and glandular epithelial cells, it could be assumed
             that ISG17 has a role in regulating intracellular proteins
             in both cell types.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF02738623},
   Key = {fds174237}
}

@booklet{Ede01,
   Author = {P. N. Ede and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Energy relations of gas estimated from flare radiation in
             Nigeria},
   Journal = {International Journal Of Energy Research},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {85 -- 91},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {Ede01}
}

@article{fds174233,
   Author = {RC Burghardt, JR Burghardt and JD Taylor 2nd and AT Reeder and BT
             Nguen, TE Spencer and KJ Bayless and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Enhanced focal adhesion assembly reflects increased
             mechanosensation and mechanotransduction at
             maternal-conceptus interface and uterine wall during ovine
             pregnancy.},
   Journal = {Reproduction (Cambridge, England)},
   Volume = {137},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {567-82},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1741-7899},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/REP-08-0304},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cytoskeletal Proteins • Embryo
             Implantation • Extracellular Matrix Proteins •
             Female • Fluorescent Antibody Technique • Focal
             Adhesions • Integrins • Mechanotransduction,
             Cellular • Models, Animal • Pregnancy • Sheep
             • Trophoblasts • Uterus • analysis •
             metabolism* • physiology • physiology*},
   Abstract = {The integrity of the fetal-maternal interface is critical
             for proper fetal nourishment during pregnancy. Integrins are
             important adhesion molecules present at the interface during
             implantation; however, in vivo evidence for integrin
             activation and focal adhesion formation at the
             maternal-conceptus interface is limited. We hypothesized
             that focal adhesion assembly in uterine luminal epithelium
             (LE) and conceptus trophectoderm (Tr) results from integrin
             binding of extracellular matrix (ECM) at this interface to
             provide increased tensile forces and signaling to coordinate
             utero-placental development. An ovine model of unilateral
             pregnancy was used to evaluate mechanotransduction events
             leading to focal adhesion assembly at the maternal-conceptus
             interface and within the uterine wall. Animals were
             hysterectomized on days 40, 80, or 120 of pregnancy, and
             uteri immunostained for integrins (ITGAV, ITGA4, ITGA5,
             ITGB1, ITGB3, and ITGB5), ECM proteins (SPP1, LGALS15,
             fibronectin (FN), and vitronectin (VTN)), cytoskeletal
             molecules (ACTN and TLN1), and a signal generator (PTK2).
             Focal adhesion assembly in myometrium and stroma was also
             studied to provide a frame of reference for mechanical
             stretch of the uterine wall. Large focal adhesions
             containing aggregates of ITGAV, ITGA4, ITGA5, ITGB1, ITGB5,
             ACTN, and PTK2 were detected in interplacentomal uterine LE
             and Tr of gravid but not non-gravid uterine horns and
             increased during pregnancy. SPP1 and LGALS15, but not FN or
             VTN, were present along LE and Tr interfaces in both uterine
             horns. These data support the idea that focal adhesion
             assembly at the maternal-conceptus interface reflects
             adaptation to increasing forces caused by the growing fetus.
             Cooperative binding of multiple integrins to SPP1 deposited
             at the maternal-conceptus interface forms an adhesive mosaic
             to maintain a tight connection between uterine and placental
             surfaces along regions of epitheliochorial placentation in
             sheep.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1530/REP-08-0304},
   Key = {fds174233}
}

@article{fds174128,
   Author = {DJ Waldon and TT Kawabe and CA Baker and GA Johnson and AE
             Buhl},
   Title = {Enhanced in vitro hair growth at the air-liquid interface:
             minoxidil preserves the root sheath in cultured whisker
             follicles.},
   Journal = {In vitro cellular & developmental biology.
             Animal},
   Volume = {29A},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {555-61},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1071-2690},
   Keywords = {Air • Animals • Cells, Cultured •
             Collagenases • Cysteine • Gelatin Sponge,
             Absorbable • Glycoproteins • Guanidines •
             Hair • Keratins • Mice • Minoxidil •
             Pyridines • Sulfotransferases • Tissue Inhibitor
             of Metalloproteinases • Vibrissae • analysis
             • antagonists & inhibitors • chemistry •
             cytology* • growth & development* • metabolism
             • pharmacology • pharmacology*},
   Abstract = {Inasmuch as hair follicles are difficult to maintain in
             culture, the study of hair biology using cultured hair
             follicles has met with only limited success. In our attempts
             to solve the problem of follicle degeneration, we cultured
             follicles at the air-surface interface on a modified
             collagen matrix (Gelfoam). In follicles cultured at the
             air-surface or submerged, we examined follicular morphology,
             hair shaft growth, sulfotransferase levels, cysteine
             incorporation, an expression of a tissue inhibitor of
             metalloproteinase (TIMP), and ultra-high sulfur keratin
             (UHSK). Follicles cultured at the air-liquid interface
             produced a 2.7-fold increase in hair growth and maintained
             an anagen-like morphology. Substrates such as nylon mesh
             seeded with fibroblasts, Full Thickness Skin, or 5-microns
             polycarbonate filter also supported hair growth, whereas
             Gelfilm, GF-A glass filter, filter paper, or 1-micron
             polycarbonate filter did not. The UHSK expression was
             significantly higher in the air-liquid interface cultures
             compared to the submerged culture. Several potassium channel
             openers, including minoxidil, a minoxidil analog, and the
             pinacidil analog (P-1075), all stimulated significant
             cysteine incorporation in follicles. Minoxidil and its
             analog specifically preserved the follicular root sheath, in
             contrast to P-1075 which did not, indicating a difference in
             the two drug types. The preservation of the root sheath was
             measured by increased TIMP expression and sulfotransferase
             activity and indicates that the root sheath is a target
             tissue for minoxidil. Our results show that follicles
             cultured at the air-liquid interface maintain a better
             morphology and produced greater hair growth than follicles
             cultured on tissue culture plastic.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174128}
}

@booklet{Waldon93,
   Author = {D. J. Waldon and T. T. Kawabe and C. A. Baker and G. A.
             Johnson and A. E. Buhl},
   Title = {Enhanced in-vitro hair-growth at the air-liquid interface -
             minoxidil preserves the root sheath in cultured whisker
             follicles},
   Journal = {In Vitro Cellular \& Developmental Biology-animal},
   Volume = {29A},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {555 -- 561},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {Waldon93}
}

@article{9150726,
   Author = {Sharief, AA and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Enhanced T2 contrast for MR histology of the mouse
             brain.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {717-725},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16964618},
   Keywords = {biomedical MRI;brain;data acquisition;image
             sequences;neurophysiology;},
   Abstract = {A 3D Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence was
             implemented to obtain enhanced T(2) contrast in actively
             stained (perfusion with fixative and contrast agent) mouse
             brains at 9.4 T. Short interecho spacing was used to
             minimize diffusion and susceptibility losses. The sequence
             produced 16 3D volumes with an interecho spacing of 7 ms for
             isotropic 43-mu-resolution images of the mouse brains in a
             scan time of 4 hr. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio
             (SNR) and contrast, the multiecho frequency domain image
             contrast (MEFIC) method was applied, resulting in a
             composite image with T(2)-weighted contrast. The high SNR
             and contrast thus achieved revealed aspects of mouse brain
             morphology, such as multiple cortical layers, groups of
             thalamic nuclei, layers of the inferior and superior
             colliculus, and molecular and granular layers of the
             cerebellum, with a high degree of definition and contrast
             that was not previously achieved in T(2)-weighted
             acquisitions at high fields.},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.21026},
   Key = {9150726}
}

@article{fds157113,
   Author = {AA Sharief and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Enhanced T2 contrast for MR histology of the mouse
             brain.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the
             Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of
             Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, United States},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {717-25},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain Mapping • Contrast Media •
             Heterocyclic Compounds • Imaging, Three-Dimensional
             • Least-Squares Analysis • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging • Male • Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL
             • Organometallic Compounds • Staining and Labeling
             • methods*},
   Abstract = {A 3D Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence was
             implemented to obtain enhanced T(2) contrast in actively
             stained (perfusion with fixative and contrast agent) mouse
             brains at 9.4 T. Short interecho spacing was used to
             minimize diffusion and susceptibility losses. The sequence
             produced 16 3D volumes with an interecho spacing of 7 ms for
             isotropic 43-mu-resolution images of the mouse brains in a
             scan time of 4 hr. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio
             (SNR) and contrast, the multiecho frequency domain image
             contrast (MEFIC) method was applied, resulting in a
             composite image with T(2)-weighted contrast. The high SNR
             and contrast thus achieved revealed aspects of mouse brain
             morphology, such as multiple cortical layers, groups of
             thalamic nuclei, layers of the inferior and superior
             colliculus, and molecular and granular layers of the
             cerebellum, with a high degree of definition and contrast
             that was not previously achieved in T(2)-weighted
             acquisitions at high fields.},
   Key = {fds157113}
}

@booklet{Johnson02,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and T. A. Day},
   Title = {Enhancement of photosynthesis in Sorghum bicolor by
             ultraviolet radiation},
   Journal = {Physiologia Plantarum},
   Volume = {116},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {554 -- 562},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {Johnson02}
}

@article{fds132898,
   Author = {KD Meisheri and GA Johnson and L Puddington},
   Title = {Enzymatic and non-enzymatic sulfation mechanisms in the
             biological actions of minoxidil.},
   Journal = {Biochemical pharmacology, ENGLAND},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {271-9},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0006-2952},
   Keywords = {Animals • Biotransformation • Humans •
             Minoxidil • Muscle, Smooth, Vascular • Potassium
             Channels • Proteins • Sulfotransferases •
             Triazines • Vasodilation • drug effects •
             metabolism • metabolism* • pharmacokinetics •
             pharmacology},
   Key = {fds132898}
}

@booklet{Meisheri93,
   Author = {K. D. Meisheri and G. A. Johnson and L. Puddington},
   Title = {Enzymatic and nonenzymatic sulfation mechanisms in the
             biological actions of minoxidil},
   Journal = {Biochemical Pharmacology},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {271 -- 279},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {Meisheri93}
}

@booklet{Johnson97c,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and R. Mannel and M. Khalifa and J. L. Walker and M. Wren and K. W. Min and D. M. Benbrook},
   Title = {Epidermal growth factor receptor in vulvar malignancies and
             its relationship to metastasis and patient
             survival},
   Journal = {Gynecologic Oncology},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {425 -- 429},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Johnson97c}
}

@article{fds174146,
   Author = {GA Johnson and R Mannel and M Khalifa and JL Walker and M Wren and KW Min and DM Benbrook},
   Title = {Epidermal growth factor receptor in vulvar malignancies and
             its relationship to metastasis and patient
             survival.},
   Journal = {Gynecologic oncology},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {425-9},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0090-8258},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/gyno.1997.4660},
   Keywords = {Carcinoma, Squamous Cell • Disease-Free Survival •
             Female • Humans • Lymphatic Metastasis •
             Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor • Survival Rate
             • Vulvar Neoplasms • biosynthesis* •
             metabolism* • mortality • mortality* •
             pathology},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the level of epidermal growth factor
             receptor (EGF-R) expression in vulvar malignancies and to
             determine if a correlation exists between EGF-R levels and
             metastasis or patient survival. METHODS: All patients with a
             diagnosis of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva
             who were treated at our institution with a primary radical
             vulvectomy and inguinal lymph node dissection from 1983 to
             1993 were eligible for the study. Sixty-one patients with
             available tissue blocks of benign vulvar epithelium, the
             primary malignant vulvar lesion, and groin node metastasis
             (when positive) were included in the study. Semiquantitative
             EGF-R expression was determined in a blinded fashion
             utilizing immunohistochemical staining of appropriate tissue
             samples. Survival was calculated utilizing Kaplan-Meier life
             table analysis based upon disease-free survival. RESULTS: A
             significant increase (P < 0.001) in mean EGF-R levels was
             demonstrated in the primary tumor (67%) versus benign vulvar
             epithelium (31%). In the 14 patients with lymph node
             metastasis, the mean EGF-R level in the primary tumor was
             65% versus 88% in the metastatic lesion (P < 0.001). The
             likelihood of lymph node metastasis was elevated in those
             patients with a benign tissue EGF-R level > or =40% (P <
             0.03) and in those patients with a primary tumor EGF-R level
             > or =90% (P < 0.025). Life table analysis revealed a
             cumulative disease-free survival of 45% for all patients.
             Disease-free survival in those patients with EGF-R levels >
             or =90% in the primary tumor was 25%, contrasting with a
             disease-free survival of 54% in those patients with EGF-R
             levels <90% (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: There is a progressive
             increase in EGF-R expression from benign vulvar epithelium
             to primary malignant tissue to metastatic lesions within the
             same patient. Increased expression of EGF-R in the primary
             vulvar malignancy is significantly associated with lymph
             node metastasis and decreased patient survival. Increased
             expression of EGF-R in histologically benign vulvar
             epithelium has a significant association with lymph node
             metastasis and may predict decreased patient
             survival.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1006/gyno.1997.4660},
   Key = {fds174146}
}

@booklet{Choi01a,
   Author = {Y. Choi and G. A. Johnson and R. C. Burghardt and L. R.
             Berghman and M. M. Joyce and T. E. Spencer and F. W.
             Bazer},
   Title = {Epithelial expression of interferon regulatory factor two
             restricts expression of interferon tau-stimulated genes to
             the endometrial stroma and glandular epithelium of the ovine
             uterus.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {64},
   Pages = {108 -- 108},
   Year = {2001},
   Key = {Choi01a}
}

@article{fds268763,
   Author = {Smith, BR and Sattuck, MD and Hedlund, LW and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Erratum: Time-course imaging of rat embryos in utero with
             magnetic resonance microscopy (Magnetic Resonance in
             Medicine (1998) 39 (673-677))},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {x},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds268763}
}

@article{fds174255,
   Author = {BM Markaverich and RR Gregory and MA Alejandro and RS Varma and GA
             Johnson, BS Middleditch},
   Title = {Estrogen regulation of methyl p-hydroxyphenyllactate
             hydrolysis: correlation with estrogen stimulation of rat
             uterine growth.},
   Journal = {Journal of steroid biochemistry},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {867-76},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0022-4731},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cell Compartmentation • Chromatography
             • Cytosol • Esterases • Estrogens •
             Female • Hot Temperature • Kinetics •
             Lactates • Phenylpropionates • Rats •
             Substrate Specificity • Uterus • enzymology*
             • metabolism • metabolism* •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {We have recently demonstrated that methyl
             p-hydroxyphenyllactate (MeHPLA) is the endogenous ligand for
             nuclear type II binding sites in the rat uterus and other
             estrogen target and non-target tissues. MeHPLA binds to
             nuclear type II binding sites with a very high binding
             affinity (Kd approximately 4-5 nM), blocks uterine growth in
             vivo, and inhibits MCF-7 human breast cancer cell growth in
             vitro. Conversely, the free acid (p-hydroxyphenyllactic
             acid, HPLA) interacts with type II binding sites with a much
             lower affinity (Kd approximately 200 nM) and does not
             inhibit estrogen-induced uterine growth in vivo or MCF-7
             cell growth in vitro. On the basis of these observations, we
             suggested that one way that estrogen may override MeHPLA
             inhibition of rat uterine growth may be to stimulate
             esterase hydrolysis of MeHPLA to HPLA. The present studies
             demonstrate that the rat uterus does contain an esterase
             (mol. wt approximately 50,000) which cleaves MeHPLA to HPLA,
             and that this enzyme is under estrogen regulation. This
             conclusion is supported by the observations that MeHPLA
             esterase activity is increased 2-3-fold above controls
             within 2-4 h following a single injection of estradiol, and
             is maintained at high levels for 16-24 h following hormone
             administration. This sustained elevation of MeHPLA esterase
             activity correlates with estradiol stimulation of true
             uterine growth and DNA synthesis.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174255}
}

@booklet{Markaverich89,
   Author = {B. M. Markaverich and R. R. Gregory and M. A. Alejandro and R. S. Varma and G. A. Johnson and B. S. Middleditch},
   Title = {Estrogen regulation of methyl para-hydroxyphenylactate
             hydrolysis - correlation with estrogen stimulation of rat
             uterine growth},
   Journal = {Journal Of Steroid Biochemistry And Molecular
             Biology},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {867 -- 876},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {Markaverich89}
}

@article{fds268774,
   Author = {Lipinski, RJ and Hammond, P and O'Leary-Moore, SK and Ament, JJ and Pecevich, SJ and Jiang, Y and Budin, F and Parnell, SE and Suttie, M and Godin, EA and Everson, JL and Dehart, DB and Oguz, I and Holloway, HT and Styner, MA and Johnson, GA and Sulik, KK},
   Title = {Ethanol-induced face-brain dysmorphology patterns are
             correlative and exposure-stage dependent},
   Journal = {PloS one},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {8},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {1932-6203},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0043067},
   Abstract = {Prenatal ethanol exposure is the leading preventable cause
             of congenital mental disability. Whereas a diagnosis of
             fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) requires identification of a
             specific pattern of craniofacial dysmorphology, most
             individuals with behavioral and neurological sequelae of
             heavy prenatal ethanol exposure do not exhibit these
             defining facial characteristics. Here, a novel integration
             of MRI and dense surface modeling-based shape analysis was
             applied to characterize concurrent face-brain phenotypes in
             C57Bl/6J fetuses exposed to ethanol on gestational day (GD)7
             or GD8.5. The facial phenotype resulting from ethanol
             exposure depended upon stage of insult and was predictive of
             unique patterns of corresponding brain abnormalities.
             Ethanol exposure on GD7 produced a constellation of
             dysmorphic facial features characteristic of human FAS,
             including severe midfacial hypoplasia, shortening of the
             palpebral fissures, an elongated upper lip, and deficient
             philtrum. In contrast, ethanol exposure on GD8.5 caused mild
             midfacial hypoplasia and palpebral fissure shortening, a
             shortened upper lip, and a preserved philtrum. These
             distinct, stage-specific facial phenotypes were associated
             with unique volumetric and shape abnormalities of the septal
             region, pituitary, and olfactory bulbs. By demonstrating
             that early prenatal ethanol exposure can cause more than one
             temporally-specific pattern of defects, these findings
             illustrate the need for an expansion of current diagnostic
             criteria to better capture the full range of facial and
             brain dysmorphology in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. ©
             2012 Lipinski et al.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0043067},
   Key = {fds268774}
}

@booklet{Sherrier85b,
   Author = {SHERRIER, RH and CHILES, C and SUDDARTH, SA and JOHNSON, GA and RAVIN,
             CE},
   Title = {EVALUATION OF COMPUTER SYNTHESIZED PULMONARY
             NODULES},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {S27-S27},
   Year = {1985},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1985ARG0500124&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Sherrier85b}
}

@booklet{Johnson81a,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Korobkin, M and Heinz, ER},
   Title = {EVALUATION OF MULTIPLANAR IMAGING CAPABILITIES OF FOUR
             CURRENT COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY (CT) SCANNERS.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical
             Engineering},
   Volume = {273},
   Pages = {318-325},
   Year = {1981},
   Key = {Johnson81a}
}

@article{fds268818,
   Author = {Ghaghada, KB and Badea, CT and Karumbaiah, L and Fettig, N and Bellamkonda, RV and Johnson, GA and Annapragada,
             A},
   Title = {Evaluation of tumor microenvironment in an animal model
             using a nanoparticle contrast agent in computed tomography
             imaging.},
   Journal = {Academic Radiology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {20-30},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1878-4046},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21145026},
   Keywords = {Animals • Contrast Media • Disease Models, Animal
             • Female • Imaging, Three-Dimensional •
             Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental • Mice • Mice,
             Inbred BALB C • Nanoparticles • Radiographic Image
             Enhancement • Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain
             Reaction • Tomography, X-Ray Computed •
             Triiodobenzoic Acids • Tumor Microenvironment* •
             blood supply* • diagnostic use • diagnostic use*
             • methods • methods* • radiography*},
   Abstract = {RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Non-invasive longitudinal imaging
             of tumor vasculature could provide new insights into the
             development of solid tumors, facilitating efficient delivery
             of therapeutics. In this study, we report three-dimensional
             imaging and characterization of tumor vascular architecture
             using a nanoparticle contrast agent and high-resolution
             computed tomography (CT) imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS:
             Five Balb/c mice implanted with 4T1/Luc syngeneic breast
             tumors cells were used for the study. The nanoparticle
             contrast agent was systemically administered and
             longitudinal CT imaging was performed pre-contrast and at
             serial time points post-contrast, for up to 7 days for
             studying the characteristics of tumor-associated blood
             vessels. Gene expression of tumor angiogenic biomarkers was
             measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain
             reaction. RESULTS: Early-phase imaging demonstrated the
             presence of co-opted and newly developed tumor vessels. The
             co-opted vessels demonstrated wall-permeability and
             "leakiness" characteristics evident by an increase in
             extravascular nanoparticle-based signal enhancement visible
             well beyond the margins of tumor. Diameters of
             tumor-associated vessels were larger than the contralateral
             normal vessels. Delayed-phase imaging also demonstrated
             significant accumulation of nanoparticle contrast agent both
             within and in areas surrounding the tumor. A heterogeneous
             pattern of signal enhancement was observed both within and
             among individual tumors. Gene-expression profiling
             demonstrated significant variability in several angiogenic
             biomarkers both within and among individual tumors.
             CONCLUSIONS: The nanoparticle contrast agent and
             high-resolution CT imaging facilitated visualization of
             co-opted and newly developed tumors vessels as well as
             imaging of nanoparticle accumulation within tumors. The use
             of this agent could provide novel insights into tumor
             vascular biology and could have implications on the
             monitoring of tumor status.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.acra.2010.09.003},
   Key = {fds268818}
}

@booklet{Muggia04,
   Author = {F. M. Muggia and J. A. Blessing and M. Method and D. S.
             Miller and G. A. Johnson and R. B. Lee and A.
             Menzin},
   Title = {Evaluation of vinorelbine in persistent or recurrent
             squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix: a Gynecologic
             Oncology Group study},
   Journal = {Gynecologic Oncology},
   Volume = {92},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {639 -- 643},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {Muggia04}
}

@article{fds174223,
   Author = {FM Muggia and JA Blessing and M Method and DS Miller and GA Johnson and RB
             Lee, A Menzin and Gynecologic Oncology Group
             study},
   Title = {Evaluation of vinorelbine in persistent or recurrent
             squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix: a Gynecologic
             Oncology Group study.},
   Journal = {Gynecologic oncology},
   Volume = {92},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {639-43},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0090-8258},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2003.10.045},
   Keywords = {Adult • Aged • Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic
             • Carcinoma, Squamous Cell • Drug Administration
             Schedule • Female • Humans • Middle Aged
             • Uterine Cervical Neoplasms • Vinblastine •
             analogs & derivatives* • drug therapy* •
             therapeutic use*},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: Vinorelbine is being explored by the Gynecologic
             Oncology Group (GOG) for its possible use in advanced or
             recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The
             objective of this Phase II trial was to evaluate a days 1
             and 8 every-21-days schedule and determine its activity in
             patients who had failed standard chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND
             METHODS: Eligible patients with measurable disease and
             satisfactory baseline bone marrow, liver, and kidney
             functions were treated with vinorelbine 30 mg/m(2) given on
             days 1 and 8 every 21 days. A two-stage sampling design was
             used, proceeding to a second stage accrual if sufficient
             activity was documented in the first 25 patients. RESULTS:
             The study did proceed to the second stage and accrued 44
             patients. There were six objective responses (one complete,
             five partial) for a response rate of 13.7% (95% confidence
             interval: 5.2-27.4%). There were three patients with
             response in extra-pelvic sites (including the complete
             response) and three with response in the pelvis. The overall
             frequency of grades 3 and 4 neutropenia was 41%, whereas
             neuropathy was reported in 27% and was severe in three.
             Treatment-related pain, very severe in two instances, was
             also reported in 27%. CONCLUSION: Vinorelbine has moderate
             activity in a pretreated population with squamous cell
             carcinoma of the cervix. Accordingly, vinorelbine in this
             days 1 and 8 schedule is being studied further in
             combination with cisplatin by the GOG.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ygyno.2003.10.045},
   Key = {fds174223}
}

@booklet{Joyce01,
   Author = {M. M. Joyce and T. E. Spencer and F. W. Bazer and R. C.
             Burghardt and C. Pfarrer and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Evidence for stromal decidualization in the pregnant ovine
             uterus.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {64},
   Pages = {317 -- 318},
   Year = {2001},
   Key = {Joyce01}
}

@booklet{Mantha01,
   Author = {S. V. Mantha and G. A. Johnson and T. A.
             Day},
   Title = {Evidence from action and fluorescence spectra that
             UV-induced violet-blue-green fluorescence enhances leaf
             photosynthesis},
   Journal = {Photochemistry And Photobiology},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {249 -- 256},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Mantha01}
}

@article{fds174166,
   Author = {SV Mantha and GA Johnson and TA Day},
   Title = {Evidence from action and fluorescence spectra that
             UV-induced violet-blue-green fluorescence enhances leaf
             photosynthesis.},
   Journal = {Photochemistry and photobiology},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {249-56},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0031-8655},
   Keywords = {Angiosperms • Photosynthesis • Plant Leaves •
             Spectrometry, Fluorescence • Ultraviolet Rays* •
             physiology • radiation effects*},
   Abstract = {We assessed the contribution of UV-induced violet-blue-green
             leaf fluorescence to photosynthesis in Poa annua, Sorghum
             halepense and Nerium oleander by measuring UV-induced
             fluorescence spectra (280-380 nm excitation, 400-550 nm
             emission) from leaf surfaces and determining the
             monochromatic UV action spectra for leaf photosynthetic
             O2-evolution. Peak fluorescence emission wavelengths from
             leaf surfaces ranged from violet (408 nm) to blue (448 nm),
             while excitation peaks for these maxima ranged from 333 to
             344 nm. Action spectra were developed by supplementing
             monochromatic radiation from 280 to 440 nm, in 20 nm
             increments, to a visible nonsaturating background of 500
             mumol m-2 s-1 photosynthetically active radiation and
             measuring photosynthetic O2-evolution rates. Photosynthetic
             rates tended to be higher with the 340 nm supplement than
             with higher or lower wavelength UV supplements. Comparing
             photosynthetic rates with the 340 nm supplement to those
             with the 400 nm supplement, the percentage enhancement in
             photosynthetic rates at 340 nm ranged from 7.8 to 9.8%. We
             suspect that 340 nm UV improves photosynthetic rates via
             fluorescence that provides violet-blue-green photons for
             photosynthetic energy conversion because (1) the peak
             excitation wavelength (340 nm) for violet-blue-green
             fluorescence from leaves was also the most effective UV
             wavelength at enhancing photosynthetic rates, and (2) the
             magnitude of photosynthetic enhancements attributable to
             supplemental 340 nm UV was well correlated (R2 = 0.90) with
             the apparent intensity of 340 nm UV-induced
             violet-blue-green fluorescence emission from
             leaves.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174166}
}

@booklet{Gray02,
   Author = {C. A. Gray and R. C. Burghardt and G. A. Johnson and F. W.
             Bazer and T. E. Spencer},
   Title = {Evidence that absence of endometrial gland secretions in
             uterine gland knockout ewes compromises conceptus survival
             and elongation},
   Journal = {Reproduction},
   Volume = {124},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {289 -- 300},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {August},
   Key = {Gray02}
}

@article{fds174138,
   Author = {CA Gray and RC Burghardt and GA Johnson and FW Bazer and TE
             Spencer},
   Title = {Evidence that absence of endometrial gland secretions in
             uterine gland knockout ewes compromises conceptus survival
             and elongation.},
   Journal = {Reproduction (Cambridge, England)},
   Volume = {124},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {289-300},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1470-1626},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blastocyst • Blotting, Western •
             Embryonic and Fetal Development • Endometrium •
             Female • Integrins • Interferon Type I •
             Mucin-1 • Mucins • Osteopontin • Pregnancy
             • Pregnancy Proteins • Pregnancy, Animal •
             Progesterone • Sheep • Sialoglycoproteins •
             Uterus • analysis • anatomy & histology •
             blood • chemistry • metabolism* • physiology*
             • secretion*},
   Abstract = {Endometrial glands are necessary for conceptus implantation
             and growth. In the ovine uterine gland knockout (UGKO)
             model, blastocysts hatch normally but fail to survive or
             elongate. This peri-implantation defect in UGKO ewes may be
             due to the absence of endometrial glands or, alternatively,
             to the lack of certain epithelial adhesion molecules or the
             inability of the endometrium to respond to signals from the
             conceptus. Two studies were performed to examine these
             hypotheses. In study one, normal (n = 8) and UGKO (n = 12)
             ewes were mated at oestrus (day 0) with intact rams and
             their uteri were flushed 14 days after oestrus. Normal ewes
             (n = 4) were also flushed on 14 days after oestrus. Uterine
             flushes from bred normal ewes contained filamentous
             conceptuses (n = 7 of 8), whereas those from UGKO ewes
             contained no conceptus (n = 5 of 12), a growth-retarded,
             tubular conceptus (n = 6 of 12), or a fragmented,
             filamentous conceptus (n = 1 of 12). In all groups,
             expression of mucin 1 and integrin alpha(v), alpha(5),
             beta(3) and beta(5) was localized at the apical surface of
             the endometrial luminal epithelium with no detectable
             differences between normal and UGKO ewes. Uterine flushes
             from pregnant ewes, but not cyclic or UGKO ewes, contained
             abundant immunoreactive interferon tau and the cell adhesion
             proteins, osteopontin and glycosylation-dependent cell
             adhesion molecule one. In study two, UGKO ewes were fitted
             with uterine catheters 5 days after oestrus, infused with
             recombinant ovine interferon tau or control proteins from 11
             to 15 days after oestrus, and underwent hysterectomy 16 days
             after oestrus. Expression of several interferon
             tau-stimulated genes (ISG17, STAT1, STAT2 and IRF-1) was
             increased in the endometrium from interferon tau-infused
             UGKO ewes. These results support the hypothesis that the
             defects in conceptus elongation and survival in UGKO ewes
             are due to the absence of endometrial glands and their
             secretions rather than to alterations in expression of
             anti-adhesive or adhesive molecules on the endometrial
             luminal epithelium or to the responsiveness of the
             endometrium to the conceptus pregnancy recognition
             signal.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174138}
}

@article{fds268744,
   Author = {BENVENISTE, H and JOHNSON, GA and KOZNIEWSKA, E and MAIESE, K and NARITOMI, H and POVLISHOCK, JT and HOSSMANN, KA},
   Title = {EXCITOTOXICITY AND ISCHEMIA IN THE RAT-BRAIN STUDIED IN-VIVO
             WITH HIGH-RESOLUTION MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING},
   Journal = {International Congress Series},
   Volume = {1031},
   Pages = {369-376},
   Year = {1993},
   ISBN = {0-444-89669-4},
   ISSN = {0531-5131},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1993BZ68Q00043&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds268744}
}

@article{fds174149,
   Author = {GA Johnson and TK Hung and AM Brant and HS Borovetz},
   Title = {Experimental determination of wall shear rate in canine
             carotid arteries perfused in vitro.},
   Journal = {Journal of biomechanics},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {11-12},
   Pages = {1141-50},
   Year = {1989},
   ISSN = {0021-9290},
   Keywords = {Animals • Biomechanics • Carotid Arteries •
             Dogs • Endothelium, Vascular • Hemodynamics •
             Lipoproteins, LDL • Mathematical Computing •
             Models, Cardiovascular • metabolism • physiology*
             • physiopathology},
   Abstract = {The mathematical model of Hung (Tsai and Hung, 1984) is
             employed to determine the wall shear rate acting on canine
             carotid arteries perfused in vitro. Model equations for
             pulsatile flow in a deformable vessel are coupled with
             experimental data of dynamic pressure drop, flow rate,
             vessel radius and radial wall motion. Derived quantities,
             e.g. velocity profiles and wall shear, are obtained for
             vessels exposed to 'normotensive' hemodynamics,
             'hypertension' simulations and perfusions in which the
             compliance of the vessel wall is deliberately altered. Our
             results indicate that wall shear varies markedly as a
             function of the hemodynamic environment. The effects of
             vessel radius vs flow rate on the development of wall shear
             are also demonstrated. It is found that convective processes
             correlate with the magnitude of wall shear in the
             'hypertension' simulations. The present findings and
             complementary published data may explain, at least in part,
             the variations in vessel wall transport and endothelial cell
             biology we observe as a function of the hemodynamic
             environment. For example we have documented that the
             exposure of canine carotids to 'hypertensive' (vs
             'normotensive') hemodynamics is associated with an increased
             flux of lipoproteins (LDL) into the intima and luminal
             media. Alternations in wall compliance, on the other hand,
             profoundly influence endothelial shape, orientation and
             cytoskeletal array.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174149}
}

@booklet{Johnson89,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and T. K. Hung and A. M. Brant and H. S.
             Borovetz},
   Title = {Experimental-determination of wall shear rate in canine
             carotid arteries perfused invitro},
   Journal = {Journal Of Biomechanics},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {11-12},
   Pages = {1141 -- 1150},
   Year = {1989},
   Key = {Johnson89}
}

@booklet{Johnson98a,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and C. A. Gray and J. B. Word and T. L. Ott and T. E. Spencer and R. C. Burghardt and F. W.
             Bazer},
   Title = {Expression and secretion of osteopontin by ovine endometrium
             and conceptuses.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {58},
   Pages = {119 -- 119},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {Johnson98a}
}

@booklet{Pfarrer02,
   Author = {C. D. Pfarrer and S. Hallack and G. A. Johnson and R. C.
             Burghardt and F. W. Bazer and R. Leiser},
   Title = {Expression of osteopontin in bovine placentomes and
             interplacentomal areas from early placentation until
             term.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {66},
   Pages = {229 -- 230},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {Pfarrer02}
}

@article{fds174089,
   Author = {MD Ashworth and JW Ross and J Hu and FJ White and DR Stein and U Desilva and GA Johnson and TE Spencer and RD Geisert},
   Title = {Expression of porcine endometrial prostaglandin synthase
             during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy, and following
             endocrine disruption of pregnancy.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1007-15},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.105.046557},
   Keywords = {Animals • Embryo Loss • Endometrium •
             Estrogens • Estrous Cycle • Female •
             Fertilization • Gene Expression Profiling • Gene
             Expression Regulation, Developmental • Gene Expression
             Regulation, Enzymologic • Interleukin-1 •
             Placentation • Pregnancy • Pregnancy, Animal
             • Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases • RNA,
             Messenger • Swine • Transcription, Genetic •
             analysis • drug effects • drug effects* •
             enzymology* • genetics • genetics* •
             metabolism* • pharmacology* • physiology •
             physiopathology • secretion},
   Abstract = {Porcine trophoblast attachment to the uterine surface is
             associated with increased conceptus and endometrial
             production of prostaglandins. Conceptus secretion of
             estrogen on Day 12 of gestation is important for
             establishment of pregnancy; however, early (Days 9 and 10)
             exposure to exogenous estrogens results in embryonic
             mortality. Present studies established the temporal and
             spatial pattern of endometrial PTGS1 (prostaglandin-endoperoxide
             synthase 1) and PTGS2 expression during the estrous cycle
             and early pregnancy and determined the effect of early
             estrogen treatment on endometrial PTGS expression in
             pregnant gilts. Endometrial PTGS1 mRNA expression increased
             2- to 3-fold after Day 10 of the estrous cycle and
             pregnancy, whereas PTGS2 mRNA expression increased 76-fold
             between Days 5 and 15 of the estrous cycle and pregnancy.
             Increased expression of the PTGS2 transcript was detected in
             the lumenal epithelium after Day 10 in both cyclic and
             pregnant gilts. There was a 10- and 20-fold increase in
             endometrial PTGS2 protein expression between Days 5 and 18
             of the estrous cycle and pregnancy respectively.
             Administration of estrogen on Days 9 and 10 of gestation
             increased endometrial PTGS2 mRNA and protein on Day 10, but
             decreased PTGS2 mRNA and protein in lumenal epithelium (LE)
             on Day 12 of gestation compared to vehicle-treated gilts.
             The present study demonstrates that an increase in uterine
             epithelial PTGS2 expression occurs after Day 10 of the
             estrous cycle and early pregnancy in the pig. The
             conceptus-independent increase in the uterine LE indicates
             that a novel pathway exists for endometrial induction PTGS2
             expression before conceptus elongation and attachment to the
             uterine surface. Epithelial expression of PTGS2 may serve as
             one of the signals for placental attachment and embryo
             survival in the pig. Early administration of estrogen on
             Days 9 and 10 of pregnancy alters endometrial PTGS2 mRNA and
             protein expression, which may, at least in part, represent a
             mechanism by which endocrine disruption of pregnancy causes
             total embryonic loss during implantation in the
             pig.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1095/biolreprod.105.046557},
   Key = {fds174089}
}

@booklet{Hicks00,
   Author = {B. A. Hicks and K. G. Carnahan and J. A. Baldock and S. J.
             Yankee and F. W. Bazer and G. A. Johnson and T. E. Spencer and T. L. Ott},
   Title = {Expression of the antiviral protein Mx in an immortalized
             ovine uterine glandular epithelial cell line.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {62},
   Pages = {288 -- 289},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {Hicks00}
}

@booklet{Johnson99f,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and T. E. Spencer and T. R. Hansen and K. J.
             Austin and R. C. Burghardt and F. W. Bazer},
   Title = {Expression of the interferon tau inducible ubiquitin
             cross-reactive protein in the ovine uterus},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {312 -- 318},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {Johnson99f}
}

@article{fds174235,
   Author = {GA Johnson and TE Spencer and TR Hansen and KJ Austin and RC Burghardt and FW Bazer},
   Title = {Expression of the interferon tau inducible ubiquitin
             cross-reactive protein in the ovine uterus.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {312-8},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blotting, Northern • Blotting, Western
             • Cattle • Endometrium • Epithelium •
             Female • Gene Expression Regulation* • Gestational
             Age • In Situ Hybridization • Interferon Type I
             • Ovariectomy • Pregnancy • Pregnancy
             Proteins • RNA, Messenger • Recombinant Proteins
             • Sheep* • Stromal Cells • Ubiquitins •
             Uterus • analogs & derivatives* • analysis •
             chemistry • genetics • metabolism* •
             pharmacology • pharmacology*},
   Abstract = {Ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP) is a 17-kDa protein
             that shows cross-reactivity with ubiquitin antisera and
             retains the carboxyl-terminal Leu-Arg-Gly-Gly amino acid
             sequence of ubiquitin that ligates to, and directs
             degradation of, cytosolic proteins. It has been reported
             that bovine endometrial UCRP is synthesized and secreted in
             response to conceptus-derived interferon-tau (IFNtau). In
             the present studies, UCRP mRNA and protein were detected in
             ovine endometrium. Ovine UCRP mRNA was detectable on Day 13,
             peaked at Day 15, and remained high through Day 19 of
             pregnancy. The UCRP mRNA was localized to the luminal
             epithelium (LE), stromal cells (ST) immediately beneath the
             LE, and shallow glandular epithelium (GE) on Day 13, but it
             extended to the deep GE, deep ST, and myometrium of uterine
             tissues by Day 15 of pregnancy. Western blotting revealed
             induction of UCRP in the endometrial extracts from pregnant,
             but not cyclic, ewes. Ovine UCRP was also detected in
             uterine flushings from Days 15 and 17 of pregnancy and
             immunoprecipitated from Day 17 pregnant endometrial
             explant-conditioned medium. Treatment of immortalized ovine
             LE cells with recombinant ovine (ro) IFNtau induced
             cytosolic expression of UCRP, and intrauterine injection of
             roIFNtau into ovariectomized cyclic ewes induced endometrial
             expression of UCRP mRNA. These results are the first to
             describe temporal and spatial alterations in the cellular
             localization of UCRP in the ruminant uterus. Collectively,
             UCRP is synthesized and secreted by the ovine endometrium in
             response to IFNtau during early pregnancy. Because UCRP is
             present in the uterus and uterine flushings, it may regulate
             endometrial proteins associated with establishment and
             maintenance of early pregnancy in ruminants.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174235}
}

@booklet{Hicks03,
   Author = {B. A. Hicks and S. J. Etter and K. G. Carnahan and M. M.
             Joyce and A. A. Assiri and S. J. Carling and K. Kodali and G. A. Johnson and T. R. Hansen and M. A. Mirando and G. L.
             Woods and D. K. Vanderwall and T. L. Ott},
   Title = {Expression of the uterine Mx protein in cyclic and pregnant
             cows, gilts, and mares},
   Journal = {Journal Of Animal Science},
   Volume = {81},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1552 -- 1561},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Hicks03}
}

@article{fds174174,
   Author = {BA Hicks and SJ Etter and KG Carnahan and MM Joyce and AA Assiri and SJ
             Carling, K Kodali and GA Johnson and TR Hansen and MA Mirando and GL
             Woods, DK Vanderwall and TL Ott},
   Title = {Expression of the uterine Mx protein in cyclic and pregnant
             cows, gilts, and mares.},
   Journal = {Journal of animal science},
   Volume = {81},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1552-61},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0021-8812},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blotting, Northern • Blotting, Western
             • Cattle • Estrus • Female • GTP-Binding
             Proteins • Gene Expression Regulation • Horses
             • In Situ Hybridization • Pregnancy •
             Pregnancy, Animal • Swine • Uterus •
             biosynthesis* • metabolism • metabolism* •
             physiology* • veterinary},
   Abstract = {Pregnancy and interferon-tau (IFN tau) upregulate uterine Mx
             gene expression in ewes; however, the only known role for Mx
             is in the immune response to viral infection. We hypothesize
             that Mx functions as a conceptus-induced component of the
             anti-luteolytic mechanism and/or regulator of endometrial
             secretion or uterine remodeling during early pregnancy. This
             study was conducted to determine the effects of early
             pregnancy on uterine Mx expression in domestic farm species
             with varied mechanisms of pregnancy recognition. Endometrium
             from cows, gilts, and mares was collected during the first
             20 d of the estrous cycle or pregnancy, and total messenger
             RNA (mRNA) and protein were analyzed for steady-state levels
             of Mx mRNA and protein. Northern blot analysis of Mx mRNA
             detected an approximately 2.5 Kb of mRNA in endometrium from
             each species. In pregnant cows, steady-state levels of Mx
             mRNA increased 10-fold (P < 0.05) above levels observed in
             cyclic cows by d 15 to 18. In cyclic gilts, slot blot
             analysis indicated that endometrial Mx mRNA levels did not
             change between d 5 and 18 of the cycle. However, in pregnant
             gilts, Mx levels tended (P = 0.06) to be elevated two-fold
             on d 16 only, and in situ hybridization indicated that this
             increase occurred in the stroma. In mares, Mx mRNA was low,
             but detectable, and did not change between ovulation (d 0)
             and d 20, regardless of reproductive status. Western blot
             analysis revealed multiple immunoreactive Mx protein bands
             in each species. One band was specific to pregnancy in cows.
             As in ewes, in situ hybridization analysis indicated that Mx
             mRNA was strongly expressed in the luminal epithelium,
             stroma, and myometrium by d 18 in cows. However, on d 14 in
             gilts, Mx was expressed primarily in the stroma, and on d 14
             in mares, low levels of Mx expression were confined largely
             to the luminal epithelium. The uteruses of cows, gilts, and
             mares express Mx, and expression is upregulated during
             pregnancy in cows and gilts--animals whose conceptuses
             secrete interferons during early pregnancy, but that possess
             different mechanisms for pregnancy recognition.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174174}
}

@booklet{Spencer97,
   Author = {T. A. Spencer and D. S. Clark and G. A. Johnson and S. K.
             Erickson and L. K. Curtiss},
   Title = {Feasibility of an immunoassay for mevalonolactone},
   Journal = {Bioorganic \& Medicinal Chemistry},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {873 -- 882},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {Spencer97}
}

@article{fds174267,
   Author = {TA Spencer and DS Clark and GA Johnson and SK Erickson and LK
             Curtiss},
   Title = {Feasibility of an immunoassay for mevalonolactone.},
   Journal = {Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {873-82},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0968-0896},
   Keywords = {Animals • Antibody Formation • Haptens •
             Hemocyanin • Hydrogen-Ion Concentration •
             Immunoassay • Mevalonic Acid • Rabbits •
             Stereoisomerism • analogs & derivatives* •
             analysis • chemistry • immunology •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {Mevalonic acid is a key intermediate in a broad spectrum of
             cellular biological processes and their regulation.
             Availability of a rapid, sensitive and accurate method for
             its assay would be highly useful. Therefore, the feasibility
             of developing an immunoassay for mevalonic acid in
             biological samples was explored. The strategy employed was
             to synthesize several racemic haptens structurally
             resembling R-mevalonolactone, the cyclic form of mevalonic
             acid present at lower pH and presumed to be more antigenic.
             Two of these haptens were coupled to keyhole limpet
             hemocyanin, and the resulting conjugates were used
             successfully to generate antibodies in rabbits. The first
             antiserum bound to R,S-mevalonolactone much more effectively
             at pH 4.0 than at pH 6.0, consistent with the structural
             resemblance of the haptens to the lactone form. This
             antiserum also bound the free hapten from which it was
             generated and two others of different structure with
             comparable effectiveness; and slightly better than it bound
             R,S-mevalonolactone at pH 4.0. Similar results were obtained
             with the antiserum to the second hapten. The binding of
             either antiserum to the natural enantiomer,
             R-mevalonolactone, was 20 times weaker than to
             R,S-mevalonolactone, suggesting that the nonbiological
             enantiomer was more antigenic. Nevertheless, the results
             demonstrate that an immunochemical approach to accurate
             quantitation of mevalonic acid in biological samples is
             feasible.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174267}
}

@article{fds174202,
   Author = {TE Spencer and GA Johnson and FW Bazer and RC Burghardt},
   Title = {Fetal-maternal interactions during the establishment of
             pregnancy in ruminants.},
   Journal = {Society of Reproduction and Fertility supplement},
   Volume = {64},
   Pages = {379-96},
   Year = {2007},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blastocyst • Embryo Implantation •
             Embryonic Development • Endometrium • Female
             • Hormones • Luteolysis • Pregnancy •
             Sheep • metabolism* • physiology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {This review integrates established information with new
             insights into molecular and physiological mechanisms
             responsible for events leading to pregnancy recognition,
             endometrial receptivity, and implantation with emphasis on
             sheep. After formation of the corpus luteum, progesterone
             acts on the endometrium and stimulates blastocyst growth and
             elongation to form a filamentous conceptus (embryo/fetus and
             associated extraembryonic membranes). Recurrent early
             pregnancy loss in the uterine gland knockout ewe model
             indicates that endometrial epithelial secretions are
             essential for peri-implantation blastocyst survival and
             growth. The elongating sheep conceptus secretes interferon
             tau (IFNT) that acts on the endometrium to inhibit
             development of the luteolytic mechanism by inhibiting
             transcription of the estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) gene in
             the luminal (LE) and superficial ductal glandular (sGE)
             epithelia, which prevents estrogen-induction of oxytocin
             receptors (OXTR) and production of luteolytic prostaglandin
             F2-alpha pulses. Progesterone downregulates its receptors
             (PGR) in LE and then GE, correlating with a reduction of
             anti-adhesive MUC1 (mucin glycoprotein one) and induction of
             secreted LGALS15 (galectin 15) and SPP1 (secreted
             phosphoprotein one), that are proposed to regulate
             trophectoderm growth and adhesion. IFNT acts on the LE to
             induce WNT7A (wingless-type MMTV integration site family
             member 7A) and to stimulate LGALS15, CTSL (cathepsin L), and
             CST3 (cystatin C), which may regulate conceptus development
             and implantation. During the peri-implantation period,
             trophoblast giant binucleate cells (BNC) begin to
             differentiate from mononuclear trophectoderm cells, migrate
             and then fuse with the uterine LE as well as each other to
             form multinucleated syncytial plaques. Trophoblast giant BNC
             secrete chorionic somatomammotropin (CSH1 or placental
             lactogen) that acts on the endometrial glands to stimulate
             their morphogenesis and differentiated function. The
             interactive, coordinated and stage-specific effects of
             ovarian and placental hormones regulate endometrial events
             necessary for fetal-maternal interactions and successful
             establishment of pregnancy.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174202}
}

@booklet{Jefferies01,
   Author = {B. Jefferies and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Feynman's operational calculi for noncommuting operators:
             Definitions and elementary properties},
   Journal = {Russian Journal Of Mathematical Physics},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {153 -- 171},
   Year = {2001},
   Key = {Jefferies01}
}

@booklet{Johnson00a,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and M. D. Todd and B. L. Althouse and C. C.
             Chang},
   Title = {Fiber Bragg grating interrogation and multiplexing with a 3
             x 3 coupler and a scanning filter},
   Journal = {Journal Of Lightwave Technology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1101 -- 1105},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {August},
   Key = {Johnson00a}
}

@booklet{Brau02,
   Author = {A. C. S. Brau and C. T. Wheeler and L. W. Hedlund and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Fiber-optic stethoscope: A cardiac monitoring and gating
             system for magnetic resonance microscopy},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance In Medicine},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {314 -- 321},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {Brau02}
}

