Publications of Dewey T. Lawson    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Papers Published   
@article{fds246821,
   Author = {Buss, E and Pillsbury, HC and Buchman, CA and Pillsbury, CH and Clark,
             MS and Haynes, DS and Labadie, RF and Amberg, S and Roland, PS and Kruger,
             P and Novak, MA and Wirth, JA and Black, JM and Peters, R and Lake, J and Wackym, PA and Firszt, JB and Wilson, BS and Lawson, DT and Schatzer, R and D'Haese, PSC and Barco, AL},
   Title = {Multicenter U.S. bilateral MED-EL cochlear implantation
             study: speech perception over the first year of
             use.},
   Journal = {Ear and Hearing},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {20-32},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0196-0202},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/aud.0b013e31815d7467},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: Binaural hearing has been shown to support better
             speech perception in normal-hearing listeners than can be
             achieved with monaural stimulus presentation, particularly
             under noisy listening conditions. The purpose of this study
             was to evaluate whether bilateral electrical stimulation
             could confer similar benefits for cochlear implant
             listeners. DESIGN: A total of 26 postlingually deafened
             adult patients with short duration of deafness were
             implanted at five centers and followed up for 1 yr. Subjects
             received MED-EL COMBI 40+ devices bilaterally; in all but
             one case, implantation was performed in a single-stage
             surgery. Speech perception testing included CNC words in
             quiet and CUNY sentences in noise. Target speech was
             presented at the midline (0 degrees), and masking noise,
             when present, was presented at one of three simulated source
             locations along the azimuth (-90, 0, and +90 degrees).
             RESULTS: Benefits of bilateral electrical stimulation were
             observed under conditions in which the speech and masker
             were spatially coincident and conditions in which they were
             spatially separated. Both the "head shadow" and "summation"
             effects were evident from the outset. Benefits consistent
             with "binaural squelch" were not reliably observed until 1
             yr after implantation. CONCLUSIONS: These results support a
             growing consensus that bilateral implantation provides
             functional benefits beyond those of unilateral implantation.
             Longitudinal data suggest that some aspects of binaural
             processing continue to develop up to 1 yr after
             implantation. The squelch effect, often reported as absent
             or rare in previous studies of bilateral cochlear
             implantation, was present for most subjects at the 1 yr
             measurement interval.},
   Doi = {10.1097/aud.0b013e31815d7467},
   Key = {fds246821}
}

@article{fds246824,
   Author = {Wilson, BS and Schatzer, R and Lopez-Poveda, EA and Sun, X and Lawson,
             DT and Wolford, RD},
   Title = {Two new directions in speech processor design for cochlear
             implants},
   Journal = {Ear and Hearing},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {73S-81S},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0196-0202},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16082269},
   Keywords = {Acoustic Stimulation • Auditory Perception •
             Cochlea • Cochlear Implants* • Hearing Loss •
             Humans • Models, Theoretical • Prosthesis Design
             • Prosthesis Fitting • instrumentation* •
             physiology • rehabilitation*},
   Abstract = {Two new approaches to the design of speech processors for
             cochlear implants are described. The first aims to represent
             "fine structure" or "fine frequency" information in a way
             that it can be perceived and used by patients, and the
             second aims to provide a closer mimicking than was
             previously possible of the signal processing that occurs in
             the normal cochlea.},
   Doi = {10.1097/00003446-200508001-00009},
   Key = {fds246824}
}