@article{fds269015,
   Author = {Brau, ACS and Wheeler, CT and Hedlund, LW and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Fiber-optic stethoscope: a cardiac monitoring and gating
             system for magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {314-321},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11810675},
   Keywords = {Animals • Electrocardiography • Esophagoscopy*
             • Fiber Optics* • Heart Atria • Heart Rate
             • Heart Ventricles • Hemodynamic Processes •
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Mice • Mice, Inbred
             C57BL • Microscopy • Myocardial Contraction •
             Rats • Stethoscopes* • anatomy & histology* •
             instrumentation* • physiology},
   Abstract = {A fundamental problem associated with using the conventional
             electrocardiograph (ECG) to monitor a subject's cardiac
             activity during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the
             distortion of the ECG due to electromagnetic interference.
             This problem is particularly pronounced in MR microscopy
             (MRI of small animals at microscopic resolutions (< 0.03
             mm(3))) because the strong, rapidly-switching magnetic field
             gradients induce artifacts in the animal's ECG that often
             mimic electrophysiologic activity, impairing the use of the
             ECG for cardiac monitoring and gating purposes. The
             fiber-optic stethoscope system offers a novel approach to
             measuring cardiac activity that, unlike the ECG, is immune
             to electromagnetic effects. The fiber-optic stethoscope is
             perorally inserted into the esophagus of small animals to
             optically detect pulsatile compression of the esophageal
             wall. The optical system is shown to provide a robust
             cardiac monitoring and gating signal in rats and mice during
             routine cardiac MR microscopy.},
   Key = {fds269015}
}

@booklet{Sherrier88,
   Author = {SHERRIER, RH and SUDDARTH, SA and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {FILM-BASED DIGITAL TOMOSYNTHESIS OF THE CHEST},
   Journal = {Optical Engineering},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {691-695},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0091-3286},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1988P713200014&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.7976742},
   Key = {Sherrier88}
}

@booklet{Todd98a,
   Author = {M. D. Todd and G. A. Johnson and B. A. Althouse and S. T.
             Vohra},
   Title = {Flexural beam-based fiber Bragg grating accelerometers},
   Journal = {Ieee Photonics Technology Letters},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1605 -- 1607},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {Todd98a}
}

@booklet{Todd98,
   Author = {M. D. Todd and G. A. Johnson and B. A. Althouse and S. T.
             Vohra},
   Title = {Flexural beam-based fiber Bragg grating accelerometers (vol
             10, pg 1605, 1998)},
   Journal = {Ieee Photonics Technology Letters},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1799 -- 1799},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {Todd98}
}

@booklet{Croft97,
   Author = {P. J. Croft and R. L. Pfost and J. M. Medlin and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Fog forecasting for the southern region: A conceptual model
             approach},
   Journal = {Weather And Forecasting},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {545 -- 556},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {Croft97}
}

@article{fds268866,
   Author = {Bucholz, E and Ghaghada, K and Qi, Y and Mukundan, S and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Four-dimensional MR microscopy of the mouse heart using
             radial acquisition and liposomal gadolinium contrast
             agent.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {60},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {111-118},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18581419},
   Keywords = {Animals • Contrast Media • Gadolinium • Heart
             • Liposomes • Magnetic Resonance Imaging •
             Mice • Microscopy • anatomy & histology •
             diagnostic use • methods • methods* •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) has become an important
             tool for small animal cardiac imaging. In relation to
             competing technologies (microCT and ultrasound), MR is
             limited by spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and
             acquisition time. All three of these limitations have been
             addressed by developing a four-dimensional (4D) (3D plus
             time) radial acquisition (RA) sequence. The signal-to-noise
             ratio (SNR) has been optimized by minimizing the echo time
             (TE) (300 us). The temporal resolution and throughput have
             been improved by center-out trajectories resulting in
             repetition time (TR) <2.5 ms. The contrast has been enhanced
             through the use of a liposomal blood pool agent that reduces
             the T(1) of the blood to <400 ms. We have developed
             protocols for three specific applications: 1)
             high-throughput with spatial resolution of 87 x 87 x 352
             um(3) (voxel volume = 2.7 nL) and acquisition time of 16
             min; 2) high-temporal resolution with spatial resolution of
             87 x 87 x 352 um(3) (voxel volume = 2.7 nL) and temporal
             resolution at 4.8 ms and acquisition time of 32 minutes; and
             3) high-resolution isotropic imaging at 87 x 87 x 87 um(3)
             (voxel volume = 0.68 nL) and acquisition time of 31 min. The
             4D image arrays allow direct measure of cardiac functional
             parameters dependent on chamber volumes, e.g., ejection
             fraction (EF), end diastolic volume (EDV), and end systolic
             volume (ESV).},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.21618},
   Key = {fds268866}
}

@article{fds268707,
   Author = {Xie, L and Subashi, E and Qi, Y and Knepper, MA and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Four-dimensional MRI of renal function in the developing
             mouse},
   Journal = {Nmr in Biomedicine},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1094-1102},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0952-3480},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nbm.3162},
   Abstract = {The major roles of filtration, metabolism and high blood
             flow make the kidney highly vulnerable to drug-induced
             toxicity and other renal injuries. A method to follow kidney
             function is essential for the early screening of toxicity
             and malformations. In this study, we acquired high
             spatiotemporal resolution (four dimensional) datasets of
             normal mice to follow changes in kidney structure and
             function during development. The data were acquired with
             dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (via keyhole imaging) and a
             cryogenic surface coil, allowing us to obtain a full
             three-dimensional image (isotropic resolution, 125microns)
             every 7.7s over a 50-min scan. This time course permitted
             the demonstration of both contrast enhancement and
             clearance. Functional changes were measured over a 17-week
             course (at 3, 5, 7, 9, 13 and 17weeks). The time dimension
             of the MRI dataset was processed to produce unique image
             contrasts to segment the four regions of the kidney: cortex
             (CO), outer stripe (OS) of the outer medulla (OM), inner
             stripe (IS) of the OM and inner medulla (IM). Local volumes,
             time-to-peak (TTP) values and decay constants (DC) were
             measured in each renal region. These metrics increased
             significantly with age, with the exception of DC values in
             the IS and OS. These data will serve as a foundation for
             studies of normal renal physiology and future studies of
             renal diseases that require early detection and
             intervention. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons,
             Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/nbm.3162},
   Key = {fds268707}
}

@article{fds268710,
   Author = {Xie, L and Subashi, E and Qi, Y and Knepper, MA and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Four-dimensional MRI of renal function in the developing
             mouse.},
   Journal = {Nmr in Biomedicine},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1094-1102},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0952-3480},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nbm.3162},
   Abstract = {The major roles of filtration, metabolism and high blood
             flow make the kidney highly vulnerable to drug-induced
             toxicity and other renal injuries. A method to follow kidney
             function is essential for the early screening of toxicity
             and malformations. In this study, we acquired high
             spatiotemporal resolution (four dimensional) datasets of
             normal mice to follow changes in kidney structure and
             function during development. The data were acquired with
             dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (via keyhole imaging) and a
             cryogenic surface coil, allowing us to obtain a full
             three-dimensional image (isotropic resolution,
             125 microns) every 7.7 s over a 50-min scan. This time
             course permitted the demonstration of both contrast
             enhancement and clearance. Functional changes were measured
             over a 17-week course (at 3, 5, 7, 9, 13 and 17 weeks).
             The time dimension of the MRI dataset was processed to
             produce unique image contrasts to segment the four regions
             of the kidney: cortex (CO), outer stripe (OS) of the outer
             medulla (OM), inner stripe (IS) of the OM and inner medulla
             (IM). Local volumes, time-to-peak (TTP) values and decay
             constants (DC) were measured in each renal region. These
             metrics increased significantly with age, with the exception
             of DC values in the IS and OS. These data will serve as a
             foundation for studies of normal renal physiology and future
             studies of renal diseases that require early detection and
             intervention.},
   Doi = {10.1002/nbm.3162},
   Key = {fds268710}
}

@article{fds292760,
   Author = {Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Free radicals formed by exposure of pyrimidine solids to
             sodium atoms: an electron spin resonance
             study.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {974-978},
   Year = {1975},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0027-8424},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/165496},
   Keywords = {Alloxan • Bromouracil • Cytosine • Electron
             Spin Resonance Spectroscopy • Fluorouracil • Free
             Radicals • Pyrimidines* • Sodium* • Thymine
             • Uracil • analogs & derivatives},
   Abstract = {Sodium atoms have been deposited on various pyrimidine
             powders under high vacuum at 77 degrees K and the electron
             spin resonance spectra of the resulting free radicals have
             been observed. Generally, the spectra show that the electron
             of the Na goes into a molecular orbital of the pyrimidine
             ring and the Na+ ions become attached to a carbonyl oxygen
             of the resulting pyrimidine anion. In 5-fluorouracil and
             5-chlorouracil, however, the halogen is evidently abstracted
             by the Na to form NaF or NaC1 and the neutral uracil
             radical. Thymine shows evidence for H-addition radicals as
             well as the Na+-[thymine]-complex. The H source for the
             addition radicals may be an H-2-0 impurity in the sample,
             with which the Na atoms combine to release the H atoms. In
             addition to a resonance with g equals 2.00 from the
             pyrimidine anion radical, broad resonances with g greater
             than 2 were observed for 5-bromouracil, 5-chlorouracil and
             5-iodouracil, as well as for alloxan and cytosine. These
             resonances, generally unstable at room temperature, are
             believed to arise from electrons trapped in interstitial
             sties or vacancies in the lattice.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds292760}
}

@article{fds268816,
   Author = {Zhang, X and Badea, CT and Hood, G and Wetzel, AW and Stiles, JR and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Free-space fluorescence tomography with adaptive sampling
             based on anatomical information from microCT.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical
             Engineering},
   Volume = {7757},
   Number = {775706},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {0277-786X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21743784},
   Abstract = {Image reconstruction is one of the main challenges for
             fluorescence tomography. For in vivo experiments on small
             animals, in particular, the inhomogeneous optical properties
             and irregular surface of the animal make free-space image
             reconstruction challenging because of the difficulties in
             accurately modeling the forward problem and the finite
             dynamic range of the photodetector. These two factors are
             fundamentally limited by the currently available forward
             models and photonic technologies. Nonetheless, both
             limitations can be significantly eased using a signal
             processing approach. We have recently constructed a
             free-space panoramic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography
             system to take advantage of co-registered microCT data
             acquired from the same animal. In this article, we present a
             data processing strategy that adaptively selects the optical
             sampling points in the raw 2-D fluorescent CCD images.
             Specifically, the general sampling area and sampling density
             are initially specified to create a set of potential
             sampling points sufficient to cover the region of interest.
             Based on 3-D anatomical information from the microCT and the
             fluorescent CCD images, data points are excluded from the
             set when they are located in an area where either the
             forward model is known to be problematic (e.g., large
             wrinkles on the skin) or where the signal is unreliable
             (e.g., saturated or low signal-to-noise ratio). Parallel
             Monte Carlo software was implemented to compute the
             sensitivity function for image reconstruction. Animal
             experiments were conducted on a mouse cadaver with an
             artificial fluorescent inclusion. Compared to our previous
             results using a finite element method, the newly developed
             parallel Monte Carlo software and the adaptive sampling
             strategy produced favorable reconstruction
             results.},
   Language = {ENG},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.841891},
   Key = {fds268816}
}

@booklet{Johnson85d,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {From constant air to variable},
   Journal = {Ashrae Journal-american Society Of Heating Refrigerating And
             Air-conditioning Engineers},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {106 -- \&},
   Year = {1985},
   Key = {Johnson85d}
}

@booklet{Jaeger00a,
   Author = {L. A. Jaeger and L. S. Bustamante and G. A. Johnson and F.
             W. Bazer and R. C. Burghardt},
   Title = {Functional activation of conceptus and maternal
             integrins},
   Journal = {Faseb Journal},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {A783 -- A783},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Jaeger00a}
}

@article{fds174181,
   Author = {LA Jaeger and GA Johnson and H Ka and JG Garlow and RC Burghardt and TE
             Spencer, FW Bazer},
   Title = {Functional analysis of autocrine and paracrine signalling at
             the uterine-conceptus interface in pigs.},
   Journal = {Reproduction (Cambridge, England) Supplement},
   Volume = {58},
   Pages = {191-207},
   Year = {2001},
   ISSN = {1477-0415},
   Keywords = {Animals • Autocrine Communication • Blastocyst
             • Cell Communication • Cytokines • Embryo
             Implantation • Estrogens • Extracellular Matrix
             Proteins • Female • Growth Substances •
             Integrins • Paracrine Communication • Pregnancy
             • Progesterone • Receptors, Estrogen •
             Receptors, Progesterone • Swine • Uterus •
             metabolism • metabolism* • physiology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {The complexity of implantation necessitates intimate
             dialogue between conceptus and maternal cells, and precise
             coordination of maternal and conceptus signalling events.
             Maternal and conceptus-derived steroid hormones, growth
             factors and cytokines, as well as integrins and their
             ligands, have important and inter-related roles in mediating
             adhesion between apical aspects of conceptus trophectoderm
             and maternal uterine luminal epithelium that leads to
             formation of an epitheliochorial placenta. Integrin
             receptors appear to play fundamental roles in the
             implantation cascade and may interact with extracellular
             matrix molecules and other ligands to transduce cellular
             signals through autocrine and paracrine mechanisms.
             Functional in vitro analyses can be used to monitor
             individual contributions of specific integrin receptors and
             ligands to the signalling cascades of the maternal-conceptus
             interface. Integrative studies of implantation in pigs,
             using in vivo and in vitro approaches, are required to
             understand conceptus attachment and implantation in this
             species, and provide valuable opportunities to understand
             the fundamental mechanisms of implantation in all
             species.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174181}
}

@article{fds174096,
   Author = {LA Jaeger and AK Spiegel and NH Ing and GA Johnson and FW Bazer and RC
             Burghardt},
   Title = {Functional effects of transforming growth factor beta on
             adhesive properties of porcine trophectoderm.},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {146},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {3933-42},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0013-7227},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/en.2005-0090},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blastocyst • Cell Adhesion • Cell
             Line, Transformed • Embryo Implantation •
             Endometrium • Female • Fibronectins •
             Integrins • Oligopeptides • RNA, Messenger •
             Signal Transduction • Swine • Talin •
             Transforming Growth Factor beta • Transforming Growth
             Factor beta1 • analysis • cytology* •
             genetics • metabolism • metabolism* •
             pharmacology • physiology • physiology*},
   Abstract = {In pigs, expression and amounts of biologically active
             TGFbetas at the conceptus-maternal interface increase
             significantly as conceptuses elongate and begin the
             implantation process. Before their activation, secreted
             TGFbetas are noncovalently associated with their respective,
             isoform-specific latency-associated peptides (LAPs), which
             contain the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) amino acid sequence that
             serves as a ligand for numerous integrins. Objectives of
             this study were to determine whether TGFbeta1 increases
             production of fibronectin by porcine trophectoderm, whether
             porcine trophectoderm adheres specifically to fibronectin
             and LAP, and whether functional interactions between porcine
             trophectoderm and the two TGFbeta-associated proteins,
             fibronectin and LAP, are integrin mediated. Porcine
             trophectoderm cells (pTr2) were cultured in presence of
             TGFbeta1, LAP, or pan-neutralizing anti-TGFbeta antibody;
             TGFbeta specifically increased (P < 0.05) fibronectin mRNA
             levels, as determined by Northern and slot blot analyses.
             Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated a TGFbeta-induced
             increase in fibronectin in pTr2 cells. In dispersed cell
             adhesion assays, adhesion of pTr2 cells to fibronectin was
             inhibited by an RGD-containing peptide (P < 0.05) and pTr2
             cells attached to recombinant LAP but not to an LAP mutant,
             which contained an RGE sequence rather than the RGD site (P
             < 0.05). Fibronectin- and LAP-coated microbeads induced
             integrin activation at apical surfaces of both trophectoderm
             and uterine luminal epithelial cells, as indicated by
             aggregation and transmembrane accumulation of talin detected
             with immunofluorescence microscopy. Cell surface
             biotinylation and immunoprecipitation revealed integrin
             subunits alphav and beta1 on apical membranes of pTr2 cells.
             These results suggest multiple effects of TGFbeta at the
             porcine conceptus-maternal interface, including
             integrin-mediated conceptus-maternal communication through
             LAP.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1210/en.2005-0090},
   Key = {fds174096}
}

@article{9054429,
   Author = {Badea, C.T. and Hedlund, L.W. and Ming De Lin and Boslego,
             J.F. and Johnson, G.A.},
   Title = {Functional imaging in small animals using tomographic
             digital subtraction angiography},
   Journal = {2006 3rd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging:
             Macro to Nano (IEEE Cat. No.06EX1231C)},
   Pages = {1208 - 11},
   Address = {Arlington, VA, USA},
   Year = {2006},
   Keywords = {computerised tomography;diagnostic radiography;image
             reconstruction;image resolution;medical image
             processing;},
   Abstract = {We propose the use of tomographic digital subtraction
             angiography (TDSA) for functional imaging in small animals.
             TDSA combines the advantages of high temporal resolution of
             digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and high spatial
             resolution of micro-computed tomography (CT). TDSA augments
             projection imaging methods such as DSA by providing
             three-dimensional information using tomosynthesis or CT
             reconstruction algorithms. Thus, four-dimensional (4D)
             datasets with a temporal resolution on the order of 100 ms
             and spatial resolution ranging from 100 microns to 1 mm,
             depending on the scanning angle, can be obtained. The
             approach is based on the novel paradigm that the same time
             density curves can be reproduced in a number of consecutive
             injections of microL volumes of contrast at a series of
             different angles of rotation},
   Key = {9054429}
}

@article{064610243504,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Hedlund, LW and Lin, MD and Boslego, JF and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Functional imaging in small animals using tomographic
             digital subtraction angiography},
   Journal = {2006 3rd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging:
             From Nano to Macro - Proceedings},
   Volume = {2006},
   Pages = {1208-1211},
   Address = {Arlington, VA, United States},
   Year = {2006},
   ISBN = {0780395778},
   Keywords = {Imaging systems;Angiography;Computerized tomography;Optical
             resolving power;Algorithms;Data structures;},
   Abstract = {We propose the use of Tomographic Digital Subtraction
             Angiography (TDSA) for functional imaging in small animals.
             TDSA combines the advantages of high temporal resolution of
             digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and high spatial
             resolution of micro-computed tomography (CT). TDSA augments
             projection imaging methods such as DSA by providing
             three-dimensional information using tomosynthesis or CT
             reconstruction algorithms. Thus, four-dimensional (4D)
             datasets with a temporal resolution on the order of 100 ms
             and spatial resolution ranging from 100 microns to 1 mm,
             depending on the scanning angle, can be obtained. The
             approach is based on the novel paradigm that the same time
             density curves can be reproduced in a number of consecutive
             injections of microL volumes of contrast at a series of
             different angles of rotation. © 2006 IEEE.},
   Key = {064610243504}
}

@booklet{Johnson96,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Hedlund, LW},
   Title = {Functional imaging of the lung.},
   Journal = {Nature Medicine},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1192},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1078-8956},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8898741},
   Key = {Johnson96}
}

@article{fds132766,
   Author = {GA Johnson and LW Hedlund},
   Title = {Functional imaging of the lung.},
   Journal = {Nature medicine, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1192},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1078-8956},
   Keywords = {Lung • Magnetic Resonance Imaging* •
             physiology*},
   Key = {fds132766}
}

@article{fds268976,
   Author = {Viallon, M and Cofer, GP and Suddarth, SA and Möller, HE and Chen, XJ and Chawla, MS and Hedlund, LW and Crémillieux, Y and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Functional MR microscopy of the lung using hyperpolarized
             3He.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {787-792},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10332855},
   Keywords = {Animals • Guinea Pigs • Helium • Isotopes
             • Lung • Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine •
             Microscopy • cytology • diagnostic use* •
             methods • methods* • physiology*},
   Abstract = {A new strategy designed to provide functional magnetic
             resonance images of the lung in small animals at microscopic
             resolution using hyperpolarized 3He is described. The pulse
             sequence is based on a combination of radial acquisition
             (RA) and CINE techniques, referred to as RA-CINE, and is
             designed for use with hyperpolarized 3He to explore lung
             ventilation with high temporal and spatial resolution in
             small animal models. Ventilation of the live guinea pig is
             demonstrated with effective temporal resolution of 50 msec
             and in-plane spatial resolution of <100 microm using
             hyperpolarized 3He. The RA-CINE sequence allows one to
             follow gas inflow and outflow in the airways as well as in
             the distal part of the lungs. Regional analysis of signal
             intensity variations can be performed and can help assess
             functional lung parameters such as residual gas volume and
             lung compliance to gas inflow.},
   Key = {fds268976}
}

@booklet{Viallon99,
   Author = {M. Viallon and G. P. Cofer and S. A. Suddarth and H. E.
             Moller and X. J. Chen and M. S. Chawla and L. W. Hedlund and Y. Cremillieux and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Functional MR microscopy of the lung using hyperpolarized
             He-3},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance In Medicine},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {787 -- 792},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {Viallon99}
}

@article{fds268772,
   Author = {Howles, GP and Qi, Y and Rosenzweig, SJ and Nightingale, KR and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Functional neuroimaging using ultrasonic blood-brain barrier
             disruption and manganese-enhanced MRI},
   Journal = {Journal of Visualized Experiments},
   Number = {65},
   Pages = {e4055},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {1940-087X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/4055},
   Abstract = {Although mice are the dominant model system for studying the
             genetic and molecular underpinnings of neuroscience,
             functional neuroimaging in mice remains technically
             challenging. One approach, Activation-Induced
             Manganese-enhanced MRI (AIM MRI), has been used successfully
             to map neuronal activity in rodents 1-5. In AIM MRI, Mn 2+
             acts a calcium analog and accumulates in depolarized neurons
             6,7. Because Mn 2+ shortens the T 1 tissue property, regions
             of elevated neuronal activity will enhance in MRI.
             Furthermore, Mn 2+ clears slowly from the activated regions;
             therefore, stimulation can be performed outside the magnet
             prior to imaging, enabling greater experimental flexibility.
             However, because Mn 2+ does not readily cross the
             blood-brain barrier (BBB), the need to open the BBB has
             limited the use of AIM MRI, especially in mice. One tool for
             opening the BBB is ultrasound. Though potentially damaging,
             if ultrasound is administered in combination with gas-filled
             microbubbles (i.e., ultrasound contrast agents), the
             acoustic pressure required for BBB opening is considerably
             lower. This combination of ultrasound and microbubbles can
             be used to reliably open the BBB without causing tissue
             damage 8-11. Here, a method is presented for performing AIM
             MRI by using microbubbles and ultrasound to open the BBB.
             After an intravenous injection of perflutren microbubbles,
             an unfocused pulsed ultrasound beam is applied to the shaved
             mouse head for 3 minutes. For simplicity, we refer to this
             technique of BBB Opening with Microbubbles and UltraSound as
             BOMUS 12. Using BOMUS to open the BBB throughout both
             cerebral hemispheres, manganese is administered to the whole
             mouse brain. After experimental stimulation of the lightly
             sedated mice, AIM MRI is used to map the neuronal response.
             To demonstrate this approach, herein BOMUS and AIM MRI are
             used to map unilateral mechanical stimulation of the
             vibrissae in lightly sedated mice 13. Because BOMUS can open
             the BBB throughout both hemispheres, the unstimulated side
             of the brain is used to control for nonspecific background
             stimulation. The resultant 3D activation map agrees well
             with published representations of the vibrissae regions of
             the barrel field cortex 14. The ultrasonic opening of the
             BBB is fast, noninvasive, and reversible; and thus this
             approach is suitable for high-throughput and/or longitudinal
             studies in awake mice.},
   Doi = {10.3791/4055},
   Key = {fds268772}
}

@article{fds319489,
   Author = {Howles, GP and Qi, Y and Rosenzweig, SJ and Nightingale, KR and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Functional neuroimaging using ultrasonic blood-brain barrier
             disruption and manganese-enhanced MRI.},
   Journal = {Journal of Visualized Experiments},
   Number = {65},
   Pages = {e4055},
   Year = {2012},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/4055},
   Abstract = {Although mice are the dominant model system for studying the
             genetic and molecular underpinnings of neuroscience,
             functional neuroimaging in mice remains technically
             challenging. One approach, Activation-Induced
             Manganese-enhanced MRI (AIM MRI), has been used successfully
             to map neuronal activity in rodents. In AIM MRI, Mn(2+) acts
             a calcium analog and accumulates in depolarized neurons.
             Because Mn(2+) shortens the T1 tissue property, regions of
             elevated neuronal activity will enhance in MRI. Furthermore,
             Mn(2+) clears slowly from the activated regions; therefore,
             stimulation can be performed outside the magnet prior to
             imaging, enabling greater experimental flexibility. However,
             because Mn(2+) does not readily cross the blood-brain
             barrier (BBB), the need to open the BBB has limited the use
             of AIM MRI, especially in mice. One tool for opening the BBB
             is ultrasound. Though potentially damaging, if ultrasound is
             administered in combination with gas-filled microbubbles
             (i.e., ultrasound contrast agents), the acoustic pressure
             required for BBB opening is considerably lower. This
             combination of ultrasound and microbubbles can be used to
             reliably open the BBB without causing tissue damage. Here, a
             method is presented for performing AIM MRI by using
             microbubbles and ultrasound to open the BBB. After an
             intravenous injection of perflutren microbubbles, an
             unfocused pulsed ultrasound beam is applied to the shaved
             mouse head for 3 minutes. For simplicity, we refer to this
             technique of BBB Opening with Microbubbles and UltraSound as
             BOMUS. Using BOMUS to open the BBB throughout both cerebral
             hemispheres, manganese is administered to the whole mouse
             brain. After experimental stimulation of the lightly sedated
             mice, AIM MRI is used to map the neuronal response. To
             demonstrate this approach, herein BOMUS and AIM MRI are used
             to map unilateral mechanical stimulation of the vibrissae in
             lightly sedated mice. Because BOMUS can open the BBB
             throughout both hemispheres, the unstimulated side of the
             brain is used to control for nonspecific background
             stimulation. The resultant 3D activation map agrees well
             with published representations of the vibrissae regions of
             the barrel field cortex. The ultrasonic opening of the BBB
             is fast, noninvasive, and reversible; and thus this approach
             is suitable for high-throughput and/or longitudinal studies
             in awake mice.},
   Doi = {10.3791/4055},
   Key = {fds319489}
}

@booklet{Chen04a,
   Author = {Chen, BT and Yordanov, AT and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Functional pulmonary MR microscopy in mice},
   Journal = {The FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation
             of American Societies for Experimental Biology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {A785-A785},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0892-6638},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000220470700119&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Chen04a}
}

@booklet{Pecora97,
   Author = {L. M. Pecora and T. L. Carroll and G. A. Johnson and D. J.
             Mar and J. F. Heagy},
   Title = {Fundamentals of synchronization in chaotic systems,
             concepts, and applications},
   Journal = {Chaos},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {520 -- 543},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {Pecora97}
}

@article{fds174115,
   Author = {LM Pecora and TL Carroll and GA Johnson and DJ Mar and JF
             Heagy},
   Title = {Fundamentals of synchronization in chaotic systems,
             concepts, and applications.},
   Journal = {Chaos (Woodbury, N.Y.)},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {520-543},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1089-7682},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.166278},
   Abstract = {The field of chaotic synchronization has grown considerably
             since its advent in 1990. Several subdisciplines and
             "cottage industries" have emerged that have taken on bona
             fide lives of their own. Our purpose in this paper is to
             collect results from these various areas in a review article
             format with a tutorial emphasis. Fundamentals of chaotic
             synchronization are reviewed first with emphases on the
             geometry of synchronization and stability criteria. Several
             widely used coupling configurations are examined and, when
             available, experimental demonstrations of their success
             (generally with chaotic circuit systems) are described.
             Particular focus is given to the recent notion of
             synchronous substitution-a method to synchronize chaotic
             systems using a larger class of scalar chaotic coupling
             signals than previously thought possible. Connections
             between this technique and well-known control theory results
             are also outlined. Extensions of the technique are presented
             that allow so-called hyperchaotic systems (systems with more
             than one positive Lyapunov exponent) to be synchronized.
             Several proposals for "secure" communication schemes have
             been advanced; major ones are reviewed and their strengths
             and weaknesses are touched upon. Arrays of coupled chaotic
             systems have received a great deal of attention lately and
             have spawned a host of interesting and, in some cases,
             counterintuitive phenomena including bursting above
             synchronization thresholds, destabilizing transitions as
             coupling increases (short-wavelength bifurcations), and
             riddled basins. In addition, a general mathematical
             framework for analyzing the stability of arrays with
             arbitrary coupling configurations is outlined. Finally, the
             topic of generalized synchronization is discussed, along
             with data analysis techniques that can be used to decide
             whether two systems satisfy the mathematical requirements of
             generalized synchronization. (c) 1997 American Institute of
             Physics.},
   Language = {ENG},
   Doi = {10.1063/1.166278},
   Key = {fds174115}
}

@article{fds132720,
   Title = {G.A. Johnson, G. Cates, X.J. Chen, G.P. Cofer,  B.
             Driehuys, W. Happer,  L.W. Hedlund, B. Saam, M. Shattuck,
             J. Swartz.  Dynamics of  magnetization in hyperpolarized
             gas MRI of the lung.  Magnetic Resonance  in Medicine
             submitted (1996).},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132720}
}

@article{fds132738,
   Title = {G.A. Johnson, H. Beneveniste, R.T. Engelhardt, H. Qiu, L. W.
             Hedlund,  Magnetic resonance microscopy in basic studies of
             brain structure and  function.  New York Academy of
             Sciences.  In press (1996).},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132738}
}

@article{fds132721,
   Title = {G.A. Johnson, L.W. Hedlund.  Functional imaging of the
             lung.  Nature  Medicine 2, 1192 (1996).},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132721}
}

@article{fds132739,
   Title = {G.A. Johnson, R.D. Black, G.D. Cates, X.J. Chen, B.
             Driehuys, W. Happer,  L.W. Hedlund, H. Middleton, M.D.
             Shattuck, J. Swartz.  Polarization  dynamics of
             hyperpolarized 3He in lung imaging.  in "Proc., SMR 4th
             Annual  Scientific Meeting.  New York, NY, 1996," p.
             19.},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132739}
}

@article{fds174137,
   Author = {SK Lewis and JL Farmer and RC Burghardt and GR Newton and GA Johnson and DL
             Adelson, FW Bazer and TE Spencer},
   Title = {Galectin 15 (LGALS15): a gene uniquely expressed in the
             uteri of sheep and goats that functions in trophoblast
             attachment.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {77},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1027-36},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.107.063594},
   Keywords = {Amino Acid Sequence • Animals • Cattle •
             Cells, Cultured • Embryo Implantation •
             Endometrium • Female • Galectins • Gene
             Expression • Goats • Molecular Sequence Data
             • Pregnancy • RNA, Messenger • Rabbits •
             Ruminants • Sheep • Swine • Trophoblasts
             • genetics • genetics* • metabolism •
             metabolism* • physiology • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Galectins are a family of secreted animal lectins with
             biological roles in cell adhesion and migration. In sheep,
             galectin 15 (LGALS15) is expressed specifically in the
             endometrial luminal (LE) and superficial glandular (sGE)
             epithelia of the uterus in concert with blastocyst
             elongation during the peri-implantation period. The present
             study examined LGALS15 expression in the uterus of cattle,
             goats, and pigs. Although the bovine genome contains an
             LGALS15-like gene, expressed sequence tags encoding LGALS15
             mRNA were found only for sheep, and full-length LGALS15
             cDNAs were cloned only from endometrial total RNA isolated
             from pregnant sheep and goats, but not pregnant cattle or
             pigs. Ovine and caprine LGALS15 were highly homologous at
             the mRNA (95%) and protein (91%) levels, and all contained a
             conserved carbohydrate recognition domain and RGD
             recognition sequence for integrin binding. Endometrial
             LGALS15 mRNA levels increased after Day 11 of both the
             estrous cycle and pregnancy, and were considerably increased
             after Day 15 of pregnancy in goats. In situ hybridization
             detected abundant LGALS15 mRNA in endometrial LE and sGE of
             early pregnant goats, but not in cattle or pigs.
             Immunoreactive LGALS15 protein was present in endometrial
             epithelia and conceptus trophectoderm of goat uteri and
             detected within intracellular crystal structures in
             trophectoderm and LE. Recombinant ovine and caprine LGALS15
             proteins elicited a dose-dependent increase in ovine
             trophectoderm cell attachment in vitro that was comparable
             to bovine fibronectin. These results support the hypothesis
             that LGALS15 is uniquely expressed in Caprinae endometria
             and functions as an attachment factor important for
             peri-implantation blastocyst elongation.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1095/biolreprod.107.063594},
   Key = {fds174137}
}

@booklet{Thompson82,
   Author = {W. M. Thompson and W. C. Meyers and M. Shaw and M. Bates and G. A. Johnson and L. W. Hedlund},
   Title = {Gallbladder density and iodine concentration in humans
             during oral cholecystography - a comparison of iopanoic acid
             and iopronic acid},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {621 -- 628},
   Year = {1982},
   Key = {Thompson82}
}

@booklet{Thompson80a,
   Author = {THOMPSON, WM and AMBERG, JR and LOWTHER, DT and SHAW, M and BATES, M and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {GALLBLADDER DENSITY AND IODINE CONCENTRATION IN HUMANS
             DURING ORAL CHOLECYSTOGRAPHY - A COMPARISON OF IOPANOIC ACID
             AND IOPRONIC ACID},
   Journal = {Abdominal Imaging},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {83-83},
   Year = {1980},
   ISSN = {0364-2356},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1980JN17700030&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Thompson80a}
}

@article{fds132888,
   Author = {WM Thompson and WC Meyers and M Shaw and M Bates and GA Johnson and LW
             Hedlund},
   Title = {Gallbladder density and iodine concentration in humans
             during oral cholecystography. A comparison of iopanoic acid
             and iopronic acid.},
   Journal = {Investigative radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {621-8},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   Keywords = {Administration, Oral • Bile Acids and Salts •
             Cholecystography* • Clinical Trials • Contrast
             Media • Double-Blind Method • Gallbladder •
             Humans • Iodine • Iodobenzenes • Iopanoic
             Acid • administration & dosage* •
             analysis},
   Abstract = {A comparison of two oral cholecystopaques, iopanoic acid
             (Telepaque) and iopronic acid (Oravue), was performed using
             normal volunteers. Using a double-blind crossover design,
             comparisons were made between the degree of gallbladder
             opacification and the amount of iodine recovered from the
             gallbladder. Bile was collected via a double lumen
             intestinal tube before, during, and after stimulating
             gallbladder contraction. There were no differences between
             the two agents in terms of opacification or iodine
             concentration. Only 19% of the administered dose of either
             agent was recovered, and the maximum iodine concentration in
             bile was 10 mg I/ml. The results suggest that this technique
             has merit for future comparative studies of agents
             concentrated in the gallbladder.},
   Key = {fds132888}
}

@booklet{Johnson82c,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Godwin, JD and Fram, EK},
   Title = {Gated multiplanar cardiac computed tomography.},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {145},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {195-197},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7122877},
   Abstract = {Multiplanar reformatting was combined with
             electrocardiographically gated computed tomography (CT) to
             provide a three-dimensional assessment of the beating heart
             of a live dog. Separate systolic and diastolic images were
             made in transverse, sagittal, coronal, and paraxial views.
             Three-dimensional contour images that outlined the cardiac
             chambers and the myocardium were then made using a separate
             research computer. This three-dimensional appreciation of
             cardiac morphology could be extended to assess regional
             function. Practical problems that limit the application of
             these methods are discussed, along with the proposed
             solutions.},
   Doi = {10.1148/radiology.145.1.7122877},
   Key = {Johnson82c}
}

@article{fds132816,
   Author = {GA Johnson and JD Godwin and EK Fram},
   Title = {Gated multiplanar cardiac computed tomography.},
   Journal = {Radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {145},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {195-7},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   Keywords = {Animals • Computers • Diatrizoate • Dogs
             • Electrocardiography* • Heart • Tomography,
             X-Ray Computed • diagnostic use • methods* •
             radiography*},
   Abstract = {Multiplanar reformatting was combined with
             electrocardiographically gated computed tomography (CT) to
             provide a three-dimensional assessment of the beating heart
             of a live dog. Separate systolic and diastolic images were
             made in transverse, sagittal, coronal, and paraxial views.
             Three-dimensional contour images that outlined the cardiac
             chambers and the myocardium were then made using a separate
             research computer. This three-dimensional appreciation of
             cardiac morphology could be extended to assess regional
             function. Practical problems that limit the application of
             these methods are discussed, along with the proposed
             solutions.},
   Key = {fds132816}
}

@booklet{Wang99,
   Author = {G. Y. Wang and G. A. Johnson and T. E. Spencer and F. W.
             Bazer},
   Title = {Generation of immortalized porcine uterine cell
             lines.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {60},
   Pages = {260 -- 261},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {Wang99}
}

@article{fds268844,
   Author = {Badea, A and Johnson, GA and Williams, RW},
   Title = {Genetic dissection of the mouse brain using high-field
             magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1067-1079},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1095-9572},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19349225},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
             • Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL • Mice, Inbred
             DBA • Mice, Inbred Strains • Microscopy •
             Species Specificity • anatomy & histology •
             cytology* • genetics* • methods* •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has demonstrated that
             variation in brain structure is associated with differences
             in behavior and disease state. However, it has rarely been
             practical to prospectively test causal models that link
             anatomical and functional differences in humans. In the
             present study we have combined classical mouse genetics with
             high-field MR to systematically explore and test such
             structure-functional relations across multiple brain
             regions. We segmented 33 regions in two parental
             strains-C57BL/6J (B) and DBA/2J (D)-and in nine BXD
             recombinant inbred strains. All strains have been studied
             extensively for more than 20 years using a battery of
             genetic, functional, anatomical, and behavioral assays. We
             compared levels of variation within and between strains and
             sexes, by region, and by system. Average within-strain
             variation had a coefficient of variation (CV) of 1.6% for
             the whole brain; while the CV ranged from 2.3 to 3.6% for
             olfactory bulbs, cortex and cerebellum, and up to
             approximately 18% for septum and laterodorsal thalamic
             nucleus. Variation among strain averages ranged from 6.7%
             for cerebellum, 7.6% for whole brain, 9.0% for cortex, up to
             approximately 26% for the ventricles, laterodorsal thalamic
             nucleus, and the interpeduncular nucleus. Heritabilities
             averaged 0.60+/-0.18. Sex differences were not significant
             with the possible (and unexpected) exception of the pons (
             approximately 20% larger in males). A correlation matrix of
             regional volumes revealed high correlations among
             functionally related parts of the CNS (e.g., components of
             the limbic system), and several high correlations between
             regions that are not anatomically connected, but that may
             nonetheless be functionally or genetically
             coupled.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.01.021},
   Key = {fds268844}
}

@article{fds268843,
   Author = {Badea, A and Johnson, GA and Williams, RW},
   Title = {Genetic dissection of the mouse CNS using magnetic resonance
             microscopy.},
   Journal = {Current Opinion in Neurology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {379-386},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1473-6551},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19542887},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Advances in magnetic resonance microscopy
             (MRM) make it practical to map gene variants responsible for
             structural variation in brains of many species, including
             mice and humans. We review results of a systematic genetic
             analysis of MRM data using as a case study a family of well
             characterized lines of mice. RECENT ADVANCES: MRM has
             matured to the point that we can generate high contrast,
             high-resolution images even for species as small as a mouse,
             with a brain merely 1/3000th the size of humans. We
             generated 21.5-micron data sets for a diverse panel of BXD
             mouse strains to gauge the extent of genetic variation, and
             as a prelude to comprehensive genetic and genomic analyses.
             Here we review MRM capabilities and image segmentation
             methods; heritability of brain variation; covariation of the
             sizes of brain regions; and correlations between MRM and
             classical histological data sets. SUMMARY: The combination
             of high throughput MRM and genomics will improve our
             understanding of the genetic basis of structure-function
             correlations. Sophisticated mouse models will be critical in
             converting correlations into mechanisms and in determining
             genetic and epigenetic causes of differences in disease
             susceptibility.},
   Doi = {10.1097/WCO.0b013e32832d9b86},
   Key = {fds268843}
}

@article{fds268857,
   Author = {Johnston, SM and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT},
   Title = {Geometric calibration for a dual tube/detector micro-CT
             system.},
   Journal = {Medical physics},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1820-1829},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0094-2405},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18561657},
   Keywords = {Algorithms • Animals • Artifacts •
             Calibration • Equipment Design • Humans •
             Metals • Mice • Models, Statistical • Models,
             Theoretical • Phantoms, Imaging • Radiographic
             Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted •
             Reproducibility of Results • Tomography Scanners, X-Ray
             Computed • Tomography, X-Ray Computed • X-Rays
             • instrumentation* • methods •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {The authors describe a dual tube/detector micro-computed
             tomography (micro-CT) system that has the potential to
             improve temporal resolution and material contrast in small
             animal imaging studies. To realize this potential, it is
             necessary to precisely calibrate the geometry of a dual
             micro-CT system to allow the combination of projection data
             acquired with each individual tube/detector in a single
             reconstructed image. The authors present a geometric
             calibration technique that uses multiple projection images
             acquired with the two imaging chains while rotating a
             phantom containing a vertical array of regularly spaced
             metallic beads. The individual geometries of the imaging
             chains are estimated from the phantom projection images
             using analytical methods followed by a refinement procedure
             based on nonlinear optimization. The geometric parameters
             are used to create the cone beam projection matrices
             required by the reconstruction process for each imaging
             chain. Next, a transformation between the two projection
             matrices is found that allows the combination of projection
             data in a single reconstructed image. The authors describe
             this technique, test it with a series of computer
             simulations, and then apply it to data collected from their
             dual tube/detector micro-CT system. The results demonstrate
             that the proposed technique is accurate, robust, and
             produces images free of misalignment artifacts.},
   Doi = {10.1118/1.2900000},
   Key = {fds268857}
}

@booklet{Middleditch89,
   Author = {B. S. Middleditch and G. A. Johnson and R. R. Gregory and M.
             A. Alejandro and B. M. Markaverich},
   Title = {Gingerol analysis without artifact formation},
   Journal = {Hrc-journal Of High Resolution Chromatography},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {677 -- 679},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {October},
   Key = {Middleditch89}
}

@article{fds174286,
   Author = {JT Self and TE Spencer and GA Johnson and J Hu and FW Bazer and G
             Wu},
   Title = {Glutamine synthesis in the developing porcine
             placenta.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1444-51},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.103.025486},
   Keywords = {3-Methyl-2-Oxobutanoate Dehydrogenase (Lipoamide) •
             Alanine • Alanine Transaminase • Amino Acids
             • Amino Acids, Branched-Chain • Animals •
             Biological Transport • Female • Glutamate-Ammonia
             Ligase • Glutaminase • Glutamine • Placenta
             • Pregnancy • Swine • Transaminases •
             biosynthesis • biosynthesis* • enzymology •
             growth & development* • metabolism •
             metabolism*},
   Abstract = {Glutamine plays a vital role in fetal carbon and nitrogen
             metabolism and exhibits the highest fetal:maternal plasma
             ratio among all amino acids in pigs. Such disparate
             glutamine levels between mother and fetus suggest that
             glutamine may be actively synthesized and released into the
             fetal circulation by the porcine placenta. We hypothesized
             that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism in the
             placenta plays an important role in placental glutamine
             synthesis. This hypothesis was tested by studying
             conceptuses from gilts on Days 20, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 60,
             90, or 110 of gestation (n = 6 per day). Placental tissue
             was analyzed for amino acid concentrations, BCAA transport,
             BCAA degradation, and glutamine synthesis as well as the
             activities of related enzymes (including BCAA transaminase,
             branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase, glutamine
             synthetase, glutamate-pyruvate transaminase, and
             glutaminase). On all days of gestation, rates of BCAA
             transamination were much greater than rates of
             branched-chain alpha-ketoacid decarboxylation. The glutamate
             generated from BCAA transamination was primarily directed to
             glutamine synthesis and, to a much lesser extent, alanine
             production. Placental BCAA transport, BCAA transamination,
             glutamine synthesis, and activities of related enzymes
             increased markedly between Days 20 and 40 of gestation, as
             did glutamine in fetal allantoic fluid. Accordingly,
             placental BCAA levels decreased after Day 20 of gestation in
             association with a marked increase in BCAA catabolism and
             concentrations of glutamine. There was no detectable
             catabolism of glutamine in pig placenta throughout
             pregnancy, which would ensure maximum output of glutamine by
             this tissue. These novel results demonstrate glutamine
             synthesis from BCAAs in pig placentae, aid in explaining the
             abundance of glutamine in the fetus, and provide valuable
             insight into the dynamic role of the placenta in fetal
             metabolism and nutrition.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1095/biolreprod.103.025486},
   Key = {fds174286}
}

@booklet{Self04,
   Author = {J. T. Self and T. E. Spencer and G. A. Johnson and J. B. Hu and F. W. Bazer and G. Y. Wu},
   Title = {Glutamine synthesis in the developing porcine
             placental},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1444 -- 1451},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {Self04}
}

@article{fds174092,
   Author = {JJ Muniz and MM Joyce and JD Taylor 2nd, JR Burghardt and RC
             Burghardt, GA Johnson},
   Title = {Glycosylation dependent cell adhesion molecule 1-like
             protein and L-selectin expression in sheep interplacentomal
             and placentomal endometrium.},
   Journal = {Reproduction (Cambridge, England)},
   Volume = {131},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {751-61},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1470-1626},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/rep.1.00855},
   Keywords = {Actins • Animals • Blotting, Western •
             Endometrium • Female • Fluorescent Antibody
             Technique • Keratins • L-Selectin • Mucins
             • Placenta • Pregnancy • Pregnancy, Animal
             • Sheep • analysis • analysis* •
             chemistry* • metabolism* • methods},
   Abstract = {Glycosylation dependent cell adhesion molecule 1 (GlyCAM-1),
             a mucin component of sheep histotroph produced by glandular
             epithelium (GE) during early pregnancy, is hypothesized to
             function in implantation. However, GlyCAM-1 is present in
             uterine tissues subsequent to implantation suggesting
             additional functions of this l-selectin-binding ligand. This
             study focused on uterine GlyCAM-1 expression during
             placentome development in sheep. Western blot analysis of
             day 50 pregnant sheep identified 45, 40, and 25 kDa bands in
             interplacentomal endometrium, 40 and 25 kDa bands in
             placentomes, and 80 and 40 kDa bands in chorioallantois. The
             GlyCAM-1 proteins in interplacentomal regions were
             comparable to those detected in day 15-19 pregnant sheep,
             however, the 80 kDa form was unique to chorioallantois, and
             the absence of the 45 kDa GlyCAM-1 in placentomes indicated
             differences between interplacentomal and placentomal
             endometrium. Immunofluorescence identified GlyCAM-1 in
             lumenal epithelium (LE), stromal fibroblasts, and vascular
             smooth muscle cells. To better define its cellular
             distribution, GlyCAM-1 was co-localized with either
             epithelium-specific cytokeratin, smooth muscle-specific
             alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha SMA), or stromal-specific
             vimentin. In interplacentomal endometrium, GlyCAM-1
             co-localized with cytokeratin in LE but not in GE. GlyCAM-1
             did not co-localize with alpha SMA, and was localized in the
             extracellular matrix of vimentin-positive stroma. In
             placentomes, GlyCAM-1 did not co-localize with cytokeratin,
             but did co-localize with alpha SMA and vimentin. Thus, in
             contrast to interplacentomal regions, GlyCAM-1 in
             placentomes was predominantly localized in vasculature
             rather than epithelial cells. Further, leukocytes expressing
             L-selectin were localized to the endothelial surface of
             GlyCAM-1-expressing vessels within placentomes. These data
             suggest that GlyCAM-1 assumes distinct functions in
             compartment-specific regions of the sheep
             uterus.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1530/rep.1.00855},
   Key = {fds174092}
}

@booklet{Muniz04,
   Author = {J. J. Muniz and M. M. Joyce and R. C. Burghardt and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Glycosylation-dependent cell adhesion molecule 1 (GlyCAM-1)
             expression in ovine placentomes implies roles in
             hematotrophic support for conceptus development.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Pages = {212 -- 212},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {Muniz04}
}

@article{fds268722,
   Author = {Johnston, SM and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT},
   Title = {GPU-based iterative reconstruction with total variation
             minimization for micro-CT},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
   Volume = {7622},
   Number = {PART 2},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {December},
   ISBN = {9780819480231},
   ISSN = {1605-7422},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.844368},
   Abstract = {Dynamic imaging with micro-CT often produces
             poorly-distributed sets of projections, and reconstructions
             of this data with filtered backprojection algorithms (FBP)
             may be affected by artifacts. Iterative reconstruction
             algorithms and total variation (TV) denoising are promising
             alternatives to FBP, but may require running times that are
             frustratingly long. This obstacle can be overcome by
             implementing reconstruction algorithms on graphics
             processing units (GPU). This paper presents an
             implementation of a family of iterative reconstruction
             algorithms with TV denoising on a GPU, and a series of tests
             to optimize and compare the ability of different algorithms
             to reduce artifacts. The mathematical and computational
             details of the implementation are explored. The performance,
             measured by the accuracy of the reconstruction versus the
             running time, is assessed in simulations with a virtual
             phantom and in an in vivo scan of a mouse. We conclude that
             the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique with TV
             minimization (SART-TV) is a time-effective reconstruction
             algorithm for producing reconstructions with fewer artifacts
             than FBP. © 2010 SPIE.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.844368},
   Key = {fds268722}
}

@article{fds268735,
   Author = {Johnston, SM and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT},
   Title = {GPU-based iterative reconstruction with total variation
             minimization for micro-CT},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
   Volume = {7622},
   Number = {PART 2},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {1605-7422},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.844368},
   Abstract = {Dynamic imaging with micro-CT often produces
             poorly-distributed sets of projections, and reconstructions
             of this data with filtered backprojection algorithms (FBP)
             may be affected by artifacts. Iterative reconstruction
             algorithms and total variation (TV) denoising are promising
             alternatives to FBP, but may require running times that are
             frustratingly long. This obstacle can be overcome by
             implementing reconstruction algorithms on graphics
             processing units (GPU). This paper presents an
             implementation of a family of iterative reconstruction
             algorithms with TV denoising on a GPU, and a series of tests
             to optimize and compare the ability of different algorithms
             to reduce artifacts. The mathematical and computational
             details of the implementation are explored. The performance,
             measured by the accuracy of the reconstruction versus the
             running time, is assessed in simulations with a virtual
             phantom and in an in vivo scan of a mouse. We conclude that
             the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique with TV
             minimization (SART-TV) is a time-effective reconstruction
             algorithm for producing reconstructions with fewer artifacts
             than FBP. © 2010 SPIE.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.844368},
   Key = {fds268735}
}

@booklet{Teixeira96,
   Author = {M. G. Teixeira and K. J. Austin and D. J. Perry and V. D.
             Dooley and G. A. Johnson and T. R. Hansen},
   Title = {Granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2) is a
             pregnancy-associated uterine chemokine.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {54},
   Pages = {190 -- 190},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {Teixeira96}
}

@booklet{Newton99,
   Author = {G. R. Newton and S. Woldesenbet and T. Green and H. Powell and K. Sonnier and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {H antigen expression by ovine endometrial
             cells.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {60},
   Pages = {120 -- 120},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {Newton99}
}

@article{fds132743,
   Title = {H. Qiu, L.W. Hedlund, H. Benveniste, S.L. Gewalt, G.A.
             Johnson.   Evaluation of a glycine antagonist in rat focal
             cerebral ischemia by  diffusion-weighted MR microscopy.
              in "Proc., SMR 4th Annual Scientific  Meeting.  New
             York, NY, 1996," p. 505.},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132743}
}

@article{fds174164,
   Author = {AR Diani and MJ Mulholland and KL Shull and MF Kubicek and GA Johnson and HJ Schostarez and MN Brunden and AE Buhl},
   Title = {Hair growth effects of oral administration of finasteride, a
             steroid 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, alone and in
             combination with topical minoxidil in the balding stumptail
             macaque.},
   Journal = {The Journal of clinical endocrinology and
             metabolism},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {345-50},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0021-972X},
   Keywords = {Administration, Oral • Administration, Topical •
             Androstenes • Animals • Azasteroids •
             Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid •
             Dihydrotestosterone • Drug Interactions •
             Finasteride • Hair • Macaca • Male •
             Minoxidil • Reference Values • Testosterone •
             Testosterone 5-alpha-Reductase • administration &
             dosage • antagonists & inhibitors* • blood •
             drug effects* • pharmacology* • physiology •
             urine},
   Abstract = {A 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, finasteride, was administered
             orally at 0.5 mg/day, alone or in combination with topical
             2% minoxidil, for 20 weeks to determine the effects on scalp
             hair growth in balding adult male stumptail macaque monkeys.
             A 7-day dose-finding study showed that both 0.5- and 2.0-mg
             doses of the drug produced a similar diminution in serum
             dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in male stumptails. Hair growth
             was evaluated by shaving and weighing scalp hair at baseline
             and at 4-week intervals during treatment to obtain
             cumulative delta hair weight (sum of the 4-week changes in
             hair weight from baseline) for the 20-week study. The
             activity of the 5 alpha-reductase enzyme was assessed by RIA
             of serum testosterone (T) and DHT at 4-week intervals. The
             combination of finasteride and minoxidil generated
             significant augmentation of hair weight (additive effect)
             compared to either drug alone. Finasteride increased hair
             weight in four of five monkeys. When the data of the one
             nonresponsive monkey were excluded, finasteride elicited a
             significant elevation in hair weight compared to topical
             vehicle alone. Minoxidil also evoked a significant increase
             in hair weight compared to vehicle alone. Serum T was
             unchanged, whereas serum DHT was significantly depressed in
             monkeys that received either finasteride or the combination
             of finasteride and minoxidil. These data suggest that
             inhibition of the conversion of T to DHT by this 5
             alpha-reductase inhibitor reverses the balding process and
             enhances hair regrowth by topical minoxidil in the male
             balding stumptail macaque.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174164}
}

@booklet{Diani92,
   Author = {A. R. Diani and M. J. Mulholland and K. L. Shull and M. F.
             Kubicek and G. A. Johnson and H. J. Schostarez and M. N.
             Brunden and A. E. Buhl},
   Title = {Hair-growth effects of oral-administration of finasteride, a
             steroid 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, alone and in
             combination with topical minoxidil in the balding stumptail
             macaque},
   Journal = {Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {345 -- 350},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {Diani92}
}

@article{fds268693,
   Author = {Johnston, SM and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT},
   Title = {Helical dual source cone-beam micro-CT},
   Journal = {2014 IEEE 11th International Symposium on Biomedical
             Imaging, ISBI 2014},
   Pages = {177-180},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781467319591},
   Abstract = {© 2014 IEEE. While helical scanning is well established in
             the clinical arena, most micro-CT scanners use circular cone
             beam trajectories and approximate reconstructions based on a
             filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm. This may be
             sufficient for some applications, but in studies of larger
             animals, such as rats, the size of the detector can
             constrain the field of view and extend scan time. To address
             this problem, we have designed and implemented helical
             scanning and reconstruction procedures for an
             in-house-developed dual source cone-beam micro-CT system.
             The reconstruction uses a simultaneous algebraic
             reconstruction technique combined with total variation
             regularization (SART-TV). We implemented this algorithm on a
             graphics processing unit (GPU) to reduce run time. The
             results demonstrate the speed and accuracy of the GPU-based
             SART-TV algorithm. The helical scan enables the
             reconstruction of volumes with extended field of view for
             whole body micro-CT imaging of large rodents.},
   Key = {fds268693}
}

@article{fds174225,
   Author = {DG Johnston and GA Johnson and KG Alberti and GH Millward-Sadler and J
             Mitchell, R Wright},
   Title = {Hepatic regeneration and metabolism after partial
             hepatectomy in diabetic rats: effects of insulin
             therapy.},
   Journal = {European journal of clinical investigation},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {384-90},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0014-2972},
   Keywords = {Adenine Nucleotides • Animals • DNA •
             Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental • Glucose •
             Hepatectomy* • Insulin • Lactates • Lactic
             Acid • Liver • Liver Glycogen • Liver
             Regeneration • Male • Organ Size • Pyruvates
             • Pyruvic Acid • Rats • Rats, Inbred Strains
             • Water • analysis • biosynthesis •
             blood • drug effects* • drug therapy •
             metabolism • metabolism* • therapeutic
             use*},
   Abstract = {The effect of insulin deficiency on liver regeneration has
             been assessed in untreated v. insulin-treated streptozotocin
             (65 mg kg-1) diabetic rats, 12, 24 and 48 h after partial
             hepatectomy. Dry weight of regenerating liver increased from
             12 to 48 h after partial hepatectomy and insulin treatment
             caused a further minor increase at 24 h. [6-3H]Thymidine
             uptake in untreated rats peaked at 24 h (12.5 +/- 3.4% of
             total cells labelled). Insulin therapy produced a delayed
             168% rise in uptake at 48 h. Insulin deficiency alone in
             sham-operated animals caused a 33% decrease in hepatic
             [ATP], while [ADP] rose by 43% and [AMP] by 86% at 12 h.
             Partial hepatectomy produced only minor further
             abnormalities in untreated animals. Insulin therapy
             increased hepatic [ATP] and decreased [ADP] and [AMP] 12 h
             after partial hepatectomy, but [ATP] remained decreased
             (15%) and [ADP] and [AMP] increased (45% and 73%
             respectively) compared with insulin-treated sham-operated
             controls. Metabolite changes observed after partial
             hepatectomy in untreated animals, including a decrease in
             hepatic [glycogen] and increases in [triglyceride] and the
             ratios of [lactate]:[pyruvate] and [3-hydroxybutyrate]:[acetoacetate],
             were partially reversed by insulin treatment. Insulin
             deficiency thus impairs regeneration after partial
             hepatectomy and magnifies the decline in hepatic
             intracellular energy state and the metabolite changes
             associated with liver regrowth.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174225}
}

@article{fds161595,
   Author = {DG Johnston and GA Johnson and KG Alberti and GH Millward-Sadler and J
             Mitchell, R Wright},
   Title = {Hepatic regeneration and metabolism after partial
             hepatectomy in normal rats: effects of insulin
             therapy.},
   Journal = {European journal of clinical investigation,
             ENGLAND},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {376-83},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0014-2972},
   Keywords = {Adenine Nucleotides • Animals • DNA • Glucose
             • Glycogen • Hepatectomy* • Insulin •
             Liver • Liver Regeneration • Male • Organ
             Size • Rats • Rats, Inbred Strains •
             Thymidine • Water • analysis • biosynthesis
             • cytology • drug effects* • metabolism
             • metabolism* • therapeutic use*},
   Abstract = {The effect of insulin therapy on liver regeneration has been
             studied in normal fed rats 12, 24 and 48 h after partial
             hepatectomy. Dry weight of regenerating liver increased
             between 12 and 48 h after partial hepatectomy and was
             unaffected by insulin therapy. [6-3H] Thymidine uptake
             peaked at 24-h (24.7 +/- 2.4% of total liver cells) and
             insulin treatment had no additional effect. At 12-h after
             partial hepatectomy, hepatic [ATP] was decreased 15%, while
             [ADP] and [AMP] were increased 47% and 83% respectively
             compared with sham-operated animals. Partial hepatectomy
             also caused an increase in hepatic [triglyceride], a
             decrease in hepatic [glycogen] and an increase in the levels
             of glucose and several glycolytic intermediates. The hepatic
             redox ratios, [lactate]:[pyruvate] and [3-hydroxybutyrate]:[acetoacetate],
             were elevated. Insulin therapy had only minor effects on
             hepatic adenine nucleotide levels, intermediary metabolite
             concentrations or intrahepatic redox ratios after partial
             hepatectomy. These findings suggest a decreased hepatic
             intracellular energy state in regenerating liver; insulin
             therapy in normal rats does not influence this metabolic
             change nor the regenerative response.},
   Key = {fds161595}
}

@booklet{Johnston86a,
   Author = {D. G. Johnston and G. A. Johnson and K. G. M. M. Alberti and G. H. Millwardsadler and J. Mitchell and R.
             Wright},
   Title = {Hepatic regeneration and metabolism after
             partial-hepatectomy in diabetic rats - effects of insulin
             therapy},
   Journal = {European Journal Of Clinical Investigation},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {384 -- 390},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {October},
   Key = {Johnston86a}
}

@booklet{Johnston86,
   Author = {D. G. Johnston and G. A. Johnson and K. G. M. M. Alberti and G. H. Millwardsadler and J. Mitchell and R.
             Wright},
   Title = {Hepatic regeneration and metabolism after
             partial-hepatectomy in normal rats - effects of insulin
             therapy},
   Journal = {European Journal Of Clinical Investigation},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {376 -- 383},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {October},
   Key = {Johnston86}
}

@article{fds174120,
   Author = {J Shen-Gunther and JL Walker and GA Johnson and RS
             Mannel},
   Title = {Hepatic venoocclusive disease as a complication of whole
             abdominopelvic irradiation and treatment with the
             transjuglar intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: case report
             and literature review.},
   Journal = {Gynecologic oncology},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {282-6},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0090-8258},
   Keywords = {Abdomen • Adenocarcinoma • Ascites •
             Endometrial Neoplasms • Female • Hepatic
             Veno-Occlusive Disease • Humans • Jugular Veins
             • Middle Aged • Pelvis • Portasystemic Shunt,
             Surgical* • Radiotherapy • Randomized Controlled
             Trials as Topic • Stents • adverse effects* •
             complications • etiology* • instrumentation •
             radiotherapy • surgery},
   Abstract = {We report the novel use of the transjugular intrahepatic
             portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure for the treatment of
             intractable ascites due to hepatic venooclusive disease as a
             result of whole abdominopelvic radiotherapy. A patient with
             Stage III endometrioid carcinoma of the endometrium treated
             with postoperative whole abdominopelvic irradiation
             developed intractable ascites. Multiple paracenteses and
             computerized tomography were negative for recurrent
             carcinoma. Liver biopsy demonstrated hepatic venoocclusive
             disease, a rare complication of therapeutic radiation
             involving the liver. Successful relief of ascites and its
             adverse symptomology were achieved with the transjugular
             intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. Relevant literature
             regarding the pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatment of
             radiotherapy-related hepatic venoocclusive disease are
             reviewed.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174120}
}

@booklet{Shengunther96,
   Author = {J. Shengunther and J. L. Walker and G. A. Johnson and R. S.
             Mannel},
   Title = {Hepatic venoocclusive disease as a complication of whole
             abdominopelvic irradiation and treatment with the
             transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: Case report
             and literature review},
   Journal = {Gynecologic Oncology},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {282 -- 286},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {Shengunther96}
}

@article{fds174180,
   Author = {DG Johnston and GA Johnson and KG Alberti},
   Title = {Hepatotrophic factors: implications for diabetes
             mellitus.},
   Journal = {Ciba Foundation symposium},
   Number = {55},
   Pages = {357-73},
   Year = {1977},
   ISSN = {0300-5208},
   Keywords = {Adenine Nucleotides • Animals • Diabetes
             Complications • Diabetes Mellitus • Diabetes
             Mellitus, Experimental • Dogs • Fatty Liver •
             Glucose • Humans • Injections, Subcutaneous •
             Insulin • Liver • Liver Cirrhosis • Liver
             Glycogen • Liver Regeneration • Portal Vein •
             Rats • administration & dosage* • analysis •
             drug therapy* • etiology • metabolism},
   Abstract = {In view of the importance of insulin in hepatic cell
             proliferation and regeneration, disturbances might be
             expected in these processes in diabetics. The relative
             importnace of insulin replacement given intraportally rather
             than subcutaneously is discussed. Results are presented
             showing that even when normoglycaemia is achieved with
             peripheral insulin infusion using the 'artificial pancreas'
             there are still abnormalities in intermediary metabolism.
             The incidence of cirrhosis in diabetes is reviewed and it is
             concluded that the evidence is poor for an increase in
             diabetics. Finally it is shown that in the normal diabetic
             rat changes are observed after partial hepatectomy
             consistent with an increase in redox potential within the
             regenerating liver. Insulin treatment improves redox status
             but does not completely reverse the changes
             shown.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174180}
}

@booklet{Johnson99,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and N. M. Ghoniem},
   Title = {Hierarchical modeling of C and Si nano-cluster nucleation
             utilizing quantum and statistical mechanics},
   Journal = {Journal Of Computer-aided Materials Design},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2-3},
   Pages = {337 -- 347},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {Johnson99}
}

@booklet{Thompson83a,
   Author = {W. M. Thompson and R. A. Halvorsen and R. K. Gedgaudas and F. M. Kelvin and R. P. Rice and S. Woodfield and G. A.
             Johnson and L. W. Hedlund and D. B. Jorgensen},
   Title = {High kvp vs low kvp for t-tube and operative
             cholangiography},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {146},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {635 -- 642},
   Year = {1983},
   Key = {Thompson83a}
}

@article{fds268910,
   Author = {Thompson, WM and Halvorsen, RA and Gedgaudas, RK and Kelvin, FM and Rice, RP and Woodfield, S and Johnson, GA and Hedlund, LW and Jorgensen,
             DB},
   Title = {High kVp vs. low kVp for T-tube and operative
             cholangiography.},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {146},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {635-642},
   Year = {1983},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6828675},
   Keywords = {Cholangiography • Cholecystectomy • Cholelithiasis
             • Diatrizoate • Diatrizoate Meglumine •
             Humans • Intraoperative Care • Models, Structural
             • Radiation Dosage • analogs & derivatives* •
             diagnostic use* • methods* • radiography*},
   Abstract = {Based on several considerations, high kVp and high contrast
             agent concentration should produce better-quality operative
             and T-tube cholangiograms than the currently recommended low
             kVp and low contrast agent concentration. To test this
             theory, two kinds of studies were performed. In a laboratory
             phantom, the influence of kVp and contrast agent
             concentration on detectability of different size phantom
             stones was evaluated. High kVp and high contrast agent
             concentration (110 kVp, 38% iodine) were also compared with
             low kVp and low contrast agent concentration (75 kVp, 15%
             iodine) in 62 patients undergoing operative or T-tube
             cholangiography. Almost all phantom stones were well shown
             with all kVps and iodine concentrations. As the kVp was
             raised there was a mild decrease in stone detectability but
             this decrease was partially corrected by raising the iodine
             concentration. Overall stone detectability with high kVp and
             high contrast agent concentration technique was better than
             or similar to the currently recommended low kVp and low
             contrast agent concentration technique. Evaluation of the
             direct cholangiograms by five radiologists revealed that the
             high kVp, high contrast agent concentration studies were
             superior or similar to the low kVp and low contrast agent
             concentration radiographs in 70% of the cases. Based on
             these results high kVp (100-110) and a high contrast agent
             concentration (38%) are recommended for direct
             cholangiography.},
   Doi = {10.1148/radiology.146.3.6828675},
   Key = {fds268910}
}

@article{fds268808,
   Author = {Liu, C and Li, W and Johnson, GA and Wu, B},
   Title = {High-field (9.4 T) MRI of brain dysmyelination by
             quantitative mapping of magnetic susceptibility.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {930-938},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1095-9572},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21320606},
   Keywords = {Algorithms • Animals • Anisotropy • Axons
             • Brain • Brain Mapping • Demyelinating
             Diseases • Diffusion Tensor Imaging • Echo-Planar
             Imaging • Electromagnetic Fields* • Fourier
             Analysis • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted •
             Mice • Mice, Inbred C3H • Mice, Neurologic Mutants
             • Myelin Sheath • Tissue Fixation • methods*
             • pathology • pathology* •
             physiology},
   Abstract = {The multilayered myelin sheath wrapping around nerve axons
             is essential for proper functioning of the central nervous
             system. Abnormal myelination leads to a wide range of
             neurological diseases and developmental disorders.
             Non-invasive imaging of myelin content is of great clinical
             importance. The present work demonstrated that loss of
             myelin in the central nervous system of the shiverer mouse
             results in a dramatic reduction of magnetic susceptibility
             in white matter axons. The reduction resulted in a near
             extinction of susceptibility contrast between gray and white
             matter. Quantitative magnetic susceptibility imaging and
             diffusion tensor imaging were conducted on a group of
             control and shiverer mice at 9.4 T. We measured the
             resonance frequency distribution of the whole brain for each
             mouse. Magnetic susceptibility maps were computed and
             compared between the two groups. It was shown that the
             susceptibility contrast between gray and white matter was
             reduced by 96% in the shiverer compared to the controls.
             Diffusion measurements further confirmed intact fiber
             pathways in the shiverer mice, ruling out the possibility of
             axonal injury and its potential contribution to the altered
             susceptibility. As an autosomal recessive mutation, shiverer
             is characterized by an almost total lack of central nervous
             system myelin. Our data provide new evidences indicating
             that myelin is the predominant source of susceptibility
             differences between deep gray and white matter observed in
             magnetic resonance imaging. More importantly, the present
             study suggests that quantitative magnetic susceptibility is
             a potential endogenous biomarker for myelination.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.02.024},
   Key = {fds268808}
}

@booklet{Zhou93a,
   Author = {Zhou, X and Cofer, GP and Suddarth, SA and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {High-field MR microscopy using fast spin-echoes.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {60-67},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8371676},
   Abstract = {Fast spin-echo imaging has been investigated with attention
             to the requirements and opportunities for high-field MR
             microscopy. Two- and three-dimensional versions were
             implemented at 2.0 T, 7.1 T, and 9.4 T. At these fields, at
             least eight echoes were collectable with a 10 ms TE from
             fixed tissue specimens and living animals, giving an
             eightfold improvement in imaging efficiency. To reduce the
             phase-encoding gradient amplitude and its duty cycle, a
             modified pulse sequence with phase accumulation was
             developed. Images obtained using this pulse sequence
             exhibited comparable signal-to-noise (SNR) to those obtained
             from the conventional fast spin-echo pulse sequences. Signal
             losses due to imperfections in RF pulses and lack of phase
             rewinders were offset in this sequence by reduced diffusion
             losses incurred with the gradients required for MR
             microscopy. Image SNR, contrast, edge effects and spatial
             resolution for three k-space sampling schemes were studied
             experimentally and theoretically. One method of sampling
             k-space, 4-GROUP FSE, was found particularly useful in
             producing varied T2 contrast at high field. Two-dimensional
             images of tissue specimens were obtained in a total
             acquisition time of 1 to 2 min with in-plane resolution
             between 30 to 70 microns, and 3D images with 256(3) arrays
             were acquired from fixed rat brain tissue (isotropic voxel =
             70 microns) and a living rat (isotropic voxel = 117 microns)
             in approximately 4.5 h.},
   Key = {Zhou93a}
}

@article{fds132762,
   Author = {X Zhou and GP Cofer and SA Suddarth and GA Johnson},
   Title = {High-field MR microscopy using fast spin-echoes.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance in medicine : official journal of the
             Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of
             Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {60-7},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Brain Neoplasms • Cerebral
             Cortex • Corpus Callosum • Humans • Image
             Enhancement • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
             • Magnetic Resonance Imaging* • Melanoma •
             Microscopy* • Models, Structural • Rats •
             anatomy & histology • methods •
             pathology},
   Abstract = {Fast spin-echo imaging has been investigated with attention
             to the requirements and opportunities for high-field MR
             microscopy. Two- and three-dimensional versions were
             implemented at 2.0 T, 7.1 T, and 9.4 T. At these fields, at
             least eight echoes were collectable with a 10 ms TE from
             fixed tissue specimens and living animals, giving an
             eightfold improvement in imaging efficiency. To reduce the
             phase-encoding gradient amplitude and its duty cycle, a
             modified pulse sequence with phase accumulation was
             developed. Images obtained using this pulse sequence
             exhibited comparable signal-to-noise (SNR) to those obtained
             from the conventional fast spin-echo pulse sequences. Signal
             losses due to imperfections in RF pulses and lack of phase
             rewinders were offset in this sequence by reduced diffusion
             losses incurred with the gradients required for MR
             microscopy. Image SNR, contrast, edge effects and spatial
             resolution for three k-space sampling schemes were studied
             experimentally and theoretically. One method of sampling
             k-space, 4-GROUP FSE, was found particularly useful in
             producing varied T2 contrast at high field. Two-dimensional
             images of tissue specimens were obtained in a total
             acquisition time of 1 to 2 min with in-plane resolution
             between 30 to 70 microns, and 3D images with 256(3) arrays
             were acquired from fixed rat brain tissue (isotropic voxel =
             70 microns) and a living rat (isotropic voxel = 117 microns)
             in approximately 4.5 h.},
   Key = {fds132762}
}

@booklet{Drayer84,
   Author = {DRAYER, BP and HERFKENS, RJ and JOHNSON, GA and HEINZ, ER and YEATES,
             AE},
   Title = {HIGH-FIELD NMR IMAGING (1.5T) IN A HOSPITAL
             ENVIRONMENT},
   Journal = {American Journal of Neuroradiology},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {669-669},
   Year = {1984},
   ISSN = {0195-6108},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1984TG20900058&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Drayer84}
}

@article{fds268875,
   Author = {Nahrendorf, M and Badea, C and Hedlund, LW and Figueiredo, J-L and Sosnovik, DE and Johnson, GA and Weissleder, R},
   Title = {High-resolution imaging of murine myocardial infarction with
             delayed-enhancement cine micro-CT.},
   Journal = {American journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory
             physiology},
   Volume = {292},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {H3172-H3178},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0363-6135},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17322414},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cineradiography • Contrast Media •
             Coronary Vessels • Disease Models, Animal •
             Feasibility Studies • Female • Iopamidol •
             Ligation • Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL •
             Myocardial Infarction • Radiographic Image
             Interpretation, Computer-Assisted* • Reproducibility of
             Results • Time Factors • Tomography, X-Ray
             Computed* • Ventricular Function, Left •
             Ventricular Remodeling • diagnostic use • methods*
             • physiopathology • radiography* •
             surgery},
   Abstract = {The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility
             of delayed-enhancement micro-computed tomography (microCT)
             imaging to quantify myocardial infarct size in experimental
             mouse models. A total of 20 mice were imaged 5 or 35 days
             after surgical ligation of the left coronary artery or sham
             surgery (n=6 or 7 per group). We utilized a prototype
             microCT that covers a three-dimensional (3D) volume with an
             isotropic spatial resolution of 100 microm. A series of
             image acquisitions were started after a 200 microl bolus of
             a high-molecular-weight blood pool CT agent to outline the
             ventricles. CT imaging was continuously performed over 60
             min, while an intravenous constant infusion with iopamidol
             370 was started at a dosage of 1 ml/h. Thirty minutes after
             the initiation of this infusion, signal intensity in
             Hounsfield units was significantly higher in the infarct
             than in the remote, uninjured myocardium. Cardiac morphology
             and motion were visualized with excellent contrast and in
             fine detail. In vivo CT determination of infarct size at the
             midventricular level was in good agreement with ex vivo
             staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride [5 days
             post-myocardial infarction (MI): r(2)=0.86, P<0.01; 35 days
             post-MI: r(2)=0.92, P<0.01]. In addition, we detected
             significant left ventricular remodeling consisting of left
             ventricular dilation and decreased ejection fraction. 3D
             cine microCT reliably and rapidly quantifies infarct size
             and assesses murine anatomy and physiology after coronary
             ligation, despite the small size and fast movement of the
             mouse heart. This efficient imaging tool is a valuable
             addition to the current phenotyping armamentarium and will
             allow rapid testing of novel drugs and cell-based
             interventions in murine models.},
   Doi = {10.1152/ajpheart.01307.2006},
   Key = {fds268875}
}

@article{fds268832,
   Author = {Howles, GP and Ghaghada, KB and Qi, Y and Mukundan, S and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {High-resolution magnetic resonance angiography in the mouse
             using a nanoparticle blood-pool contrast
             agent.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1447-1456},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1522-2594},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19902507},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cerebral Arteries • Contrast Media
             • Gadolinium • Image Enhancement • Liposomes
             • Magnetic Resonance Angiography • Male •
             Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL • Nanoparticles •
             anatomy & histology* • chemistry • chemistry*
             • diagnostic use* • methods*},
   Abstract = {High-resolution magnetic resonance angiography is already a
             useful tool for studying mouse models of human disease.
             Magnetic resonance angiography in the mouse is typically
             performed using time-of-flight contrast. In this work, a new
             long-circulating blood-pool contrast agent-a liposomal
             nanoparticle with surface-conjugated gadolinium (SC-Gd
             liposomes)-was evaluated for use in mouse neurovascular
             magnetic resonance angiography. A total of 12 mice were
             imaged. Scan parameters were optimized for both
             time-of-flight and SC-Gd contrast. Compared to
             time-of-flight contrast, SC-Gd liposomes (0.08 mmol/kg)
             enabled improved small-vessel contrast-to-noise ratio,
             larger field of view, shorter scan time, and imaging of
             venous structures. For a limited field of view,
             time-of-flight and SC-Gd were not significantly different;
             however, SC-Gd provided better contrast-to-noise ratio when
             the field of view encompassed the whole brain (P < 0.001) or
             the whole neurovascular axis (P < 0.001). SC-Gd allowed
             acquisition of high-resolution magnetic resonance
             angiography (52 x 52 x 100 micrometer(3) or 0.27 nL), with
             123% higher (P < 0.001) contrast-to-noise ratio in
             comparable scan time ( approximately 45 min). Alternatively,
             SC-Gd liposomes could be used to acquire high-resolution
             magnetic resonance angiography (0.27 nL) with 32% higher
             contrast-to-noise ratio (P < 0.001) in 75% shorter scan time
             (12 min).},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.22154},
   Key = {fds268832}
}

@article{fds268873,
   Author = {Petiet, AE and Kaufman, MH and Goddeeris, MM and Brandenburg, J and Elmore, SA and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {High-resolution magnetic resonance histology of the
             embryonic and neonatal mouse: a 4D atlas and morphologic
             database.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {105},
   Number = {34},
   Pages = {12331-12336},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1091-6490},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18713865},
   Keywords = {Anatomy, Cross-Sectional • Animals • Animals,
             Newborn • Databases, Factual • Embryo, Mammalian
             • Embryonic Development* • Heart Septal Defects
             • Imaging, Three-Dimensional • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging • Mice • Mice, Mutant Strains • Mice,
             Transgenic • Microscopy • Time Factors •
             anatomy & histology* • instrumentation •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {Engineered mice play an ever-increasing role in defining
             connections between genotype and phenotypic expression. The
             potential of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) for
             morphologic phenotyping in the mouse has previously been
             demonstrated; however, applications have been limited by
             long scan times, availability of the technology, and a
             foundation of normative data. This article describes an
             integrated environment for high-resolution study of normal,
             transgenic, and mutant mouse models at embryonic and
             neonatal stages. Three-dimensional images are shown at an
             isotropic resolution of 19.5 microm (voxel volumes of 8 pL),
             acquired in 3 h at embryonic days 10.5-19.5 (10 stages) and
             postnatal days 0-32 (6 stages). A web-accessible atlas
             encompassing this data was developed, and for critical
             stages of embryonic development (prenatal days 14.5-18.5),
             >200 anatomical structures have been identified and labeled.
             Also, matching optical histology and analysis tools are
             provided to compare multiple specimens at multiple
             developmental stages. The utility of the approach is
             demonstrated in characterizing cardiac septal defects in
             conditional mutant embryos lacking the Smoothened receptor
             gene. Finally, a collaborative paradigm is presented that
             allows sharing of data across the scientific community. This
             work makes magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse embryo
             and neonate broadly available with carefully annotated
             normative data and an extensive environment for
             collaborations.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.0805747105},
   Key = {fds268873}
}

@booklet{Blinder85a,
   Author = {BLINDER, RA and HERFKENS, RJ and COLEMAN, RE and JOHNSON, GA and SCHENCK, JF and HART, HR and FOSTER, TH and EDELSTEIN,
             WA},
   Title = {HIGH-RESOLUTION MRI IMAGING AT 1.5T USING SURFACE
             COILS},
   Journal = {Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society
             of Nuclear Medicine},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {P8-P8},
   Year = {1985},
   ISSN = {0161-5505},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1985AGS2100042&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Blinder85a}
}

@booklet{Silverman82b,
   Author = {SILVERMAN, PM and JOHNSON, GA and KOROBKIN, M and THOMPSON,
             WM},
   Title = {HIGH-RESOLUTION MULTIPLANAR CT IMAGES OF THE
             LARYNX},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {S34-S34},
   Year = {1982},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1982PA96700153&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198207000-00161},
   Key = {Silverman82b}
}

@booklet{Silverman82,
   Author = {Silverman, PM and Johnson, GA and Korobkin, M and Thompson,
             WM},
   Title = {High-resolution multiplanar CT images of the
             larynx.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {634-637},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7152866},
   Abstract = {The standard technique for computed tomographic evaluation
             of the larynx utilizes 5-mm contiguous transaxial sections.
             Multiplanar images reformatted with these sections have not
             been of clinical use. We have evaluated the practicality of
             utilizing coronal and sagittal reformatted images produced
             from contiguous 1.5-mm transaxial sections. The technique of
             rapid sequential scanning with automatic table
             incrementation allows 36 contiguous thin section scans to be
             acquired in less than 9 minutes. Phantom studies showed a
             marked improvement in spatial resolution with thin section
             reconstructions. Preliminary clinical evaluation shows
             visualization of smaller structures with improved edge
             definition of both low- and high-contrast
             structures.},
   Key = {Silverman82}
}

@article{fds132770,
   Author = {PM Silverman and GA Johnson and M Korobkin and WM
             Thompson},
   Title = {High-resolution multiplanar CT images of the
             larynx.},
   Journal = {Investigative radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {634-7},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   Keywords = {Humans • Larynx • Models, Structural •
             Tomography, X-Ray Computed • methods* •
             radiography*},
   Abstract = {The standard technique for computed tomographic evaluation
             of the larynx utilizes 5-mm contiguous transaxial sections.
             Multiplanar images reformatted with these sections have not
             been of clinical use. We have evaluated the practicality of
             utilizing coronal and sagittal reformatted images produced
             from contiguous 1.5-mm transaxial sections. The technique of
             rapid sequential scanning with automatic table
             incrementation allows 36 contiguous thin section scans to be
             acquired in less than 9 minutes. Phantom studies showed a
             marked improvement in spatial resolution with thin section
             reconstructions. Preliminary clinical evaluation shows
             visualization of smaller structures with improved edge
             definition of both low- and high-contrast
             structures.},
   Key = {fds132770}
}

@article{fds268733,
   Author = {O'Leary-Moore, SK and Budin, F and Paniagua, B and Oguz, I and Johnson,
             GA and Sulik, KK},
   Title = {HIGH-RESOLUTION NEUROIMAGING REVEALS A RANGE OF CORPUS
             CALLOSUM INSULT INDUCED BY ETHANOL ON GESTATIONAL DAY 7
             INMICE},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {37},
   Pages = {167A-167A},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0145-6008},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000318998300625&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds268733}
}

@article{fds268813,
   Author = {Zhang, X and Badea, C and Hood, G and Wetzel, A and Qi, Y and Stiles, J and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {High-resolution reconstruction of fluorescent inclusions in
             mouse thorax using anatomically guided sampling and parallel
             Monte Carlo computing.},
   Journal = {Biomedical Optics Express},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {2449-2460},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {2156-7085},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21991539},
   Abstract = {We present a method for high-resolution reconstruction of
             fluorescent images of the mouse thorax. It features an
             anatomically guided sampling method to retrospectively
             eliminate problematic data and a parallel Monte Carlo
             software package to compute the Jacobian matrix for the
             inverse problem. The proposed method was capable of
             resolving microliter-sized femtomole amount of quantum dot
             inclusions closely located in the middle of the mouse
             thorax. The reconstruction was verified against
             co-registered micro-CT data. Using the proposed method, the
             new system achieved significantly higher resolution and
             sensitivity compared to our previous system consisting of
             the same hardware. This method can be applied to any system
             utilizing similar imaging principles to improve imaging
             performance.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1364/BOE.2.002449},
   Key = {fds268813}
}

@booklet{Silverman83,
   Author = {Silverman, PM and Johnson, GA and Korobkin, M},
   Title = {High-resolution sagittal and coronal reformatted CT images
             of the larynx.},
   Journal = {AJR. American journal of roentgenology},
   Volume = {140},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {819-822},
   Year = {1983},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0361-803X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6601398},
   Doi = {10.2214/ajr.140.4.819},
   Key = {Silverman83}
}

@article{fds132867,
   Author = {PM Silverman and GA Johnson and M Korobkin},
   Title = {High-resolution sagittal and coronal reformatted CT images
             of the larynx.},
   Journal = {AJR. American journal of roentgenology, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {140},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {819-22},
   Year = {1983},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0361-803X},
   Keywords = {Computers • Humans • Laryngeal Neoplasms •
             Larynx • Time Factors • Tomography, X-Ray Computed
             • methods* • radiography* •
             radiotherapy},
   Key = {fds132867}
}

@article{fds268859,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Ali-Sharief, A and Badea, A and Brandenburg, J and Cofer, G and Fubara, B and Gewalt, S and Hedlund, LW and Upchurch,
             L},
   Title = {High-throughput morphologic phenotyping of the mouse brain
             with magnetic resonance histology.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {82-89},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17574443},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Databases as Topic •
             Dominance, Cerebral • Image Enhancement • Image
             Processing, Computer-Assisted • Imaging,
             Three-Dimensional • Magnetic Resonance Imaging •
             Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL • Phenotype* •
             Sensitivity and Specificity • Software* • anatomy
             & histology* • methods* • physiology},
   Abstract = {The Mouse Biomedical Informatics Research Network (MBIRN)
             has been established to integrate imaging studies of the
             mouse brain ranging from three-dimensional (3D) studies of
             the whole brain to focused regions at a sub-cellular scale.
             Magnetic resonance (MR) histology provides the entry point
             for many morphologic comparisons of the whole brain. We
             describe a standardized protocol that allows acquisition of
             3D MR histology (43-microm resolution) images of the fixed,
             stained mouse brain with acquisition times <30 min. A higher
             resolution protocol with isotropic spatial resolution of
             21.5 microm can be executed in 2 h. A third acquisition
             protocol provides an alternative image contrast (at
             43-microm isotropic resolution), which is exploited in a
             statistically driven algorithm that segments 33 of the most
             critical structures in the brain. The entire process, from
             specimen perfusion, fixation and staining, image acquisition
             and reconstruction, post-processing, segmentation,
             archiving, and analysis, is integrated through a structured
             workflow. This yields a searchable database for archive and
             query of the very large (1.2 GB) images acquired with this
             standardized protocol. These methods have been applied to a
             collection of both male and female adult murine brains
             ranging over 4 strains and 6 neurologic knockout models.
             These collection and acquisition methods are now available
             to the neuroscience community as a standard web-deliverable
             service.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2007.05.013},
   Key = {fds268859}
}

@booklet{Mcadams85,
   Author = {MCADAMS, HP and JOHNSON, GA and SUDDARTH, SA and RAVIN,
             CE},
   Title = {HISTOGRAM DIRECTED PROCESSING OF DIGITAL CHEST
             IMAGES},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {S18-S18},
   Year = {1985},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1985ARG0500088&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198509000-00099},
   Key = {Mcadams85}
}

@booklet{Mcadams86,
   Author = {McAdams, HP and Johnson, GA and Suddarth, SA and Ravin,
             CE},
   Title = {Histogram-directed processing of digital chest
             images.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {253-259},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3957599},
   Abstract = {One of the potential advantages of digital chest imaging is
             the ability to process these images. However, such
             processing, when uniformly applied to the entire image, is
             often unsatisfactory due to the different processing
             requirements of lung field and mediastinum. Therefore, a
             method to selectively process these regions based upon the
             histogram of the original image has been developed. Thirteen
             conventional chest films were digitized with a laser film
             scanner. Analysis of individual lung field and mediastinum
             histograms showed that the chest image histogram is
             essentially bimodal with significant lung field-mediastinum
             histogram peak separation; overlap between these peaks is
             small (9% of the total histogram) and insensitive to minor
             pathologic change or radiographic technique. Using these
             histograms, a gray level threshold distinguishing
             mediastinum from lung field was selected and used to direct
             the regionally-selective processing of several chest images.
             This technique may prove especially useful for digital
             enhancement of the underexposed mediastinum often
             encountered on conventional chest radiographs.},
   Key = {Mcadams86}
}

@article{fds132872,
   Author = {HP McAdams and GA Johnson and SA Suddarth and CE Ravin},
   Title = {Histogram-directed processing of digital chest
             images.},
   Journal = {Investigative radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {253-9},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   Keywords = {Computers • Humans • Lasers • Lung •
             Mediastinum • Radiographic Image Enhancement •
             Radiography, Thoracic • methods* •
             radiography},
   Abstract = {One of the potential advantages of digital chest imaging is
             the ability to process these images. However, such
             processing, when uniformly applied to the entire image, is
             often unsatisfactory due to the different processing
             requirements of lung field and mediastinum. Therefore, a
             method to selectively process these regions based upon the
             histogram of the original image has been developed. Thirteen
             conventional chest films were digitized with a laser film
             scanner. Analysis of individual lung field and mediastinum
             histograms showed that the chest image histogram is
             essentially bimodal with significant lung field-mediastinum
             histogram peak separation; overlap between these peaks is
             small (9% of the total histogram) and insensitive to minor
             pathologic change or radiographic technique. Using these
             histograms, a gray level threshold distinguishing
             mediastinum from lung field was selected and used to direct
             the regionally-selective processing of several chest images.
             This technique may prove especially useful for digital
             enhancement of the underexposed mediastinum often
             encountered on conventional chest radiographs.},
   Key = {fds132872}
}

@booklet{Johnson93,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Benveniste, H and Black, RD and Hedlund, LW and Maronpot, RR and Smith, BR},
   Title = {Histology by magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance quarterly},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-30},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0899-9422},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8512830},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) has advanced from a
             technical challenge to a practical tool in a wide range of
             basic sciences. This article focuses on the use of MRM as a
             tool for histological studies. The technical challenges of
             limited signal to noise have been overcome by improved
             radio-frequency (rf) coil design and 3DFT encoding with
             large arrays. Resolution limits imposed by motion in in vivo
             studies have been overcome by improved physiologic
             monitoring and control and projection encoding. Integration
             of technologies now permits routine studies in vivo down to
             50 microns. MRM has also been applied to in vitro studies of
             fixed tissues where absence of motion allows studies down to
             10 microns. The nondestructive nature of the technique
             allows repeated studies of the same sample, retrospective
             studies through any arbitrary plane, registered studies
             using different contrast mechanisms, and examination of
             valuable specimens. The many and unique proton contrasts
             provided by MRM, i.e., T1, T2, and diffusion weighting,
             permit direct examination of the state of water in tissues,
             something not possible with other microscopic techniques.
             Finally, the inherent three-dimensional nature of MRM allows
             acquisition of perfectly registered isotropic 3D arrays
             that, when displayed with appropriate visualization tools,
             provide new perspectives to histologic examination. The
             technology of MRM continues to develop rapidly. New pulse
             sequences are reducing acquisition times. New computer
             architectures allow larger arrays. A new class of
             superconducting rf probe has increased the signal to noise
             ratio by 10 times. These developments promise routine use of
             MRM in histology studies with resolution to 1 micron in the
             near future.},
   Key = {Johnson93}
}

@article{fds132878,
   Author = {GA Johnson and H Benveniste and RD Black and LW Hedlund and RR Maronpot and BR Smith},
   Title = {Histology by magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance quarterly, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-30},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0899-9422},
   Keywords = {Animals • Histological Techniques • Histology*
             • Image Enhancement • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
             • Microscopy • Tissue Fixation •
             instrumentation • methods*},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) has advanced from a
             technical challenge to a practical tool in a wide range of
             basic sciences. This article focuses on the use of MRM as a
             tool for histological studies. The technical challenges of
             limited signal to noise have been overcome by improved
             radio-frequency (rf) coil design and 3DFT encoding with
             large arrays. Resolution limits imposed by motion in in vivo
             studies have been overcome by improved physiologic
             monitoring and control and projection encoding. Integration
             of technologies now permits routine studies in vivo down to
             50 microns. MRM has also been applied to in vitro studies of
             fixed tissues where absence of motion allows studies down to
             10 microns. The nondestructive nature of the technique
             allows repeated studies of the same sample, retrospective
             studies through any arbitrary plane, registered studies
             using different contrast mechanisms, and examination of
             valuable specimens. The many and unique proton contrasts
             provided by MRM, i.e., T1, T2, and diffusion weighting,
             permit direct examination of the state of water in tissues,
             something not possible with other microscopic techniques.
             Finally, the inherent three-dimensional nature of MRM allows
             acquisition of perfectly registered isotropic 3D arrays
             that, when displayed with appropriate visualization tools,
             provide new perspectives to histologic examination. The
             technology of MRM continues to develop rapidly. New pulse
             sequences are reducing acquisition times. New computer
             architectures allow larger arrays. A new class of
             superconducting rf probe has increased the signal to noise
             ratio by 10 times. These developments promise routine use of
             MRM in histology studies with resolution to 1 micron in the
             near future.},
   Key = {fds132878}
}

@booklet{Green80,
   Author = {D. J. Green and G. A. Johnson and S. T. Hutchison},
   Title = {Hot-pressing sodium beta-alumina using solution spray-dried
             and freeze-dried powders},
   Journal = {Journal Of The Canadian Ceramic Society},
   Volume = {49},
   Pages = {7 -- 12},
   Year = {1980},
   Key = {Green80}
}

@article{fds174078,
   Author = {GA Johnson and PA Van Pernis},
   Title = {How pathology kept pace with expansion.},
   Journal = {Modern hospital},
   Volume = {105},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {105-7},
   Year = {1965},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0026-783X},
   Keywords = {Hospital Design and Construction* • Humans •
             Illinois • Laboratories* • Pathology*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174078}
}

@booklet{Macfall96,
   Author = {MacFall, JR and Charles, HC and Black, RD and Middleton, H and Swartz,
             JC and Saam, B and Driehuys, B and Erickson, C and Happer, W and Cates, GD and Johnson, GA and Ravin, CE},
   Title = {Human lung air spaces: potential for MR imaging with
             hyperpolarized He-3.},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {200},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {553-558},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8685356},
   Abstract = {Two healthy volunteers who had inhaled approximately 0.75 L
             of laser-polarized helium-3 gas underwent magnetic resonance
             imaging at 1.5 T with fast gradient-echo pulse sequences and
             small flip angles ( < 10 degrees). Thick-section (20 mm)
             coronal images, time-course data (30 images collected every
             1.8 seconds), and thin-section (6 mm) images were acquired.
             Subjects were able to breathe the gas (12% polarization)
             without difficulty. Thick-section images were of good
             quality and had a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 32:1 near
             the surface coil and 16:1 farther away. The time images
             showed regional differences, which indicated potential value
             for quantitation. High-resolution images showed greater
             detail and a S/N of approximately 6:1.},
   Doi = {10.1148/radiology.200.2.8685356},
   Key = {Macfall96}
}

@article{fds132793,
   Author = {JR MacFall and HC Charles and RD Black and H Middleton and JC Swartz and B
             Saam, B Driehuys and C Erickson and W Happer and GD Cates and GA
             Johnson, CE Ravin},
   Title = {Human lung air spaces: potential for MR imaging with
             hyperpolarized He-3.},
   Journal = {Radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {200},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {553-8},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   Keywords = {Adult • Helium • Humans • Image Enhancement
             • Isotopes • Lung • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging • Male • Middle Aged • anatomy &
             histology* • diagnostic use* • instrumentation
             • methods • methods*},
   Abstract = {Two healthy volunteers who had inhaled approximately 0.75 L
             of laser-polarized helium-3 gas underwent magnetic resonance
             imaging at 1.5 T with fast gradient-echo pulse sequences and
             small flip angles ( < 10 degrees). Thick-section (20 mm)
             coronal images, time-course data (30 images collected every
             1.8 seconds), and thin-section (6 mm) images were acquired.
             Subjects were able to breathe the gas (12% polarization)
             without difficulty. Thick-section images were of good
             quality and had a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 32:1 near
             the surface coil and 16:1 farther away. The time images
             showed regional differences, which indicated potential value
             for quantitation. High-resolution images showed greater
             detail and a S/N of approximately 6:1.},
   Key = {fds132793}
}

@booklet{Kudlacek95,
   Author = {P. E. Kudlacek and R. J. Anderson and D. K. Liebentritt and G. A. Johnson and C. J. Huerter},
   Title = {Human skin and platelet minoxidil sulfotransferase
             activities - biochemical-properties, correlations and
             contribution of thermolabile phenol sulfotransferase},
   Journal = {Journal Of Pharmacology And Experimental
             Therapeutics},
   Volume = {273},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {582 -- 590},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {Kudlacek95}
}

@article{fds174118,
   Author = {PE Kudlacek and RJ Anderson and DK Liebentritt and GA Johnson and CJ
             Huerter},
   Title = {Human skin and platelet minoxidil sulfotransferase
             activities: biochemical properties, correlations and
             contribution of thermolabile phenol sulfotransferase.},
   Journal = {The Journal of pharmacology and experimental
             therapeutics},
   Volume = {273},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {582-90},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0022-3565},
   Keywords = {Arylsulfotransferase • Blood Platelets •
             Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid • Chromatography,
             Ion Exchange • Enzyme Stability • Humans •
             Minoxidil • Nitrophenols • Skin • Sodium
             Chloride • Substrate Specificity •
             Sulfotransferases • Temperature • antagonists &
             inhibitors • enzymology* • isolation &
             purification • metabolism* • pharmacology},
   Abstract = {Human scalp skin high speed supernatants were used to test
             whether minoxidil sulfotransferase (MNX-ST) and phenol
             sulfotransferase (PST) activities were present. Platelet
             homogenates from the same skin donors were used to test
             whether levels of sulfotransferase activities in the blood
             platelet would reflect levels of the enzyme activities in
             skin. Dopamine, p-nitrophenol and minoxidil were used as
             substrates for skin and platelet thermolabile (TL PST),
             thermostable (TS PST) and MNX-ST activities, respectively.
             Biochemical properties of each skin enzyme were the same as
             the platelet enzymes with respect to apparent Km values for
             substrates, pH optima, thermal stabilities and responses to
             inhibition by 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP). An
             unexpected finding was that skin and platelet MNX-ST thermal
             stabilities and responses to DCNP were more similar to TL
             PST than to TS PST, the enzyme reported to be responsible
             for MNX-ST activity. There were significant positive
             correlations of platelet sulfotransferases with the relative
             levels of activities of the same skin sulfotransferases.
             Unexpected findings were significant positive correlations
             of MNX-ST and TL PST activities. Partially purified platelet
             TS PST assayed with minoxidil as the substrate showed a
             response to DCNP and thermal stability that were the same as
             TS PST. Platelet TL PST assayed with minoxidil showed
             thermal stability and a response to DCNP that were
             essentially the same as TL PST. The results indicated that
             not only TS PST, but also TL PST activities in human skin
             and platelet contributed to MNX-ST activity. It will be
             feasible to test whether measures of platelet PST activities
             will predict physiologic responses to minoxidil.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174118}
}