@booklet{Wilson03,
   Author = {Wilson, BS and Lawson, DT and Muller, JM and Tyler, RS and Kiefer,
             J},
   Title = {Cochlear implants: some likely next steps.},
   Journal = {Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering},
   Volume = {5},
   Pages = {207-249},
   Year = {2003},
   ISSN = {1523-9829},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12704085},
   Abstract = {The history of cochlear implants is marked by large
             improvements in performance, especially over the past two
             decades and especially due to the development of ever-better
             processing strategies. Although the progress to date has
             been substantial, present devices still do not restore
             normal speech reception, even for top performers and
             particularly for listening to speech in competition with
             noise or other talkers. In addition, a wide range of
             outcomes persists, with some patients receiving little
             benefit using the same devices that support high levels of
             speech reception for others. The purpose of this review is
             to describe some likely possibilities for further
             improvement, including (a) combined electric and acoustic
             stimulation of the auditory system for patients with
             significant residual hearing, (b) use of bilateral implants,
             (c) a closer replication with implants of the processing
             steps in the normal cochlea, and (d) applications of
             knowledge about factors that are correlated with outcomes to
             help patients presently at the low end of the performance
             scale.},
   Doi = {10.1146/annurev.bioeng.5.040202.121645},
   Key = {Wilson03}
}

@article{fds98968,
   Author = {BS Wilson and DT Lawson and JM Muller and RS Tyler and J
             Kiefer},
   Title = {Cochlear implants: some likely next steps.},
   Journal = {Annual review of biomedical engineering, United
             States},
   Volume = {5},
   Pages = {207-49},
   Year = {2003},
   ISSN = {1523-9829},
   Keywords = {Acoustic Stimulation • Biomimetics • Cochlear
             Implants • Electric Stimulation Therapy •
             Equipment Failure Analysis • Hearing Loss • Humans
             • Prosthesis Design • Signal Processing,
             Computer-Assisted* • Speech Intelligibility •
             Speech Perception • Treatment Outcome •
             classification* • instrumentation • methods •
             methods* • rehabilitation* • trends •
             trends*},
   Abstract = {The history of cochlear implants is marked by large
             improvements in performance, especially over the past two
             decades and especially due to the development of ever-better
             processing strategies. Although the progress to date has
             been substantial, present devices still do not restore
             normal speech reception, even for top performers and
             particularly for listening to speech in competition with
             noise or other talkers. In addition, a wide range of
             outcomes persists, with some patients receiving little
             benefit using the same devices that support high levels of
             speech reception for others. The purpose of this review is
             to describe some likely possibilities for further
             improvement, including (a) combined electric and acoustic
             stimulation of the auditory system for patients with
             significant residual hearing, (b) use of bilateral implants,
             (c) a closer replication with implants of the processing
             steps in the normal cochlea, and (d) applications of
             knowledge about factors that are correlated with outcomes to
             help patients presently at the low end of the performance
             scale.},
   Key = {fds98968}
}

@article{fds98955,
   Title = {Lawson, J.H., and Anderson, R.W., Rypin Intensive Reviews:
             Surgery. Clinical Sciences Review, 18th edition, Lippincott
             - Raven, 2000},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds98955}
}

@article{fds98956,
   Title = {Lawson, J.H.: The Hematologic System. The Handbook of
             Surgical Intensive Care, 5th Edition, Clary, B. and Milano,
             C eds. W. B. Saunders, 2000.},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds98956}
}

@article{fds98960,
   Title = {Mercer, M.C., and Lawson, J.H.: Fibrin Sealants: An
             Innovative Approach to Achieving Hemostasis and Tissue
             Sealing in the Surgical Patient. Independent Study Guide. A
             Continuing Education Activity Sponsored by Education Design.
             2000.},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds98960}
}

@article{fds98961,
   Title = {Schoenecker, J.G., Hauck, R.K., Mercer, M.C., Parker, W.,
             Lawson, J.H. Exposure of Topical Bovine Thrombin During
             Surgery Elicits a Response Against the Xenogeneic
             Carbohydrate Galactosea1-3 Galactose, Journal of Clinical
             Immunology, 20(6)m 434-444, 2000.},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds98961}
}

@article{fds98962,
   Title = {Rusconi, P., Yeh, A., Lyerly, H.K., Lawson, J.H., and
             Sullenger B.: Blocking the Initiation of Coagulation by RNA
             Aptamars to Factor VIIa. Thrombosis and Heamostasis,
             84(5):841-848, 2000.},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds98962}
}