@article{fds132745,
   Title = {Hurlston SE, Brey WW, Suddarth SA, Yap M, Johson GA. A high
             temperature superconducting Helmholtz probe for microscopy
             at 9.4 T Magn Res Med. In press 1998},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds132745}
}

@article{fds269056,
   Author = {Chawla, MS and Chen, XJ and Cofer, GP and Hedlund, LW and Kerby, MB and Ottoboni, TB and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Hyperpolarized 3He microspheres as a novel vascular signal
             source for MRI.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {440-445},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10725887},
   Keywords = {Animals • Helium • Image Enhancement •
             Magnetic Resonance Angiography* • Male •
             Microscopy, Electron, Scanning • Microspheres •
             Pelvis • Phantoms, Imaging • Rats • blood
             supply • chemistry* • methods},
   Abstract = {Hyperpolarized (HP) 3He can be encapsulated within
             biologically compatible microspheres while retaining
             sufficient polarization to be used as a signal source for
             MRI. Two microsphere sizes were used, with mean diameters of
             5.3 +/- 1.3 microm and 10.9 +/- 3.0 microm. These
             suspensions ranged in concentration from 0.9-7.0% gas by
             volume. Spectroscopic measurements in phantoms at 2 T
             yielded 3He relaxation times that varied with gas
             concentration. At the highest 3He concentration, the
             spinlattice relaxation time, T1, was 63.8 +/- 9.4 sec, while
             the transverse magnetization decayed with a time constant of
             T2* = 11.0 +/- 0.4 msec. In vivo MR images of the pelvic
             veins in a rat were acquired during intravenous injection of
             3He microspheres (SNR approximately equal 15). Advantages
             such as intravascular confinement, lack of background
             signal, and limited recirculation indicate quantitative
             perfusion measurements may be improved using this novel
             signal source.},
   Key = {fds269056}
}

@article{fds269124,
   Author = {Chen, XJ and Chawla, MS and Cofer, GP and Hedlund, LW and Möller, HE and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Hyperpolarized 3He NMR lineshape measurements in the live
             guinea pig lung.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {61-65},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9660554},
   Keywords = {Animals • Guinea Pigs • Helium • Isotopes
             • Lung • Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy •
             Pulmonary Gas Exchange • Reference Values •
             Respiratory Mechanics • Sensitivity and Specificity
             • anatomy & histology* • diagnostic use* •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {Spatially localized lineshapes of hyperpolarized (HP) 3He in
             guinea pig lungs have been measured in vivo. Three different
             axial slice locations, each containing different
             compositions of airway sizes and orientations, were studied.
             Gas peaks from major bronchi (2 ppm) and alveoli (-2 ppm)
             were distinguished. The gas phase spectra show structural
             features that are a result of frequency shifts caused by
             bulk magnetic susceptibility. For a given slice, the
             spectral lineshapes reflect the airway composition within
             the slice location, according to theory. The peak
             assignments given here also agree with previous studies done
             by Wagshul et al. with HP 129Xe. At each of the slice
             locations, data were acquired during two phases of the
             breathing cycle, resulting in a relative frequency shift of
             approximately 0.3 ppm in the superior slices. Spectra
             obtained over a number of breaths show the dynamics of the
             gas buildup in the lung and provide further evidence
             supporting the peak assignments.},
   Key = {fds269124}
}

@booklet{Chawla00,
   Author = {M. S. Chawla and X. J. Chen and G. P. Cofer and L. W.
             Hedlund and M. B. Kerby and T. B. Ottoboni and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Hyperpolarized He-3 microspheres as a novel vascular signal
             source for MRI},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance In Medicine},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {440 -- 445},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Chawla00}
}

@booklet{Chen98,
   Author = {X. J. Chen and M. S. Chawla and G. P. Cofer and L. W.
             Hedlund and H. E. Moller and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Hyperpolarized He-3 NMR lineshape measurements in the live
             guinea pig lung},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance In Medicine},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {61 -- 65},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {Chen98}
}

@article{fds174086,
   Author = {GA Johnson},
   Title = {HYPOCHLORITE TREATMENT OF PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES: ITS
             ADAPTIBILITY AND LIMITATIONS.},
   Journal = {Journal. American Public Health Association},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {562-74},
   Year = {1911},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0273-1975},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174086}
}

@article{fds174158,
   Author = {GA Johnson},
   Title = {HYPOCHLORITE TREATMENT OF PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES: ITS
             ADAPTIBILITY AND LIMITATIONS.},
   Journal = {Journal. American Public Health Association},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {562-574},
   Year = {1911},
   Month = {August},
   Language = {ENG},
   Key = {fds174158}
}

@booklet{Spencer99c,
   Author = {T. E. Spencer and F. F. Bartol and F. W. Bazer and G. A.
             Johnson and M. M. Joyce},
   Title = {Identification and characterization of glycosylation-dependent
             cell adhesion molecule 1-like protein expression in the
             ovine uterus},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {60},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {241 -- 250},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {Spencer99c}
}

@article{fds174088,
   Author = {TE Spencer and FF Bartol and FW Bazer and GA Johnson and MM
             Joyce},
   Title = {Identification and characterization of glycosylation-dependent
             cell adhesion molecule 1-like protein expression in the
             ovine uterus.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {60},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {241-50},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blotting, Western • Embryonic
             Development • Endometrium • Epithelium •
             Estrus • Female • Gestational Age •
             Immunosorbent Techniques • Mucins • Myometrium
             • Pregnancy • Sheep • Uterus • analysis*
             • chemistry • chemistry*},
   Abstract = {Glycosylation-dependent cell adhesion molecule 1 (GlyCAM-1)
             is an endothelial glycoprotein secreted in lymph nodes that
             serves as a ligand for leukocyte cell surface selectin and
             mediates lymphocyte extravasation. In the present studies,
             rabbit anti-rat GlyCAM-1 IgG was used in immunochemical
             analyses of GlyCAM-1-like protein in the ovine uterus. In
             cyclic ewes, GlyCAM-1 expression increased in the
             endometrial luminal epithelium (LE) and shallow glandular
             epithelium (cGE) between Days 1 and 5 and then decreased
             between Days 11 and 15. In pregnant ewes, GlyCAM-1 in the LE
             and cGE was low on Days 11 and 13, increased on Day 15, and
             was abundant on Days 17 and 19. Immunoreactive GlyCAM-1 was
             also detected in the conceptus trophectoderm on Days 13-19.
             Staining for GlyCAM-1 in the smooth muscle of the
             vasculature and myometrium was constitutive, and no staining
             was detected in the stroma. An immunoreactive protein of
             approximately 45 kDa was identified in endometrial extracts
             and uterine flushings from cyclic and pregnant ewes. In
             pregnant ewes, the relative amount of immunoreactive
             GlyCAM-1 in uterine flushings was low on Days 11 and 13 but
             high on Days 15 and 17. Results suggest that a GlyCAM-1-like
             protein may be a secretory product of the endometrial
             epithelium and/or conceptus trophectoderm. Patterns of
             distribution observed for immunoreactive GlyCAM-1-like
             protein in the endometrial epithelium, combined with
             proposed functions for lymphoid GlyCAM-1, suggest that this
             mucin glycoprotein may be involved in conceptus-maternal
             interactions during the periimplantation period of pregnancy
             in sheep.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174088}
}

@article{fds204260,
   Author = {C Abad and DF Antczak and J Carvalho and LW Chamley and Q Chen and S Daher and AE Damiano and V Dantzer and P Díaz and CE Dunk and E Daly and C Escudero and B Falcón and M Guillomot and YW Han and LK Harris and JP Huidobro-Toro and N Illsley and H Jammes and T Jansson and GA Johnson, JR Kfoury Jr and R
             Marín, P Murthi and B Novakovic and L Myatt and MG Petroff and FT
             Pereira, C Pfarrer and CW Redman and G Rice and R Saffery and JM Tolosa and C Vaillancourt and M Wareing and R Yuen and GE Lash},
   Title = {IFPA Meeting 2010 Workshop Report I: Immunology; ion
             transport; epigenetics; vascular reactivity;
             epitheliochorial placentation; proteomics.},
   Journal = {Placenta},
   Volume = {32 Suppl 2},
   Pages = {S81-9},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1532-3102},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.placenta.2010.12.019},
   Keywords = {Animals • Education • Epigenesis, Genetic •
             Female • Fetus • Humans • Ion Transport
             • Maternal-Fetal Exchange • Placenta •
             Placentation • Pregnancy • Proteomics •
             Trophoblasts • blood supply • cytology •
             immunology • methods • physiology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting.
             At IFPA Meeting 2010 there were twelve themed workshops, six
             of which are summarized in this report. 1. The immunology
             workshop focused on normal and pathological functions of the
             maternal immune system in pregnancy. 2. The transport
             workshop dealt with regulation of ion and water transport
             across the syncytiotrophoblast of human placenta. 3. The
             epigenetics workshop covered DNA methylation and its
             potential role in regulating gene expression in placental
             development and disease. 4. The vascular reactivity workshop
             concentrated on methodological approaches used to study
             placental vascular function. 5. The workshop on
             epitheliochorial placentation covered current advances from
             in vivo and in vitro studies of different domestic species.
             6. The proteomics workshop focused on a variety of
             techniques and procedures necessary for proteomic analysis
             and how they may be implemented for placental
             research.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.placenta.2010.12.019},
   Key = {fds204260}
}

@booklet{Johnson02e,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Hedlund, LW},
   Title = {Image based phenotyping: The visible mouse},
   Journal = {The FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation
             of American Societies for Experimental Biology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {A1091-A1091},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0892-6638},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000174593902021&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Johnson02e}
}

@article{fds268888,
   Author = {Sherrier, RH and Chotas, HG and Johnson, GA and Chiles, C and Ravin,
             CE},
   Title = {Image optimization in a computed-radiography/photostimulable-phosphor
             system.},
   Journal = {Journal of Digital Imaging},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {212-219},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0897-1889},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2488166},
   Keywords = {Humans • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted* •
             Radiography, Thoracic • Tomography, X-Ray Computed*
             • X-Ray Film},
   Abstract = {Photostimulable phosphor imaging is an exciting new
             technology that has several advantages over film/screen
             radiography, the most important of which is the linearity of
             the photostimulable phosphor system over a wide exposure
             latitude. The photostimulable phosphor image is digital, and
             as such, provides options of how the image is viewed by
             radiologists. This report discusses the various
             image-processing parameters available for a photostimulable
             phosphor system and describes a rational approach for
             selecting these parameters in portable chest radiography. As
             photostimulable phosphor imaging becomes more widely
             implemented, an understanding of the processing parameters
             will facilitate the production of images that take full
             advantage of the benefits of these systems.},
   Key = {fds268888}
}

@booklet{Johnson82e,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Korobkin, M},
   Title = {Image techniques for multiplanar computed
             tomography.},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {144},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {829-834},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7111733},
   Abstract = {Hardware and software options of the GE 8800 CT scanner were
             analyzed with respect to their effect on image quality for
             multiplanar images. Phantom studies were undertaken to
             demonstrate the effect of collimation, thick pixel
             reconstruction, and interpolation of both high- and
             low-contrast multiplanar images. Noise and spatial
             resolution were measured. Thick pixel reconstruction was
             found to be most useful in aiding in the delineation of
             low-contrast lesion boundaries. In addition, this option
             permits use of lower techniques, thus speeding data
             acquisition and reducing patient dose. Clinical examples are
             included.},
   Doi = {10.1148/radiology.144.4.7111733},
   Key = {Johnson82e}
}

@article{fds132851,
   Author = {GA Johnson and M Korobkin},
   Title = {Image techniques for multiplanar computed
             tomography.},
   Journal = {Radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {144},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {829-34},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   Keywords = {Humans • Models, Structural • Radiographic Image
             Enhancement • Technology, Radiologic • Tomography,
             X-Ray Computed • methods*},
   Abstract = {Hardware and software options of the GE 8800 CT scanner were
             analyzed with respect to their effect on image quality for
             multiplanar images. Phantom studies were undertaken to
             demonstrate the effect of collimation, thick pixel
             reconstruction, and interpolation of both high- and
             low-contrast multiplanar images. Noise and spatial
             resolution were measured. Thick pixel reconstruction was
             found to be most useful in aiding in the delineation of
             low-contrast lesion boundaries. In addition, this option
             permits use of lower techniques, thus speeding data
             acquisition and reducing patient dose. Clinical examples are
             included.},
   Key = {fds132851}
}

@article{fds320200,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Anderson, RJ and Cook, JJ and Long, C and Badea,
             A},
   Title = {Image-processing pipelines: Applications in magnetic
             resonance histology},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE},
   Volume = {9784},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781510600195},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2203525},
   Abstract = {© 2016 SPIE. Image processing has become ubiquitous in
             imaging research - so ubiquitous that it is easy to loose
             track of how diverse this processing has become. The Duke
             Center for In Vivo Microscopy has pioneered the development
             of Magnetic Resonance Histology (MRH), which generates large
             multidimensional data sets that can easily reach into the
             tens of gigabytes. A series of dedicated image-processing
             workstations and associated software have been assembled to
             optimize each step of acquisition, reconstruction,
             post-processing, registration, visualization, and
             dissemination. This talk will describe the image-processing
             pipelines from acquisition to dissemination that have become
             critical to our everyday work.},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.2203525},
   Key = {fds320200}
}

@article{fds268880,
   Author = {Yelbuz, TM and Zhang, X and Choma, MA and Stadt, HA and Zdanowicz, M and Johnson, GA and Kirby, ML},
   Title = {Images in cardiovascular medicine. Approaching cardiac
             development in three dimensions by magnetic resonance
             microscopy.},
   Journal = {Circulation},
   Volume = {108},
   Number = {22},
   Pages = {e154-e155},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1524-4539},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14656909},
   Keywords = {Animals • Chick Embryo • Heart • Imaging,
             Three-Dimensional* • Internet • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging • Microscopy • Video Recording •
             anatomy & histology • embryology* •
             instrumentation* • methods*},
   Doi = {10.1161/01.CIR.0000102940.17908.CA},
   Key = {fds268880}
}

@article{fds268862,
   Author = {Driehuys, B and Cofer, GP and Pollaro, J and Mackel, JB and Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Imaging alveolar-capillary gas transfer using hyperpolarized
             129Xe MRI.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {103},
   Number = {48},
   Pages = {18278-18283},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0027-8424},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17101964},
   Keywords = {Animals • Erythrocytes • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging • Microcirculation • Oxygen • Rats
             • Rats, Inbred F344 • Respiration* • Xenon
             Isotopes • metabolism • metabolism* •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {Effective pulmonary gas exchange relies on the free
             diffusion of gases across the thin tissue barrier separating
             airspace from the capillary red blood cells (RBCs).
             Pulmonary pathologies, such as inflammation, fibrosis, and
             edema, which cause an increased blood-gas barrier thickness,
             impair the efficiency of this exchange. However, definitive
             assessment of such gas-exchange abnormalities is
             challenging, because no methods currently exist to directly
             image the gas transfer process. Here we exploit the
             solubility and chemical shift of (129)Xe, the magnetic
             resonance signal of which has been enhanced by 10(5) with
             hyperpolarization, to differentially image its transfer from
             the airspaces into the tissue barrier spaces and RBCs in the
             gas exchange regions of the lung. Based on a simple
             diffusion model, we estimate that this MR imaging method for
             measuring (129)Xe alveolar-capillary transfer is sensitive
             to changes in blood-gas barrier thickness of approximately 5
             microm. We validate the successful separation of tissue
             barrier and RBC images and show the utility of this method
             in a rat model of pulmonary fibrosis where (129)Xe
             replenishment of the RBCs is severely impaired in regions of
             lung injury.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.0608458103},
   Key = {fds268862}
}

@booklet{Gareau02,
   Author = {Gareau, PJ and Wymore, AC and Cofer, GP and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Imaging inflammation: direct visualization of perivascular
             cuffing in EAE by magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {28-36},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1053-1807},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12112500},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: To determine if the architectural features revealed
             by magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) allow one to detect
             microscopic abnormalities associated with neuroinflammation
             in fixed brain sections from animals with experimental
             allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for
             multiple sclerosis (MS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Imaging was
             performed at the Center for In Vivo Microscopy (CIVM) using
             a 9.4-Tesla, 89-mm bore, superconducting magnet with
             actively shielded gradients capable of 850 mT/m. A number of
             MR contrasts and spatial resolutions were explored. RESULTS:
             The assessment of EAE brain showed that it is possible to
             visualize perivascular cuffing in vitro by MRM on
             three-dimensional T1 proton stains. CONCLUSION: Inflammatory
             cell infiltration is a prerequisite for the development of
             lesions in EAE and MS. Thus, the ability to directly detect
             individual perivascular cuffs of inflammation may provide a
             useful means of monitoring the time course of inflammatory
             events, as conventional histopathological scoring of
             perivascular cuffs is utilized, but in the absence of
             sectioning and staining.},
   Doi = {10.1002/jmri.10136},
   Key = {Gareau02}
}

@article{fds132842,
   Author = {PJ Gareau and AC Wymore and GP Cofer and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Imaging inflammation: direct visualization of perivascular
             cuffing in EAE by magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Journal of magnetic resonance imaging : JMRI, United
             States},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {28-36},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1053-1807},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Disease Models, Animal •
             Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental • Female
             • Guinea Pigs • Inflammation • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging • Microscopy • Multiple
             Sclerosis • methods* • pathology •
             pathology*},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: To determine if the architectural features revealed
             by magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) allow one to detect
             microscopic abnormalities associated with neuroinflammation
             in fixed brain sections from animals with experimental
             allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for
             multiple sclerosis (MS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Imaging was
             performed at the Center for In Vivo Microscopy (CIVM) using
             a 9.4-Tesla, 89-mm bore, superconducting magnet with
             actively shielded gradients capable of 850 mT/m. A number of
             MR contrasts and spatial resolutions were explored. RESULTS:
             The assessment of EAE brain showed that it is possible to
             visualize perivascular cuffing in vitro by MRM on
             three-dimensional T1 proton stains. CONCLUSION: Inflammatory
             cell infiltration is a prerequisite for the development of
             lesions in EAE and MS. Thus, the ability to directly detect
             individual perivascular cuffs of inflammation may provide a
             useful means of monitoring the time course of inflammatory
             events, as conventional histopathological scoring of
             perivascular cuffs is utilized, but in the absence of
             sectioning and staining.},
   Key = {fds132842}
}

@booklet{Johnson81d,
   Author = {JOHNSON, GA and NELSON, CE and OFOGHLUDHA, F},
   Title = {IMAGING LIMITS IN DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {377-377},
   Year = {1981},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1981MK56200033&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198109000-00033},
   Key = {Johnson81d}
}

@article{fds268855,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Bucholz, E and Hedlund, LW and Rockman, HA and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Imaging methods for morphological and functional phenotyping
             of the rodent heart.},
   Journal = {Toxicologic Pathology (Sage)},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {111-117},
   Year = {2006},
   ISSN = {0192-6233},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16507552},
   Keywords = {Animals • Biological Markers • Heart •
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Mice •
             Microradiography • Myocardium • Rats •
             Tomography, X-Ray Computed • methods* • pathology*
             • radiography*},
   Abstract = {Small animal imaging has a critical role in phenotyping,
             drug discovery, and in providing a basic understanding of
             mechanisms of disease. Translating imaging methods from
             humans to small animals is not an easy task. The purpose of
             this work is to compare two cardiac imaging modalities,
             i.e., magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) and microcomputed
             tomography (CT) for preclinical studies on rodents. We
             present the two technologies, the parameters that they can
             measure, the types of alterations that they can detect, and
             show how these imaging methods compare to techniques
             available in clinical medicine. While this paper does not
             refer per se to the cardiac risk assessment for drug or
             chemical development, we hope that the information will
             effectively address how MRM and micro-CT might be exploited
             to measure biomarkers critical for safety
             assessment.},
   Doi = {10.1080/01926230500404126},
   Key = {fds268855}
}

@article{fds268782,
   Author = {Johnson, K and Badea, C and Hedlund, L and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Imaging techniques for small animal imaging models of
             pulmonary disease: Micro-CT (Toxicologic Pathology (2007)
             35, 5 (9-64))},
   Journal = {Toxicologic Pathology (Sage)},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {895-},
   Year = {2008},
   ISSN = {0192-6233},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0192623308323921},
   Doi = {10.1177/0192623308323921},
   Key = {fds268782}
}

@booklet{Henson94,
   Author = {Henson, MM and Henson, OW and Gewalt, SL and Wilson, JL and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Imaging the cochlea by magnetic resonance
             microscopy.},
   Journal = {Hearing Research},
   Volume = {75},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {75-80},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0378-5955},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8071156},
   Abstract = {The isolated, fixed cochlea of the mustached bat was studied
             with three dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy.
             The cochlea of this animal is about 4 mm in diameter and its
             entire volume was imaged. With the field of view and matrix
             size used, the volume elements (voxels) making up the volume
             data set were isotropic 25 x 25 x 25 micron cubes. Three
             dimensional (3D) MR microscopy based on isotropic voxels has
             many advantages over commonly used light microscopy: 1) it
             is non destructive; 2) it is much less time consuming; 3) no
             dehydration is required and shrinkage is minimized; 4) the
             data set can be used to create sections in any desired
             plane; 5) the proper alignment of sections is inherent in
             the 3D acquisition so that no reference points are required;
             6) the entire data set can be viewed from any point of view
             in a volume rendered image; 7) the data is digital and
             features can be enhanced by computer image processing; and
             8) the isotropic dimensions of the voxels make the data
             well-suited for structural reconstructions and measurements.
             Good images of the osseous spiral lamina, spiral ligament,
             scala tympani, scala vestibuli, and nerve bundles were
             obtained. The vestibular (Reissner's) membrane was easily
             identified in the mustached bat and it appears to bulge into
             the scala vestibuli. The visibility of this structure
             suggests that MR microscopy would be well-suited for studies
             of endolymphatic hydrops.},
   Key = {Henson94}
}

@article{fds132818,
   Author = {MM Henson and OW Henson and SL Gewalt and JL Wilson and GA
             Johnson},
   Title = {Imaging the cochlea by magnetic resonance
             microscopy.},
   Journal = {Hearing research, NETHERLANDS},
   Volume = {75},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {75-80},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0378-5955},
   Keywords = {Animals • Chiroptera • Cochlea • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging* • Scala Tympani • Spiral
             Ganglion • Tissue Fixation • Vestibular Nerve
             • Vestibulocochlear Nerve • anatomy & histology
             • anatomy & histology*},
   Abstract = {The isolated, fixed cochlea of the mustached bat was studied
             with three dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy.
             The cochlea of this animal is about 4 mm in diameter and its
             entire volume was imaged. With the field of view and matrix
             size used, the volume elements (voxels) making up the volume
             data set were isotropic 25 x 25 x 25 micron cubes. Three
             dimensional (3D) MR microscopy based on isotropic voxels has
             many advantages over commonly used light microscopy: 1) it
             is non destructive; 2) it is much less time consuming; 3) no
             dehydration is required and shrinkage is minimized; 4) the
             data set can be used to create sections in any desired
             plane; 5) the proper alignment of sections is inherent in
             the 3D acquisition so that no reference points are required;
             6) the entire data set can be viewed from any point of view
             in a volume rendered image; 7) the data is digital and
             features can be enhanced by computer image processing; and
             8) the isotropic dimensions of the voxels make the data
             well-suited for structural reconstructions and measurements.
             Good images of the osseous spiral lamina, spiral ligament,
             scala tympani, scala vestibuli, and nerve bundles were
             obtained. The vestibular (Reissner's) membrane was easily
             identified in the mustached bat and it appears to bulge into
             the scala vestibuli. The visibility of this structure
             suggests that MR microscopy would be well-suited for studies
             of endolymphatic hydrops.},
   Key = {fds132818}
}

@article{fds289613,
   Author = {Nugent, AC and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Imaging using magnetization-prepared projection encoding
             (MaPPE)},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {421-428},
   Year = {2000},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1522-2594(200003)43:3<421::AID-MRM14>3.0.CO;2-},
   Abstract = {T(1p), contrast weighting using a magnetization-prepared
             projection encoding (MaPPE) pulse sequence was investigated.
             Fast radial imaging was implemented by applying
             magnetization preparation pulses, each followed by multiple
             RF α pulses encoding radial trajectories of k-space.
             Acquiring multiple views per preparatory pulse imposes
             view-to-view variation; the resultant distortion of the
             point-spread function is examined. The issue of maximizing
             signal while preserving the intended contrast weighting is
             addressed. Under modification of repetition time and flip
             angle (α), three distinct behavior regimes of the sequence
             are identified. The utility of the pulse sequence as a
             quantitative relaxation measurement tool is also examined by
             comparing imaging and spectroscopy experiments. A mouse was
             imaged in vitro to demonstrate the viability of application
             to MR histology. These images exhibit the utility of
             spinlocking and projection encoding as an alternative
             contrast source to both T2-weighted MaPPE images and
             conventional T2-weighted spin-echo images. (C) 2000
             Wiley-Liss, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/(SICI)1522-2594(200003)43:3<421::AID-MRM14>3.0.CO;2-},
   Key = {fds289613}
}

@article{fds316054,
   Author = {Wei, H and Xie, L and Dibb, R and Li, W and Decker, K and Zhang, Y and Johnson, GA and Liu, C},
   Title = {Imaging whole-brain cytoarchitecture of mouse with MRI-based
             quantitative susceptibility mapping.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {137},
   Pages = {107-115},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.05.033},
   Abstract = {The proper microstructural arrangement of complex neural
             structures is essential for establishing the functional
             circuitry of the brain. We present an MRI method to resolve
             tissue microstructure and infer brain cytoarchitecture by
             mapping the magnetic susceptibility in the brain at high
             resolution. This is possible because of the heterogeneous
             magnetic susceptibility created by varying concentrations of
             lipids, proteins and irons from the cell membrane to
             cytoplasm. We demonstrate magnetic susceptibility maps at a
             nominal resolution of 10-μm isotropic, approaching the
             average cell size of a mouse brain. The maps reveal many
             detailed structures including the retina cell layers,
             olfactory sensory neurons, barrel cortex, cortical layers,
             axonal fibers in white and gray matter. Olfactory glomerulus
             density is calculated and structural connectivity is traced
             in the optic nerve, striatal neurons, and brainstem nerves.
             The method is robust and can be readily applied on MRI
             scanners at or above 7T.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.05.033},
   Key = {fds316054}
}

@article{fds174276,
   Author = {AL Asirvatham and GA Johnson and EL Belden and EA Van Kirk and GE Moss and WJ Murdoch},
   Title = {Immunization of mice against a synthetic N-terminal
             extracellular domain gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor
             peptide: evidence for a direct uterine effect.},
   Journal = {American journal of reproductive immunology (New York, N.Y.
             : 1989)},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {95-100},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {1046-7408},
   Keywords = {Amino Acid Sequence • Animals • Female •
             Immunization, Passive • Male • Mice • Mice,
             Inbred BALB C • Molecular Sequence Data • Peptide
             Fragments • Receptors, LHRH • Uterus •
             Vaccination • chemistry • immunology •
             immunology* • pathology},
   Abstract = {PROBLEM: Immature male and female mice were immunized with a
             synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acids 5-17
             (ASLEQDPNHCSAI) of the mouse hypophyseal
             gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor. METHOD:
             Effect of immunization (postpuberal) was restricted to the
             uterus. Pituitary-gonadal functions were not altered.
             RESULTS: The endometrial lining of immunized females was
             thin and lacked glandular development. These observations
             were corroborated in actively immunized and passively
             immunized adult females. CONCLUSIONS: Apparently endometrial
             cells express a unique surface antigen, though reactive with
             antipeptide antibodies, that differs from the prototype
             pituitary GnRH receptor. Antibodies that selectively inhibit
             endometrial maturation might be used to treat proliferative
             diseases of the uterus.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174276}
}

@booklet{Asirvatham94,
   Author = {A. L. Asirvatham and G. A. Johnson and E. L. Belden and E.
             A. Vankirk and G. E. Moss and W. J. Murdoch},
   Title = {Immunization of mice against a synthetic n-terminal
             extracellular domain gonadotropin-releasing-hormone receptor
             peptide - evidence for a direct uterine effect},
   Journal = {American Journal Of Reproductive Immunology},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {95 -- 100},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {Asirvatham94}
}

@booklet{Zelei90,
   Author = {B. V. Zelei and C. J. Walker and G. A. Sawada and T. T.
             Kawabe and K. A. Knight and A. E. Buhl and G. A. Johnson and A. R. Diani},
   Title = {Immunohistochemical and autoradiographic findings suggest
             that minoxidil is not localized in specific cells of
             vibrissa, pelage, or scalp follicles},
   Journal = {Cell And Tissue Research},
   Volume = {262},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {407 -- 413},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {Zelei90}
}

@article{fds174107,
   Author = {BV Zelei and CJ Walker and GA Sawada and TT Kawabe and KA Knight and AE
             Buhl, GA Johnson and AR Diani},
   Title = {Immunohistochemical and autoradiographic findings suggest
             that minoxidil is not localized in specific cells of
             vibrissa, pelage, or scalp follicles.},
   Journal = {Cell and tissue research},
   Volume = {262},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {407-13},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0302-766X},
   Keywords = {Animals • Autoradiography • Hair •
             Immunohistochemistry • Male • Melanins •
             Minoxidil • Rats • Scalp • Vibrissae •
             cytology* • metabolism • metabolism*},
   Abstract = {Immunohistochemistry with a minoxidil antibody suggested
             that minoxidil-immunoreactivity is associated with the root
             sheaths, laterally orientated differentiating matrix cells,
             and dividing epithelial cells of cultured vibrissa follicles
             of pigmented and albino neonatal mice. The dermal papilla
             and connective tissue sheath were devoid of
             minoxidil-immunoreactivity. To verify that
             minoxodil-immunoreactivity in the follicles was specific,
             immunostaining was conducted with dissected whisker pads,
             formalin-fixed "dead" follicles, and sections of spleen,
             liver and kidney (non-haired organs) cultured with
             minoxidil. Microscopic examination revealed
             minoxidil-immunoreactivity in all of these tissues.
             Follicles and whisker pads cultured with minoxidil, then
             washed for one h in media were devoid of
             minoxidil-immunoreactivity. These data suggest that
             minoxidil-immunoreactivity in cultured vibrissa follicles is
             probably non-specific. Sections of skin from C3H and CF1
             mice which were topically dosed with minoxidil (in vivo)
             showed no minoxidil-immunoreactivity. Autoradiography
             demonstrated that tritiated minoxidil was bound in vivo and
             in vitro only to melanin granules in pigmented follicles of
             rodent and human tissue. This is probably non-specific
             binding since melanin is known to accumulate several
             chemically and pharmacologically unrelated drugs. It is
             reasonable to conclude that, under the conditions of these
             experiments, minoxidil is not specifically localized in any
             cells of whisker, pelage or, scalp follicles.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174107}
}

@booklet{Harris86,
   Author = {D. W. Harris and D. M. Sutter and G. A. Johnson and J. H.
             Ludens},
   Title = {Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic factors (ir-anf) in plasma
             of conscious, unperturbed doca-salt hypertensive
             rats},
   Journal = {Clinical Research},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {A479 -- A479},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {Harris86}
}

@article{fds180932,
   Author = {G Wu and FW Bazer and RC Burghardt and GA Johnson and SW Kim and XL Li and MC
             Satterfield, TE Spencer},
   Title = {Impacts of amino acid nutrition on pregnancy outcome in
             pigs: mechanisms and implications for swine
             production.},
   Journal = {Journal of animal science},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {13 Suppl},
   Pages = {E195-204},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1525-3163},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2527/jas.2009-2446},
   Keywords = {Adipose Tissue • Amino Acids • Animal Nutritional
             Physiological Phenomena • Animals • Diet •
             Female • Fetal Development • Fetal Growth
             Retardation • Litter Size • Muscle, Skeletal
             • Placenta • Pregnancy • Pregnancy Outcome
             • Swine • drug effects • embryology •
             growth & development • metabolism • physiology
             • physiology* • veterinary •
             veterinary*},
   Abstract = {Pigs suffer up to 50% embryonic and fetal loss during
             gestation and exhibit the most severe naturally occurring
             intrauterine growth retardation among livestock species.
             Placental insufficiency is a major factor contributing to
             suboptimal reproductive performance and reduced birth
             weights of pigs. Enhancement of placental growth and
             function through nutritional management offers an effective
             solution to improving embryonic and fetal survival and
             growth. We discovered an unusual abundance of the arginine
             family of AA in porcine allantoic fluid (a reservoir of
             nutrients) during early gestation, when placental growth is
             most rapid. Arginine is metabolized to ornithine, proline,
             and nitric oxide, and these compounds possess a plethora of
             physiological functions. Nitric oxide is a vasodilator and
             angiogenic factor, whereas both ornithine and proline are
             substrates for placental synthesis of polyamines, which are
             key regulators of protein synthesis and angiogenesis.
             Additionally, arginine, leucine, glutamine, and proline
             activate the mammalian target of rapamycin cell-signaling
             pathway to enhance protein synthesis and cell proliferation
             in placentae. To translate basic research on AA biochemistry
             and nutrition into application, dietary supplementation with
             0.83% l-arginine to gilts on d 14 to 28 or d 30 to 114 of
             gestation increased the number and litter birth weight of
             live-born piglets. In addition, supplementing the gestation
             diet with 0.4% l-arginine plus 0.6% l-glutamine enhanced the
             efficiency of nutrient utilization, reduced variation in
             piglet birth weight, and increased litter birth weight. By
             regulating syntheses of nitric oxide, polyamines, and
             proteins, functional AA stimulate placental growth and the
             transfer of nutrients from mother to embryo or fetus to
             promote conceptus survival, growth, and development.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.2527/jas.2009-2446},
   Key = {fds180932}
}

@article{fds174076,
   Author = {TE Spencer and GA Johnson and FW Bazer and RC Burghardt},
   Title = {Implantation mechanisms: insights from the
             sheep.},
   Journal = {Reproduction (Cambridge, England)},
   Volume = {128},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {657-68},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1470-1626},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/rep.1.00398},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blastocyst • Cell Adhesion Molecules
             • Embryo Implantation • Embryonic Development
             • Female • Gestational Age • Pregnancy •
             Sheep • Uterus • physiology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {Implantation in all mammals involves shedding of the zona
             pellucida, followed by orientation, apposition, attachment
             and adhesion of the blastocyst to the endometrium.
             Endometrial invasion does not occur in domestic ruminants;
             thus, definitive implantation is achieved by adhesion of the
             mononuclear trophoblast cells to the endometrial lumenal
             epithelium (LE) and formation of syncytia by the fusion of
             trophoblast binucleate cells with the LE. This review
             highlights new information on mechanisms regulating the
             implantation cascade in sheep. The embryo enters the uterus
             on day 4 at the morula stage of development and then
             develops into a blastocyst by day 6. The blastocyst sheds
             the zona pellucida (day 8), elongates to a filamentous form
             (days 11-16), and adheres to the endometrial LE (day 16).
             Between days 14 and 16, the binucleate cells begin to
             differentiate in the trophoblast and subsequently migrate
             and fuse with the endometrial LE to form syncytia.
             Continuous exposure of the endometrium to progesterone in
             early pregnancy downregulates the progesterone receptors in
             the epithelia, a process which is associated with loss of
             the cell-surface mucin MUC1 and induction of several
             secreted adhesion proteins. Recurrent early pregnancy loss
             in the uterine gland knockout ewe model indicates that
             secretions of the endometrial epithelia have a physiologic
             role in blastocyst elongation and implantation. A number of
             endometrial proteins have been identified as potential
             regulators of blastocyst development and implantation in
             sheep, including glycosylated cell adhesion molecule 1
             (GlyCAM-1), galectin-15, integrins and osteopontin. The
             epithelial derived secreted adhesion proteins (GlyCAM-1,
             galectin-15 and osteopontin) are expressed in a dynamic
             temporal and spatial manner and regulated by progesterone
             and/or interferon tau, which is the pregnancy recognition
             signal produced by the trophoblast during blastocyst
             elongation. The noninvasive and protracted nature of
             implantation in domestic animals provides valuable
             opportunities to investigate fundamental processes of
             implantation that are shared among all mammals.
             Understanding of the cellular and molecular signals that
             regulate uterine receptivity and implantation can be used to
             diagnose and identify causes of recurrent pregnancy loss and
             to improve pregnancy outcome in domestic animals and
             humans.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1530/rep.1.00398},
   Key = {fds174076}
}

@booklet{Farmer89,
   Author = {T. H. R. Farmer and G. A. Johnson and G. P. Cofer and R. R.
             Maronpot and D. Dixon and L. W. Hedlund},
   Title = {Implanted coil mr microscopy of renal pathology},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance In Medicine},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {310 -- 323},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Farmer89}
}

@article{fds269011,
   Author = {Farmer, TH and Johnson, GA and Cofer, GP and Maronpot, RR and Dixon, D and Hedlund, LW},
   Title = {Implanted coil MR microscopy of renal pathology.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {310-323},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2733588},
   Keywords = {Animals • Electrodes, Implanted • Kidney •
             Kidney Diseases • Magnetic Resonance Imaging •
             Microscopy • Rats • Rats, Inbred Strains •
             chemically induced • metabolism • methods* •
             pathology*},
   Abstract = {Inductively coupled implanted coils have been shown to
             provide up to a 10-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio
             when compared to whole-body imaging of small animals. The
             current study was designed to extend the implanted coil
             imaging technique to a rodent model of renal pathology.
             Resonant radiofrequency (RF) coils were implanted around the
             left kidney of four rats and inductively coupled from within
             a birdcage body coil. All images were acquired at 2 T using
             a T1-weighted spin-echo sequence with TR = 500 ms and TE =
             20 ms. In vivo MR microscopy with voxels of 117 x 117 x 2000
             microns demonstrated cortex, inner and outer medulla, and
             major vascular structures on baseline images. Mercuric
             chloride-induced nephrotoxic acute tubular necrosis (ATN)
             diminished cortico-medullary contrast at 24 h after dosing
             with pathologic evaluation demonstrating nephrotoxic changes
             in the inner cortex. The kidney regained a baseline MR
             appearance 360 h after dosing and resolution of the damage
             was confirmed with histology. T1 data were gathered on
             excised kidneys as an adjunct to the images to help
             correlate the loss and return of cortico-medullary contrast
             with the pathology and pathophysiology of nephrotoxic ATN.
             With implanted RF coils we were able to demonstrate renal
             pathology and follow its subsequent resolution.
             Specifically, loss and return of cortico-medullary contrast
             as a result of nephrotoxic ATN were serially documented in
             four rats. Such serial in vivo studies performed on single
             animals should further the use of MR microscopy by
             minimizing the number of animals required for adequate
             biostatistics.},
   Key = {fds269011}
}

@booklet{Mcadams87,
   Author = {McAdams, HP and Johnson, GA and Suddarth, SA and Sherrier, RH and Ravin,
             CE},
   Title = {IMPLEMENTATION OF ADAPTIVE FILTRATION FOR DIGITAL CHEST
             IMAGING.},
   Journal = {Optical Engineering},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {669-674},
   Year = {1987},
   Abstract = {Previous work has demonstrated the potential for adaptive
             filtration in processing digital chest images. The technique
             uses the histogram of the image to determine the pixels (and
             regions) in which edge enhancement is applied. This paper
             extends that work by investigating the choice of parameters
             used in selectively enhancing the mediastinum. The image is
             separated into its low and high frequency components by
             convolution with a square kernel. The effect of kernel size
             was studied with a choice of 17 multiplied by 17 mm, which
             was found to be sufficient to include the frequencies of
             interest. A serious deficiency in previous implementations
             of this technique is the existence of ringing artifacts at
             the juncture of the lung and mediastinum. These result in
             part from the use of a step function to specify the low
             frequency image intensity above which high frequencies are
             amplified. By replacing this step with a smoother (cosine)
             function, the artifact can be removed.},
   Key = {Mcadams87}
}

@booklet{Zhang03,
   Author = {X. W. Zhang and T. M. Yelbuz and G. P. Cofer and M. A. Choma and M. L. Kirby and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Improved preparation of chick embryonic samples for magnetic
             resonance microscopy},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance In Medicine},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1192 -- 1195},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Zhang03}
}

@article{fds269008,
   Author = {Zhang, X and Yelbuz, TM and Cofer, GP and Choma, MA and Kirby, ML and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Improved preparation of chick embryonic samples for magnetic
             resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1192-1195},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12768599},
   Keywords = {Animals • Chick Embryo • Contrast Media •
             Heart • Image Enhancement* • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging* • Microscopy • anatomy & histology •
             embryology* • instrumentation*},
   Abstract = {Previous work demonstrated the power of three-dimensional
             (3D) magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) to follow
             complicated morphologic development in the embryonic
             cardiovascular system. In this study we describe a new
             dual-contrast method for specimen preparation that combines
             perfusion fixation and immersion in fixative with macro- and
             small molecular gadolinium agents to provide enhanced
             definition of both the heart wall and chamber. MRM was
             performed at 9.4 T with image resolutions of 25, 31, and 50
             microm isotropic voxels for three stages of chick embryos
             (day 4, day 5.5, and day 9), and compared to histological
             sections of the same embryos. The results show considerable
             improvement of image quality over previous efforts, with
             better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast between the
             cardiac chamber and myocardial wall. Excellent correlation
             was shown between the MRM images and histological sections.
             Thus, 3D high-resolution MRM in combination with the
             dual-contrast technique is useful for acquiring quantitative
             3D morphologic data regarding heart development.},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.10460},
   Key = {fds269008}
}

@article{fds268822,
   Author = {Brinegar, C and Schmitter, SS and Mistry, NN and Johnson, GA and Liang,
             Z-P},
   Title = {Improving temporal resolution of pulmonary perfusion imaging
             in rats using the partially separable functions
             model.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1162-1170},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1522-2594},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20564601},
   Keywords = {Algorithms* • Animals • Blood Flow Velocity •
             Computer Simulation • Female • Image Enhancement
             • Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted •
             Magnetic Resonance Angiography • Models,
             Cardiovascular* • Pulmonary Artery • Pulmonary
             Circulation • Rats • Rats, Inbred F344 •
             Reproducibility of Results • Sensitivity and
             Specificity • anatomy & histology • methods •
             methods* • physiology • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (or DCE-MRI) is a useful tool
             for measuring blood flow and perfusion, and it has found use
             in the study of pulmonary perfusion in animal models.
             However, DCE-MRI experiments are difficult in small animals
             such as rats. A recently developed method known as
             Interleaved Radial Imaging and Sliding window-keyhole (IRIS)
             addresses this problem by using a data acquisition scheme
             that covers (k,t)-space with data acquired from multiple
             bolus injections of a contrast agent. However, the temporal
             resolution of IRIS is limited by the effects of temporal
             averaging inherent in the sliding window and keyhole
             operations. This article describes a new method to cover
             (k,t)-space based on the theory of partially separable
             functions (PSF). Specifically, a sparse sampling of
             (k,t)-space is performed to acquire two data sets, one with
             high-temporal resolution and the other with extended k-space
             coverage. The high-temporal resolution training data are
             used to determine the temporal basis functions of the PSF
             model, whereas the other data set is used to determine the
             spatial variations of the model. The proposed method was
             validated by simulations and demonstrated by an experimental
             study. In this particular study, the proposed method
             achieved a temporal resolution of 32 msec.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1002/mrm.22500},
   Key = {fds268822}
}

@booklet{Cserhati89,
   Author = {A. F. Cserhati and V. K. Lucian and E. K. Austin and G. A.
             Johnson and P. D. Sarmiento and G. A. West and C.
             Magee},
   Title = {Impurity content, redistribution and interface topography in
             poly and amorphous-silicon based cobalt polycides},
   Journal = {Applied Surface Science},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {1-4},
   Pages = {195 -- 195},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {Cserhati89}
}

@booklet{Hollett87,
   Author = {Hollett, MD and Cofer, GP and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {In situ magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {965-968},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3440731},
   Abstract = {Recent developments in MR permit imaging at microscopic
             resolution. Efforts have focused on small samples that fit
             entirely in the imaging probe. Extension of the techniques
             to imaging of individual organs in small animals is
             complicated by both the need to acquire an excessive number
             of phase encodings and limited signal to noise. Implantable
             radiofrequency coils described in this work eliminate both
             problems, permitting MR microscopy in the kidney of a live
             200-g rat with spatial resolution of 117 X 117 X 1250 mu
             (.02 mm3). Inductive coupling permits complete freedom from
             external leads. A phantom designed to evaluate dielectric
             losses is described. Both phantom and in vivo comparison of
             live kidney images demonstrate the tenfold improvement in
             signal to noise obtained with the implantable
             coil.},
   Key = {Hollett87}
}

@article{fds132776,
   Author = {MD Hollett and GP Cofer and GA Johnson},
   Title = {In situ magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Investigative radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {965-8},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   Keywords = {Animals • Kidney • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
             • Models, Structural • Rats • anatomy &
             histology* • methods*},
   Abstract = {Recent developments in MR permit imaging at microscopic
             resolution. Efforts have focused on small samples that fit
             entirely in the imaging probe. Extension of the techniques
             to imaging of individual organs in small animals is
             complicated by both the need to acquire an excessive number
             of phase encodings and limited signal to noise. Implantable
             radiofrequency coils described in this work eliminate both
             problems, permitting MR microscopy in the kidney of a live
             200-g rat with spatial resolution of 117 X 117 X 1250 mu
             (.02 mm3). Inductive coupling permits complete freedom from
             external leads. A phantom designed to evaluate dielectric
             losses is described. Both phantom and in vivo comparison of
             live kidney images demonstrate the tenfold improvement in
             signal to noise obtained with the implantable
             coil.},
   Key = {fds132776}
}

@booklet{Matyac89,
   Author = {Matyac, CA and Cofer, GP and Bailey, JE and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {In Situ Observations of Root-gall Formation Using Nuclear
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging.},
   Journal = {Journal of nematology},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {131-134},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-300X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19287587},
   Key = {Matyac89}
}

@article{fds174140,
   Author = {CA Matyac and GP Cofer and JE Bailey and GA Johnson},
   Title = {In Situ Observations of Root-gall Formation Using Nuclear
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging.},
   Journal = {Journal of nematology},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {131-4},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-300X},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174140}
}

@booklet{Huesgen93,
   Author = {Huesgen, CT and Burger, PC and Crain, BJ and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {In vitro MR microscopy of the hippocampus in Alzheimer's
             disease.},
   Journal = {Neurology},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {145-152},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0028-3878},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8423879},
   Abstract = {We used MR microscopy at 7 tesla to identify the anatomy of
             the degenerating hippocampus in Alzheimer's disease (AD),
             which we then correlated with the histopathologic findings
             in the same specimens. The specimens studied were resected
             postmortem from 13 patients with confirmed AD and from nine
             age-matched controls. We imaged the specimens in the coronal
             plane using either three-dimensional Fourier encoding or
             single-slice Carr, Purcell, Meiboom, Gill (CPMG) spin echo
             sequences. On all specimens imaged with the CPMG pulse
             sequence, we calculated the T2 relaxation times for
             subfields within the hippocampus. Histologic sections were
             taken from each specimen and compared with the corresponding
             MR image. Using histologic boundaries, we quantified the
             number of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in
             each hippocampal subfield. We measured the area,
             morphometric characteristics, and width of identifiable
             signal variant regions on each image and compared these
             measurements with the histopathologic findings. The mean
             cross-sectional area of the hippocampus in AD was decreased
             by 31% compared with the control group. This atrophy was
             highly correlated with tangle counts within the hippocampus,
             but not with plaque counts. The width of the gray matter in
             hippocampal area CA1, as identified by MR, correlated with
             the total area of the hippocampus. An age-related decrease
             in the size of a low-signal region that corresponds
             histologically to input projections comprising part of the
             perforant pathway was identified. Measurements of the T2
             relaxation times of hippocampal subfields showed little
             regional variability and were not accurate indicators of
             disease presence or severity (p > 0.05).},
   Key = {Huesgen93}
}

@article{fds132788,
   Author = {CT Huesgen and PC Burger and BJ Crain and GA Johnson},
   Title = {In vitro MR microscopy of the hippocampus in Alzheimer's
             disease.},
   Journal = {Neurology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {145-52},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0028-3878},
   Keywords = {Aged • Aged, 80 and over • Alzheimer Disease
             • Fourier Analysis • Hippocampus • Humans
             • Magnetic Resonance Imaging* • Middle Aged •
             Neurofibrillary Tangles • pathology •
             pathology*},
   Abstract = {We used MR microscopy at 7 tesla to identify the anatomy of
             the degenerating hippocampus in Alzheimer's disease (AD),
             which we then correlated with the histopathologic findings
             in the same specimens. The specimens studied were resected
             postmortem from 13 patients with confirmed AD and from nine
             age-matched controls. We imaged the specimens in the coronal
             plane using either three-dimensional Fourier encoding or
             single-slice Carr, Purcell, Meiboom, Gill (CPMG) spin echo
             sequences. On all specimens imaged with the CPMG pulse
             sequence, we calculated the T2 relaxation times for
             subfields within the hippocampus. Histologic sections were
             taken from each specimen and compared with the corresponding
             MR image. Using histologic boundaries, we quantified the
             number of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in
             each hippocampal subfield. We measured the area,
             morphometric characteristics, and width of identifiable
             signal variant regions on each image and compared these
             measurements with the histopathologic findings. The mean
             cross-sectional area of the hippocampus in AD was decreased
             by 31% compared with the control group. This atrophy was
             highly correlated with tangle counts within the hippocampus,
             but not with plaque counts. The width of the gray matter in
             hippocampal area CA1, as identified by MR, correlated with
             the total area of the hippocampus. An age-related decrease
             in the size of a low-signal region that corresponds
             histologically to input projections comprising part of the
             perforant pathway was identified. Measurements of the T2
             relaxation times of hippocampal subfields showed little
             regional variability and were not accurate indicators of
             disease presence or severity (p > 0.05).},
   Key = {fds132788}
}

@booklet{Benveniste99a,
   Author = {Benveniste, H and Qui, H and Hedlund, LW and Hüttemeier, PC and Steele,
             SM and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {In vivo diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance microscopy of
             rat spinal cord: effect of ischemia and intrathecal
             hyperbaric 5% lidocaine.},
   Journal = {Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {311-318},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1098-7339},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10445769},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pathophysiologic mechanisms
             underlying persistent neurologic deficits after continuous
             spinal anesthesia using hyperbaric 5% lidocaine are still
             not well understood. It has been suggested that high-dose
             intrathecal lidocaine induces irreversible conduction block
             and even ischemia in white matter tracts by breakdown of the
             blood-nerve barrier. In this study, we use
             diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance microscopy to
             characterize the effect of intrathecal hyperbaric 5%
             lidocaine in rat spinal cord. The parameter measured with
             DWM, is an "apparent diffusion coefficient," (ADC), which
             can be used to exclude the presence of ischemia. METHODS:
             Female Fischer CDF rats were used. Group 1 (n = 5) was
             exposed to ischemia, group 2 (n = 7) was exposed to
             intrathecal 5% hyperbaric lidocaine, and group 3 (n = 5) was
             exposed to intrathecal 7.5% glucose. Diffusion-weighted MR
             images in group 1 were acquired before and after ischemia
             induced by cardiac arrest and in groups 2 and 3 rats prior
             to and during perfusion of the spinal catheter with either
             5% hyperbaric lidocaine or 7.5% glucose. RESULTS: Ischemia
             decreased the ADC by 40% in gray matter and by 30% in white
             matter of spinal cord. Continuous intrathecal anesthesia
             with hyperbaric 5% lidocaine did not affect the spinal cord
             ADC. Further, 7.5% intrathecal glucose had no effect on ADCs
             in gray or white matter of spinal cord. CONCLUSIONS:
             Ischemia reduced the ADC in both spinal cord white and gray
             matter. Hyperbaric 5% lidocaine did not affect the spinal
             cord ADC during the first 1.5 hours. We suggest that 5%
             hyperbaric lidocaine does not induce irreversible neurologic
             deficits by causing spinal cord ischemia.},
   Key = {Benveniste99a}
}

@article{fds132840,
   Author = {H Benveniste and H Qui and LW Hedlund and PC Hüttemeier and SM Steele and GA Johnson},
   Title = {In vivo diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance microscopy of
             rat spinal cord: effect of ischemia and intrathecal
             hyperbaric 5% lidocaine.},
   Journal = {Regional anesthesia and pain medicine, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {311-8},
   ISSN = {1098-7339},
   Keywords = {Anesthetics, Local • Animals • Blood Pressure
             • Catheterization • Dose-Response Relationship,
             Drug • Female • Heart Rate • Injections,
             Spinal • Ischemia • Lidocaine • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging • Microscopy • Rats • Rats,
             Inbred F344 • Spinal Cord • anatomy & histology*
             • blood supply* • chemically induced* •
             cytology • diagnosis* • drug effects •
             methods • pathology • physiopathology •
             toxicity*},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pathophysiologic mechanisms
             underlying persistent neurologic deficits after continuous
             spinal anesthesia using hyperbaric 5% lidocaine are still
             not well understood. It has been suggested that high-dose
             intrathecal lidocaine induces irreversible conduction block
             and even ischemia in white matter tracts by breakdown of the
             blood-nerve barrier. In this study, we use
             diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance microscopy to
             characterize the effect of intrathecal hyperbaric 5%
             lidocaine in rat spinal cord. The parameter measured with
             DWM, is an "apparent diffusion coefficient," (ADC), which
             can be used to exclude the presence of ischemia. METHODS:
             Female Fischer CDF rats were used. Group 1 (n = 5) was
             exposed to ischemia, group 2 (n = 7) was exposed to
             intrathecal 5% hyperbaric lidocaine, and group 3 (n = 5) was
             exposed to intrathecal 7.5% glucose. Diffusion-weighted MR
             images in group 1 were acquired before and after ischemia
             induced by cardiac arrest and in groups 2 and 3 rats prior
             to and during perfusion of the spinal catheter with either
             5% hyperbaric lidocaine or 7.5% glucose. RESULTS: Ischemia
             decreased the ADC by 40% in gray matter and by 30% in white
             matter of spinal cord. Continuous intrathecal anesthesia
             with hyperbaric 5% lidocaine did not affect the spinal cord
             ADC. Further, 7.5% intrathecal glucose had no effect on ADCs
             in gray or white matter of spinal cord. CONCLUSIONS:
             Ischemia reduced the ADC in both spinal cord white and gray
             matter. Hyperbaric 5% lidocaine did not affect the spinal
             cord ADC during the first 1.5 hours. We suggest that 5%
             hyperbaric lidocaine does not induce irreversible neurologic
             deficits by causing spinal cord ischemia.},
   Key = {fds132840}
}

@booklet{Black96,
   Author = {Black, RD and Middleton, HL and Cates, GD and Cofer, GP and Driehuys, B and Happer, W and Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA and Shattuck, MD and Swartz,
             JC},
   Title = {In vivo He-3 MR images of guinea pig lungs.},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {199},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {867-870},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8638019},
   Abstract = {The authors imaged the lungs of live guinea pigs with
             hyperpolarized (HP) helium-3 as a magnetic resonance (MR)
             signal source. HP He-3 gas produced through spin exchange
             with rubidium metal vapor was delivered through an
             MR-compatible, small-animal ventilator. Two- and
             three-dimensional lung images acquired with
             ventilation-gated, radial k-space sampling showed complete
             ventilation of both lungs. All images were of high quality,
             demonstrating that HP He-3 allows high-signal-intensity MR
             imaging in living systems.},
   Doi = {10.1148/radiology.199.3.8638019},
   Key = {Black96}
}

@article{fds132806,
   Author = {RD Black and HL Middleton and GD Cates and GP Cofer and B Driehuys and W
             Happer, LW Hedlund and GA Johnson, MD Shattuck and JC
             Swartz},
   Title = {In vivo He-3 MR images of guinea pig lungs.},
   Journal = {Radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {199},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {867-70},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   Keywords = {Animals • Guinea Pigs • Helium • Lung •
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Male • Radioisotopes
             • anatomy & histology* • instrumentation •
             methods* • statistics & numerical data},
   Abstract = {The authors imaged the lungs of live guinea pigs with
             hyperpolarized (HP) helium-3 as a magnetic resonance (MR)
             signal source. HP He-3 gas produced through spin exchange
             with rubidium metal vapor was delivered through an
             MR-compatible, small-animal ventilator. Two- and
             three-dimensional lung images acquired with
             ventilation-gated, radial k-space sampling showed complete
             ventilation of both lungs. All images were of high quality,
             demonstrating that HP He-3 allows high-signal-intensity MR
             imaging in living systems.},
   Key = {fds132806}
}

@article{fds268811,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Hedlund, LW and Qi, Y and Berridge, B and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {In vivo imaging of rat coronary arteries using bi-plane
             digital subtraction angiography.},
   Journal = {Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological
             Methods},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {151-157},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21683146},
   Abstract = {INTRODUCTION: X-ray based digital subtraction angiography
             (DSA) is a common clinical imaging method for vascular
             morphology and function. Coronary artery characterization is
             one of its most important applications. We show that
             bi-plane DSA of rat coronary arteries can provide a powerful
             imaging tool for translational safety assessment in drug
             discovery. METHODS: A novel, dual tube/detector system,
             constructed explicitly for preclinical imaging, supports
             image acquisition at 10 frames/s with 88-micron spatial
             resolution. Ventilation, x-ray exposure, and contrast
             injection are all precisely synchronized using a biological
             sequence controller implemented as a LabVIEW application. A
             set of experiments were performed to test and optimize the
             sampling and image quality. We applied the DSA imaging
             protocol to record changes in the visualization of
             coronaries and myocardial perfusion induced by a vasodilator
             drug, nitroprusside. The drug was infused into a tail vein
             catheter using a peristaltic infusion pump at a rate of 0.07
             mL/h for 3 min (dose: 0.0875 mg). Multiple DSA sequences
             were acquired before, during, and up to 25 min after drug
             infusion. Perfusion maps of the heart were generated in
             MATLAB to compare the drug effects over time. RESULTS: The
             best trade-off between the injection time, pressure, and
             image quality was achieved at 60 PSI, with the injection of
             150 ms occurring early in diastole (60 ms delay) and
             resulting in the delivery of 113 μL of contrast agent. DSA
             images clearly show the main branches of the coronary
             arteries in an intact, beating heart. The drug test
             demonstrated that DSA can detect relative changes in
             coronary circulation via perfusion maps. CONCLUSIONS: The
             methodology for DSA imaging of rat coronary arteries can
             serve as a template for future translational studies to
             assist in safety evaluation of new pharmaceuticals. Although
             x-ray imaging involves radiation, the associated dose (0.4
             Gy) is not a major limitation.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.vascn.2011.05.008},
   Key = {fds268811}
}

@article{fds204265,
   Author = {CT Badea and LW Hedlund and Y Qi and B Berridge and GA
             Johnson},
   Title = {In vivo imaging of rat coronary arteries using bi-plane
             digital subtraction angiography.},
   Journal = {Journal of pharmacological and toxicological
             methods},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {151-7},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1873-488X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vascn.2011.05.008},
   Keywords = {Angiography, Digital Subtraction • Animals •
             Contrast Media • Coronary Angiography • Coronary
             Circulation • Male • Myocardial Perfusion Imaging
             • Nitroprusside • Rats • Rats, Sprague-Dawley
             • Time Factors • Vasodilator Agents •
             administration & dosage • drug effects* •
             instrumentation • methods* • pharmacology},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: X-ray based digital subtraction angiography
             (DSA) is a common clinical imaging method for vascular
             morphology and function. Coronary artery characterization is
             one of its most important applications. We show that
             bi-plane DSA of rat coronary arteries can provide a powerful
             imaging tool for translational safety assessment in drug
             discovery. METHODS: A novel, dual tube/detector system,
             constructed explicitly for preclinical imaging, supports
             image acquisition at 10 frames/s with 88-micron spatial
             resolution. Ventilation, x-ray exposure, and contrast
             injection are all precisely synchronized using a biological
             sequence controller implemented as a LabVIEW application. A
             set of experiments were performed to test and optimize the
             sampling and image quality. We applied the DSA imaging
             protocol to record changes in the visualization of
             coronaries and myocardial perfusion induced by a vasodilator
             drug, nitroprusside. The drug was infused into a tail vein
             catheter using a peristaltic infusion pump at a rate of 0.07
             mL/h for 3 min (dose: 0.0875 mg). Multiple DSA sequences
             were acquired before, during, and up to 25 min after drug
             infusion. Perfusion maps of the heart were generated in
             MATLAB to compare the drug effects over time. RESULTS: The
             best trade-off between the injection time, pressure, and
             image quality was achieved at 60 PSI, with the injection of
             150 ms occurring early in diastole (60 ms delay) and
             resulting in the delivery of 113 μL of contrast agent. DSA
             images clearly show the main branches of the coronary
             arteries in an intact, beating heart. The drug test
             demonstrated that DSA can detect relative changes in
             coronary circulation via perfusion maps. CONCLUSIONS: The
             methodology for DSA imaging of rat coronary arteries can
             serve as a template for future translational studies to
             assist in safety evaluation of new pharmaceuticals. Although
             x-ray imaging involves radiation, the associated dose (0.4
             Gy) is not a major limitation.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.vascn.2011.05.008},
   Key = {fds204265}
}

@article{fds174200,
   Author = {GA Johnson and SJ Boukma and EG Kim},
   Title = {In vivo inhibition of dopamine beta-hydroxylase by
             1-phenyl-3-(2-thiazolyl)-2-thiourea (U-14,624).},
   Journal = {The Journal of pharmacology and experimental
             therapeutics},
   Volume = {171},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {80-7},
   Year = {1970},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-3565},
   Keywords = {Adrenal Glands • Adrenalectomy • Animals •
             Brain • Brain Chemistry • Carbon Isotopes •
             Catecholamines • Disulfiram • Dopamine •
             Dopamine Antagonists* • Hydrolases • Male •
             Metaraminol • Mice • Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors
             • Myocardium • Norepinephrine • Rats •
             Species Specificity • Thiazoles • Thiourea •
             Time Factors • Tritium • Tyrosine • analysis
             • antagonists & inhibitors* • biosynthesis •
             drug effects • enzymology • metabolism •
             metabolism* • pharmacology • pharmacology* •
             physiology},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174200}
}

@booklet{Brouwer92,
   Author = {Brouwer, M and Engel, DW and Bonaventura, J and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {In vivo magnetic resonance imaging of the blue crab,
             Callinectes sapidus: effect of cadmium accumulation in
             tissues on proton relaxation properties.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Zoology},
   Volume = {263},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {32-40},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0022-104X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1645119},
   Abstract = {Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to
             visualize the internal anatomy of a living blue crab. The
             resolution obtained in these studies was sufficient to
             distinguish individual organs by the differences in their
             proton densities and proton relaxation properties. T1
             (spin-lattice relaxation time)-weighted imaging revealed the
             lipid-rich nature of the hepatopancreas and gonadal tissue.
             To evaluate the effect of metal-induced stress on the
             different organs, crabs were exposed to elevated levels of
             cadmium in their diet, which resulted in increased
             concentrations of both cadmium and copper in the
             hepatopancreas. The spin-spin relaxation time, T2, of mobile
             protons in the metal-exposed tissue was significantly
             greater than T2 in the control tissues. These measurements
             suggest that the excess copper in the exposed tissues was
             diamagnetic [Cu(I)], since the presence of paramagnetic
             copper [Cu(II)] would result in a decrease of observed T2
             values. We hypothesize that the increased T2 value is a
             reflection of increased free water in the hepatopancreas.
             These studies show that magnetic resonance imaging is an
             important nondestructive tool for the study of morphological
             and physiological changes that occur in marine invertebrates
             in response to anthropogenic and natural
             stresses.},
   Doi = {10.1002/jez.1402630105},
   Key = {Brouwer92}
}

@article{fds132893,
   Author = {M Brouwer and DW Engel and J Bonaventura and GA Johnson},
   Title = {In vivo magnetic resonance imaging of the blue crab,
             Callinectes sapidus: effect of cadmium accumulation in
             tissues on proton relaxation properties.},
   Journal = {The Journal of experimental zoology, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {263},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {32-40},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0022-104X},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brachyura • Cadmium • Copper •
             Diet • Liver • Magnetic Resonance Imaging* •
             Male • Organ Specificity • Pancreas • Trace
             Elements • administration & dosage • analysis
             • anatomy & histology • anatomy & histology*
             • metabolism},
   Abstract = {Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to
             visualize the internal anatomy of a living blue crab. The
             resolution obtained in these studies was sufficient to
             distinguish individual organs by the differences in their
             proton densities and proton relaxation properties. T1
             (spin-lattice relaxation time)-weighted imaging revealed the
             lipid-rich nature of the hepatopancreas and gonadal tissue.
             To evaluate the effect of metal-induced stress on the
             different organs, crabs were exposed to elevated levels of
             cadmium in their diet, which resulted in increased
             concentrations of both cadmium and copper in the
             hepatopancreas. The spin-spin relaxation time, T2, of mobile
             protons in the metal-exposed tissue was significantly
             greater than T2 in the control tissues. These measurements
             suggest that the excess copper in the exposed tissues was
             diamagnetic [Cu(I)], since the presence of paramagnetic
             copper [Cu(II)] would result in a decrease of observed T2
             values. We hypothesize that the increased T2 value is a
             reflection of increased free water in the hepatopancreas.
             These studies show that magnetic resonance imaging is an
             important nondestructive tool for the study of morphological
             and physiological changes that occur in marine invertebrates
             in response to anthropogenic and natural
             stresses.},
   Key = {fds132893}
}

@booklet{Cofer89,
   Author = {Cofer, GP and Brown, JM and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {In vivo magnetic resonance microscopy at 5
             μm},
   Journal = {Journal of Magnetic Resonance (1969)},
   Volume = {83},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {608-616},
   Year = {1989},
   ISSN = {0022-2364},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0022-2364(89)90354-5},
   Doi = {10.1016/0022-2364(89)90354-5},
   Key = {Cofer89}
}

@booklet{Brown86,
   Author = {Brown, JM and Johnson, GA and Kramer, PJ},
   Title = {In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Changing Water
             Content in Pelargonium hortorum Roots.},
   Journal = {Plant physiology},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1158-1160},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0032-0889},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16665154},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to
             nondestructively observe changes in water content in roots
             of Pelargonium hortorum x Bailey during a period of
             relatively rapid transpiration. Anatomical regions of the
             root could be differentiated with a spatial resolution of
             0.1 x 0.1 mm. MRI shows great potential for study of
             plant-water relations.},
   Key = {Brown86}
}

@article{fds157096,
   Author = {JM Brown and GA Johnson and PJ Kramer},
   Title = {In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Changing Water
             Content in Pelargonium hortorum Roots.},
   Journal = {Plant physiology},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1158-1160},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0032-0889},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to
             nondestructively observe changes in water content in roots
             of Pelargonium hortorum x Bailey during a period of
             relatively rapid transpiration. Anatomical regions of the
             root could be differentiated with a spatial resolution of
             0.1 x 0.1 mm. MRI shows great potential for study of
             plant-water relations.},
   Key = {fds157096}
}

@article{fds269086,
   Author = {Chawla, MS and Chen, XJ and Möller, HE and Cofer, GP and Wheeler, CT and Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {In vivo magnetic resonance vascular imaging using
             laser-polarized 3He microbubbles.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {18},
   Pages = {10832-10835},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0027-8424},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9724790},
   Keywords = {Angiography • Animals • Helium • Lasers
             • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Male • Rats
             • Rats, Sprague-Dawley • methods*},
   Abstract = {Laser-polarized gases (3He and 129Xe) are currently being
             used in magnetic resonance imaging as strong signal sources
             that can be safely introduced into the lung. Recently,
             researchers have been investigating other tissues using
             129Xe. These studies use xenon dissolved in a carrier such
             as lipid vesicles or blood. Since helium is much less
             soluble than xenon in these materials, 3He has been used
             exclusively for imaging air spaces. However, considering
             that the signal of 3He is more than 10 times greater than
             that of 129Xe for presently attainable polarization levels,
             this work has focused on generating a method to introduce
             3He into the vascular system. We addressed the low
             solubility issue by producing suspensions of 3He
             microbubbles. Here, we provide the first vascular images
             obtained with laser-polarized 3He. The potential increase in
             signal and absence of background should allow this technique
             to produce high-resolution angiographic images. In addition,
             quantitative measurements of blood flow velocity and tissue
             perfusion will be feasible.},
   Key = {fds269086}
}

@booklet{Chawla98,
   Author = {M. S. Chawla and X. J. Chen and H. E. Moller and G. P. Cofer and C. T. Wheeler and L. W. Hedlund and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {In vivo magnetic resonance vascular imaging using
             laser-polarized He-3 microbubbles},
   Journal = {Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The
             United States Of America},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {18},
   Pages = {10832 -- 10835},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {Chawla98}
}

@booklet{Johnson91a,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Maki, JH},
   Title = {In vivo measurement of proton diffusion in the presence of
             coherent motion.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {540-545},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1650333},
   Abstract = {Measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient D of water in
             tissue has been performed traditionally using the technique
             proposed by Stejskal and Tanner. A variant of that technique
             is shown here, employing flow-compensated gradients that
             significantly reduce the sensitivity to small coherent
             motions that are common in body imaging. An interleaved
             sequence with four values of diffusion-sensitizing gradient
             (b) minimizes registration errors. Eddy currents and other
             systematic errors are reduced, permitting the measurement of
             standards in an imaging context within 5% of nonimaging
             values in the literature. The flow-compensated sequence
             permits the measure of D for tissues in the abdominal cavity
             of the rat. We present in vivo measurements of D for the
             following rat tissues; liver, kidney (cortex), kidney
             (medulla) muscle, brain, fat.},
   Key = {Johnson91a}
}

@article{fds132790,
   Author = {GA Johnson and JH Maki},
   Title = {In vivo measurement of proton diffusion in the presence of
             coherent motion.},
   Journal = {Investigative radiology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {540-5},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   Keywords = {Acetone • Animals • Diffusion • Dimethyl
             Sulfoxide • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Movement
             • Protons* • Rats • Water •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {Measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient D of water in
             tissue has been performed traditionally using the technique
             proposed by Stejskal and Tanner. A variant of that technique
             is shown here, employing flow-compensated gradients that
             significantly reduce the sensitivity to small coherent
             motions that are common in body imaging. An interleaved
             sequence with four values of diffusion-sensitizing gradient
             (b) minimizes registration errors. Eddy currents and other
             systematic errors are reduced, permitting the measurement of
             standards in an imaging context within 5% of nonimaging
             values in the literature. The flow-compensated sequence
             permits the measure of D for tissues in the abdominal cavity
             of the rat. We present in vivo measurements of D for the
             following rat tissues; liver, kidney (cortex), kidney
             (medulla) muscle, brain, fat.},
   Key = {fds132790}
}

@article{fds268853,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Drangova, M and Holdsworth, DW and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {In vivo small-animal imaging using micro-CT and digital
             subtraction angiography.},
   Journal = {Physics in Medicine and Biology},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {19},
   Pages = {R319-R350},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0031-9155},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18758005},
   Keywords = {Angiography, Digital Subtraction • Animals •
             Humans • X-Ray Microtomography • instrumentation
             • methods*},
   Abstract = {Small-animal imaging has a critical role in phenotyping,
             drug discovery and in providing a basic understanding of
             mechanisms of disease. Translating imaging methods from
             humans to small animals is not an easy task. The purpose of
             this work is to review in vivo x-ray based small-animal
             imaging, with a focus on in vivo micro-computed tomography
             (micro-CT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). We
             present the principles, technologies, image quality
             parameters and types of applications. We show that both
             methods can be used not only to provide morphological, but
             also functional information, such as cardiac function
             estimation or perfusion. Compared to other modalities, x-ray
             based imaging is usually regarded as being able to provide
             higher throughput at lower cost and adequate resolution. The
             limitations are usually associated with the relatively poor
             contrast mechanisms and potential radiation damage due to
             ionizing radiation, although the use of contrast agents and
             careful design of studies can address these limitations. We
             hope that the information will effectively address how x-ray
             based imaging can be exploited for successful in vivo
             preclinical imaging.},
   Doi = {10.1088/0031-9155/53/19/R01},
   Key = {fds268853}
}

@article{fds174241,
   Author = {CW Flanagan and RS Mannel and JL Walker and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Incidence and location of para-aortic lymph node metastases
             in gynecologic malignancies.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American College of Surgeons},
   Volume = {181},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {72-4},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1072-7515},
   Keywords = {Abdomen • Endometrial Neoplasms • Female •
             Genital Neoplasms, Female • Humans • Lymph Node
             Excision • Lymphatic Metastasis* • Neoplasm
             Staging • Ovarian Neoplasms • Retrospective
             Studies • Uterine Cervical Neoplasms • pathology
             • pathology*},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: We sought to determine the location of
             metastases to para-aortic lymph nodes in patients with
             gynecologic malignancies. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective
             chart review was performed for all cases of endometrial,
             ovarian, and cervical carcinoma in which right and left
             para-aortic lymph node dissection was done at our
             institution from 1985 to 1993. Records were assessed for
             tumor type as well as for presence and location of
             metastases to para-aortic lymph nodes. RESULTS: A total of
             315 patients had bilateral para-aortic lymphadenectomy
             performed at the time of laparotomy as part of staging or
             therapy for their gynecologic malignancies. A total of 47
             patients (15 percent) had metastasis to the para-aortic
             lymph nodes. Para-aortic metastasis were identified in 22
             (30 percent) of 73 patients with ovarian carcinoma, 11 (8
             percent) of 141 patients with cervical carcinoma, and 14 (14
             percent) of 101 patients sampled. Unilateral left-sided
             para-aortic node involvement was observed in 13 patients,
             unilateral right-sided involvement was present in 14
             patients, and bilateral involvement occurred in 20 patients.
             Regarding tumor type or origin, no significant difference
             was noted in right-sided compared with left-sided
             para-aortic metastases. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest no
             difference in the incidence of metastases to right-sided
             compared with left para-aortic lymph nodes in patients with
             gynecologic malignancies, emphasizing the need for bilateral
             evaluation of the para-aortic lymph nodes. This information
             is important in the clinical staging of gynecologic
             malignancies and in establishing protocols requiring
             para-aortic lymph node dissection.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174241}
}

@booklet{Flanagan95,
   Author = {C. W. Flanagan and R. S. Mannel and J. L. Walker and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Incidence and location of paraaortic lymph-node metastases
             in gynecologic malignancies},
   Journal = {Journal Of The American College Of Surgeons},
   Volume = {181},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {72 -- 74},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {Flanagan95}
}

@article{fds174179,
   Author = {GA Johnson and EG Kim},
   Title = {Increase of brain levels of tryptophan induced by inhibition
             of dopamine beta-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.2.1).},
   Journal = {Journal of neurochemistry},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1761-4},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0022-3042},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Cresols • Disulfides •
             Dopamine beta-Hydroxylase • Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid
             • Imidazoles • Kinetics • Male •
             Norepinephrine • Oxazoles • Phenylthiourea •
             Rats • Serotonin • Thiazoles • Tryptophan
             • antagonists & inhibitors* • drug effects •
             metabolism • metabolism* • pharmacology},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174179}
}

@booklet{Johnson91b,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and V. J. Kapoor and M. Shokrani and L. J.
             Messick and R. Nguyen and R. A. Stall and M. A.
             Mckee},
   Title = {Indium gallium-arsenide microwave-power transistors},
   Journal = {Ieee Transactions On Microwave Theory And
             Techniques},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {1069 -- 1076},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {Johnson91b}
}

@article{fds132904,
   Author = {MJ Upfal and GA Johnson and AP Jacobson and PA Brady and JA
             Campbell},
   Title = {Indoor radon and lung cancer in China.},
   Journal = {Journal of the National Cancer Institute, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {21},
   Pages = {1722-3},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0027-8874},
   Keywords = {Air Pollutants • Carcinogens • China • Dust
             • Female • Humans • Lung Neoplasms •
             Radon • adverse effects • epidemiology •
             etiology* • toxicity • toxicity*},
   Key = {fds132904}
}

@booklet{Upfal90,
   Author = {M. J. Upfal and G. A. Johnson and A. P. Jacobson and P. A.
             Brady and J. A. Campbell},
   Title = {Indoor radon and lung-cancer in china},
   Journal = {Journal Of The National Cancer Institute},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {21},
   Pages = {1722 -- 1722},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {Upfal90}
}

@article{fds174153,
   Author = {RC Ackerman and GA Johnson and EA Van Kirk and AL Asirvatham and WJ
             Murdoch},
   Title = {Induction of apoptotic or lytic death in an ovarian
             adenocarcinoma cell line by antibodies generated against a
             synthetic N-terminal extracellular domain
             gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor peptide.},
   Journal = {Cancer letters},
   Volume = {81},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {177-84},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0304-3835},
   Keywords = {Adenocarcinoma • Amino Acid Sequence • Animals
             • Apoptosis* • Cytotoxicity, Immunologic •
             Female • Humans • Immune Sera • Mice •
             Molecular Sequence Data • Ovarian Neoplasms •
             Peptide Fragments • Receptors, LHRH • Sheep •
             Tumor Cells, Cultured • immunology* •
             pathology*},
   Abstract = {A polyclonal antiserum was generated in ovariectomized sheep
             against a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acids
             5-17 of the deduced mouse pituitary gonadotropin-releasing
             hormone (GnRH) receptor. Antipeptide antibodies did not bind
             native cells, but did react strongly with a human ovarian
             cancer cell line (OVCAR-3) reportedly sensitive to GnRH.
             Growth of cultured OVCAR-3 cells was specifically suppressed
             by antipeptide serum. This was attributed in part to
             programmed death (chromatin condensation and DNA
             fragmentation) of cells by antibody-induced apoptosis.
             Antibodies also exhibited a cytolytic effect (lactate
             dehydrogenase release) toward OVCAR-3 cells in the presence
             of the complement. Endometria of passively immunized mice
             lacked development; thus, antipeptide antibodies evidently
             recognize Mullerian duct derivatives. Experiments are in
             progress to determine whether the putative antigen is a
             variant of the pituitary GnRH receptor or a largely
             dissimilar protein. Effector-functional antibodies could be
             useful in the management of ovarian or uterine
             neoplasia.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174153}
}

@booklet{Ackerman94,
   Author = {R. C. Ackerman and G. A. Johnson and E. A. Vankirk and A. L.
             Asirvatham and W. J. Murdoch},
   Title = {Induction of apoptotic or lytic death in an ovarian
             adenocarcinoma cell-line by antibodies generated against a
             synthetic n-terminal extracellular domain
             gonadotropin-releasing-hormone receptor peptide},
   Journal = {Cancer Letters},
   Volume = {81},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {177 -- 184},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Ackerman94}
}

@booklet{Johnson91c,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and C. A. Baker and K. A. Knight},
   Title = {Induction of minoxidil sulfotransferase (mst) activity
             during differentiation of normal human epidermal-keratinocytes
             (nheks)},
   Journal = {Faseb Journal},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {A1749 -- A1749},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Johnson91c}
}

@booklet{Johnson92a,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and V. J. Kapoor and H. Jurgensen and D.
             Schmitz},
   Title = {Ingaas field-effect transistors with submicron gates for
             k-band applications},
   Journal = {Ieee Transactions On Microwave Theory And
             Techniques},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {429 -- 433},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Johnson92a}
}

@article{fds174222,
   Author = {GA Johnson and EG Kim and SJ Boukma and D Lednicer and GA
             Youngdale},
   Title = {Inhibition of dopamine -hydroxylase by 5-phenoxymethyl-2-oxazolidinethiones.},
   Journal = {Journal of medicinal chemistry},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {327-9},
   Year = {1972},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0022-2623},
   Keywords = {Adrenal Glands • Animals • Brain • Brain
             Chemistry • Cattle • Dopamine beta-Hydroxylase
             • Food Habits • Male • Mice • Mice,
             Inbred Strains • Mixed Function Oxygenases • Motor
             Activity • Norepinephrine • Oxazoles •
             Phenols • Structure-Activity Relationship •
             analysis • antagonists & inhibitors • antagonists
             & inhibitors* • drug effects • enzymology •
             pharmacology • pharmacology*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174222}
}

@article{fds174273,
   Author = {GA Johnson and SJ Boukma and EG Kim},
   Title = {Inhibition of dopamine beta-hydroxylase by aromatic and
             alkyl thioureas.},
   Journal = {The Journal of pharmacology and experimental
             therapeutics},
   Volume = {168},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {229-34},
   Year = {1969},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0022-3565},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain Chemistry • Disulfiram •
             Dopamine • Mice • Mixed Function Oxygenases •
             Norepinephrine • Rats • Thiourea • Tyramine
             • administration & dosage • analysis •
             antagonists & inhibitors* • metabolism •
             pharmacology • pharmacology*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174273}
}

@booklet{Johnston81,
   Author = {D. G. Johnston and G. A. Johnson and H. Millwardsadler},
   Title = {Insulin and liver-regeneration after partial-hepatectomy
             (ph) in normal and diabetic rats},
   Journal = {Diabetologia},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {288 -- 288},
   Year = {1981},
   Key = {Johnston81}
}

@article{fds174127,
   Author = {RM Simmons and DW Erikson and J Kim and RC Burghardt and FW Bazer and GA
             Johnson, TE Spencer},
   Title = {Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in the ruminant
             uterus: potential endometrial marker and regulator of
             conceptus elongation.},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {150},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {4295-305},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {1945-7170},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/en.2009-0060},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cattle • Cell Movement • Cell
             Proliferation • Endometrium • Female •
             Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 •
             Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 •
             Interferon Type I • Pregnancy • Pregnancy Proteins
             • Progesterone • Sheep • Uterus • drug
             effects • metabolism • metabolism* •
             pharmacology • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Establishment of pregnancy in ruminants requires conceptus
             elongation and production of interferon-tau (IFNT), the
             pregnancy recognition signal that maintains ovarian
             progesterone (P4) production. These studies determined
             temporal and spatial alterations in IGF binding protein
             (IGFBP)-1 and IGFBP3 in the ovine and bovine uterus; effects
             of P4 and IFNT on their expression in the ovine uterus; and
             effects of IGFBP1 on ovine trophectoderm cell proliferation,
             migration, and attachment. IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 were studied
             because they are the only IGFBPs specifically expressed by
             the endometrial luminal epithelia in sheep. In sheep, IGFBP1
             and IGFBP3 expression was coordinate with the period of
             conceptus elongation, whereas only IGFBP1 expression was
             coordinate with conceptus elongation in cattle. IGFBP1 mRNA
             in the ovine endometria was between 5- and 29-fold more
             abundant between d 12 and 16 of pregnancy compared with the
             estrous cycle and greater on d 16 of pregnancy than
             nonpregnancy in the bovine uterus. In sheep, P4 induced and
             IFNT stimulated expression of IGFBP1 but not IGFBP3;
             however, the effect of IFNT did not mimic the abundant
             increase observed in pregnant ewes. Therefore, IGFBP1
             expression in the endometrium is regulated by another factor
             from the conceptus. IGFBP1 did not affect the proliferation
             of ovine trophectoderm cells in vitro but did stimulate
             their migration and mediate their attachment. These studies
             reveal that IGFBP1 is a common endometrial marker of
             conceptus elongation in sheep and cattle and most likely
             regulates conceptus elongation by stimulating migration and
             attachment of the trophectoderm.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1210/en.2009-0060},
   Key = {fds174127}
}

@article{fds174184,
   Author = {J Kim and G Song and H Gao and JL Farmer and MC Satterfield and RC
             Burghardt, G Wu and GA Johnson and TE Spencer and FW
             Bazer},
   Title = {Insulin-like growth factor II activates phosphatidylinositol
             3-kinase-protooncogenic protein kinase 1 and
             mitogen-activated protein kinase cell Signaling pathways,
             and stimulates migration of ovine trophectoderm
             cells.},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {149},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {3085-94},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0013-7227},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/en.2007-1367},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cell Differentiation • Cell Division
             • Cloning, Molecular • Female • Insulin-Like
             Growth Factor II • MAP Kinase Signaling System •
             Male • Pregnancy • Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
             • RNA, Messenger • Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases,
             90-kDa • Sheep • Uterus • Vasectomy •
             genetics • metabolism • p38 Mitogen-Activated
             Protein Kinases • physiology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {IGF-II, a potent stimulator of cellular proliferation,
             differentiation, and development, regulates uterine function
             and conceptus growth in several species. In situ
             hybridization analyses found that IGF-II mRNA was most
             abundant in the caruncular endometrial stroma of both
             cyclical and pregnant ewes. In the intercaruncular
             endometrium, IGF-II mRNA transitioned from stroma to luminal
             epithelium between d 14 and 20 of pregnancy. IGF-II mRNA was
             present in all cells of the conceptus but was particularly
             abundant in the yolk sac. Immunohistochemical analyses
             revealed that phosphorylated (p)-protooncogenic protein
             kinase 1, p-ribosomal protein S6 kinase, p-ERK1/2, and p-P38
             MAPK proteins were present at low levels in a majority of
             endometrial cells but were most abundant in the nuclei of
             endometrial luminal epithelium and conceptus trophectoderm
             of pregnant ewes. In mononuclear trophectoderm cells
             isolated from d-15 conceptuses, IGF-II increased the
             abundance of p-pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1,
             p-protooncogenic protein kinase 1, p-glycogen synthase
             kinase 3B, p-FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin associated
             protein 1, and p-ribosomal protein S6 kinase protein within
             15 min, and the increase was maintained for 90 min. IGF-II
             also elicited a rapid increase in p-ERK1/2 and p-P38 MAPK
             proteins that was maximal at 15 or 30 min posttreatment.
             Moreover, IGF-II increased migration of trophectoderm cells.
             Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that
             IGF-II coordinately activates multiple cell signaling
             pathways critical to survival, growth, and differentiation
             of the ovine conceptus during early pregnancy.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1210/en.2007-1367},
   Key = {fds174184}
}

@article{fds268760,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Chotas, HG and Suddarth, SA and Ziv, SB and Todd,
             BE},
   Title = {Integrated network for medical imaging research},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical
             Engineering},
   Volume = {1234 pt 1},
   Pages = {159-166},
   Year = {1990},
   Abstract = {There are a number of generic problems that researchers in
             medical imaging have in common. For example, researchers in
             MR, CT, PET, SPECT, DSA, and digital radiography all need to
             display and window digital images. We describe here an
             integrated with tools applicable to all of the current areas
             of medical imaging that enable researchers at Duke to share
             resources and solve software and hardware problems in a
             unified effort. We will show examples where efforts in a
             specific area of imaging research can be readily applied in
             new ways to different imaging modalities through the
             facilities provided in this integrated approach. We will
             point out some of the problems and opportunities in the
             research environment that are different from those
             encountered in clinical PACS system.},
   Key = {fds268760}
}

@booklet{Johnson98d,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and T. R. Hoverstad and R. E.
             Greenwald},
   Title = {Integrated weed management using narrow corn row spacing,
             herbicides, and cultivation},
   Journal = {Agronomy Journal},
   Volume = {90},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {40 -- 46},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {Johnson98d}
}

@article{fds174274,
   Author = {PS Bridger and S Haupt and R Leiser and GA Johnson and RC Burghardt and HR
             Tinneberg, C Pfarrer},
   Title = {Integrin activation in bovine placentomes and in caruncular
             epithelial cells isolated from pregnant cows.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {274-82},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.108.067637},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cattle • Cell Proliferation • Cell
             Separation • Cells, Cultured • Epithelial Cells
             • Extracellular Matrix • Female •
             Fibronectins • Focal Adhesions • Integrins •
             Models, Biological • Placenta • Pregnancy •
             Pregnancy, Animal* • Trophoblasts • cytology
             • metabolism • metabolism* •
             physiology},
   Abstract = {In the bovine synepitheliochorial placenta, restricted
             trophoblast invasion requires complex interactions of
             integrin receptors with proteins of the extracellular matrix
             (ECM) and integrin receptors of neighboring cells. Activated
             integrins assemble to focal adhesions and are linked to the
             actin cytoskeleton via signaling molecules including
             alpha-actinin (ACTN), focal adhesion kinase (PTK2 or FAK),
             phosphotyrosine, and talin (TLN1). Aims of this study were
             to assess integrin activation and focal adhesion assembly
             within epithelial cells of bovine placentomes and
             low-passage (not transformed) placentomal caruncular
             epithelial cells cultured on dishes coated with ECM
             proteins. Immunofluorescence analysis was performed to
             colocalize the signaling molecules ACTN, PTK2,
             phosphotyrosine, and TLN1 with each other and with
             beta(1)-integrin (ITGB1) in placentomal cryosections
             throughout pregnancy and in caruncular epithelial cells in
             vitro. Antibody specificity was confirmed by Western blot.
             Cells were cultured on uncoated dishes, and the dishes were
             coated with fibronectin (FN), laminin (LAMA), and collagen
             type IV (COL4), thereby statistically assessing cell number
             and qualitatively assessing the expression pattern of ITGB1,
             phosphotyrosine, and TLN1. Results demonstrated integrin
             activation and focal adhesion assembly in the placentome and
             that low-passage caruncular epithelial cells maintain
             integrin-associated properties observed in vivo. Expression
             and/or colocalization of signaling molecules with ITGB1
             confirmed, for the first time, integrin activation and
             participation in "outside-in" and "inside-out" signaling
             pathways. The prominent role of ECM, and FN in particular,
             in integrin signaling is supported by the in vitro
             enhancement of proliferation and focal adhesion expression.
             Thus, this in vitro model provides excellent potential for
             further mechanistic studies designed to elucidate
             feto-maternal interactions in the bovine
             placentome.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1095/biolreprod.108.067637},
   Key = {fds174274}
}

@booklet{Burghardt02,
   Author = {R. C. Burghardt and G. A. Johnson and L. A. Jaeger and H. Ka and J. E. Garlow and T. E. Spencer and F. W.
             Bazer},
   Title = {Integrins and extracellular matrix proteins at the
             maternal-fetal interface in domestic animals},
   Journal = {Cells Tissues Organs},
   Volume = {172},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {202 -- 217},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {Burghardt02}
}

@article{fds174284,
   Author = {RC Burghardt and GA Johnson and LA Jaeger and H Ka and JE Garlow and TE
             Spencer, FW Bazer},
   Title = {Integrins and extracellular matrix proteins at the
             maternal-fetal interface in domestic animals.},
   Journal = {Cells, tissues, organs},
   Volume = {172},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {202-17},
   Year = {2002},
   ISSN = {1422-6405},
   Keywords = {Animals • Embryo Implantation • Endometrium •
             Extracellular Matrix Proteins • Female • Humans
             • Integrins • Maternal-Fetal Exchange* •
             Osteopontin • Peptide Fragments • Placenta •
             Pregnancy • Protein Precursors • Sheep •
             Sialoglycoproteins • Swine • Transforming Growth
             Factor beta1 • cytology • genetics •
             metabolism • metabolism* • physiology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {Establishment of pregnancy in mammals requires coordinated
             conceptus-maternal interactions involving numerous hormones,
             growth factors and cytokines acting via specific receptors
             in the uterus. Uterine secretions play an important role in
             establishing synchrony between development of the conceptus
             and uterine receptivity, as well as in conceptus remodeling,
             adhesion, implantation and placentation in domestic species.
             Studies of non-invasive implantation in domestic livestock
             provide valuable opportunities to investigate fundamental
             processes of the initial events of apposition, attachment
             and adhesive interactions that are shared among species. In
             pigs and sheep, it appears that integrins play a dominant
             role in these fundamental processes via interactions with
             extracellular matrix molecules and other ligands to
             transduce cellular signals in uterine epithelial cells and
             conceptus trophectoderm. This review considers several of
             the potential integrin-binding ligands involved in the
             complex implantation adhesion cascade in pigs and sheep
             along with in vitro evidence for the transduction of
             cytoplasmic signals that may be required to sustain fetal
             and maternal contributions to the formation of the
             epitheliochorial placenta.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174284}
}

@booklet{Buhl92,
   Author = {A. E. Buhl and T. T. Kawabe and D. K. Maccallum and D. J.
             Waldon and K. A. Knight and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Interaction of minoxidil with pigment in cells of the hair
             follicle - an example of binding without apparent biological
             effects},
   Journal = {Skin Pharmacology},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {114 -- 123},
   Year = {1992},
   Key = {Buhl92}
}

@article{fds174260,
   Author = {AE Buhl and TT Kawabe and DK MacCallum and DJ Waldon and KA Knight and GA
             Johnson},
   Title = {Interaction of minoxidil with pigment in cells of the hair
             follicle: an example of binding without apparent biological
             effects.},
   Journal = {Skin pharmacology : the official journal of the Skin
             Pharmacology Society},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {114-23},
   Year = {1992},
   ISSN = {1011-0283},
   Keywords = {Animals • Autoradiography • Cell Differentiation
             • Cell Division • Cysteine • Melanins •
             Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormones • Mice • Mice,
             Inbred C3H • Mice, Inbred C57BL • Mice, Inbred
             Strains • Minoxidil • Pigments, Biological •
             Protein Binding • Thymidine • Vibrissae •
             drug effects • metabolism • metabolism* •
             pharmacokinetics* • pharmacology},
   Abstract = {To identify minoxidil target cells in hair follicles we
             followed the uptake of radiolabeled drug in mouse vibrissae
             follicles both in vitro and in vivo. Autoradiography showed
             that both 3H-minoxidil and 3H-minoxidil sulfate accumulated
             in the differentiating epithelial matrix cells superior to
             the dermal papilla, a distribution similar to that of
             pigment. Minoxidil localized in melanocytes, melanocyte
             processes, and areas of greater melanin concentrations
             within the epithelial cells. Although uptake of minoxidil
             was significantly less in unpigmented follicles, the drug
             stimulated proliferation and differentiation of both
             pigmented and unpigmented follicles. Labeled minoxidil bound
             to Sepia melanin and was displaced with unlabeled minoxidil
             and other electron donor drugs. This interaction with
             melanin acts as a targeting mechanism of minoxidil to
             pigmented hair follicles but has no apparent functional
             significance in hair growth. This work illustrates how
             measurement of drugs in hair may be biased by
             pigmentation.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174260}
}

@booklet{Choi01,
   Author = {Y. S. Choi and G. A. Johnson and R. C. Burghardt and L. R.
             Berghman and M. M. Joyce and K. M. Taylor and M. D. Stewart and F. W. Bazer and T. E. Spencer},
   Title = {Interferon regulatory factor-two restricts expression of
             interferon-stimulated genes to the endometrial stroma and
             glandular epithelium of the ovine uterus},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1038 -- 1049},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {October},
   Key = {Choi01}
}

@article{fds174124,
   Author = {Y Choi and GA Johnson and RC Burghardt and LR Berghman and MM Joyce and KM
             Taylor, MD Stewart and FW Bazer and TE Spencer},
   Title = {Interferon regulatory factor-two restricts expression of
             interferon-stimulated genes to the endometrial stroma and
             glandular epithelium of the ovine uterus.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1038-49},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • DNA-Binding Proteins • Endometrium
             • Epithelium • Estrous Cycle • Female •
             Fluorescent Antibody Technique • Gene Expression*
             • Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 • Interferon
             Regulatory Factor-2 • Interferon Type I •
             Interferon-Stimulated Gene Factor 3 • Interferons
             • Phosphoproteins • Pregnancy Proteins •
             Promoter Regions, Genetic • RNA, Messenger •
             Recombinant Proteins • Repressor Proteins* • STAT1
             Transcription Factor • STAT2 Transcription Factor
             • Sheep* • Stromal Cells • Trans-Activators
             • Transcription Factors • Transcriptional
             Activation • Transfection • Uterus • analysis
             • drug effects • genetics • metabolism •
             metabolism* • pharmacology • pharmacology* •
             physiology • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Interferon tau (IFNtau) is the signal for maternal
             recognition of pregnancy in ruminants. The positive effects
             of IFNtau on IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression are
             mediated by ISG factor 3 (ISGF3), which is composed of
             signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 1,
             Stat 2, and IFN regulatory factor-9 (IRF-9), and by
             gamma-activated factor (GAF), which is a Stat 1 homodimer.
             Induction of ISGs, such as ISG17 and 2',5'-oligoadenylate
             synthetase, by IFNtau during pregnancy is limited to the
             endometrial stroma (S) and glandular epithelium (GE) of the
             ovine uterus. The IRF-2, a potent transcriptional repressor
             of ISG expression, is expressed in the luminal epithelium
             (LE). This study determined effects of the estrous cycle,
             pregnancy, and IFNtau on expression of Stat 1, Stat 2,
             IRF-9, IRF-1, and IRF-2 genes in the ovine endometrium. In
             cyclic ewes, Stat 1, Stat 2, IRF-1, and IRF-9 mRNA and
             protein were detected at low levels in the S and GE. During
             pregnancy, expression of these genes increased only in the S
             and GE. Expression of IRF-2 was detected only in the LE and
             superficial GE (sGE) of both cyclic and pregnant ewes. In
             cyclic ewes, intrauterine administration of IFNtau
             stimulated Stat 1, Stat 2, IRF-9, and IRF-1 expression in
             the endometrium. Ovine IRF-2 repressed transcriptional
             activity driven by IFN-stimulated response elements that
             bind ISGF3, but not by gamma-activation sequences that bind
             GAF. These results suggest that IRF-2 in the LE and sGE
             restricts IFNtau induction of ISGs to the S and GE. In the S
             and GE, IFNtau hyperactivation of ISG expression likely
             involves formation and actions of the transcription factors
             ISGF3 and, perhaps, IRF-1.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174124}
}