@article{fds98963,
   Title = {Lawson, J.H., Cintron, J., Grossman, P.H., Katkhouda, N.,
             Levitsky, S., Superina, R.A., Emerging Technologies in
             Surgical Wound Management. Surgical Rounds, pp 2-11,
             2000},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds98963}
}

@article{fds98964,
   Title = {Paulson, E.K., Neal, M.C, Stephenson, R.G., and Lawson,
             J.H.: Use of Fibrin Sealant as a Hemostatic Agent after
             Liver Biopsy in Swine. Journal of Vascular Interventional
             Radiology, V11, No.7, 905-911, 2000.},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds98964}
}

@article{fds98953,
   Title = {Stephenson, G.R., Lawson, J.H., and Brody, F.: Laparoscopic
             Exposure of the Lumbosacral Spine for Discectomy and Fusion.
             Atlas of Laparoscopic Surgery, 2nd Edition, Pappas, T.N.,
             Chekan, E.G., and Eubanks, S., eds. Appleton & Lange, 23,
             23.2-23.6, 1999.},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds98953}
}

@article{fds98954,
   Title = {Jaggers, J., Smith, P.K., Ungerleider, R., Neal, M., and
             Lawson, J.H. Infant Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Procoagulant
             State. The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 68(2): 513-20,
             1999.},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds98954}
}

@article{fds98958,
   Title = {Lau, C.L., Posther, K., Stephenson, G.R., Lodge, A., Lawson,
             J.H., Darling, E.M., Davis, R.D. Jr., Ungerleider, R.M.,
             Jaggers, J. Mini-Circuit Cardiopulmonary Bypass With Vacuum
             Assisted Venous Drainage: Feasibility of an Asanguineous
             Prime in In the Neonate. Perfusion, 14, 389-396,
             1999.},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds98958}
}

@article{fds98959,
   Title = {Lawson, J.H., and Platt, J.L.: Xenotransplantation:
             Prospects for Clinical Application. Dialysis and
             Transplantation. Owen, W. and Periera, B., Eds. W.B.
             Saunders Co., pp 653-660, 1999. Thal, E.R., Cintron, J.R.,
             Kockerling, F., Lange, V.A., Lawson, J.H., Marczell, A.P.,
             Waclawiczek, H.W. The Future of Surgical Wound Care for the
             Next Millennium. Surgical Rounds, (Supplement) pp 2-7,
             1999.},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds98959}
}

@article{fds98969,
   Author = {DT Lawson and BS Wilson and M Zerbi and C van den Honert and CC Finley and JC Farmer and JT McElveen and PA Roush},
   Title = {Bilateral cochlear implants controlled by a single speech
             processor.},
   Journal = {The American journal of otology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {758-61},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0192-9763},
   Keywords = {Adult • Cochlear Implants* • Communication Aids
             for Disabled* • Deafness • Encephalitis •
             Humans • Listeria Infections • Loudness Perception
             • Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted* • Sound
             Localization • Speech Perception* • Treatment
             Outcome • complications • microbiology •
             physiopathology* • surgery*},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess, in one profoundly
             hearing impaired subject, potential benefits and limitations
             in placing bilaterally implanted scala tympani electrode
             arrays under control of a single speech processor. STUDY
             DESIGN: All available stimulation sites in both ears were
             compared in studies of pitch discrimination and pitch
             ranking, identifying three bilateral pairs capable of
             supporting interaural comparisons with no perceptible
             difference in pitch. Using those pairs, the subject's
             ability to lateralize sound was studied as a function of
             interaural time delay and interaural amplitude difference.
             Consonant identification scores were obtained for continuous
             interleaved sampling processors using various unilateral and
             bilateral combinations of electrodes. RESULTS: For
             loudness-matched stimuli composed of 50-msec bursts of
             80-microsec/phase pulses at 480 pulses/sec, the subject was
             able to identify the ear receiving the earlier onset for
             interaural delays at least as brief as 150 microsec for all
             three matched pairs. For similar simultaneous stimuli, the
             subject could identify the ear receiving the louder signal
             for the smallest deviations from loudness-matched amplitudes
             available from the implanted electronics. The consonant
             studies found no evidence that bilateral stimulation per se
             degrades speech processor performance, even for arbitrary
             divisions of information between the two ears. Additional
             contralateral as well as ipsilateral channels were observed
             to improve speech processor performance. CONCLUSIONS: The
             ability of this subject to lateralize sounds on the basis of
             interaural delay or loudness difference, combined with the
             consonant identification results, supports further use of
             coordinated binaural stimulation to improve cochlear implant
             users' ability to understand speech, especially in the
             presence of competing speech noise.},
   Key = {fds98969}
}