@article{fds174113,
   Author = {MM Joyce and FJ White and RC Burghardt and JJ Muñiz and TE Spencer and FW
             Bazer, GA Johnson},
   Title = {Interferon stimulated gene 15 conjugates to endometrial
             cytosolic proteins and is expressed at the uterine-placental
             interface throughout pregnancy in sheep.},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {146},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {675-84},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0013-7227},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/en.2004-1224},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blotting, Western • Cytokines •
             Cytosol • Endometrium • Female • Gene
             Expression • Immunohistochemistry • In Situ
             Hybridization • Interferon Type I • Male •
             Placenta • Pregnancy • Pregnancy Proteins •
             RNA, Messenger • Sheep • Ubiquitin • analogs
             & derivatives* • analysis • genetics •
             genetics* • metabolism • metabolism* •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is a ubiquitin homolog
             expressed in uteri of ruminants in response to interferon
             (IFN)-tau and is also induced during pregnancy in the uteri
             of mice, pigs, humans, and baboons. This study examined
             expression of ISG15 and its conjugation to target proteins
             in the ovine uterus beyond the period of IFNtau secretion by
             the conceptus. Although steady-state levels of ISG15 mRNA
             decreased after d 25 of pregnancy, ISG15 persisted in
             endometrium through d 120. In situ hybridization and
             immunocytochemistry localized ISG15 across the entire
             uterine wall through d 25, after which expression was
             restricted to endometrial stroma along the
             maternal-placental interface. Western blots revealed ISG15
             and ISG15-conjugated proteins in endometrium. Treatment of
             ovariectomized sheep with progesterone and IFNtau increased
             both free and conjugated ISG15. These results are the first
             to show in vivo regulation of ISG15 function (i.e.
             conjugation to target proteins) by a type I IFN in the
             uterus of any species and that ISG15 is expressed at
             contacts between the placenta and uterus when trophectoderm
             no longer produces IFNtau. Interestingly, mRNA for the type
             II IFNgamma was present in the endometrial stromal
             compartment on d 15-50, which may stimulate the synthesis of
             ISG15 through later pregnancy. We hypothesize that ISG15 is
             not merely a consequence of an antiviral state induced by
             trophoblast IFNtau but represents a critical component of
             the microenvironment at the uterine-placental interface
             during the progressive events of conceptus development,
             implantation, and placentation in sheep and perhaps other
             mammalian species.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1210/en.2004-1224},
   Key = {fds174113}
}

@booklet{Bazer00,
   Author = {F. W. Bazer and J. A. G. W. Fleming and G. A. Johnson and Y.
             S. Choi and M. D. Stewart and T. E. Spencer},
   Title = {Interferon tau inhibits transcription of the ovine estrogen
             receptor alpha gene: Involvement of STATs and
             IRFs.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {62},
   Pages = {292 -- 292},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {Bazer00}
}

@booklet{Joyce02,
   Author = {M. M. Joyce and T. R. Hansen and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Interferon-stimulated gene 17 is expressed in the porcine
             uterus and may be critical to placental development across
             species.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {66},
   Pages = {185 -- 186},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {Joyce02}
}

@booklet{Joyce03,
   Author = {M. M. Joyce and R. C. Burghardt and F. W. Bazer and G. M.
             Zaunbrecher and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are induced in the
             endometrium of pregnant but not pseudopregnant
             pigs.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {68},
   Pages = {206 -- 206},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {Joyce03}
}

@booklet{Stewart01,
   Author = {M. D. Stewart and G. A. Johnson and F. W. Bazer and T. E.
             Spencer},
   Title = {Interferon-tau (IFN tau) regulation of IFN-stimulated gene
             expression in cell lines lacking specific IFN-signaling
             components},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {142},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1786 -- 1794},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {Stewart01}
}

@article{fds174144,
   Author = {MD Stewart and GA Johnson and FW Bazer and TE Spencer},
   Title = {Interferon-tau (IFNtau) regulation of IFN-stimulated gene
             expression in cell lines lacking specific IFN-signaling
             components.},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {142},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1786-94},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0013-7227},
   Keywords = {2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase • Cell Line •
             DNA-Binding Proteins • Fibroblasts • Gene
             Expression Regulation • Humans • Interferon Type I
             • Interferon-Stimulated Gene Factor 3 •
             Interferon-Stimulated Gene Factor 3, gamma Subunit •
             Phosphorylation • Pregnancy Proteins • STAT1
             Transcription Factor • STAT2 Transcription Factor
             • STAT3 Transcription Factor • Trans-Activators
             • Transcription Factors • biosynthesis • drug
             effects* • genetics* • metabolism •
             pharmacology* • physiology},
   Abstract = {Interferon-tau (IFNtau) is a unique type I IFN secreted by
             the ruminant conceptus that acts in a paracrine manner on
             the endometrial epithelium to signal pregnancy recognition.
             In the ovine endometrium, IFNtau suppresses estrogen
             receptor alpha and oxytocin receptor gene expression, but
             increases or induces expression of IFN-simulated genes
             (ISGs), including signal transducer and activator of
             transcription-1 (STAT1), STAT2, ISG factor-3gamma
             (ISGF3gamma)/p48/IFN regulatory factor-9, and
             2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS). Human fibroblast cell
             lines lacking specific IFN signaling components were
             employed to determine the roles of STAT1, STAT2, and
             ISGF3gamma in the effects of IFNtau on ISG protein
             expression. Results indicated that STAT1alpha or STAT1beta
             is required for IFNtau effects on STAT2, ISGF3gamma, and OAS
             (40/46, 69/71, and 100 kDa). STAT2 is required for effects
             on STAT1, ISGF3gamma, and all OAS forms. ISGF3gamma is
             required for effects of IFNtau on STAT2 and 40/46- and
             69/71-kDa OAS and plays a role in the effects of IFNtau on
             100-kDa OAS and STAT1. Mutation of Tyr(701), but not
             Ser(727), of STAT1 abolished the effects of IFNtau on ISG
             expression. Mutation of the SH2 domain of STAT1 abolished
             the effects of IFNtau on all ISGs and reduced increases in
             100-kDa OAS. These data illustrate the importance of
             transcription factors composed of STAT1, STAT2, and
             ISGF3gamma in the signaling pathway mediating the effects of
             IFNtau on ISG expression.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174144}
}

@booklet{Stewart01a,
   Author = {D. M. Stewart and G. A. Johnson and C. A. Vyhlidal and R. C.
             Burghardt and S. H. Safe and L. Y. Yu-lee and F. W. Bazer and T. E. Spencer},
   Title = {Interferon-tau activates multiple signal transducer and
             activator of transcription proteins and has complex effects
             on interferon-responsive gene transcription in ovine
             endometrial epithelial cells},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {142},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {98 -- 107},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {Stewart01a}
}

@article{fds174117,
   Author = {DM Stewart and GA Johnson and CA Vyhlidal and RC Burghardt and SH Safe and LY Yu-Lee and FW Bazer and TE Spencer},
   Title = {Interferon-tau activates multiple signal transducer and
             activator of transcription proteins and has complex effects
             on interferon-responsive gene transcription in ovine
             endometrial epithelial cells.},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {142},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {98-107},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0013-7227},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cell Nucleus • Cells, Cultured •
             DNA-Binding Proteins • Endometrium • Epithelial
             Cells • Female • Interferon Type I •
             Interferon-Stimulated Gene Factor 3 • Luciferases
             • Phosphorylation • Pregnancy Proteins •
             Promoter Regions, Genetic • Protein Transport •
             Recombinant Fusion Proteins • STAT1 Transcription
             Factor • STAT2 Transcription Factor • Sheep •
             Signal Transduction • Trans-Activators •
             Transcription Factors • Transcription, Genetic •
             Transfection • analysis • cytology • drug
             effects • genetics* • metabolism •
             metabolism* • pharmacology* • physiology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {Interferon-tau (IFNtau), a type I IFN produced by sheep
             conceptus trophectoderm, is the signal for maternal
             recognition of pregnancy. Although it is clear that IFNtau
             suppresses transcription of the estrogen receptor alpha and
             oxytocin receptor genes and induces expression of various
             IFN-stimulated genes within the endometrial epithelium,
             little is known of the signal transduction pathway activated
             by the hormone. This study determined the effects of IFNtau
             on signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)
             activation, expression, DNA binding, and transcriptional
             activation using an ovine endometrial epithelial cell line.
             IFNtau induced persistent tyrosine phosphorylation and
             nuclear translocation of STAT1 and -2 (10 min to 48 h), but
             transient phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of
             STAT3, -5a/b, and -6 (10 to <60 min). IFNtau increased
             expression of STAT1 and -2, but not STAT3, -5a/b, and -6.
             IFN-stimulated gene factor-3 and STAT1 homodimers formed and
             bound an IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and
             gamma-activated sequence (GAS) element, respectively. IFNtau
             increased transcription of GAS-driven promoters at 3 h, but
             suppressed their activity at 24 h. In contrast, the activity
             of an ISRE-driven promoter was increased at 3 and 24 h.
             These results indicate that IFNtau activates multiple STATs
             and has differential effects on ISRE- and GAS-driven gene
             transcription.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174117}
}

@booklet{Johnson00d,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson and T. E. Spencer and R. C. Burghardt and M.
             M. Joyce and F. W. Bazer},
   Title = {Interferon-tau and progesterone regulate ubiquitin
             cross-reactive protein expression in the ovine
             uterus},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {622 -- 627},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Johnson00d}
}

@article{fds174133,
   Author = {GA Johnson and TE Spencer and RC Burghardt and MM Joyce and FW
             Bazer},
   Title = {Interferon-tau and progesterone regulate ubiquitin
             cross-reactive protein expression in the ovine
             uterus.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {622-7},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blotting, Western • Female •
             Hormone Antagonists • Hysterectomy • In Situ
             Hybridization • Interferon Type I • Pregnancy
             Proteins • Progesterone • Sheep • Ubiquitins
             • Uterus • analogs & derivatives* •
             antagonists & inhibitors • drug effects • genetics
             • metabolism • metabolism* • pharmacology
             • physiology},
   Abstract = {Ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP) is a functional
             ubiquitin homolog synthesized by the ruminant endometrium in
             response to conceptus-derived interferon-tau (IFNtau).
             Progesterone is required for IFNtau to exert antiluteolytic
             actions on the endometrium. Therefore, this study was
             designed to determine whether progesterone is requisite for
             IFNtau induction of UCRP expression within the ovine uterus.
             Cyclic ewes were ovariectomized and fitted with intrauterine
             (i.u.) catheters on Day 5 and treated daily with steroids
             (i.m.) and protein (i.u.) as follows: 1) progesterone (P,
             Days 5-24) and control serum proteins (CX, Days 11-24); 2) P
             and ZK 137.316 (ZK; progesterone receptor antagonist, Days
             11-24) and CX proteins; 3) P and recombinant ovine IFNtau
             (roIFNtau, Days 11-24); or 4) P and ZK and roIFNtau. All
             ewes were hysterectomized on Day 25. In P-treated ewes,
             roIFNtau increased endometrial UCRP mRNA and protein levels.
             However, administration of ZK to ewes ablated roIFNtau
             induction of UCRP. Recombinant ovine IFNtau induced
             expression of UCRP mRNA in progestinized endometrial luminal
             (LE) and glandular (GE) epithelium as well as in both
             stratum compactum and spongiosum layers of the stroma (ST).
             Progesterone receptor protein was located in endometrial ST,
             but not in LE and GE from these ewes. Results support the
             hypothesis that progesterone is required for IFNtau
             induction of type I IFN-responsive genes, such as UCRP, in
             the ruminant uterus.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174133}
}

@booklet{Staggs97,
   Author = {K. L. Staggs and K. J. Austin and G. A. Johnson and C. T.
             Talbott and T. R. Hansen},
   Title = {Interferon-tau may elicit specific responses in the
             endometrium through signal transduction pathways other than
             the Jak/Stat system.},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {56},
   Pages = {159 -- 159},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {Staggs97}
}

@article{fds174185,
   Author = {FW Bazer and RC Burghardt and GA Johnson and TE Spencer and G
             Wu},
   Title = {Interferons and progesterone for establishment and
             maintenance of pregnancy: interactions among novel cell
             signaling pathways.},
   Journal = {Reproductive biology},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {179-211},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1642-431X},
   Keywords = {Animals • Embryo Implantation • Estrogens •
             Female • Humans • Interferon Type I •
             Interferons • Pregnancy • Pregnancy Maintenance
             • Pregnancy Proteins • Progesterone • Signal
             Transduction • Swine • Uterus • drug effects
             • physiology • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Type I and/or type II interferons (IFNs) are important in
             establishing uterine receptivity to implantation in mammals.
             Gene expression effected by IFNs may be induced, stimulated
             or inhibited, but most are IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs).
             Effects of IFNs range from pregnancy recognition signaling
             in ruminants by IFN tau (IFNT) to effects on cellular
             functions of the uterus and uterine vasculature. For most,
             if not all, actions of IFNs on the uterus, progesterone
             (P(4)) is permissive to ISG expression, with genes being
             induced by IFN or induced by P(4) and stimulated by IFN.
             Uterine receptivity to implantation is P(4)-dependent;
             however, implantation events are preceded by loss of
             expression of progesterone (PGR) and estrogen (ESR1)
             receptors by uterine epithelia. Thus, P4 likely stimulates
             PGR-positive stromal cells to express one or more
             progestamedins, e.g., fibroblast growth factors-7 and -10,
             and/or hepatocyte growth factor, that act via their
             respective receptors on uterine epithelia and trophectoderm
             to regulate expression of ISGs. FGF10 appears to be the most
             important progestamedin in sheep uteri during pregnancy.
             Sequential effects of P(4) to induce and IFNs to stimulate
             gene expression suggest that P(4) and IFNs activate
             complimentary cell signaling pathways to modulate expression
             of genes for attachment of trophectoderm to uterine lumenal
             and superficial glandular epithelia (LE/sGE), modify
             phenotype of uterine stromal cells, silence PGR and ESR1
             genes, signal pregnancy recognition, suppress genes for
             immune recognition, alter membrane permeability to enhance
             conceptus-maternal exchange of factors, increase endometrial
             vascularity and activate genes for transport of nutrients
             into the uterine lumen. In ewes, IFNT abrogrates the uterine
             luteolytic mechanism and stimulates expression of classical
             ISGs by GE and stromal cells, whereas LE/sGE express
             P(4)-induced and IFNT-stimulated genes important for uterine
             receptivity to implantation and conceptus development. These
             include wingless-type MMTV (mouse mammary tumor virus)
             integration site family member 7A (WNT7A) induced by IFNT,
             as well as galectin, proteases, protease inhibitors,
             transporters for glucose and amino acids, gastrin releasing
             polypeptide, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1
             and a hypoxia inducible factor. The specific functions of
             IFNs and ISGs induced in primates, pigs and other mammals
             during pregnancy are not known, but likely are important in
             establishment of pregnancy. Understanding the roles of IFNs
             and ISGs in uterine receptivity for implantation is
             necessary to develop strategies to enhance reproductive
             health and fertility in humans and domestic animals. The
             magnitude of the LH surge was reduced in cows receiving
             endotoxin.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174185}
}

@article{fds174306,
   Author = {FW Bazer and TE Spencer and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Interferons and uterine receptivity.},
   Journal = {Seminars in reproductive medicine},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {90-102},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1526-4564},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0028-1108013},
   Keywords = {Animals • Embryo Implantation • Estrogens •
             Female • Interferons • Models, Biological •
             Pregnancy • Primates • Rodentia • Ruminants
             • Swine • Uterus • physiology •
             physiology*},
   Abstract = {This article focuses on the potential roles of interferons
             (IFNs) in establishing uterine receptivity to implantation.
             A common feature of the peri-implantation period of
             pregnancy in most mammals is production of type I and/or
             type II IFNs by trophoblasts that induce and/or stimulate
             expression of an array of IFN-stimulate genes (ISGs). These
             effects range from pregnancy recognition signaling in
             ruminants through IFN tau to effects on cellular functions
             of the uterus and uterine vasculature. For actions of IFNs,
             progesterone (P4) is permissive to the expression of many
             effects and to the expression of ISGs that are induced
             directly by an IFN or induced by P4 and stimulated by an IFN
             in a temporal and/or cell-specific manner. Uterine
             receptivity to implantation is P4 dependent; however,
             implantation events are preceded by loss of expression of
             progesterone (PGR) and estrogen (ESR1) receptors by uterine
             epithelia. Therefore, P4 likely acts via PGR-positive
             stromal cells to induce expression of fibroblast growth
             factors-7 and -10 and/or hepatocyte growth factor
             (progestamedins) that then act via their respective
             receptors on uterine epithelia and trophectoderm to affect
             expression of ISGs. The permissive effects of P4 on the
             expression of ISGs and the effects of P4 to induce and IFNs
             to stimulate gene expression raise the question of whether
             uterine receptivity to implantation requires P4 and IFN to
             activate unique, but complementary, cell signaling pathways.
             Uterine receptivity to implantation, depending on species,
             involves changes in the expression of genes for the
             attachment of trophectoderm to the uterine lumenal
             epithelium (LE) and superficial glandular epithelium (sGE),
             modification of the phenotype of uterine stromal cells, the
             silencing of PGR and ESR1 genes, the suppression of genes
             for immune recognition, alterations in membrane permeability
             to enhance conceptus-maternal exchange of factors, increased
             vascularity of the endometrium, activation of genes for
             transport of nutrients into the uterine lumen, and enhanced
             signaling for pregnancy recognition. Differential expression
             of genes by uterine LE/sGE, mid- to deep-glandular epithelia
             (GE), and stromal cells in response to P4 and IFNs is likely
             to influence uterine receptivity to implantation in most
             mammals. Understanding the roles of IFNs in uterine
             receptivity for implantation is necessary to develop
             approaches to enhance reproductive health and fertility in
             humans and domestic animals.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1055/s-0028-1108013},
   Key = {fds174306}
}

@article{fds268849,
   Author = {Goddeeris, MM and Rho, S and Petiet, A and Davenport, CL and Johnson,
             GA and Meyers, EN and Klingensmith, J},
   Title = {Intracardiac septation requires hedgehog-dependent cellular
             contributions from outside the heart.},
   Journal = {Development (Cambridge)},
   Volume = {135},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1887-1895},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0950-1991},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18441277},
   Keywords = {Animals • Fetal Heart • Heart Atria • Heart
             Septal Defects, Ventricular • Hedgehog Proteins •
             Mesoderm • Mice • Mice, Mutant Strains •
             Mutation • Signal Transduction • cytology •
             cytology* • embryology • genetics •
             metabolism*},
   Abstract = {Septation of the mammalian heart into four chambers requires
             the orchestration of multiple tissue progenitors.
             Abnormalities in this process can result in potentially
             fatal atrioventricular septation defects (AVSD). The
             contribution of extracardiac cells to atrial septation has
             recently been recognized. Here, we use a genetic marker and
             novel magnetic resonance microscopy techniques to
             demonstrate the origins of the dorsal mesenchymal protrusion
             in the dorsal mesocardium, and its substantial contribution
             to atrioventricular septation. We explore the functional
             significance of this tissue to atrioventricular septation
             through study of the previously uncharacterized AVSD
             phenotype of Shh(-/-) mutant mouse embryos. We demonstrate
             that Shh signaling is required within the dorsal mesocardium
             for its contribution to the atria. Failure of this addition
             results in severe AVSD. These studies demonstrate that AVSD
             can result from a primary defect in dorsal mesocardium,
             providing a new paradigm for the understanding of human
             AVSD.},
   Doi = {10.1242/dev.016147},
   Key = {fds268849}
}

@article{fds174231,
   Author = {DA Massuto and RN Hooper and EC Kneese and GA Johnson and NH Ing and BR
             Weeks, LA Jaeger},
   Title = {Intrauterine infusion of latency-associated peptide (LAP)
             during early porcine pregnancy affects conceptus elongation
             and placental size.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {534-42},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1529-7268},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.109.081893},
   Abstract = {In the pig, transforming growth factor beta (TGFB), TGFB
             receptors (TGFBRs), and integrins are present during the
             peri-implantation period. Latency-associated peptide (LAP),
             a part of latent TGFB, can bind to integrin heterodimers via
             its Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence; therefore, ligand-receptor
             interactions between TGFB and TGFBRs, along with LAP and
             integrin heterodimers, may be functional in mediating events
             supporting conceptus elongation and attachment. With the use
             of surgically implantable osmotic pumps, we were able to
             maintain pregnancy with the aim of mechanistically altering
             in vivo receptor-ligand interactions involving TGFB with
             TGFBRs and LAP with integrins during porcine pregnancy. Day
             9 pregnant gilts received intrauterine infusions of LAP-RGD,
             a recombinant mutant of LAP (LAP-RGE), or vehicle control
             and were ovariohysterectomized on Day 13 or 24 of pregnancy.
             We hypothesized that intrauterine infusion of LAP-RGD would
             decrease downstream signaling of TGFB while increasing
             LAP-integrin interactions and that net effect would enhance
             conceptus survival and attachment early in the
             peri-implantation period but possibly increase the chance of
             abnormal placentation later in pregnancy. Additionally, we
             hypothesized that infusion of LAP-RGE would disrupt TGFB
             signals but not alter integrin signaling, and thus the net
             result would be decreased conceptus survival and abnormal
             development. Unexpectedly, LAP-RGD intrauterine infusions
             resulted in a reduction of conceptus elongation, whereas
             infusions of LAP-RGE permitted implantation and placentation
             but resulted in larger fetal weight, allantois length, and
             allantoic fluid volume. Results suggest TGFB and integrins
             are contributing factors in the regulation of conceptus
             elongation and placental and fetal size.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1095/biolreprod.109.081893},
   Key = {fds174231}
}

@booklet{Johnson85c,
   Author = {G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Inverse no-matrices},
   Journal = {Linear Algebra And Its Applications},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {JAN},
   Pages = {215 -- 222},
   Year = {1985},
   Key = {Johnson85c}
}

@article{fds268712,
   Author = {Calabrese, E and Badea, A and Coe, CL and Lubach, GR and Styner, MA and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Investigating the tradeoffs between spatial resolution and
             diffusion sampling for brain mapping with diffusion
             tractography: time well spent?},
   Journal = {Human Brain Mapping},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {5667-5685},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1065-9471},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.22578},
   Abstract = {Interest in mapping white matter pathways in the brain has
             peaked with the recognition that altered brain connectivity
             may contribute to a variety of neurologic and psychiatric
             diseases. Diffusion tractography has emerged as a popular
             method for postmortem brain mapping initiatives, including
             the ex-vivo component of the human connectome project, yet
             it remains unclear to what extent computer-generated tracks
             fully reflect the actual underlying anatomy. Of particular
             concern is the fact that diffusion tractography results vary
             widely depending on the choice of acquisition protocol. The
             two major acquisition variables that consume scan time,
             spatial resolution, and diffusion sampling, can each have
             profound effects on the resulting tractography. In this
             analysis, we determined the effects of the temporal tradeoff
             between spatial resolution and diffusion sampling on
             tractography in the ex-vivo rhesus macaque brain, a close
             primate model for the human brain. We used the wealth of
             autoradiography-based connectivity data available for the
             rhesus macaque brain to assess the anatomic accuracy of six
             time-matched diffusion acquisition protocols with varying
             balance between spatial and diffusion sampling. We show that
             tractography results vary greatly, even when the subject and
             the total acquisition time are held constant. Further, we
             found that focusing on either spatial resolution or
             diffusion sampling at the expense of the other is
             counterproductive. A balanced consideration of both sampling
             domains produces the most anatomically accurate and
             consistent results.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hbm.22578},
   Key = {fds268712}
}

@article{fds268787,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Stanton, IN and Johnston, SM and Johnson, GA and Therien,
             MJ},
   Title = {Investigations on X-ray luminescence CT for small animal
             imaging.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical
             Engineering},
   Volume = {8313},
   Pages = {83130T},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {0277-786X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23227300},
   Abstract = {X-ray Luminescence CT (XLCT) is a hybrid imaging modality
             combining x-ray and optical imaging in which x-ray
             luminescent nanophosphors (NPs) are used as emissive imaging
             probes. NPs are easily excited using common CT energy x-ray
             beams, and the NP luminescence is efficiently collected
             using sensitive light based detection systems. XLCT can be
             recognized as a close analog to fluorescence diffuse optical
             tomography (FDOT). However, XLCT has remarkable advantages
             over FDOT due to the substantial excitation penetration
             depths provided by x-rays relative to laser light sources,
             long term photo-stability of NPs, and the ability to tune NP
             emission within the NIR spectral window. Since XCLT uses an
             x-ray pencil beam excitation, the emitted light can be
             measured and back-projected along the x-ray path during
             reconstruction, where the size of the X-ray pencil beam
             determines the resolution for XLCT. In addition, no
             background signal competes with NP luminescence (i.e., no
             auto fluorescence) in XLCT. Currently, no small animal XLCT
             system has been proposed or tested. This paper investigates
             an XLCT system built and integrated with a dual source
             micro-CT system. Two novel sampling paradigms that result in
             more efficient scanning are proposed and tested via
             simulations. Our preliminary experimental results in
             phantoms indicate that a basic CT-like reconstruction is
             able to recover a map of the NP locations and differences in
             NP concentrations. With the proposed dual source system and
             faster scanning approaches, XLCT has the potential to
             revolutionize molecular imaging in preclinical
             studies.},
   Key = {fds268787}
}

@booklet{Maynor88,
   Author = {MAYNOR, CH and CHARLES, HC and HERFKENS, RJ and SUDDARTH, SA and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {INVITRO CHEMICAL-SHIFT IMAGING OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS AT
             7.0-TESLA},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {S3-S3},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1988Q574500021&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Maynor88}
}

@booklet{Herfkens84,
   Author = {HERFKENS, RJ and JOHNSON, GA and GLOVER, G},
   Title = {INVIVO CHEMICAL-SHIFT IMAGING OF HYDROGEN},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {S42-S42},
   Year = {1984},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1984TL42800185&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198409000-00191},
   Key = {Herfkens84}
}

@booklet{Johnson84,
   Author = {JOHNSON, GA and HERFKENS, RJ and MACFALL, JR},
   Title = {INVIVO FIELD-DEPENDENCE OF TISSUE RELAXATION-TIMES},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {S33-S33},
   Year = {1984},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1984TL42800149&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198409000-00154},
   Key = {Johnson84}
}

@booklet{Veres91a,
   Author = {VERES, JS and JOHNSON, GA and KRAMER, PJ},
   Title = {INVIVO MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING OF BLECHNUM FERNS -
             CHANGES IN T1 AND N(H) DURING DEHYDRATION AND
             REHYDRATION},
   Journal = {American journal of botany},
   Volume = {78},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {80-88},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0002-9122},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1991EW16700009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2445231},
   Key = {Veres91a}
}

@booklet{Thompson80,
   Author = {THOMPSON, WM and AMBERG, JR and SHAW, M and BATES, M and HEDLUNG, L and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {IODINE CONCENTRATION AND RADIOGRAPHIC DENSITY DURING ORAL
             CHOLECYSTOGRAPHY},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {397-397},
   Year = {1980},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1980KK17000048&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198009000-00049},
   Key = {Thompson80}
}

@booklet{Waldon89,
   Author = {D. J. Waldon and A. E. Buhl and C. A. Baker and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Is minoxidil sulfate the active metabolite for
             hair-growth},
   Journal = {Clinical Research},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {A769 -- A769},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {Waldon89}
}

@booklet{Waldon89a,
   Author = {D. J. Waldon and A. E. Buhl and C. A. Baker and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Is minoxidil sulfate the active metabolite for
             hair-growth},
   Journal = {Journal Of Investigative Dermatology},
   Volume = {92},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {538 -- 538},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Waldon89a}
}

@article{fds174206,
   Author = {GA JOHNSON and RH MCCLUER},
   Title = {ISOLATION AND ANALYSIS OF MONO-, DI-, AND
             TRISIALOGANGLIOSIDES.},
   Journal = {Biochimica et biophysica acta},
   Volume = {70},
   Pages = {487-90},
   Year = {1963},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0006-3002},
   Keywords = {BRAIN* • CHROMATOGRAPHY* • EXPERIMENTAL LAB STUDY*
             • GANGLIOSIDES* • HEXOSAMINES* • HEXOSES*
             • NEURAMINIC ACIDS* • NEUROCHEMISTRY*},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174206}
}

@booklet{Wang00,
   Author = {G. Y. Wang and G. A. Johnson and T. E. Spencer and F. W.
             Bazer},
   Title = {Isolation, immortalization, and initial characterization of
             uterine cell lines: An in vitro model system for the porcine
             uterus},
   Journal = {In Vitro Cellular \& Developmental Biology-animal},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {650 -- 656},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {Wang00}
}

@article{fds174283,
   Author = {G Wang and GA Johnson and TE Spencer and FW Bazer},
   Title = {Isolation, immortalization, and initial characterization of
             uterine cell lines: an in vitro model system for the porcine
             uterus.},
   Journal = {In vitro cellular & developmental biology.
             Animal},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {650-6},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1071-2690},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blotting, Western • Cell Division •
             Cell Line, Transformed • Female • Models,
             Biological* • Swine • Uterus •
             cytology*},
   Abstract = {The aim of this study was to develop immortalized cell lines
             from porcine uterus. Endometrial cells including luminal
             epithelium (LE), glandular epithelium (GE), stroma (ST), and
             myometrium (MYO) were enzymatically isolated from the uterus
             of a day 12 pregnant gilt. Primary cultures were
             immortalized by transduction with a retroviral vector
             containing the E6 and E7 open reading frames of human
             papillomavirus type 16 (LXSN-16E6E7) packaged by the
             amphotropic fibroblast line PA-317. Cells having integrated
             the vector were selected by resistance to the neomycin
             analog G418 (0.4-1.5 mg/ml). Surviving cells were maintained
             in complete culture medium containing G418 (0.1 mg/ml) and
             subcultured for 1 yr. Expression of the E7 protein was
             confirmed in all cell lines by Western blotting. Phase
             contrast microscopy revealed that LE and GE cells exhibited
             cobblestone morphology, whereas ST and MYO cells exhibited
             spindle-shaped morphology. The epithelial origin of LE and
             GE was confirmed by positive immunostaining for cytokeratin.
             Stromal and MYO cells were vimentin-positive, but
             cytokeratin-negative. The MYO cell lines were positive for
             smooth muscle alpha-actin staining, whereas LE, GE, and ST
             cell lines were negative for alpha-actin. Western blotting
             indicated that all cell lines expressed both estrogen and
             progesterone receptors, but only GE cells secreted
             uteroferrin (UF). Collectively, these porcine uterine cell
             lines provide an in vitro model for studying cell
             type-specific actions of hormones and cytokines, signal
             transduction pathways, cell-cell interactions, and gene
             expression.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174283}
}

@article{fds132741,
   Title = {J.R. MacFall, H.C.Charles, R.D. Black, H. Middleton,
             J.Swartz, B. Saam,   B. Dreihuys, C. Erickson, W. Happer,
             G. Cates, G.A. Johnson, C.E. Ravin.   Human lung air
             spaces: potential for MR imaging with hyperpolarized He-3.
               Radiology 200, 553-558. (1996).},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132741}
}

@article{fds132742,
   Title = {J.R. MacFall, H.C.Charles, R.D. Black, H. Middleton,
             J.Swartz, B. Saam,   W. Happer, G. Cates, G.A. Johnson,
             C.E. Ravin. MR imaging of lung air  spaces with
             hyperpolarized 3He.  in "Proc., SMR 4th Annual Scientific
              Meeting.  New York, NY, 1996," p. 21.},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132742}
}

@article{fds132722,
   Title = {J.S. MacFall, G.A. Johnson, in "Encyclopedia of Nuclear
             Magnetic  Resonance" (D.M. Grant, R.K. Harris, Ed.), p.
             3633-3640, John Wiley &  Sons, London, 1996.},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132722}
}

@article{fds132746,
   Title = {Johnson GA, Hedlund LW, MacFall JR. A new window into the
             lung. Physics in Medicine 35-38 1998},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds132746}
}

@booklet{Ka01,
   Author = {H. Ka and L. A. Jaeger and G. A. Johnson and T. E. Spencer and F. W. Bazer},
   Title = {Keratinocyte growth factor is up-regulated by estrogen in
             the porcine uterine endometrium and functions in
             trophectoderm cell proliferation and differentiation},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {142},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {2303 -- 2310},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Ka01}
}

@article{fds174110,
   Author = {H Ka and LA Jaeger and GA Johnson and TE Spencer and FW
             Bazer},
   Title = {Keratinocyte growth factor is up-regulated by estrogen in
             the porcine uterine endometrium and functions in
             trophectoderm cell proliferation and differentiation.},
   Journal = {Endocrinology},
   Volume = {142},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {2303-10},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0013-7227},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cell Differentiation • Cell Division
             • Culture Techniques • Endometrium • Enzyme
             Activation • Estradiol • Estrogens •
             Estrogens, Catechol • Female • Fibroblast Growth
             Factor 7 • Fibroblast Growth Factors • Gene
             Expression Regulation • Gestational Age •
             Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1 • Mitogen-Activated
             Protein Kinase 3 • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
             • Phosphorylation • Pregnancy • Progesterone
             • Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen • Receptor,
             Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 2 • Receptors,
             Fibroblast Growth Factor* • Receptors, Growth Factor
             • Recombinant Proteins • Swine* •
             Trophoblasts • analysis • cytology • drug
             effects • genetics* • metabolism •
             metabolism* • pharmacology • pharmacology*},
   Abstract = {Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is expressed by uterine
             endometrial epithelial cells during the estrous cycle and
             during pregnancy in pigs, whereas KGF receptor is expressed
             in conceptus trophectoderm and endometrial epithelia. In
             particular, KGF expression in the endometrium is highest on
             day 12 of pregnancy. This corresponds to the period of
             maternal recognition of pregnancy in pigs, which is signaled
             by large amounts of estrogen secreted by conceptus
             trophectoderm acting on the endometrium. Our hypothesis is
             that estrogens of conceptus origin stimulate endometrial
             epithelial KGF expression, and, in turn, secreted KGF
             stimulates proliferation and differentiation of conceptus
             trophectoderm. To determine the factors affecting KGF
             expression in the uterus, endometrial explants from gilts on
             day 9 of the estrous cycle were cultured in the presence of
             17beta-estradiol, catechol estrogens, or progesterone.
             17beta-Estradiol stimulated the expression of KGF (P <
             0.05), whereas catechol estrogens had no effect (P > 0.05).
             Between days 9 and 15 of pregnancy, proliferating cell
             nuclear antigen was abundant in conceptuses, but was barely
             detectable in uterine endometrial epithelia. To determine
             the effects of KGF on conceptus trophectoderm, porcine
             trophectoderm (pTr) cells were treated with recombinant rat
             KGF (rKGF). rKGF increased the proliferation of pTr cells (P
             < 0.01) as measured by [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. rKGF
             elicited phosphorylation of KGF receptor and activated the
             mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) cascade in pTr
             cells. pTr cell differentiation was affected by rKGF,
             because it increased expression of urokinase-type
             plasminogen activator, a marker for differentiation in pTr
             cells. Collectively, these results indicate that estrogen,
             the pregnancy recognition signal from the conceptus in pigs,
             increases uterine epithelial KGF expression, and, in turn,
             KGF stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of
             conceptus trophectoderm.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174110}
}

@booklet{Ka00a,
   Author = {H. Ka and T. E. Spencer and G. A. Johnson and F. W.
             Bazer},
   Title = {Keratinocyte growth factor: Expression by endometrial
             epithelia of the porcine uterus},
   Journal = {Biology Of Reproduction},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1772 -- 1778},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {Ka00a}
}

@article{fds174080,
   Author = {H Ka and TE Spencer and GA Johnson and FW Bazer},
   Title = {Keratinocyte growth factor: expression by endometrial
             epithelia of the porcine uterus.},
   Journal = {Biology of reproduction},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1772-8},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0006-3363},
   Keywords = {Animals • Blotting, Northern • Cloning, Molecular
             • DNA, Complementary • Endometrium •
             Epithelium • Estrus • Female • Fibroblast
             Growth Factor 10 • Fibroblast Growth Factor 7 •
             Fibroblast Growth Factors* • Gene Expression* •
             Growth Substances • In Situ Hybridization •
             Pregnancy • RNA, Messenger • Swine* •
             analysis • genetics* • metabolism •
             metabolism*},
   Abstract = {Keratinocyte growth factor/fibroblast growth factor-7
             (KGF/FGF-7) is an established paracrine mediator of
             hormone-regulated epithelial growth and differentiation. In
             all organs studied, KGF is uniquely expressed in cells of
             mesenchymal origin. To determine whether KGF and its
             receptor, keratinocyte growth factor receptor (KGFR) or
             fibroblast growth factor receptor-2IIIb, were expressed in
             the porcine uterus as a potential paracrine system mediating
             progesterone action, we cloned KGF and KGFR partial cDNAs
             from the porcine endometrium. KGF and KGFR expression was
             detected in endometrium by Northern blot hybridization.
             Interestingly, in situ hybridization results demonstrated
             that KGF was expressed by endometrial epithelia and was
             particularly abundant between Days 12 and 15 of the estrous
             cycle and pregnancy. KGF secretion into the lumen of the
             porcine uterus was also detected on Day 12 of the estrous
             cycle and pregnancy. KGFR was expressed in both endometrial
             epithelia and conceptus trophectoderm. These novel findings
             suggest that KGF may act on the uterine endometrial
             epithelium in an autocrine manner and on the conceptus
             trophectoderm in a paracrine manner in the pig, which is the
             only species possessing a true epitheliochorial type of
             placentation.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174080}
}

@article{fds132719,
   Title = {L.W. Hedlund, M.D. Shattuck, G.A. Johnson.
              Three-dimensional MR  microscopy of pulmonary dynamics.
              in "Proc., 1996.  New York, NY,  1996,"
             p.327.},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132719}
}

@article{fds132736,
   Title = {L.W. Hedlund, S.L. Gewalt, G.P. Cofer, G.A. Johnson, in
             "Application of  Magnetic Resonance to the Study of the
             Lung" (A. Cutillo, Ed.), p. 401-415,  Futura Press, Mt.
             Kisko, NY, 1996.},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132736}
}

@booklet{Shen-gunther98,
   Author = {J. Shen-gunther and R. S. Mannel and J. L. Walker and G. A.
             Johnson and A. E. Sienko},
   Title = {Laparoscopic paraaortic lymphadenectomy using laparosonic
             coagulating shears},
   Journal = {Journal Of The American Association Of Gynecologic
             Laparoscopists},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {47 -- 50},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {Shen-gunther98}
}

@article{fds174302,
   Author = {J Shen-Gunther and RS Mannel and JL Walker and GA Johnson and AE
             Sienko},
   Title = {Laparoscopic paraaortic lymphadenectomy using laparosonic
             coagulating shears.},
   Journal = {The Journal of the American Association of Gynecologic
             Laparoscopists},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {47-50},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1074-3804},
   Keywords = {Adult • Carcinoma, Squamous Cell • Female •
             Hemostasis, Surgical • Humans • Laparoscopes*
             • Laparoscopy • Lymph Node Excision • Middle
             Aged • Surgical Instruments • Time Factors •
             Ultrasonics • Uterine Cervical Neoplasms •
             instrumentation • methods • methods* •
             surgery},
   Abstract = {With marked innovations in endosurgical instrumentation,
             operative laparoscopy to include lymphadenectomy has become
             feasible and has a valuable role in the management of
             gynecologic malignancy. We used laparosonic coagulating
             shears (LCS) for laparoscopic paraaortic lymphadenectomy in
             two women with cervical carcinoma. Operating times for the
             laparoscopic portion were 55 and 65 minutes and blood loss
             was 20 and 30 ml, respectively. No surgical complications
             were encountered. Lymphatic tissues were evaluated
             histologically and no thermal artifacts were identified. The
             major advantage of the ultrasonically activated scalpel of
             the LCS is the ability to cut and coagulate tissues
             simultaneously without electrical current. The LCS may
             afford the surgeon a greater margin of safety than unipolar
             electrocoagulation scissors by eliminating potential thermal
             and electrical injury to vital structures.
             Ultrasonic-activated technology deserves extended clinical
             investigation in laparoscopic lymphadenectomy to
             substantiate our preliminary findings, as well as to explore
             its potential in gynecologic oncology.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174302}
}

@booklet{Scribner02,
   Author = {D. R. Scribner and J. L. Walker and G. A. Johnson and D. S.
             Mcmeekin and M. A. Gold and R. S. Mannel},
   Title = {Laparoscopic pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection in
             the obese},
   Journal = {Gynecologic Oncology},
   Volume = {84},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {426 -- 430},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {Scribner02}
}

@article{fds174296,
   Author = {DR Scribner Jr and JL Walker and GA Johnson and DS McMeekin and MA Gold and RS Mannel},
   Title = {Laparoscopic pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection in
             the obese.},
   Journal = {Gynecologic oncology},
   Volume = {84},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {426-30},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0090-8258},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/gyno.2001.6548},
   Keywords = {Adult • Aged • Aged, 80 and over • Aorta,
             Abdominal • Endometrial Neoplasms • Female •
             Humans • Laparoscopy • Lymph Node Excision •
             Lymphatic Metastasis • Middle Aged • Obesity
             • Pelvis • Retrospective Studies •
             complications • complications* • methods •
             methods* • pathology • surgery*},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the
             utility of laparoscopic pelvic and paraaortic lymph node
             dissection in obese women. METHODS: We performed a
             retrospective analysis from 1/8/96 to 1/14/01 at the
             University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, evaluating
             patients who had a Quetelet index (QI) > or =28 and had
             planned laparoscopic bilateral pelvic and paraaortic lymph
             node dissections (lnd) for their gynecologic cancer. This
             group was compared to a matched group of patients that had
             lnd done by laparotomy. Patients were identified by our
             institution's database and data were collected by review of
             their medical records. Data were collected regarding
             demographics, stage, histology, length of stay, and
             procedural information including completion rates, estimated
             blood loss (EBL), operating room (OR) time, lymph node
             count, assistant, and complications. Associations between
             variables were analyzed using Student t tests and chi(2)
             testing, Excel v9.0. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients had
             planned laparoscopic lnd (Group 1) and 45 patients had lnd
             via laparotomy (Group 2). All patients had the diagnosis of
             endometrial cancer. The percentage of stage I patients did
             not differ between groups (42/55, 71.2% versus 37/45, 82.2%,
             P = n.s.). Age and QI were also similar between groups,
             (64.6 versus 58.4, 40.0 versus 39.3, P = n.s.). Laparoscopy
             was completed in 35/55 (63.6%) cases. Reasons for conversion
             included obesity (23.6%), adhesions (1.8%), intraperitoneal
             cancer (5.5%), and bleeding (5.5%). QI > or =35 was
             associated with a decreased success rate compared to QI <35
             (44.4% versus 82.1%, P = 0.004). There was no difference in
             successful laparoscopy when the first assistant was a fellow
             or a community obstetrician/gynecologist (61.0% versus
             50.0%, P = n.s.). The patients in Group 1 who had
             laparoscopy completed had a longer OR time compared to those
             in Group 2 (265.3 versus 140.7 min, P < 0.0001), EBL and
             transfusion rates were equivalent (361.8 versus 344.2 ml,
             5.6% versus 6.7%, P = n.s.), and length of stay was shorter
             (2.8 versus 4.5 days, P = 0.0004). Group 1 had significantly
             fewer postoperative fevers (5.5% versus 31.1%, P = 0.0007),
             fewer postoperative ileus (0% versus 13.3%, P = 0.005), and
             a trend for fewer wound infections (9.0% versus 22.2%, P =
             0.07). CONCLUSIONS: Obesity is not a contraindication to
             laparoscopic pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection.
             The overall success rate was significantly higher in those
             patients with a QI <35. Advantages include shorter hospital
             stay, fewer postoperative fevers, fewer postoperative ileus,
             and possibly fewer wound infections.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1006/gyno.2001.6548},
   Key = {fds174296}
}

@booklet{Scribner01a,
   Author = {D. R. Scribner and J. L. Walker and G. A. Johnson and S. D.
             Mcmeekin and M. A. Gold and R. S. Mannel},
   Title = {Laparoscopic pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection:
             Analysis of the first 100 cases},
   Journal = {Gynecologic Oncology},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {498 -- 503},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {Scribner01a}
}

@article{fds174212,
   Author = {DR Scribner Jr and JL Walker and GA Johnson and SD McMeekin and MA Gold and RS Mannel},
   Title = {Laparoscopic pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection:
             analysis of the first 100 cases.},
   Journal = {Gynecologic oncology},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {498-503},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0090-8258},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/gyno.2001.6314},
   Keywords = {Adult • Aged • Aged, 80 and over • Aorta,
             Thoracic • Endometrial Neoplasms • Female •
             Humans • Laparoscopy • Lymph Node Excision •
             Middle Aged • Neoplasm Staging • Ovarian Neoplasms
             • Pelvis • Retrospective Studies • adverse
             effects • methods* • pathology •
             surgery*},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze the first
             100 cases of planned laparoscopic pelvic and paraaortic
             lymph node dissection (LND) done for staging of gynecologic
             cancers. The goal of the study was to assess prognostic
             factors for conversion to laparotomy and document
             complications. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients
             who had planned laparoscopic bilateral pelvic and bilateral
             paraaortic LND for staging of their gynecologic cancer was
             performed. Patients were identified by our institutional
             database and data were collected by review of their medical
             records. Data were obtained regarding demographics, stage,
             histology, length of stay, and procedural information
             including completion rates, operating room time, estimated
             blood loss, assistant, lymph node count, and complications.
             Associations between variables were analyzed using Student t
             tests, analysis of variance, and chi(2) testing (Excel
             v7.0). RESULTS: A total of 103 patients were identified from
             12/15/95 to 8/28/00. Demographics included mean age of 66.2
             (25-92) and mean Quetelet index (QI) of 30.8 (15.9-56.1). A
             total of 34/103 (33.0%) had > or =1 previous laparotomy.
             Ninety-five patients had endometrial cancer and 8 had
             ovarian cancer. Eighty-six of 103 (83.5%) were stage I or
             II. The length of stay was shorter for those who had
             laparoscopy than for those who needed conversion to
             laparotomy (2.8 vs 5.6 days, P < 0.0001). Laparoscopy was
             completed in 73/103 (70.9%) of the cases. Completion rates
             were 62/76 (81.6%) with QI < 35 vs 11/27 (40.7%) with QI >
             or = 35, P < 0.001. Significantly more patients had their
             laparoscopy completed when an attending gynecologic
             oncologist was the first assistant compared to a fellow or a
             community obstetrician/gynecologist (92.9%, 69.0%, 64.5%, P
             < 0.0001). The top three reasons for conversion to
             laparotomy were obesity, 12/30 (29.1%), adhesions, 5/30
             (16.7%), and intraperitoneal disease, 5/30 (16.7%). Pelvic,
             common iliac, and paraaortic lymph node counts did not
             differ when compared to those of patients who had conversion
             to laparotomy (18.1, 5.1, 6.8 vs 17.3, 5.7, 6.8, P = ns).
             Complications included 2 urinary tract injuries, 2 pulmonary
             embolisms, and 6 wound infections (all in the laparotomy
             group). Two deaths occurred, 1 due to a vascular injury on
             initial trocar insertion and 1 due to a pulmonary embolism
             after a laparotomy for bowel herniation through a trocar
             incision. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic bilateral pelvic and
             paraaortic LND can be completed successfully in 70.9% of
             patients. Age, obesity, previous surgery, and the need to
             perform this procedure in the community were not
             contraindications. Advantages include a shorter hospital
             stay, similar nodal counts, and acceptable
             complications.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1006/gyno.2001.6314},
   Key = {fds174212}
}

@article{fds268842,
   Author = {Song, J and Liu, Y and Gewalt, SL and Cofer, G and Johnson, GA and Liu,
             QH},
   Title = {Least-square NUFFT methods applied to 2-D and 3-D radially
             encoded MR image reconstruction.},
   Journal = {IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1134-1142},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1558-2531},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19174334},
   Keywords = {Animals • Computer Simulation • Image Processing,
             Computer-Assisted • Least-Squares Analysis* •
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Mice • Models,
             Statistical • Phantoms, Imaging •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {Radially encoded MRI has gained increasing attention due to
             its motion insensitivity and reduced artifacts. However,
             because its samples are collected nonuniformly in the
             k-space, multidimensional (especially 3-D) radially sampled
             MRI image reconstruction is challenging. The objective of
             this paper is to develop a reconstruction technique in high
             dimensions with on-the-fly kernel calculation. It implements
             general multidimensional nonuniform fast Fourier transform
             (NUFFT) algorithms and incorporates them into a k-space
             image reconstruction framework. The method is then applied
             to reconstruct from the radially encoded k-space data,
             although the method is applicable to any non-Cartesian
             patterns. Performance comparisons are made against the
             conventional Kaiser-Bessel (KB) gridding method for 2-D and
             3-D radially encoded computer-simulated phantoms and
             physically scanned phantoms. The results show that the NUFFT
             reconstruction method has better accuracy-efficiency
             tradeoff than the KB gridding method when the kernel weights
             are calculated on the fly. It is found that for a particular
             conventional kernel function, using its corresponding
             deapodization function as a scaling factor in the NUFFT
             framework has the potential to improve accuracy. In
             particular, when a cosine scaling factor is used, the NUFFT
             method is faster than KB gridding method since a closed-form
             solution is available and is less computationally expensive
             than the KB kernel (KB griding requires computation of
             Bessel functions). The NUFFT method has been successfully
             applied to 2-D and 3-D in vivo studies on small
             animals.},
   Doi = {10.1109/TBME.2009.2012721},
   Key = {fds268842}
}