@booklet{Wilson98,
   Author = {Wilson, BS and Rebscher, S and Zeng, FG and Shannon, RV and Loeb, GE and Lawson, DT and Zerbi, M},
   Title = {Design for an inexpensive but effective cochlear
             implant.},
   Journal = {Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery},
   Volume = {118},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {235-241},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0194-5998},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9482558},
   Abstract = {Widespread application of cochlear implants is limited by
             cost, especially in developing countries. In this article we
             present a design for a low-cost but effective cochlear
             implant system. The system includes a speech processor, four
             pairs of transmitting and receiving coils, and an electrode
             array with four monopolar electrodes. All implanted
             components are passive, reducing to a minimum the complexity
             of manufacture and allowing high reliability. A four-channel
             continuous interleaved sampling strategy is used for the
             speech processor. The processor and transmission link have
             been evaluated in tests with a subject previously implanted
             with the Ineraid electrode array and percutaneous connector.
             A prototype of the link, consisting of four pairs of
             transmitting and external receiving coils, was used, with
             the outputs of the receiving coils directed to four
             intracochlear electrodes through the percutaneous connector.
             The subject achieved speech reception scores with the
             prototype system that were equivalent to those achieved with
             a standard laboratory implementation of a continuous
             interleaved sampling processor with current-controlled
             stimuli.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0194-5998(98)80022-3},
   Key = {Wilson98}
}

@article{fds98975,
   Author = {BS Wilson and S Rebscher and FG Zeng and RV Shannon and GE Loeb and DT
             Lawson, M Zerbi},
   Title = {Design for an inexpensive but effective cochlear
             implant.},
   Journal = {Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of
             American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery,
             UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {118},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {235-41},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0194-5998},
   Keywords = {Cochlear Implantation • Deafness • Equipment
             Design • Female • Humans • Male •
             Phonetics • Speech Discrimination Tests • Speech
             Perception* • Speech Reception Threshold Test •
             instrumentation* • rehabilitation*},
   Abstract = {Widespread application of cochlear implants is limited by
             cost, especially in developing countries. In this article we
             present a design for a low-cost but effective cochlear
             implant system. The system includes a speech processor, four
             pairs of transmitting and receiving coils, and an electrode
             array with four monopolar electrodes. All implanted
             components are passive, reducing to a minimum the complexity
             of manufacture and allowing high reliability. A four-channel
             continuous interleaved sampling strategy is used for the
             speech processor. The processor and transmission link have
             been evaluated in tests with a subject previously implanted
             with the Ineraid electrode array and percutaneous connector.
             A prototype of the link, consisting of four pairs of
             transmitting and external receiving coils, was used, with
             the outputs of the receiving coils directed to four
             intracochlear electrodes through the percutaneous connector.
             The subject achieved speech reception scores with the
             prototype system that were equivalent to those achieved with
             a standard laboratory implementation of a continuous
             interleaved sampling processor with current-controlled
             stimuli.},
   Key = {fds98975}
}