@article{fds268861,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Wetzel, AW and Mistry, N and Pomerantz, S and Nave, D and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Left ventricle volume measurements in cardiac micro-CT: the
             impact of radiation dose and contrast agent.},
   Journal = {Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {239-250},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0895-6111},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18243656},
   Keywords = {Animals • Contrast Media • Heart Ventricles •
             Imaging, Three-Dimensional • Mice • Mice, Inbred
             C57BL • Radiation Dosage • Radiographic Image
             Interpretation, Computer-Assisted • Tomography, X-Ray
             Computed • administration & dosage • methods*
             • radiography*},
   Abstract = {Micro-CT-based cardiac function estimation in small animals
             requires measurement of left ventricle (LV) volume at
             multiple time points during the cardiac cycle. Measurement
             accuracy depends on the image resolution, its signal and
             noise properties, and the analysis procedure. This work
             compares the accuracy of the Otsu thresholding and a region
             sampled binary mixture approach, for live mouse LV volume
             measurement using 100 microm resolution datasets. We
             evaluate both analysis methods after varying the volume of
             injected contrast agent and the number of projections used
             for CT reconstruction with a goal of permitting reduced
             levels of both X-ray and contrast agent doses.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.compmedimag.2007.12.004},
   Key = {fds268861}
}

@article{fds268755,
   Author = {Johnston, SM and Johnson, GA and Badea, CT},
   Title = {lGPU-based iterative reconstruction with total variation
             minimization for micro-CT},
   Journal = {Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical
             Engineering},
   Volume = {7622},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {0277-786X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000285047200110&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1117/12.844368},
   Key = {fds268755}
}

@article{fds292761,
   Author = {Spielmann, AL and Nelson, RC and Lowry, CR and Johnson, GA and Sundaramoothy, G and Sheafor, DH and Paulson, EK},
   Title = {Liver: single breath-hold dynamic subtraction CT with
             multi-detector row helical technology feasibility
             study.},
   Journal = {Radiology},
   Volume = {222},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {278-283},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0033-8419},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11756737},
   Keywords = {Adult • Aged • Feasibility Studies • Female
             • Humans • Liver Neoplasms • Male •
             Middle Aged • Neovascularization, Pathologic •
             Prospective Studies • Subtraction Technique •
             Tomography, X-Ray Computed • methods* •
             radiography • radiography* • secondary},
   Abstract = {Fifty-two patients with known or suspected hypervascular
             malignancy were examined to determine the technical
             feasibility of performing single-breath-hold dynamic
             subtraction computed tomography (CT) of the liver with
             multi-detector row helical CT. The precontrast and hepatic
             arterial CT scans, which were acquired during the same
             breath hold, were subtracted. The mean liver-to-muscle
             contrast ratio on the precontrast, hepatic arterial, and
             subtracted images was 1.3, 1.4, and 2.3, respectively. In 13
             patients with lesions, the subtracted images showed a
             2.5-fold increase in mean lesion contrast compared with the
             hepatic arterial CT scans.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1148/radiol.2221010190},
   Key = {fds292761}
}

@article{fds268694,
   Author = {Borg, JS and Vu, M-A and Badea, C and Badea, A and Johnson, GA and Dzirasa,
             K},
   Title = {Localization of Metal Electrodes in the Intact Rat Brain
             Using Registration of 3D Microcomputed Tomography Images to
             a Magnetic Resonance Histology Atlas.},
   Journal = {eNeuro},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {4},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/10327 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {Simultaneous neural recordings taken from multiple areas of
             the rodent brain are garnering growing interest due to the
             insight they can provide about spatially distributed neural
             circuitry. The promise of such recordings has inspired great
             progress in methods for surgically implanting large numbers
             of metal electrodes into intact rodent brains. However,
             methods for localizing the precise location of these
             electrodes have remained severely lacking. Traditional
             histological techniques that require slicing and staining of
             physical brain tissue are cumbersome, and become
             increasingly impractical as the number of implanted
             electrodes increases. Here we solve these problems by
             describing a method that registers 3-D computerized
             tomography (CT) images of intact rat brains implanted with
             metal electrode bundles to a Magnetic Resonance Imaging
             Histology (MRH) Atlas. Our method allows accurate
             visualization of each electrode bundle's trajectory and
             location without removing the electrodes from the brain or
             surgically implanting external markers. In addition, unlike
             physical brain slices, once the 3D images of the electrode
             bundles and the MRH atlas are registered, it is possible to
             verify electrode placements from many angles by "re-slicing"
             the images along different planes of view. Further, our
             method can be fully automated and easily scaled to
             applications with large numbers of specimens. Our digital
             imaging approach to efficiently localizing metal electrodes
             offers a substantial addition to currently available
             methods, which, in turn, may help accelerate the rate at
             which insights are gleaned from rodent network
             neuroscience.},
   Key = {fds268694}
}

@booklet{Ford82a,
   Author = {Ford, KK and Heinz, ER and Johnson, GA and Drayer, BP and Dubois,
             PJ},
   Title = {Low-cost digital subtraction},
   Journal = {American Journal Of Neuroradiology},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {99-99},
   Year = {1982},
   Key = {Ford82a}
}

@booklet{Ford82,
   Author = {Ford, KK and Heinz, ER and Johnson, GA and Drayer, BD and Dubois,
             PJ},
   Title = {Low-cost digital subtraction angiography.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Neuroradiology},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {448-451},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0195-6108},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6810680},
   Key = {Ford82}
}

@article{fds132892,
   Author = {KK Ford and ER Heinz and GA Johnson and BD Drayer and PJ
             Dubois},
   Title = {Low-cost digital subtraction angiography.},
   Journal = {AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {448-51},
   ISSN = {0195-6108},
   Keywords = {Angiography • Humans • Radiographic Image
             Enhancement • Subtraction Technique • Videotape
             Recording • economics • methods*},
   Key = {fds132892}
}

@article{fds268830,
   Author = {Badea, CT and Johnston, SM and Subashi, E and Qi, Y and Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Lung perfusion imaging in small animals using 4D micro-CT at
             heartbeat temporal resolution.},
   Journal = {Medical physics},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {54-62},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0094-2405},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20175466},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cardiac-Gated Imaging Techniques •
             Contrast Media • Iopamidol • Lung •
             Microinjections • Perfusion Imaging • Radiographic
             Image Enhancement • Rats • Rats, Inbred F344
             • Reproducibility of Results • Sensitivity and
             Specificity • Tomography, X-Ray Computed •
             administration & dosage • diagnostic use* •
             methods • methods* • radiography* •
             veterinary • veterinary*},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: Quantitative in vivo imaging of lung perfusion in
             rodents can provide critical information for preclinical
             studies. However, the combined challenges of high temporal
             and spatial resolution have made routine quantitative
             perfusion imaging difficult in small animals. The purpose of
             this work is to demonstrate 4D micro-CT for perfusion
             imaging in rodents at heartbeat temporal resolution and
             isotropic spatial resolution. METHODS: We have recently
             developed a dual tube/detector micro-CT scanner that is well
             suited to capture first pass kinetics of a bolus of contrast
             agent used to compute perfusion information. Our approach is
             based on the paradigm that similar time density curves can
             be reproduced in a number of consecutive, small volume
             injections of iodinated contrast agent at a series of
             different angles. This reproducibility is ensured by the
             high-level integration of the imaging components of our
             system with a microinjector, a mechanical ventilator, and
             monitoring applications. Sampling is controlled through a
             biological pulse sequence implemented in LABVIEW. Image
             reconstruction is based on a simultaneous algebraic
             reconstruction technique implemented on a graphic processor
             unit. The capabilities of 4D micro-CT imaging are
             demonstrated in studies on lung perfusion in rats. RESULTS:
             We report 4D micro-CT imaging in the rat lung with a
             heartbeat temporal resolution (approximately 150 ms) and
             isotropic 3D reconstruction with a voxel size of 88 microm
             based on sampling using 16 injections of 50 microL each. The
             total volume of contrast agent injected during the
             experiments (0.8 mL) was less than 10% of the total blood
             volume in a rat. This volume was not injected in a single
             bolus, but in multiple injections separated by at least 2
             min interval to allow for clearance and adaptation. We
             assessed the reproducibility of the time density curves with
             multiple injections and found that these are very similar.
             The average time density curves for the first eight and last
             eight injections are slightly different, i.e., for the last
             eight injections, both the maximum of the average time
             density curves and its area under the curve are decreased by
             3.8% and 7.2%, respectively, relative to the average time
             density curves based on the first eight injections. The
             radiation dose associated with our 4D micro-CT imaging is
             0.16 Gy and is therefore in the range of a typical micro-CT
             dose. CONCLUSIONS: 4D micro-CT-based perfusion imaging
             demonstrated here has immediate application in a wide range
             of preclinical studies such as tumor perfusion,
             angiogenesis, and renal function. Although our imaging
             system is in many ways unique, we believe that our approach
             based on the multiple injection paradigm can be used with
             the newly developed flat-panel slip-ring-based micro-CT to
             increase their temporal resolution in dynamic perfusion
             studies.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1118/1.3264619},
   Key = {fds268830}
}

@article{fds132734,
   Title = {M. Delnomdedieu, L. W. Hedlund, R.R. Maronpot, G.A. Johnson.
             MR  microscopy to follow bromobenzene-induced hepatoxicity
             in the rat. in  "Proc., SMR 4th Annual Scientific Meeting.
              New York, NY, 1996," p.325.},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132734}
}

@article{fds132733,
   Title = {M. Delnomdedieu, L.W. Hedlund, G.A. Johnson, R.R. Maronpot,
             Magnetic  Resonance Microscopy-A New Tool for the
             Toxicologic Pathologist.   Toxicologic Pathology 24, 36-44
             (1996).},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132733}
}

@article{fds132723,
   Title = {M.D. Shattuck, G.P. Cofer, G.H. Glover, L.W. Hedlund, G.A.
             Johnson.    Three-dimensional projection microscopy of the
             lung. in "Proc., SMR 4th  Scientific Meeting.  New York,
             NY, 1996," p. 18.},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds132723}
}

@article{fds268750,
   Author = {Sulik, KK and O'Leary-Moore, SK and Parnell, SE and Lipinski, RJ and Pecevich, S and Holloway, HT and Ament, J and Oguz, I and Budin, F and Jiang, Y and Dehart, DB and Styner, MA and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging of pre- and
             postnatal brains in a mouse Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
             model},
   Journal = {Alcohol},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {282-282},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0741-8329},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000289538300070&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds268750}
}

@article{fds269032,
   Author = {Möller, HE and Chawla, MS and Chen, XJ and Driehuys, B and Hedlund, LW and Wheeler, CT and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance angiography with hyperpolarized 129Xe
             dissolved in a lipid emulsion.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1058-1064},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0740-3194},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10332890},
   Keywords = {Abdomen • Animals • Artifacts • Blood Flow
             Velocity • Blood Volume • Contrast Media* •
             Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy • Fat Emulsions,
             Intravenous • Iliac Vein • Injections, Intravenous
             • Lasers • Magnetic Resonance Angiography •
             Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy • Male • Pelvis
             • Rats • Renal Veins • Signal Processing,
             Computer-Assisted • Veins • Vena Cava, Inferior
             • Xenon Isotopes* • administration & dosage •
             anatomy & histology • blood supply • diagnostic
             use* • methods*},
   Abstract = {Hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe can be dissolved in biologically
             compatible lipid emulsions while maintaining sufficient
             polarization for in vivo vascular imaging. For xenon in
             Intralipid 30%, in vitro spectroscopy at 2 T yielded a
             chemical shift of 197 +/- 1 ppm with reference to xenon gas,
             a spin-lattice relaxation time T1 = 25.3 +/- 2.1 sec, and a
             T2* time constant of 37 +/- 5 msec. Angiograms of the
             abdominal and pelvic veins in the rat obtained with 129Xe
             MRI after intravenous injection of HP 129Xe/Intralipid 30%
             into the tail demonstrated signal-to-noise ratios between 8
             and 29. An analysis of the inflow effect on time-of-flight
             images of two segments of the inferior vena cava yielded
             additional information. The mean blood flow velocity was
             34.7 +/- 1.0 mm/sec between the junction of the caudal veins
             and the kidneys and 13.3 +/- 0.8 mm/sec at the position of
             the diaphragm. The mean volume flow rates in these segments
             were 7.2 +/- 3.4 ml/min and 11.0 +/- 2.8 ml/min,
             respectively. Intravenous delivery of HP 129Xe dissolved in
             a carrier may lead to novel biomedical applications of
             laser-polarized gases.},
   Key = {fds269032}
}

@booklet{Moller99a,
   Author = {H. E. Moller and M. S. Chawla and X. J. Chen and B. Driehuys and L. W. Hedlund and C. T. Wheeler and G. A.
             Johnson},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance angiography with hyperpolarized Xe-129
             dissolved in a lipid emulsion},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance In Medicine},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1058 -- 1064},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {Moller99a}
}

@booklet{Johnson02a,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Cofer, GP and Fubara, B and Gewalt, SL and Hedlund, LW and Maronpot, RR},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance histology for morphologic
             phenotyping.},
   Journal = {Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {423-429},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1053-1807},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12353257},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance histology (MRH) images of the whole mouse
             have been acquired at 100-micron isotropic resolution at 2.0
             T with image arrays of 256 x 256 x 1024. Higher resolution
             (50 x 50 x 50 microns) of limited volumes has been acquired
             at 7.1T with image arrays of 512 x 512 x 512. Even higher
             resolution images (20 x 20 x 20 microns) of isolated organs
             have been acquired at 9.4 T. The volume resolution
             represents an increase of 625000 x over conventional
             clinical MRI. The technological basis is summarized that
             will allow basic scientists to begin using MRH as a routine
             method for morphologcic phenotyping of the mouse. MRH
             promises four unique attributes over conventional histology:
             1). MRH is non-destructive; 2). MRH exploits the unique
             contrast mechanisms that have made MRI so successful
             clinically; 3). MRH is 3-dimensional; and 4). the data are
             inherently digital. We demonstrate the utility in
             morphologic phenotyping a whole C57BL/6J
             mouse.},
   Doi = {10.1002/jmri.10175},
   Key = {Johnson02a}
}

@article{fds132780,
   Author = {GA Johnson and GP Cofer and B Fubara and SL Gewalt and LW Hedlund and RR
             Maronpot},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance histology for morphologic
             phenotyping.},
   Journal = {Journal of magnetic resonance imaging : JMRI, United
             States},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {423-9},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1053-1807},
   Keywords = {Animals • Magnetic Resonance Imaging* • Mice
             • Mice, Inbred C57BL • Phenotype •
             methods},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance histology (MRH) images of the whole mouse
             have been acquired at 100-micron isotropic resolution at 2.0
             T with image arrays of 256 x 256 x 1024. Higher resolution
             (50 x 50 x 50 microns) of limited volumes has been acquired
             at 7.1T with image arrays of 512 x 512 x 512. Even higher
             resolution images (20 x 20 x 20 microns) of isolated organs
             have been acquired at 9.4 T. The volume resolution
             represents an increase of 625000 x over conventional
             clinical MRI. The technological basis is summarized that
             will allow basic scientists to begin using MRH as a routine
             method for morphologcic phenotyping of the mouse. MRH
             promises four unique attributes over conventional histology:
             1). MRH is non-destructive; 2). MRH exploits the unique
             contrast mechanisms that have made MRI so successful
             clinically; 3). MRH is 3-dimensional; and 4). the data are
             inherently digital. We demonstrate the utility in
             morphologic phenotyping a whole C57BL/6J
             mouse.},
   Key = {fds132780}
}

@article{fds268773,
   Author = {Xie, L and Cianciolo, RE and Hulette, B and Lee, HW and Qi, Y and Cofer, G and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance histology of age-related nephropathy in
             the Sprague Dawley rat.},
   Journal = {Toxicologic Pathology (Sage)},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {764-778},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22504322},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance histology (MRH) has become a valuable
             tool in evaluating drug-induced toxicity in preclinical
             models. However, its application in renal injury has been
             limited. This study tested the hypothesis that MRH could
             detect image-based biomarkers of chronic disease,
             inflammation, or age-related degeneration in the kidney,
             laying the foundation for more extensive use in evaluating
             drug toxicity. We examined the entire intact kidney in a
             spontaneous model of chronic progressive nephropathy.
             Kidneys from male Sprague Dawley rats were imaged at 8 weeks
             (n = 4) and 52 weeks (n =4) on a 9.4 T system dedicated to
             MR microscopy. Several potential contrast mechanisms were
             explored to optimize the scanning protocols. Full coverage
             of the entire kidney was achieved with isotropic spatial
             resolution at 31 microns (voxel volume = 30 pL) using a
             gradient recalled echo sequence. Isotropic spatial
             resolution of 15 microns (voxel volume < 4 pL) was achieved
             in a biopsy core specimen. Qualitative age-related
             structural changes, such as renal cortical microvasculature,
             tubular dilation, interstitial fibrosis, and glomerular
             architecture, were apparent. The nondestructive 3D images
             allowed measurement of quantitative differences of kidney
             volume, pelvis volume, main vessel volume, glomerular size,
             as well as thickness of the cortex, outer medulla, and inner
             medulla.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0192623312441408},
   Key = {fds268773}
}

@article{fds268706,
   Author = {Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance histology.},
   Journal = {Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-2},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1053-1807},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.24774},
   Doi = {10.1002/jmri.24774},
   Key = {fds268706}
}

@article{fds268728,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Badea, A and Calabrese, E and Liu, C and Xie,
             L},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance histology: cool images- but who
             cares?},
   Journal = {Toxicology Letters},
   Volume = {221},
   Pages = {S50-S50},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0378-4274},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000323865800154&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.toxlet.2013.06.183},
   Key = {fds268728}
}

@article{fds268705,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Badea, A and Calabrese, E and Liu, C and Xie,
             L},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance histology—Applications in
             toxicology},
   Journal = {Toxicology Letters},
   Volume = {229},
   Pages = {S31-S32},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0378-4274},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2014.06.148},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.toxlet.2014.06.148},
   Key = {fds268705}
}

@article{fds268797,
   Author = {Dixon, D and Johnson, GA and Cofer, GP and Hedlund, LW and Maronpot,
             RR},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): A new tool in experimental
             toxicologic pathology},
   Journal = {Toxicologic Pathology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {387-391},
   Year = {1988},
   Abstract = {Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging
             technique that provides multidimensional images of the soft
             tissues of the body. This imaging technique has proven to be
             an excellent diagnostic and experimental tool for the
             detection of pathologic alterations in soft tissues, as well
             as an adjunct screening method for following the genesis,
             progression, or regression of chemically induced lesions in
             the same live animal. Future applications of MRI technology
             in small animals include MRI microscopy, mapping of vascular
             or circulatory alterations, measurement of perfusion and
             diffusion rates of body fluids, and acquisition of cell
             metabolic states in combination with Nuclear Magnetic
             Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, all of which will contribute
             immensely to the advancement of toxicologic and biomolecular
             research.},
   Key = {fds268797}
}

@booklet{Dixon88,
   Author = {Dixon, D and Johnson, GA and Cofer, GP and Hedlund, LW and Maronpot,
             RR},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): a new tool in experimental
             toxicologic pathology.},
   Journal = {Toxicologic Pathology (Sage)},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {386-391},
   Year = {1988},
   ISSN = {0192-6233},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3194661},
   Abstract = {Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging
             technique that provides multidimensional images of the soft
             tissues of the body. This imaging technique has proven to be
             an excellent diagnostic and experimental tool for the
             detection of pathologic alterations in soft tissues, as well
             as an adjunct screening method for following the genesis,
             progression, or regression of chemically induced lesions in
             the same live animal. Future applications of MRI technology
             in small animals include MRI microscopy, mapping of vascular
             or circulatory alterations, measurement of perfusion and
             diffusion rates of body fluids, and acquisition of cell
             metabolic states in combination with Nuclear Magnetic
             Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, all of which will contribute
             immensely to the advancement of toxicologic and biomolecular
             research.},
   Doi = {10.1177/019262338801600311},
   Key = {Dixon88}
}

@article{fds132761,
   Author = {D Dixon and GA Johnson and GP Cofer and LW Hedlund and RR
             Maronpot},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): a new tool in experimental
             toxicologic pathology.},
   Journal = {Toxicologic pathology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {386-91},
   Year = {1988},
   ISSN = {0192-6233},
   Keywords = {Animals • Magnetic Resonance Imaging* • Pathology*
             • Rats • Toxicology*},
   Abstract = {Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging
             technique that provides multidimensional images of the soft
             tissues of the body. This imaging technique has proven to be
             an excellent diagnostic and experimental tool for the
             detection of pathologic alterations in soft tissues, as well
             as an adjunct screening method for following the genesis,
             progression, or regression of chemically induced lesions in
             the same live animal. Future applications of MRI technology
             in small animals include MRI microscopy, mapping of vascular
             or circulatory alterations, measurement of perfusion and
             diffusion rates of body fluids, and acquisition of cell
             metabolic states in combination with Nuclear Magnetic
             Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, all of which will contribute
             immensely to the advancement of toxicologic and biomolecular
             research.},
   Key = {fds132761}
}

@article{fds268893,
   Author = {Herfkens, RJ and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging at high-strength magnetic
             fields.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance annual},
   Pages = {197-215},
   Year = {1985},
   ISSN = {8756-9787},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3917235},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Electromagnetic Fields •
             Heart • Humans • Magnetic Resonance Imaging •
             Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy • anatomy & histology
             • instrumentation • methods*},
   Key = {fds268893}
}

@article{fds268898,
   Author = {Cyr, M and Caron, MG and Johnson, GA and Laakso, A},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution reveals
             subtle morphological changes in a mouse model of
             dopaminergic hyperfunction.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {83-90},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15862208},
   Abstract = {Structural abnormalities of the basal ganglia have been
             documented in several neuropsychiatric conditions associated
             with dysregulation of the dopamine system. However, the
             histological nature underlying these changes is largely
             unknown. Using magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic
             resolution (MRI, 9.4 T with 43 microm isotropic spatial
             resolution) and stereological techniques, we have
             investigated the effect of increased dopamine
             neurotransmission on brain morphology in mice with elevated
             extracellular dopamine, the dopamine transporter knockout
             (DAT-KO) mice. We first demonstrate the usefulness of MRI at
             microscopic resolution for the accurate identification and
             measurement of volumes of specific subregions, accounting
             for less than 0.03% (0.16 mm(3)) of the volume of a mouse
             brain. Furthermore, the MRI analysis reveals a significantly
             lower volume (-9%) of the anterior striatum of DAT-KO mice,
             while the volume of other dopamine-related structures such
             as the posterior striatum and the substantia nigra pars
             reticulata is unchanged in comparison to wild type
             littermates. Stereological analysis performed in the same
             brains reveals that one important structural factor
             accounting for this selective change in volume is a
             reduction of 18% in the absolute number of neuronal cell
             bodies. The feasibility of assessing accurately small
             morphological alterations in mouse models, where the
             molecular and histological pathologies can be easily
             compared in a controlled manner, provides a paradigm to
             examine the relevance of selective brain volumetric changes
             associated with a number of neuropathological
             conditions.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2005.01.039},
   Key = {fds268898}
}

@article{fds132905,
   Author = {M Cyr and MG Caron and GA Johnson and A Laakso},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution reveals
             subtle morphological changes in a mouse model of
             dopaminergic hyperfunction.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage, United States},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {83-90},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   Keywords = {Animals • Basal Ganglia • Brain • Cell Count
             • Dopamine • Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport
             Proteins • Fluorescent Antibody Technique • Image
             Interpretation, Computer-Assisted • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging • Male • Membrane Glycoproteins •
             Membrane Transport Proteins • Mice • Mice,
             Knockout • Models, Neurological • Neostriatum
             • Nerve Tissue Proteins • Neurons • anatomy &
             histology • anatomy & histology* • cytology •
             genetics • physiology • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Structural abnormalities of the basal ganglia have been
             documented in several neuropsychiatric conditions associated
             with dysregulation of the dopamine system. However, the
             histological nature underlying these changes is largely
             unknown. Using magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic
             resolution (MRI, 9.4 T with 43 microm isotropic spatial
             resolution) and stereological techniques, we have
             investigated the effect of increased dopamine
             neurotransmission on brain morphology in mice with elevated
             extracellular dopamine, the dopamine transporter knockout
             (DAT-KO) mice. We first demonstrate the usefulness of MRI at
             microscopic resolution for the accurate identification and
             measurement of volumes of specific subregions, accounting
             for less than 0.03% (0.16 mm(3)) of the volume of a mouse
             brain. Furthermore, the MRI analysis reveals a significantly
             lower volume (-9%) of the anterior striatum of DAT-KO mice,
             while the volume of other dopamine-related structures such
             as the posterior striatum and the substantia nigra pars
             reticulata is unchanged in comparison to wild type
             littermates. Stereological analysis performed in the same
             brains reveals that one important structural factor
             accounting for this selective change in volume is a
             reduction of 18% in the absolute number of neuronal cell
             bodies. The feasibility of assessing accurately small
             morphological alterations in mouse models, where the
             molecular and histological pathologies can be easily
             compared in a controlled manner, provides a paradigm to
             examine the relevance of selective brain volumetric changes
             associated with a number of neuropathological
             conditions.},
   Key = {fds132905}
}

@booklet{Drayer87,
   Author = {Drayer, BP and Burger, P and Hurwitz, B and Dawson, D and Cain, J and Leong, J and Herfkens, R and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis: decreased
             signal in thalamus and putamen.},
   Journal = {Annals of Neurology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {546-550},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0364-5134},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3435073},
   Abstract = {High-field strength (1.5 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging
             in 15 patients with multiple and extensive white-matter
             lesions and clinically definite multiple sclerosis
             delineated a previously undescribed finding of abnormally
             decreased signal intensity on T2-weighted images in the
             thalamus and putamen. The decreased signal intensity
             (preferential decreased T2 relaxation time) is most likely
             to be related to abnormally increased iron accumulation
             causing local magnetic field heterogeneities.},
   Doi = {10.1002/ana.410220418},
   Key = {Drayer87}
}

@article{fds132879,
   Author = {BP Drayer and P Burger and B Hurwitz and D Dawson and J Cain and J Leong and R
             Herfkens, GA Johnson},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis: decreased
             signal in thalamus and putamen.},
   Journal = {Annals of neurology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {546-50},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0364-5134},
   Keywords = {Humans • Magnetic Resonance Imaging* • Multiple
             Sclerosis • Putamen • Thalamus • diagnosis*
             • pathology*},
   Abstract = {High-field strength (1.5 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging
             in 15 patients with multiple and extensive white-matter
             lesions and clinically definite multiple sclerosis
             delineated a previously undescribed finding of abnormally
             decreased signal intensity on T2-weighted images in the
             thalamus and putamen. The decreased signal intensity
             (preferential decreased T2 relaxation time) is most likely
             to be related to abnormally increased iron accumulation
             causing local magnetic field heterogeneities.},
   Key = {fds132879}
}

@booklet{Hsu94,
   Author = {Hsu, JC and Johnson, GA and Smith, WM and Reimer, KA and Ideker,
             RE},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of chronic myocardial infarcts in
             formalin-fixed human autopsy hearts.},
   Journal = {Circulation},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {2133-2140},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0009-7322},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8181138},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: In post-myocardial infarction patients,
             three-dimensional structure of the infarct as well as
             infarct size are likely to be important factors affecting
             mortality, cardiac function, and arrhythmias. Current
             morphological methods for determining three-dimensional
             infarct structure in autopsied hearts are inexact and time
             consuming. The cardiac magnetic resonance imaging techniques
             used in living patients have shown potential in determining
             infarct size and structure but have limited resolution for
             morphometric postmortem studies. The recent development of
             magnetic resonance microscopy raises the possibility that
             three-dimensional infarct structure can be quantified at
             microscopic levels in autopsied hearts. The purpose of this
             study was to determine the ability of magnetic resonance
             imaging at different spatial resolutions to differentiate
             infarcted from noninfarcted myocardium. METHODS AND RESULTS:
             Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 2.0 T on cross
             sections taken from 10 autopsied hearts containing old
             myocardial infarcts. T1 was derived from six images with
             repetition times (TRs) for each image ranging from 100 to
             3200 milliseconds. T2 was derived from multi-echo images
             with echo times (TEs) ranging from 10 to 60 milliseconds.
             Resolution was approximately 400 x 400 microns in 2-mm-thick
             slices. Sites of infarcted and noninfarcted tissue were
             identified from histological sections taken from each slice,
             and the T1 and T2 values of these sites were obtained.
             Microscopic images were acquired with voxels of 100 x 100 x
             625 microns, representing tissue volumes more than 1000-fold
             smaller than conventional clinical images. In all cases, T1
             of infarcted tissue (459 +/- 266 milliseconds, mean +/- SD)
             was greater than that of noninfarcted tissue (272 +/- 163
             milliseconds). Also, in all cases, T2 of infarcted tissue
             (49 +/- 14 milliseconds) was greater than that of
             noninfarcted tissue (35 +/- 8 milliseconds). CONCLUSIONS: T1
             and T2 values for infarcted tissue are significantly
             different from those of noninfarcted tissue (P < .001).
             Based on these findings, it should be possible to develop
             techniques to perform three-dimensional imaging and
             quantitation of infarcts with a resolution of 400 microns or
             less. When volumetric three-dimensional imaging was
             performed using a T1-weighted sequence, the resulting 256(3)
             arrays supported isotropic resolution at 400 microns (voxel
             volume, 0.064 mm3). Subsequent volume rendering using a
             compositing algorithm clearly shows the infarcted areas in
             three dimensions. The techniques demonstrate the potential
             for quantitative three-dimensional cardiac morphometry using
             magnetic resonance imaging.},
   Key = {Hsu94}
}

@article{fds132827,
   Author = {JC Hsu and GA Johnson and WM Smith and KA Reimer and RE
             Ideker},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of chronic myocardial infarcts in
             formalin-fixed human autopsy hearts.},
   Journal = {Circulation, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {2133-40},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0009-7322},
   Keywords = {Algorithms • Formaldehyde • Fourier Analysis
             • Humans • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
             • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Magnetic Resonance
             Spectroscopy • Myocardial Infarction • Myocardium
             • Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted • Tissue
             Fixation • methods • methods* •
             pathology*},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: In post-myocardial infarction patients,
             three-dimensional structure of the infarct as well as
             infarct size are likely to be important factors affecting
             mortality, cardiac function, and arrhythmias. Current
             morphological methods for determining three-dimensional
             infarct structure in autopsied hearts are inexact and time
             consuming. The cardiac magnetic resonance imaging techniques
             used in living patients have shown potential in determining
             infarct size and structure but have limited resolution for
             morphometric postmortem studies. The recent development of
             magnetic resonance microscopy raises the possibility that
             three-dimensional infarct structure can be quantified at
             microscopic levels in autopsied hearts. The purpose of this
             study was to determine the ability of magnetic resonance
             imaging at different spatial resolutions to differentiate
             infarcted from noninfarcted myocardium. METHODS AND RESULTS:
             Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 2.0 T on cross
             sections taken from 10 autopsied hearts containing old
             myocardial infarcts. T1 was derived from six images with
             repetition times (TRs) for each image ranging from 100 to
             3200 milliseconds. T2 was derived from multi-echo images
             with echo times (TEs) ranging from 10 to 60 milliseconds.
             Resolution was approximately 400 x 400 microns in 2-mm-thick
             slices. Sites of infarcted and noninfarcted tissue were
             identified from histological sections taken from each slice,
             and the T1 and T2 values of these sites were obtained.
             Microscopic images were acquired with voxels of 100 x 100 x
             625 microns, representing tissue volumes more than 1000-fold
             smaller than conventional clinical images. In all cases, T1
             of infarcted tissue (459 +/- 266 milliseconds, mean +/- SD)
             was greater than that of noninfarcted tissue (272 +/- 163
             milliseconds). Also, in all cases, T2 of infarcted tissue
             (49 +/- 14 milliseconds) was greater than that of
             noninfarcted tissue (35 +/- 8 milliseconds). CONCLUSIONS: T1
             and T2 values for infarcted tissue are significantly
             different from those of noninfarcted tissue (P < .001).
             Based on these findings, it should be possible to develop
             techniques to perform three-dimensional imaging and
             quantitation of infarcts with a resolution of 400 microns or
             less. When volumetric three-dimensional imaging was
             performed using a T1-weighted sequence, the resulting 256(3)
             arrays supported isotropic resolution at 400 microns (voxel
             volume, 0.064 mm3). Subsequent volume rendering using a
             compositing algorithm clearly shows the infarcted areas in
             three dimensions. The techniques demonstrate the potential
             for quantitative three-dimensional cardiac morphometry using
             magnetic resonance imaging.},
   Key = {fds132827}
}

@article{fds268762,
   Author = {Bcnveniste, H and Hüttemeier, PC and Qiu, H and Steele, S and Hedlund,
             LW and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of continuous spinal anesthesia
             with hyperbaric lidocaine: Root or white matter
             lesion?},
   Journal = {Regional anesthesia},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {2 SUPPL.},
   Pages = {15-},
   Year = {1997},
   ISSN = {0146-521X},
   Abstract = {Introduction: Persistent neurologic deficits in patients
             after continuous spinal anesthesia with hyperbaric lidocaine
             may have been erroneously characterized as a cauda equina
             syndrome (1,2). First, clinical reports of symptoms rarely
             include pain (typical for cauda equina lesions) but most
             often consist of saddle anesthesia, paraplegia and sphincter
             dysfunction (typical for conus medullaris lesions).
             Secondly, spinal cord damage in dogs after intrathecal
             procaine (3) or lidocaine (4) is confined only to the myelin
             sheath beneath the pia mater and not nerve roots. In this
             study we use diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging
             (DWI) to further characterize hyperbaric lidocaine-induced
             spinal cord damage. DWI measures diffusion of free protons
             and is a very sensitive detector of white or gray matter
             injury (5). Normal spinal cord gray and white matter as well
             as nerve roots are clearly visualized by DWI because the
             proton diffusion coefficient (DC) - the critical parameter
             measured with DWI - within these tissues differs. The effect
             of hyperbaric 5% lidocaine on the spinal cord diffusion
             coefficient will be compared with those found in ischémie
             conditions. Methods: The study was approved by the Duke
             University Animal Care Institutional Committee. Nine female
             adult Fisher rats (weighing 150-190g) were anesthetized with
             isoflurane, intubated and mechanically ventilated. Catheters
             were inserted into the right external jugular vein and
             carotid artery. Heart rate, arterial blood pressure and body
             temperature was monitored continuously. Diffusion-weighted
             MR images (DWI) were acquired at the level of C6 in five
             rats before and after ischemia induced by cardiac arrest. In
             another four rats catheters were first placed intrathecally
             via the atlanto-occipital membrane. Subsequently, DWI's were
             acquired at the level of C6 before and during 3 hr
             continuous intrathecal perfusion with 5% hyperbaric
             lidocaine. Hemodynamic stability during lidocaine
             administration was maintained with i.v. hydration, atropine
             and ephedrine as needed. All imaging was done on a 7 T
             magnet using a standard spin echo diffusion pulse sequence
             (5). Results: Ischemia reduced the diffusion coefficient
             (DC) of white matter by 25%, gray matter by 45% and nerve
             roots/dorsal root ganglia by 35%. Figure 1 shows that one
             hour of continuous intrathecal administration of 5%
             hyperbaric lidocaine reduces the DC of white matter by 15%
             and that the changes are not as profound as those found
             during ischemia (results are presented as mean ± SD).
             Figure 2 shows that in contrast to white matter, DCs of
             adjacent nerve roots are unaffected by 5 % hyperbaric
             lidocaine. Discussion: The present study has led to the
             following conclusion: (1) diffusion-weighted imaging of
             spinal cord in rats with indwelling intrathecal catheters is
             possible in vivo, (2) the diffusion coefficient of white
             matter is reduced by 15% after 1 hr of 5% hyperbaric
             lidocaine indicating onset of cytotoxic edema, (3) the
             lidocaine-induced changes in the white matter DC do not
             reach ischémie levels, (4) adjacent gray matter as well as
             nerve roots are unaffected. Ongoing work will provide
             information as to the exact pathophysiological sequence of
             events which lead to irreversible spinal cord damage during
             continuous spinal anesthesia with high dose hyperbaric 5%
             lidocaine. It is our goal that this research will be
             applicable to local anesthesia toxicity studies and useful
             as a future neurotoxicity screening tool for new intralhecal
             drugs designed for both anesthesia and analgesia.},
   Key = {fds268762}
}

@booklet{Smith99,
   Author = {Smith, BR and Huff, DS and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of embryos: an Internet resource
             for the study of embryonic development.},
   Journal = {Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {33-40},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0895-6111},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10091866},
   Abstract = {The recent amassing of gene expression data to study
             development in mammals has led to an increased demand for
             access to human embryological data. The difficulty of
             obtaining well-preserved human embryos presents an important
             challenge to studying human development. The
             Multidimensional Human Embryo project is generating an image
             data set based on magnetic resonance microscopy of specimens
             from the highly respected Carnegie Collection of Human
             Embryos. The data are available from a web site to
             facilitate the work of clinicians, investigators, and
             students of human development. A consequence of the project
             will be to preserve a highly respected, yet impermanent,
             collection of human embryos and minimize the need for
             collecting new specimens.},
   Key = {Smith99}
}

@article{fds132767,
   Author = {BR Smith and DS Huff and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of embryos: an Internet resource
             for the study of embryonic development.},
   Journal = {Computerized medical imaging and graphics : the official
             journal of the Computerized Medical Imaging Society, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {33-40},
   ISSN = {0895-6111},
   Keywords = {Embryo • Humans • Image Processing,
             Computer-Assisted* • Internet* • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging* • anatomy & histology*},
   Abstract = {The recent amassing of gene expression data to study
             development in mammals has led to an increased demand for
             access to human embryological data. The difficulty of
             obtaining well-preserved human embryos presents an important
             challenge to studying human development. The
             Multidimensional Human Embryo project is generating an image
             data set based on magnetic resonance microscopy of specimens
             from the highly respected Carnegie Collection of Human
             Embryos. The data are available from a web site to
             facilitate the work of clinicians, investigators, and
             students of human development. A consequence of the project
             will be to preserve a highly respected, yet impermanent,
             collection of human embryos and minimize the need for
             collecting new specimens.},
   Key = {fds132767}
}

@article{fds268702,
   Author = {Cutlip, RG and Hollander, MS and Johnson, GA and Johnson, BW and Friend,
             SA and Baker, BA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of graded skeletal muscle injury
             in live rats.},
   Journal = {Environmental Health Insights},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {Suppl 1},
   Pages = {31-39},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/10309 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {Increasing number of stretch-shortening contractions (SSCs)
             results in increased muscle injury.Fischer Hybrid rats were
             acutely exposed to an increasing number of SSCs in vivo
             using a custom-designed dynamometer. Magnetic resonance
             imaging (MRI) imaging was conducted 72 hours after exposure
             when rats were infused with Prohance and imaged using a 7T
             rodent MRI system (GE Epic 12.0). Images were acquired in
             the transverse plane with typically 60 total slices acquired
             covering the entire length of the hind legs. Rats were
             euthanized after MRI, the lower limbs removed, and tibialis
             anterior muscles were prepared for histology and quantified
             stereology.Stereological analyses showed myofiber
             degeneration, and cellular infiltrates significantly
             increased following 70 and 150 SSC exposure compared to
             controls. MRI images revealed that the percent affected area
             significantly increased with exposure in all SSC groups in a
             graded fashion. Signal intensity also significantly
             increased with increasing SSC repetitions.These results
             suggest that contrast-enhanced MRI has the sensitivity to
             differentiate specific degrees of skeletal muscle strain
             injury, and imaging data are specifically representative of
             cellular histopathology quantified via stereological
             analyses.},
   Doi = {10.4137/ehi.s15255},
   Key = {fds268702}
}

@booklet{Johnson89a,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Thompson, MB and Cofer, GP and Campen, D and Maronpot,
             RR},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of hepatic neoplasms in the
             rat.},
   Journal = {Veterinary pathology},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {303-308},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0300-9858},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2763419},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microscopic resolution
             was done on a live rat that had chemically induced hepatic
             neoplasms. Beginning at the anterior aspect of the liver, 16
             contiguous transaxial slices (each 1.25 mm thick) were
             produced using three-dimensional Fourier transform
             sequences. The rat had been treated with diethylnitrosamine
             (200 mg/kg) at 70 days of age, and, subsequently, received
             periodic implants of 17a-ethynylestradiol for 60 weeks.
             Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequences (repetition time
             = 2,000 and echo time = 20, 40, 60, 80 ms) were done to give
             quantitative measures of spin-spin relaxation times (T2).
             Pixel-by-pixel curve fitting from these multiple images
             yielded calculated T2 images. Histologic evaluation of three
             abnormal areas in the liver revealed solid and cystic
             hepatocellular adenomas. Although lesions were evident in
             early-echo images of the CPMG sequence, they were more
             apparent in the late-echo images. This was consistent with
             longer T2 relaxation times for the lesions. The voxels of
             dimensions (230 x 230 x 1,250 microns) permitted resolution
             of volume elements less than 0.07 mm3. This in turn
             permitted clear delineation of focal lesions less than 3 mm
             in diameter. The potential for MRI at microscopic resolution
             in toxicologic research is clearly demonstrated.},
   Doi = {10.1177/030098588902600403},
   Key = {Johnson89a}
}

@article{fds132815,
   Author = {GA Johnson and MB Thompson and GP Cofer and D Campen and RR
             Maronpot},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of hepatic neoplasms in the
             rat.},
   Journal = {Veterinary pathology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {303-8},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0300-9858},
   Keywords = {Animals • Female • Liver Neoplasms, Experimental
             • Magnetic Resonance Imaging* • Ovariectomy •
             Rats • Rats, Inbred Strains • diagnosis •
             pathology* • veterinary},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microscopic resolution
             was done on a live rat that had chemically induced hepatic
             neoplasms. Beginning at the anterior aspect of the liver, 16
             contiguous transaxial slices (each 1.25 mm thick) were
             produced using three-dimensional Fourier transform
             sequences. The rat had been treated with diethylnitrosamine
             (200 mg/kg) at 70 days of age, and, subsequently, received
             periodic implants of 17a-ethynylestradiol for 60 weeks.
             Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequences (repetition time
             = 2,000 and echo time = 20, 40, 60, 80 ms) were done to give
             quantitative measures of spin-spin relaxation times (T2).
             Pixel-by-pixel curve fitting from these multiple images
             yielded calculated T2 images. Histologic evaluation of three
             abnormal areas in the liver revealed solid and cystic
             hepatocellular adenomas. Although lesions were evident in
             early-echo images of the CPMG sequence, they were more
             apparent in the late-echo images. This was consistent with
             longer T2 relaxation times for the lesions. The voxels of
             dimensions (230 x 230 x 1,250 microns) permitted resolution
             of volume elements less than 0.07 mm3. This in turn
             permitted clear delineation of focal lesions less than 3 mm
             in diameter. The potential for MRI at microscopic resolution
             in toxicologic research is clearly demonstrated.},
   Key = {fds132815}
}

@booklet{Levron98,
   Author = {Levron, D and Walter, DK and Appelt, S and Fitzgerald, RJ and Kahn, D and Korbly, SE and Sauer, KL and Happer, W and Earles, TL and Mawst, LJ and al,
             E},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized 129Xe produced
             by spin exchange with diode-laser pumped
             Cs},
   Journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {18},
   Pages = {2666-2668},
   Year = {1998},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.122547},
   Abstract = {We report the results of experiments leading to the
             production of an image of a polarized 129Xe sample prepared
             by spin exchange with Cs, optically pumped with a spectrally
             narrowed 894.3 nm diode laser. Representative images of the
             average electron spin polarization are shown. Appreciable
             cesium electron polarization values were achieved, and a
             nuclear polarization of about 2.5% was measured for 129Xe.
             The absolute nuclear polarization was measured by
             water-calibrated free induction decay of the nuclear
             magnetic resonance signal, and the polarized xenon imaged
             using a 2 T magnetic resonance imaging system. © 1998
             American Institute of Physics.},
   Doi = {10.1063/1.122547},
   Key = {Levron98}
}

@article{fds268776,
   Author = {Shattuck, M and Behringer, R and Geordiadis, J and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of interstitial velocity
             distributions in porous media},
   Journal = {American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Fluids Engineering
             Division (Publication) FED},
   Volume = {125},
   Pages = {39-45},
   Year = {1991},
   Abstract = {In this article we report on a promising application of
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), which can measure local
             interstitial velocity distributions inside fully-saturated
             porous media. We have extended the standard
             three-dimensional MRI sequence to include local velocity
             information. During flow, the moving spins of the fluid (in
             this case water) accumulate phase in the presence of
             magnetic field gradients. This phase is proportional to the
             local velocity. By repeating the measurement under the
             influence of different magnetic gradient strengths, we can
             reconstruct the velocity distribution in each volume element
             (voxel). Using this technique to study pressure-driven flow
             through a fully-saturated, cylindrical packed bed, we have
             observed flow channeling near the walls and an exponential
             distribution of velocities.},
   Key = {fds268776}
}

@booklet{Stern90,
   Author = {Stern, RL and Johnson, GA and Ravin, CE},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic cavity using a
             paused 3DFT acquisition technique.},
   Journal = {Magnetic Resonance Imaging},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {747-753},
   Year = {1990},
   ISSN = {0730-725X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2266801},
   Abstract = {A new pulse sequence designed for magnetic resonance imaging
             of the entire thoracic cavity is described. This sequence,
             called 3DPAUSE, is a rapid three-dimensional Fourier
             transform (3DFT) sequences with periodic pauses for
             breathing and additional rf pulses after each pause to
             restore the magnetization to steady-state before data
             acquisition resumes. Cardiac motion artifacts are
             effectively removed by signal averaging. Respiratory motion
             artifacts are removed by breath hold. Image artifacts caused
             by an inadequate number of pauses or by inappropriate
             placement of the pauses within a scan are shown, and ways to
             avoid these artifacts are discussed. 3DPAUSE provides the
             ability to acquire three-dimensional arrays in the thoracic
             cavity with minimal artifacts from respiratory and cardiac
             motions in a clinically reasonable time.},
   Key = {Stern90}
}

@article{fds132801,
   Author = {RL Stern and GA Johnson and CE Ravin},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic cavity using a
             paused 3DFT acquisition technique.},
   Journal = {Magnetic resonance imaging, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {747-53},
   Year = {1990},
   ISSN = {0730-725X},
   Keywords = {Animals • Dogs • Humans • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging • Thorax • anatomy & histology* •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {A new pulse sequence designed for magnetic resonance imaging
             of the entire thoracic cavity is described. This sequence,
             called 3DPAUSE, is a rapid three-dimensional Fourier
             transform (3DFT) sequences with periodic pauses for
             breathing and additional rf pulses after each pause to
             restore the magnetization to steady-state before data
             acquisition resumes. Cardiac motion artifacts are
             effectively removed by signal averaging. Respiratory motion
             artifacts are removed by breath hold. Image artifacts caused
             by an inadequate number of pauses or by inappropriate
             placement of the pauses within a scan are shown, and ways to
             avoid these artifacts are discussed. 3DPAUSE provides the
             ability to acquire three-dimensional arrays in the thoracic
             cavity with minimal artifacts from respiratory and cardiac
             motions in a clinically reasonable time.},
   Key = {fds132801}
}

@article{fds325754,
   Author = {Sulik, KK and O'Leary-Moore, SK and Parnell, SE and Godin, EA and Styner, MA and Lipinski, RJ and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING-BASED ANALYSES OF A FETAL ALCOHOL
             SPECTRUM DISORDERS MOUSE MODEL},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {31A-31A},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {August},
   Key = {fds325754}
}

@article{fds268751,
   Author = {O'Leary-Moore, SK and Parnell, SE and Godin, EA and Johnson, GA and Styner, M and Oguz, I and Budin, F and Jiang, Y and Dehart, DB and Sulik,
             KK},
   Title = {MAGNETIC RESONANCE MICROSCOPY AND DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGING
             DEFINE STAGE-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN BRAIN MORPHOLOGY AFTER
             PRENATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE IN MICE},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {298A-298A},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0145-6008},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000291641500215&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds268751}
}

@booklet{Delnomdedieu98,
   Author = {M. Delnomdedieu and L. W. Hedlund and R. R. Maronpot and G.
             A. Johnson},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy and histopathology:
             Comparative approach of bromobenzene-induced hepatotoxicity
             in the rat},
   Journal = {Hepatology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {526 -- 532},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {Delnomdedieu98}
}

@article{fds269045,
   Author = {Delnomdedieu, M and Hedlund, LW and Maronpot, RR and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy and histopathology:
             comparative approach of bromobenzene-induced hepatotoxicity
             in the rat.},
   Journal = {Hepatology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {526-532},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0270-9139},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9462653},
   Keywords = {Animals • Bromobenzenes* • Female •
             Histocytochemistry • Liver Diseases • Microscopy
             • Rats • Rats, Inbred F344 • Reproducibility
             of Results • Sensitivity and Specificity •
             chemically induced • methods* •
             pathology*},
   Abstract = {The development of magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy has
             provided new approaches to histology and histopathology.
             Recent work has shown the promise of increased sensitivity
             in animal models of chemically induced hepatotoxicity.
             However, the field is so new that there is little experience
             to relate changes seen in MR micrographs to the more
             traditional optical images stained with hematoxylin and
             eosin. This work compares the sensitivity and
             reproducibility of MR microscopy with conventional
             histopathology in detecting bromobenzene-induced
             hepatotoxicity in the rat. A time-course study was
             undertaken to provide a range of histopathologies. Specimens
             were studied at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after exposure to
             10% of the median lethal dose of bromobenzene. Using 4
             animals per group (a total of 32 rats) added statistical
             significance to the study and defined a range of interanimal
             variability over 96 hours. This work shows that MR
             microscopy, besides being nondestructive and
             three-dimensional, is at least as sensitive as conventional
             hematoxylin-eosin staining in detecting bromobenzene-induced
             centrilobular lesions and recovery of the hepatocellular
             architecture in the rat. This study further suggests that,
             as we begin to understand the underlying mechanisms of
             contrast in MR histology, MR may, in fact, supply even
             higher specificity than more traditional studies: variations
             were observed in MR images of treated livers at a given time
             point that could be not be differentiated based on the
             grading of necrosis and inflammation on hematoxylin-eosin-stained
             sections.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hep.510270229},
   Key = {fds269045}
}

@article{fds268768,
   Author = {Godin, EA and O'Leary-Moore, SK and Khan, AA and Parnell, SE and Ament,
             JJ and Dehart, DB and Johnson, BW and Johnson, GA and Styner, MA and Sulik,
             KK},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy defines ethanol-induced brain
             abnormalities in prenatal mice: Effects of acute insult on
             gestational day 7},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {98-111},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {0145-6008},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2009.01071.x},
   Abstract = {Background: This magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM)-based
             report is the second in a series designed to illustrate the
             spectrum of craniofacial and central nervous system (CNS)
             dysmorphia resulting from single- and multiple-day maternal
             ethanol treatment. The study described in this report
             examined the consequences of ethanol exposure on gestational
             day (GD) 7 in mice, a time in development when gastrulation
             and neural plate development begins; corresponding to the
             mid- to late third week postfertilization in humans. Acute
             GD 7 ethanol exposure in mice has previously been shown to
             result in CNS defects consistent with holoprosencephaly
             (HPE) and craniofacial anomalies typical of those in Fetal
             Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). MRM has facilitated further
             definition of the range of GD 7 ethanol-induced defects.
             Methods: C57Bl/6J female mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.)
             administered vehicle or 2 injections of 2.9 g/kg ethanol on
             day 7 of pregnancy. Stage-matched control and
             ethanol-exposed GD 17 fetuses selected for imaging were
             immersion fixed in a Bouins/Prohance solution. MRM was
             conducted at either 7.0 Tesla (T) or 9.4 T. Resulting 29 μm
             isotropic spatial resolution scans were segmented and
             reconstructed to provide 3D images. Linear and volumetric
             brain measures, as well as morphological features, were
             compared for control and ethanol-exposed fetuses. Following
             MRM, selected specimens were processed for routine histology
             and light microscopic examination. Results: Gestational day
             7 ethanol exposure resulted in a spectrum of median facial
             and forebrain deficiencies, as expected. This range of
             abnormalities falls within the HPE spectrum; a spectrum for
             which facial dysmorphology is consistent with and typically
             is predictive of that of the forebrain. In addition, other
             defects including median facial cleft, cleft palate,
             micrognathia, pituitary agenesis, and third ventricular
             dilatation were identified. MRM analyses also revealed
             cerebral cortical dysplasia/heterotopias resulting from this
             acute, early insult and facilitated a subsequent focused
             histological investigation of these defects. Conclusions:
             Individual MRM scans and 3D reconstructions of fetal mouse
             brains have facilitated demonstration of a broad range of GD
             7 ethanol-induced morphological abnormality. These results,
             including the discovery of cerebral cortical heterotopias,
             elucidate the teratogenic potential of ethanol insult during
             the third week of human prenatal development. © 2009 by the
             Research Society on Alcoholism.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1530-0277.2009.01071.x},
   Key = {fds268768}
}

@article{fds268767,
   Author = {Parnell, SE and O'Leary-Moore, SK and Godin, EA and Dehart, DB and Johnson, BW and Johnson, GA and Styner, MA and Sulik,
             KK},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy defines ethanol-induced brain
             abnormalities in prenatal mice: Effects of acute insult on
             gestational day 8},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1001-1011},
   Year = {2009},
   ISSN = {0145-6008},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2009.00921.x},
   Abstract = {Background: Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), magnetic
             resonance imaging (MRI) at microscopic levels, provides
             unprecedented opportunities to aid in defining the full
             spectrum of ethanol's insult to the developing brain. This
             is the first in a series of reports that, collectively, will
             provide an MRM-based atlas of developmental stage-dependent
             structural brain abnormalities in a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum
             Disorders (FASD) mouse model. The ethanol exposure time and
             developmental stage examined for this report is gestational
             day (GD) 8 in mice, when the embryos are at early
             neurulation stages; stages present in humans early in the
             fourth week postfertilization. Methods: For this study,
             pregnant C57Bl/6J mice were administered an ethanol dosage
             of 2.8 g/kg intraperitoneally at 8 days, 0 hour and again at
             8 days, 4 hours postfertilization. On GD 17, fetuses that
             were selected for MRM analyses were immersion fixed in a
             Bouin's/Prohance ® solution. Control fetuses from
             vehicle-treated dams were stage-matched to those that were
             ethanol-exposed. The fetal mice were scanned ex vivo at 7.0
             T and 512 × 512 × 1024 image arrays were acquired using
             3-D spin warp encoding. The resulting 29 μm (isotropic)
             resolution images were processed using ITK-SNAP, a 3-D
             segmentation/ visualization tool. Linear and volume
             measurements were determined for selected brain, head, and
             body regions of each specimen. Comparisons were made between
             control and treated fetuses, with an emphasis on determining
             (dis)proportionate changes in specific brain regions.
             Results: As compared with controls, the crown-rump lengths
             of stage-matched ethanol-exposed GD 17 fetuses were
             significantly reduced, as were brain and whole body volumes.
             Volume reductions were notable in every brain region
             examined, with the exception of the pituitary and septal
             region, and were accompanied by increased ventricular
             volumes. Disproportionate regional brain volume reductions
             were most marked on the right side and were significant for
             the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum; the latter
             being the most severely affected. Additionally, the septal
             region and the pituitary were disproportionately large.
             Linear measures were consistent with those of volume. Other
             dysmorphologic features noted in the MR scans were choanal
             stenosis and optic nerve coloboma. Conclusions: This study
             demonstrates that exposure to ethanol occurring in mice at
             stages corresponding to the human fourth week
             postfertilization results in structural brain abnormalities
             that are readily identifiable at fetal stages of
             development. In addition to illustrating the utility of MR
             microscopy for analysis of an FASD mouse model, this work
             provides new information that confirms and extends human
             clinical observations. It also provides a framework for
             comparison of structural brain abnormalities resulting from
             ethanol exposure at other developmental stages and dosages.
             © 2009 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1530-0277.2009.00921.x},
   Key = {fds268767}
}

@booklet{Johnson97a,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Benveniste, H and Engelhardt, RT and Qiu, H and Hedlund,
             LW},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy in basic studies of brain
             structure and function.},
   Journal = {Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
   Volume = {820},
   Series = {ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES},
   Pages = {139-147},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0077-8923},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9237453},
   Key = {Johnson97a}
}

@article{fds132813,
   Author = {GA Johnson and H Benveniste and RT Engelhardt and H Qiu and LW
             Hedlund},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy in basic studies of brain
             structure and function.},
   Journal = {Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {820},
   Pages = {139-47; discussion 147-8},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0077-8923},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Diagnostic Imaging • Humans
             • Microscopy • methods* • pathology •
             physiology • radiography*},
   Key = {fds132813}
}

@article{fds268884,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Thompson, MB and Drayer, BP and Bone,
             SN},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy in neurologic
             models.},
   Journal = {Acta radiologica. Supplementum},
   Volume = {369},
   Pages = {267-268},
   Year = {1986},
   ISSN = {0365-5954},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2980471},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Chick Embryo • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging • Rats • anatomy & histology*
             • cytology • methods*},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been developed to
             permit imaging with slice thickness less than 1 mm and
             pixels of 50 x 50 microns. Special purpose gradient and
             radiofrequency coils and three-dimensional imaging
             techniques enable acquisition of images with sufficient
             signal to noise to utilize these microscopic picture
             elements. Live 200 g rats were imaged enabling clear
             definition of gray and white matter structures. Examples
             include the Sylvian aqueduct and the substantia nigra.
             Three-dimensional microscopic images of live chick embryos
             enabled definition of ventricles and brain parenchyma as
             well as measurement of T1 over the set of 16 contiguous 1.2
             mm slices.},
   Key = {fds268884}
}

@article{fds268764,
   Author = {Benveniste, H and Einstein, G and Kim, KR and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of Alzheimer's disease: Senile
             plaques - A whiter shade of pale?},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {4 PART II},
   Pages = {S519},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds268764}
}

@booklet{Johnson87d,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Brown, J and Kramer, PJ},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of changes in water content in
             stems of transpiring plants.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {84},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {2752-2755},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0027-8424},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3472235},
   Abstract = {Differences in water content and degree of binding in the
             various stem tissues of Pelargonium hortorum were observed
             by magnetic resonance imaging. 1H images were obtained with
             a resolution of 100 microns in the transverse plane and a
             slice thickness of 1250 microns. It was possible to
             distinguish the principal tissues of the stem by differences
             in their proton density or apparent water content and spin
             lattice relaxation time (T1) or degree of water binding.
             Measurements were made while the plant was slowly and
             actively transpiring. In the slowly transpiring plant, T1 of
             various tissues ranged from an average of 659 to 865 ms with
             a proton density variation of from 72 to 100%. In the
             actively transpiring plant, T1 ranged from an average of 511
             to 736 ms, and the proton density was reduced, ranging
             between 62 and 88% of the peak value found in the slowly
             transpiring plant. The fibrous sheath surrounding the
             vascular tissue and the epidermal region was found to have
             the highest spin density and T1. Both tissues are comprised
             of relatively small thick-walled cells. Cortical and pith
             parenchyma are composed of larger, thinner-walled cells with
             numerous intercellular spaces and lower spin density and T1.
             The differences are attributed to the higher water content
             by volume in the tissue composed of smaller, more compactly
             arranged cells. The resolution obtained in this work enables
             clear definition of tissues in the living plant and
             quantitative information concerning differences in the
             distribution and extent of binding of water.},
   Key = {Johnson87d}
}

@article{fds132845,
   Author = {GA Johnson and J Brown and PJ Kramer},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of changes in water content in
             stems of transpiring plants.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the
             United States of America, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {84},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {2752-5},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0027-8424},
   Keywords = {Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy • Plants • Water
             • metabolism*},
   Abstract = {Differences in water content and degree of binding in the
             various stem tissues of Pelargonium hortorum were observed
             by magnetic resonance imaging. 1H images were obtained with
             a resolution of 100 microns in the transverse plane and a
             slice thickness of 1250 microns. It was possible to
             distinguish the principal tissues of the stem by differences
             in their proton density or apparent water content and spin
             lattice relaxation time (T1) or degree of water binding.
             Measurements were made while the plant was slowly and
             actively transpiring. In the slowly transpiring plant, T1 of
             various tissues ranged from an average of 659 to 865 ms with
             a proton density variation of from 72 to 100%. In the
             actively transpiring plant, T1 ranged from an average of 511
             to 736 ms, and the proton density was reduced, ranging
             between 62 and 88% of the peak value found in the slowly
             transpiring plant. The fibrous sheath surrounding the
             vascular tissue and the epidermal region was found to have
             the highest spin density and T1. Both tissues are comprised
             of relatively small thick-walled cells. Cortical and pith
             parenchyma are composed of larger, thinner-walled cells with
             numerous intercellular spaces and lower spin density and T1.
             The differences are attributed to the higher water content
             by volume in the tissue composed of smaller, more compactly
             arranged cells. The resolution obtained in this work enables
             clear definition of tissues in the living plant and
             quantitative information concerning differences in the
             distribution and extent of binding of water.},
   Key = {fds132845}
}

@article{fds268758,
   Author = {Johnson, GA and Maronpont, RR},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of chemically-induced liver
             foci},
   Journal = {Toxicologic Pathology (Sage)},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4 I},
   Pages = {613-616},
   Year = {1989},
   ISSN = {0192-6233},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2629098},
   Keywords = {Animals • Carcinogenicity Tests • Diet •
             Female • Liver • Liver Neoplasms, Experimental
             • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Rats • Rats,
             Inbred F344 • chemically induced • pathology*
             • ultrastructure},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new imaging technique
             used in clinical diagnosis. This paper describes extension
             of the technique to basic research applications -
             specifically detecting and characterizing chemically-induced
             liver neoplasms and foci of cellular alteration. Two systems
             have been built that allow spatial microscopic resolution -
             more than 100,000x greater than that of earlier efforts. Use
             of spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times
             permits detailed characterization of the
             tissue.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0192623389017004106},
   Key = {fds268758}
}

@booklet{Effmann88,
   Author = {Effmann, EL and Johnson, GA and Smith, BR and Talbott, GA and Cofer,
             G},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of chick embryos in
             ovo.},
   Journal = {Teratology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {59-65},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0040-3709},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3175940},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the live 11-day chick
             embryo with special radiofrequency coils and 3-D imaging
             methods has produced contiguous 1.25-mm-thick slices with
             200-microns pixel resolution, permitting definition of
             cardiac chambers, cerebral ventricles, spinal cord, liver,
             and lungs. It was the objective of this study to image
             younger chick embryos in ovo with higher spatial resolution
             through the application of implanted radiofrequency coils.
             Fertilized Arbor Acre eggs were windowed at 9, 6, and 4
             days. Circular coils 18 mm in diameter tuned to 85.5 MHz
             were suspended around the developing embryo. The eggs were
             sealed with tape and maintained at 37 degrees C during the
             imaging procedure. MRI was performed in a 2.0-Tesla GE
             system utilizing a 3-D Fourier transform acquisition in
             sagittal and axial planes with a partial saturation sequence
             (TR = 400 ms, TE = 27 ms). Approximately 1 hour of imaging
             time was required to obtain 16 contiguous 600-microns-thick
             slices with 50-microns pixel resolution. Embryos remained
             viable through the imaging procedure. Embryos were
             photographed, fixed, and cleared for correlative anatomical
             study. Vitelline vessels, dorsal aorta, aortic arches,
             cardinal veins, and cardiac chambers were identified as
             areas of decreased signal intensity. Cerebral ventricles and
             the vitreous portion of the eye have signal intensities that
             are less than adjacent neural, scleral, and lens tissue.
             Further refinements in MR instrumentation and imaging
             sequences promise improvements in resolution and offer the
             potential for sequential observations of the intact
             embryo.},
   Doi = {10.1002/tera.1420380109},
   Key = {Effmann88}
}

@article{fds132781,
   Author = {EL Effmann and GA Johnson and BR Smith and GA Talbott and G
             Cofer},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of chick embryos in
             ovo.},
   Journal = {Teratology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {59-65},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0040-3709},
   Keywords = {Animals • Cardiovascular System • Chick Embryo
             • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Nervous System
             • anatomy & histology* • embryology •
             methods*},
   Abstract = {Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the live 11-day chick
             embryo with special radiofrequency coils and 3-D imaging
             methods has produced contiguous 1.25-mm-thick slices with
             200-microns pixel resolution, permitting definition of
             cardiac chambers, cerebral ventricles, spinal cord, liver,
             and lungs. It was the objective of this study to image
             younger chick embryos in ovo with higher spatial resolution
             through the application of implanted radiofrequency coils.
             Fertilized Arbor Acre eggs were windowed at 9, 6, and 4
             days. Circular coils 18 mm in diameter tuned to 85.5 MHz
             were suspended around the developing embryo. The eggs were
             sealed with tape and maintained at 37 degrees C during the
             imaging procedure. MRI was performed in a 2.0-Tesla GE
             system utilizing a 3-D Fourier transform acquisition in
             sagittal and axial planes with a partial saturation sequence
             (TR = 400 ms, TE = 27 ms). Approximately 1 hour of imaging
             time was required to obtain 16 contiguous 600-microns-thick
             slices with 50-microns pixel resolution. Embryos remained
             viable through the imaging procedure. Embryos were
             photographed, fixed, and cleared for correlative anatomical
             study. Vitelline vessels, dorsal aorta, aortic arches,
             cardinal veins, and cardiac chambers were identified as
             areas of decreased signal intensity. Cerebral ventricles and
             the vitreous portion of the eye have signal intensities that
             are less than adjacent neural, scleral, and lens tissue.
             Further refinements in MR instrumentation and imaging
             sequences promise improvements in resolution and offer the
             potential for sequential observations of the intact
             embryo.},
   Key = {fds132781}
}

@booklet{Smith96,
   Author = {Smith, BR and Linney, E and Huff, DS and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of embryos.},
   Journal = {Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {483-490},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0895-6111},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9007215},
   Abstract = {We demonstrate that magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy
             provides a mechanism to investigate normal and abnormal
             developmental anatomy in a non-destructive and
             distortion-free manner. Techniques for the fixation,
             embedding, perfusion and image acquisition of embryos
             between 3 and 30 mm crown rump length are described. We
             describe the perfusion of a contrast agent to enhance images
             of the developing embryonic vasculature. Data are acquired
             as three-dimensional isotropic arrays which permit images to
             be reformatted retrospectively in any plane. The data are
             available for archiving, distributing and for
             post-acquisition manipulations. MR microscopy is a fast
             technique for producing three-dimensional reconstructions
             and is free from registration and sectioning
             artifacts.},
   Key = {Smith96}
}

@article{fds132819,
   Author = {BR Smith and E Linney and DS Huff and GA Johnson},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of embryos.},
   Journal = {Computerized medical imaging and graphics : the official
             journal of the Computerized Medical Imaging Society, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {483-90},
   ISSN = {0895-6111},
   Keywords = {Anatomy, Artistic • Animals • Contrast Media
             • Databases, Factual • Embryo • Embryonic and
             Fetal Development* • Humans • Image Processing,
             Computer-Assisted • Magnetic Resonance Imaging* •
             Medical Illustration • Mice • Microscopy •
             anatomy & histology • anatomy & histology* •
             embryology},
   Abstract = {We demonstrate that magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy
             provides a mechanism to investigate normal and abnormal
             developmental anatomy in a non-destructive and
             distortion-free manner. Techniques for the fixation,
             embedding, perfusion and image acquisition of embryos
             between 3 and 30 mm crown rump length are described. We
             describe the perfusion of a contrast agent to enhance images
             of the developing embryonic vasculature. Data are acquired
             as three-dimensional isotropic arrays which permit images to
             be reformatted retrospectively in any plane. The data are
             available for archiving, distributing and for
             post-acquisition manipulations. MR microscopy is a fast
             technique for producing three-dimensional reconstructions
             and is free from registration and sectioning
             artifacts.},
   Key = {fds132819}
}

@booklet{Smith94,
   Author = {Smith, BR and Johnson, GA and Groman, EV and Linney,
             E},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of mouse embryos.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {91},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {3530-3533},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0027-8424},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8170941},
   Abstract = {The increased use of the mouse as a model for various
             aspects of mammalian biology has caused a renewed interest
             in developing strategies for examining and comparing normal
             and abnormal mouse embryonic development and anatomy. In
             this study, we have explored the use of magnetic resonance
             microscopy as a tool for these purposes. Techniques for the
             fixation, embedding, perfusion, and image acquisition of
             mouse embryos are described. The perfusion of bovine serum
             albumin-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic anhydride-gadolinium
             as a contrast agent enhances images of the developing
             embryonic vasculature during critical stages of
             organogenesis and allows for comparisons when embryos have
             been treated with teratogens such as retinoic acid. The
             acquired three-dimensional data sets are available for
             archiving, distributing, and postacquisition manipulations
             such as computer segmentation of anatomical
             structures.},
   Key = {Smith94}
}

@article{fds132863,
   Author = {BR Smith and GA Johnson and EV Groman and E Linney},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of mouse embryos.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the
             United States of America, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {91},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {3530-3},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0027-8424},
   Keywords = {Age Factors • Albumins • Animals • Contrast
             Media • Gadolinium DTPA* • Image Processing,
             Computer-Assisted • Mice • Organometallic
             Compounds • Pentetic Acid • analogs & derivatives
             • diagnostic use • embryology*},
   Abstract = {The increased use of the mouse as a model for various
             aspects of mammalian biology has caused a renewed interest
             in developing strategies for examining and comparing normal
             and abnormal mouse embryonic development and anatomy. In
             this study, we have explored the use of magnetic resonance
             microscopy as a tool for these purposes. Techniques for the
             fixation, embedding, perfusion, and image acquisition of
             mouse embryos are described. The perfusion of bovine serum
             albumin-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic anhydride-gadolinium
             as a contrast agent enhances images of the developing
             embryonic vasculature during critical stages of
             organogenesis and allows for comparisons when embryos have
             been treated with teratogens such as retinoic acid. The
             acquired three-dimensional data sets are available for
             archiving, distributing, and postacquisition manipulations
             such as computer segmentation of anatomical
             structures.},
   Key = {fds132863}
}

@booklet{Benveniste00,
   Author = {Benveniste, H and Kim, K and Zhang, L and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of the C57BL mouse
             brain},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {601-611},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000087963600003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1006/nimg.2000.0567},
   Key = {Benveniste00}
}

@article{fds292763,
   Author = {Benveniste, H and Kim, K and Zhang, L and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of the C57BL mouse
             brain.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {6 Pt 1},
   Pages = {601-611},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10860789},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain • Caudate Nucleus • Globus
             Pallidus • Hippocampus • Image Enhancement •
             Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy* • Mice • Mice,
             Inbred C57BL • Neocortex • Putamen • anatomy
             & histology • anatomy & histology*},
   Abstract = {With the rapid progression in gene technologies, transgenic,
             targeted, and chemically induced mutations in mice are
             continually created. The major goal of these studies is to
             understand and characterize the effects of genotype on
             anatomy, physiology, and behavior and ultimately the role of
             genotype in development of disease. The demand for imaging
             techniques with high spatial resolution potential is rising
             because such imaging tools would expedite anatomical
             phenotyping in the genetically altered mice. Magnetic
             resonance microscopy (MRM) is a noninvasive, inherently
             three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique capable of
             visualizing several anatomical structures in the small
             mouse. The 3D nature of MRM also allows for interpretation
             of complex spatial relationships between substructures,
             which is important when phenotyping anatomically. The goal
             of this paper is to systematically describe three major
             brain regions in the C57BL/6J mouse at microanatomical
             spatial resolution ranges using in vitro MRM. We explore
             different MR contrast parameters, voxel sizes, and
             signal-to-noise ratios to best characterize C57BL/6J mouse
             brain microstructure by MRM. Further, we compare all MRM
             images with Nissl-stained brain sections. Major findings
             were as follows: T2* MR images visualized several gross
             anatomical regions in the mouse brain but not, for example,
             subregions within the hippocampus. Diffusion proton stains
             on the other hand were superior to T2* MR images and
             delineated many subregions within the hippocampus proper.
             Finally, contrast enhancement facilitated visualization of
             hippocampal anatomy on the T2* MR images. The results of
             this study are part of an ongoing initiative at our Center
             focused on creating a complete C57BL/6J mouse anatomical 3D
             image database by MRM.},
   Doi = {10.1006/nimg.2000.0567},
   Key = {fds292763}
}

@article{fds268911,
   Author = {Arnder, L and Zhou, X and Cofer, GP and Hedlund, LW and Johnson,
             GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of the rat carotid artery at
             300 megahertz.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {822-826},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7995700},
   Keywords = {Angioplasty, Balloon • Animals • Arteriosclerosis
             • Carotid Arteries • Carotid Artery Diseases
             • Female • Magnetic Resonance Angiography •
             Microscopy • Rats • Rats, Sprague-Dawley •
             diagnosis • methods* • pathology* •
             therapy},
   Abstract = {RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Magnetic resonance microscopy
             (MRM) has evolved from a technical curiosity to a tool with
             which researchers can study important disease models. But
             MRM is not simply an extension of clinical magnetic
             resonance imaging. In this article, the unique adaptations
             of MRM required in the study of carotid artery disease are
             outlined. The techniques of MRM are integrated into a
             specific model of carotid artery disease in the rat to allow
             in vivo studies of vascular wall thickening after removal of
             the vascular endothelium. METHODS: Imaging was performed at
             300 MHz in 250-gm Sprague-Dawley rats using surgically
             implanted radiofrequency coils to localize the region of
             interest and to provide an increase in the signal-to-noise
             ratio over that of volume or surface coils. A
             three-dimensional Fourier encoding sequence was modified
             with flow-dephasing gradients to minimize signal and
             artifacts from moving blood. RESULTS: In vivo images were
             acquired with spatial resolution of 25 x 25 x 400 microns
             and signal-to-noise ratio more than sufficient to define the
             morphology of the vascular wall. Significant changes in the
             intensity and distribution of signal were visible in the
             area surrounding the vessel after angioplasty. CONCLUSIONS:
             Signal-to-noise improvements from surgically implanted coils
             coupled to a three-dimensional radiofrequency-refocused
             sequence with flow-dephasing gradients were sufficient to
             define the wall of the carotid artery. The
             diffusion-weighted pulse sequence detects signal changes in
             the area surrounding the vessel after angioplasty. The MRM
             techniques described and the contrast observed allow us, for
             the first time to follow in vivo the early stage of
             developing atherosclerosis in the vessel wall and closely
             surrounding tissue.},
   Key = {fds268911}
}

@article{fds268993,
   Author = {Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA and Mills, GI},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of the rat thorax and
             abdomen.},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {843-846},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3781788},
   Keywords = {Abdomen • Animals • Magnetic Resonance
             Spectroscopy • Male • Myocardial Contraction
             • Rats • Rats, Inbred Strains • Respiration
             • Thorax • anatomy & histology* • diagnostic
             use},
   Abstract = {With magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy, high-resolution
             volumetric imaging (3DFT) of small animals is possible.
             Although these techniques are suitable for imaging the head
             and other small stationary objects, breathing and cardiac
             motion degrade the quality of body images. Scan synchronous
             ventilation and cardiac gating methods have been developed
             that permit acquisition of high-resolution images from
             anywhere in the body of small animals (150 to 400 g).
             Anesthetized rats were ventilated in synchrony with
             three-dimensional Fourier spin warp (3DFT) sequence (TR =
             400 to 1000 ms, TE = 20 ms). Eight or 16 slices (1.2 or 2.5
             mm thick) were acquired simultaneously. Effective pixel size
             was 200 X 200 mu. Imaging was performed in a 1.5 T, 1-m bore
             research system using a 28-cm diameter high field gradient
             coil and a 6-cm diameter radio frequency coil. For thoracic
             imaging, acquisitions were gated to the QRS of the ECG. Scan
             synchronous ventilation eliminated breathing motion
             artifacts and permitted visualization of peripheral vascular
             structures in the lung and liver. In images that were also
             cardiac gated, cardiac chambers and major thoracic vessels,
             including the coronary arteries, were well demonstrated.
             Thus, thoroughly characterized rodent models can now be
             studied with MR not only to explore noninvasively the
             intricacies of mammalian pathomorphology, but also to test
             the capabilities of MR and aid in interpreting MR
             data.},
   Key = {fds268993}
}

@booklet{Hedlund91,
   Author = {Hedlund, LW and Maronpot, RR and Johnson, GA and Cofer, GP and Mills,
             GI and Wheeler, CT},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of toxic renal injury induced
             by bromoethylamine in rats},
   Journal = {Fundamental and Applied Toxicology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {787-797},
   Year = {1991},
   ISSN = {0272-0590},
   Abstract = {The alkylhalide 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide (BEA)
             produces renal injury in rats that mimics analgesic-related
             renal injury in humans. Our purpose was to examine this
             injury, in vivo in rats, with magnetic resonance (MR)
             microscopy and correlate MR findings with findings from
             light microscopy of hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections. Rats
             (n = 48) were injected intravenously with BEA (150 mg/kg) or
             saline and imaged with MR 6, 48, and 336 hr later. The
             spin-spin relaxation time, T2, was measured from the cortex
             to the papilla. In other rats, we measured regional water
             content of the kidney. Renal injury was present 48 and 336
             hr after BEA dosing based on increased renal organ weights,
             decreased urine specific gravity, and significant renal
             lesions (H &amp; E). T2 was elevated in the inner stripe of
             the outer medulla in injured kidneys at 48 hr. The
             differences in T2 between cortex and outer medulla were also
             elevated 48 hr after BEA. In the inner medulla, there were
             no changes in T2 after BEA treatment. However, in all groups
             there were significant regional differences in T2. The value
             of T2 increased from outer to inner medulla and this
             gradient was directly correlated with water content. Thus,
             MR microscopy detected damage in the outer medulla after BEA
             injury but not the damage in the inner medulla. T2 appeared
             to reflect the water content in the different regions of the
             medulla. The noninvasive in vivo capability of MR
             microscopy, with its high sensitivity to tissue water,
             allows the toxicologist to monitor the progression and
             regression of toxic insult in the same animal. At present
             the technology is complicated. The precise and accurate
             measure of MR-sensitive parameters in live animals at
             microscopic resolution is difficult. However, as the
             technology matures, there will be significant improvements
             providing the toxicologist a unique in vivo tool. ©
             1991.},
   Key = {Hedlund91}
}

@article{fds269102,
   Author = {Hedlund, LW and Maronpot, RR and Johnson, GA and Cofer, GP and Mills,
             GI and Wheeler, CT},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy of toxic renal injury induced
             by bromoethylamine in rats.},
   Journal = {Fundamental and Applied Toxicology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {787-797},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0272-0590},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1884916},
   Keywords = {Animals • Ethylamines • Female • Kidney
             • Kidney Cortex • Kidney Diseases • Kidney
             Medulla • Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy* •
             Microscopy • Organ Size • Rats • Rats, Inbred
             Strains • Specific Gravity • chemically induced*
             • methods* • pathology • pathology* •
             toxicity*},
   Abstract = {The alkylhalide 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide (BEA)
             produces renal injury in rats that mimics analgesic-related
             renal injury in humans. Our purpose was to examine this
             injury, in vivo in rats, with magnetic resonance (MR)
             microscopy and correlate MR findings with findings from
             light microscopy of hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections. Rats
             (n = 48) were injected intravenously with BEA (150 mg/kg) or
             saline and imaged with MR 6, 48, and 336 hr later. The
             spin-spin relaxation time, T2, was measured from the cortex
             to the papilla. In other rats, we measured regional water
             content of the kidney. Renal injury was present 48 and 336
             hr after BEA dosing based on increased renal organ weights,
             decreased urine specific gravity, and significant renal
             lesions (H & E). T2 was elevated in the inner stripe of the
             outer medulla in injured kidneys at 48 hr. The differences
             in T2 between cortex and outer medulla were also elevated 48
             hr after BEA. In the inner medulla, there were no changes in
             T2 after BEA treatment. However, in all groups there were
             significant regional differences in T2. The value of T2
             increased from outer to inner medulla and this gradient was
             directly correlated with water content. Thus, MR microscopy
             detected damage in the outer medulla after BEA injury but
             not the damage in the inner medulla. T2 appeared to reflect
             the water content in the different regions of the medulla.
             The noninvasive in vivo capability of MR microscopy, with
             its high sensitivity to tissue water, allows the
             toxicologist to monitor the progression and regression of
             toxic insult in the same animal. At present the technology
             is complicated. The precise and accurate measure of
             MR-sensitive parameters in live animals at microscopic
             resolution is difficult. However, as the technology matures,
             there will be significant improvements providing the
             toxicologist a unique in vivo tool.},
   Key = {fds269102}
}

@booklet{Tengowski00,
   Author = {Tengowski, MW and Hedlund, LW and Guyot, DJ and Burkhardt, JE and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy predicts findings in a
             theophylline-induced rat model of reproductive
             toxicity},
   Journal = {Molecular Biology of the Cell},
   Volume = {11},
   Pages = {125A-125A},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1059-1524},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000165525900655&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Tengowski00}
}

@booklet{Delnomdedieu96,
   Author = {Delnomdedieu, M and Hedlund, LW and Johnson, GA and Maronpot,
             RR},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy--a new tool for the
             toxicologic pathologist.},
   Journal = {Toxicologic Pathology (Sage)},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {36-44},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0192-6233},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8839279},
   Abstract = {Parallel to its many applications in medical imaging,
             magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy is a potentially powerful
             tool in toxicologic pathology. Because of the intrinsic
             qualities of MR microscopy (noninvasiveness,
             3-dimensionality, and slicing in any chosen plane), the
             scientist has a new means by which to investigate different
             types of lesions based on differential contrast. By choosing
             appropriate proton stains to probe the state of the water in
             tissues, organ structure and vasculature can be seen and
             progressive lesion development can be followed in a given
             animal. This paper discusses toxicologic pathology
             applications for MR microscopy and compares MR microscopy
             with conventional histopathology using a time-course study
             of bromobenzene-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Hematoxylin
             and eosin (H&E)-stained histological sections are compared
             with MR microscopy images from fixed tissue blocks to
             demonstrate one of the applications of MR microscopy to
             toxicologic pathology. The results indicate that MR
             microscopy is as sensitive as conventional H&E staining in
             detecting bromobenzene-induced hepatic lesions.},
   Doi = {10.1177/019262339602400106},
   Key = {Delnomdedieu96}
}

@article{fds132841,
   Author = {M Delnomdedieu and LW Hedlund and GA Johnson and RR
             Maronpot},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy--a new tool for the
             toxicologic pathologist.},
   Journal = {Toxicologic pathology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {36-44},
   ISSN = {0192-6233},
   Keywords = {Animals • Brain Ischemia • Disease Models, Animal
             • Kidney • Liver • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
             • Microscopy • Rats • blood supply •
             drug effects • methods* • pathology •
             pathology*},
   Abstract = {Parallel to its many applications in medical imaging,
             magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy is a potentially powerful
             tool in toxicologic pathology. Because of the intrinsic
             qualities of MR microscopy (noninvasiveness,
             3-dimensionality, and slicing in any chosen plane), the
             scientist has a new means by which to investigate different
             types of lesions based on differential contrast. By choosing
             appropriate proton stains to probe the state of the water in
             tissues, organ structure and vasculature can be seen and
             progressive lesion development can be followed in a given
             animal. This paper discusses toxicologic pathology
             applications for MR microscopy and compares MR microscopy
             with conventional histopathology using a time-course study
             of bromobenzene-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Hematoxylin
             and eosin (H&E)-stained histological sections are compared
             with MR microscopy images from fixed tissue blocks to
             demonstrate one of the applications of MR microscopy to
             toxicologic pathology. The results indicate that MR
             microscopy is as sensitive as conventional H&E staining in
             detecting bromobenzene-induced hepatic lesions.},
   Key = {fds132841}
}

@article{fds325753,
   Author = {Lipinski, RJ and Hammond, P and Ament, JJ and Pecevich, SJ and Jiang, Y and Dehart, DB and Johnson, GA and Sulik, KK},
   Title = {MAGNETIC RESONANCE MICROSCOPY-BASED 3D FACE-BRAIN
             CORRELATIONS IN AN FASD MOUSE MODEL},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {266A-266A},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {fds325753}
}

@article{fds268826,
   Author = {O'Leary-Moore, SK and Parnell, SE and Godin, EA and Dehart, DB and Ament, JJ and Khan, AA and Johnson, GA and Styner, MA and Sulik,
             KK},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy-based analyses of the brains
             of normal and ethanol-exposed fetal mice.},
   Journal = {Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular
             Teratology},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {953-964},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1542-0760},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20842647},
   Keywords = {Abnormalities, Drug-Induced • Animals • Brain
             • Disease Models, Animal • Ethanol • Female
             • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome • Fetus •
             Gestational Age • Humans • Magnetic Resonance
             Imaging • Male • Mice • Mice, Inbred C57BL
             • Microscopy • Pregnancy • Prenatal Exposure
             Delayed Effects • abnormalities • chemically
             induced • drug effects* • embryology •
             methods • methods* • pathology •
             toxicity*},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: The application of magnetic resonance microscopy
             (MRM) to the study of normal and abnormal prenatal mouse
             development has facilitated discovery of dysmorphology
             following prenatal ethanol insult. The current analyses
             extend this work, providing a regional brain volume-based
             description of normal brain growth and illustrating the
             consequences of gestational day (GD) 10 ethanol exposure in
             the fetal mouse. METHODS: To assess normal growth, control
             C57Bl/6J fetuses collected on GD 16, GD 16.5, and GD 17 were
             scanned using a 9.4-T magnet, resulting in 29-μm isotropic
             resolution images. For the ethanol teratogenicity studies,
             C57Bl/6J dams were administered intraperitoneal ethanol (2.9
             g/kg) at 10 days, 0 hr, and 10 days, 4 hr, after
             fertilization, and fetuses were collected for analyses on GD
             17. From individual MRM scans, linear measurements and
             regional brain volumes were determined and compared.
             RESULTS: In control fetuses, each of the assessed brain
             regions increased in volume, whereas ventricular volumes
             decreased between GD 16 and GD 17. Illustrating a global
             developmental delay, prenatal ethanol exposure resulted in
             reduced body volumes, crown-rump lengths, and a generalized
             decrease in regional brain volumes compared with GD 17
             controls. However, compared with GD 16.5, morphologically
             matched controls, ethanol exposure resulted in volume
             increases in the lateral and third ventricles as well as a
             disproportionate reduction in cortical volume. CONCLUSIONS:
             The normative data collected in this study facilitate the
             distinction between GD 10 ethanol-induced developmental
             delay and frank dysmorphology. This work illustrates the
             utility of MRM-based analyses for developmental toxicology
             studies and extends our knowledge of the stage-dependency of
             ethanol teratogenesis.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1002/bdra.20719},
   Key = {fds268826}
}

@article{fds268727,
   Author = {Parnell, SE and Holloway, HT and O'Leary-Moore, SK and Dehart, DB and Paniaqua, B and Oguz, I and Budin, F and Styner, MA and Johnson, GA and Sulik, KK},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy-based analyses of the
             neuroanatomical effects of gestational day 9 ethanol
             exposure in mice},
   Journal = {Neurotoxicology and Teratology},
   Volume = {39},
   Pages = {77-83},
   Year = {2013},
   ISSN = {0892-0362},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ntt.2013.07.009},
   Abstract = {Animal model-based studies have shown that ethanol exposure
             during early gestation induces developmental stage-specific
             abnormalities of the face and brain. The exposure
             time-dependent variability in ethanol's teratogenic outcomes
             is expected to contribute significantly to the wide spectrum
             of effects observed in humans with fetal alcohol spectrum
             disorder (FASD). The work presented here employs a mouse
             FASD model and magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM; high
             resolution magnetic resonance imaging) in studies designed
             to further our understanding of the developmental
             stage-specific defects of the brain that are induced by
             ethanol. At neurulation stages, i.e. at the beginning of
             gestational day (GD) 9 and again 4. hours later, time-mated
             C57Bl/6J dams were intraperitoneally administered 2.9. g/kg
             ethanol or vehicle. Ethanol-exposed fetuses were collected
             on GD 17, processed for MRM analysis, and results compared
             to comparably staged controls. Linear and volume
             measurements as well as shape changes for numerous
             individual brain regions were determined. GD 9 ethanol
             exposure resulted in significantly increased septal region
             width, reduction of cerebellar volume, and enlargement of
             all of the ventricles. Additionally, the results of shape
             analyses showed that many areas of the ethanol-exposed
             brains including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and right
             striatum were significantly misshapen. These data
             demonstrate that ethanol can induce dysmorphology that may
             not be obvious based on volumetric analyses alone, highlight
             the asymmetric aspects of ethanol-induced defects, and add
             to our understanding of ethanol's developmental
             stage-dependent neuroteratogenesis.© 2013 Elsevier
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ntt.2013.07.009},
   Key = {fds268727}
}

@article{fds304894,
   Author = {Badea, A and Johnson, GA},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy.},
   Journal = {Studies in health technology and informatics},
   Volume = {185},
   Pages = {153-184},
   Year = {2013},
   ISSN = {0926-9630},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23542935},
   Abstract = {MRI, one of the major clinical imaging modalities, has
             gained an important role in studying small animal models,
             e.g., rats and mice. But imaging rodents comes with
             challenges, since the image resolution needs to be ~
             3000-times higher to resolve anatomical details at a level
             comparable to clinical imaging. A resolution on the order of
             100 microns or less redefines MR imaging as MR microscopy.
             We discuss in this chapter the basic components of the MR
             imaging chain, with a particular emphasis on small animal
             imaging demands: from hardware design to basic physical
             principles of MR image formation, and contrast mechanisms.
             We discuss special considerations of animal preparation for
             imaging, and staining methods to enhance contrast. Attention
             is given to factors that increase sensitivity, including
             exogenous contrast agents, high performance radiofrequency
             detectors, and advanced MR encoding sequences. Among these,
             diffusion tensor imaging and tractography add novel
             information on white matter tracts, helping to better
             understand important aspects of development and
             neurodegeneration. These developments open avenues for
             efficient phenotyping of small animal models, in vivo - to
             include anatomical as well as functional estimates, or
             ex-vivo - with exquisite anatomical detail. The need for
             higher resolution results in larger image arrays that need
             to be processed efficiently. We discuss image-processing
             approaches for quantitative characterization of animal
             cohorts, and building population atlases. High throughput is
             essential for these methods to become practical. We discuss
             current trends for increasing detector performance, the use
             of cryoprobes, as well as strategies for imaging multiple
             animals at the same time. Ultimately, the development of
             highly specific probes, with the possibility to be used in
             multimodal imaging, will offer new insights into histology.
             MRM, alone or in combination with other imaging modalities,
             will increase the knowledge of fundamental biological
             processes, help understanding the genetic basis of human
             diseases, and test pharmacological interventions.},
   Key = {fds304894}
}

@booklet{Conner88,
   Author = {Conner, WE and Johnson, GA and Cofer, GP and Dittrich,
             K},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy: in vivo sectioning of a
             developing insect.},
   Journal = {Experientia},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {11-12},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0014-4754},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3350110},
   Abstract = {The utility of magnetic resonance imaging vis-a-vis insect
             morphology and development was investigated. MRI is a
             noninvasive technique that distinguishes between tissues
             based on proton content and proton 'environment'. At present
             a resolution of 100 micron is achievable. The technique
             avoids fixation artifacts and allows the detection of motion
             within the organism.},
   Key = {Conner88}
}

@article{fds132771,
   Author = {WE Conner and GA Johnson and GP Cofer and K Dittrich},
   Title = {Magnetic resonance microscopy: in vivo sectioning of a
             developing insect.},
   Journal = {Experientia, SWITZERLAND},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {11-2},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0014-4754},
   Keywords = {Animals • Female • Lepidoptera • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging* • Microscopy • Moths •
             Pupa • anatomy & histology • anatomy & histology*
             • growth & development},
   Abstract = {The utility of magnetic resonance imaging vis-a-vis insect
             morphology and development was investigated. MRI is a
             noninvasive technique that distinguishes between tissues
             based on proton content and proton 'environment'. At present
             a resolution of 100 micron is achievable. The technique
             avoids fixation artifacts and allows the detection of motion
             within the organism.},
   Key = {fds132771}
}

@article{fds268748,
   Author = {MACFALL, JS and SPAINE, PC and DOUDRICK, RE and JOHNSON,
             GA},
   Title = {MAGNETIC-RESONANCE MICROSCOPY (MRM) OF WATER TRANSPORT AND
             BINDING IN FUSIFORM RUST GALLS},
   Journal = {RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS OF CHEMICAL SCIENCES IN
             FORESTRY},
   Volume = {104},
   Pages = {17-17},
   Year = {1994},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1994BA75T00004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds268748}
}

@booklet{Effmann87,
   Author = {EFFMANN, EL and JOHNSON, GA and SMITH, BR and TALBOTT, GA and COFER,
             G},
   Title = {MAGNETIC-RESONANCE MICROSCOPY OF LIVE CHICK-EMBRYOS IN
             OVO},
   Journal = {Teratology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {A44-A44},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0040-3709},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1987H226300076&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Effmann87}
}

@booklet{Brown88,
   Author = {BROWN, JM and THOMAS, JF and COFER, GP and JOHNSON,
             GA},
   Title = {MAGNETIC-RESONANCE MICROSCOPY OF STEM TISSUES OF PELARGONIUM
             HORTORUM},
   Journal = {Botanical Gazette},
   Volume = {149},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {253-259},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0006-8071},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1988Q941300001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1086/337713},
   Key = {Brown88}
}

@booklet{Arnder94,
   Author = {L. Arnder and X. H. Zhou and G. P. Cofer and L. W. Hedlund and G. A. Johnson},
   Title = {Magnetic-resonance microscopy of the rat carotid-artery at
             300-megahertz},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {822 -- 826},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {Arnder94}
}

@booklet{Hedlund86a,
   Author = {L. W. Hedlund and G. A. Johnson and G. I.
             Mills},
   Title = {Magnetic-resonance microscopy of the rat thorax and
             abdomen},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {843 -- 846},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {Hedlund86a}
}

@article{fds325757,
   Author = {SPAINE, P and MACFALL, JS and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {MAGNETIC-RESONANCE MICROSCOPY OF WATER-MOVEMENT THROUGH
             FUSIFORM RUST GALLS OF PINE},
   Journal = {RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS OF CHEMICAL SCIENCES IN
             FORESTRY},
   Volume = {104},
   Pages = {11-16},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds325757}
}

@booklet{Drayer86a,
   Author = {DRAYER, B and BURGER, P and DARWIN, R and RIEDERER, S and HERFKENS, R and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING OF BRAIN IRON},
   Journal = {American Journal of Neuroradiology},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {373-380},
   Year = {1986},
   ISSN = {0195-6108},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1986C133300001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Drayer86a}
}

@booklet{Veres93,
   Author = {VERES, JS and COFER, GP and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING OF LEAVES},
   Journal = {New Phytologist},
   Volume = {123},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {769-774},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0028-646X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1993LE53500015&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1469-8137.1993.tb03788.x},
   Key = {Veres93}
}

@booklet{Brown87a,
   Author = {BROWN, JM and KRAMER, PJ and COFER, GP and JOHNSON,
             GA},
   Title = {MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING OF ROOT-WATER
             DISTRIBUTION},
   Journal = {HortScience : a publication of the American Society for
             Horticultural Science},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1087-1087},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0018-5345},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1987K430400370&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Brown87a}
}

@booklet{Hedlund86b,
   Author = {HEDLUND, L and JOHNSON, GA},
   Title = {MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING OF THE RAT THORAX AND
             ABDOMEN},
   Journal = {Investigative Radiology},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {S14-S14},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0020-9996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1986E000900063&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004424-198609000-00071},
   Key = {Hedlund86b}
}

@article{fds174254,
   Author = {RD Geisert and JW Ross, MD Ashworth and FJ White and GA Johnson and U
             DeSilva},
   Title = {Maternal recognition of pregnancy signal or endocrine
             disruptor: the two faces of oestrogen during establishment
             of pregnancy in the pig.},
   Journal = {Society of Reproduction and Fertility supplement},
   Volume = {62},
   Pages = {131-45},
   Year = {2006},
   Keywords = {Animals • Endocrine Disruptors • Endometrium
             • Estrogens • Female • Pregnancy •
             Pregnancy Maintenance • Pregnancy, Animal •
             Receptors, Progesterone • Swine • metabolism
             • metabolism* • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Timing of conceptus growth and attachment to the uterine
             luminal epithelium is regulated by progesterone secretion
             from the corpus luteum and by expression of progesterone
             receptor in the uterine epithelia and stroma. Conceptus
             growth and uterine attachment are temporally associated with
             the disappearance of progesterone receptors from uterine
             epithelia. While the loss of progesterone receptor from the
             endometrial epithelia on day 10 of the oestrous cycle and
             pregnancy has been well documented, the factors involved
             with cell specific down-regulation of progesterone receptor
             are yet to be established. We propose that several
             progesterone stimulated factors activate nuclear factor
             kappa B (NF-kB) within the uterine epithelia, which leads to
             inhibition of progesterone receptor and concomitant
             stimulation of endometrial genes expressed during early
             conceptus development. Although oestrogens secreted by pig
             conceptuses function to establish pregnancy, timing of
             endometrial exposure to oestrogen is critical. Early
             oestrogen administration alters the pattern of gene
             expression through the NF-kB system desynchronising the
             uterine environment for conceptus implantation resulting in
             later embryonic loss.},
   Language = {eng},
   Key = {fds174254}
}

@article{fds174131,
   Author = {SL Woo and GA Johnson and BA Smith},
   Title = {Mathematical modeling of ligaments and tendons.},
   Journal = {Journal of biomechanical engineering},
   Volume = {115},
   Number = {4B},
   Pages = {468-73},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0148-0731},
   Keywords = {Animals • Biomechanics • Elasticity •
             Ligaments • Models, Biological* • Models,
             Structural • Reference Values • Stress,
             Physiological • Tendons • Viscosity •
             physiology* • physiopathology},
   Abstract = {Ligaments and tendons serve a variety of important functions
             in maintaining the structure of the human body. Although
             abundant literature exists describing experimental
             investigations of these tissues, mathematical m