@article{fds98952,
   Title = {Kalady, M.F., Lawson, J.H., Sorrell, R.D. and Platt, J.L.
             Decreased Fibrinolytic Activity in Porcine-to-Primate
             Cardiac Xenotransplantation. Molecular Medicine, 4, 629-637,
             1998.},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds98952}
}

@article{fds98957,
   Title = {Lin, S.S., Weidner, B.C., Byrne, G.W., Diamond, L.E.,
             Lawson, J.H., Hoopes, C.W., Daniels, L.J., Daggett, C.W.,
             Parker, W., Harland, R.C., Davis, R.D., Bollinger, R.R.,
             Logan J.S., Platt, J.L.: The Role of Antibodies in Acute
             Vascular Rejection of Pig-to-Baboon Cardiac Transplants.
             Journal of Clinical Investigation 101, 1745-1756,
             1998.},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds98957}
}

@booklet{Lawson98,
   Author = {Lawson, DT and Wilson, BS and Zerbi, M and Honert, CVD and Finley, CC and Jr, JCF and Jr, JTM and Roush, PA},
   Title = {Bilateral cochlear implants controlled by a single speech
             processor},
   Journal = {The American journal of otology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {758-761},
   Year = {1998},
   ISSN = {0192-9763},
   Abstract = {Objective: This study aimed to assess, in one profoundly
             hearing impaired subject, potential benefits and limitations
             in placing bilaterally implanted scala tympani electrode
             arrays under control of a single speech processor. Study
             Design: All available stimulation sites in both ears were
             compared in studies of pitch discrimination and pitch
             ranking, identifying three bilateral pairs capable of
             supporting interaural comparisons with no perceptible
             difference in pitch. Using those pairs, the subject's
             ability to lateralize sound was studied as a function of
             interaural time delay and interaural amplitude difference.
             Consonant identification scores were obtained for continuous
             interleaved sampling processors using various unilateral and
             bilateral combinations of electrodes. Results: For loudness-
             matched stimuli composed of 50-msec bursts of 80-μsec/phase
             pulses at 480 pulses/sec, the subject was able to identify
             the ear receiving the earlier onset for interaural delays at
             least as brief as 150 μsec for all three matched pairs. For
             similar simultaneous stimuli, the subject could identify the
             ear receiving the louder signal for the smallest deviations
             from loudness-matched amplitudes available from the
             implanted electronics. The consonant studies found no
             evidence that bilateral stimulation per se degrades speech
             processor performance, even for arbitrary divisions of
             information between the two ears. Additional contralateral
             as well as ipsilateral channels were observed to improve
             speech processor performance. Conclusions: The ability of
             this subject to lateralize sounds on the basis of interaural
             delay or loudness difference, combined with the consonant
             identification results, supports further use of coordinated
             binaural stimulation to improve cochlear implant users'
             ability to understand speech, especially in the presence of
             competing speech noise.},
   Key = {Lawson98}
}

@booklet{Wilson97,
   Author = {Wilson, BS and Finley, CC and Lawson, DT and Zerbi,
             M},
   Title = {Temporal representations with cochlear implants},
   Journal = {The American journal of otology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {S30-S34},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0192-9763},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1997YF21600015&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Objective: To record and characterize intracochlear evoked
             potentials (EPs) for a variety of electrical stimuli in
             studies with cochlear implant patients. Methods: Recordings
             were made with patients having direct percutaneous access to
             their implanted electrodes. Intracochlear voltages were
             recorded via unstimulated electrodes. The stimuli included
             trains of identical pulses, with pulse rates ranging from
             100 to 4065/s, and a modulated pulse train produced by a
             single-channel speech processor, with the pulse rate of
             824/s. Results: Magnitudes of EPs for each pulse in trains
             of identical pulses were uniform for pulse rates below about
             200/s. For rates between about 400 and 1000/s, an
             alternating pattern of EP magnitudes was observed, with
             relatively large EPs following the odd-numbered pulses. For
             rates between about 1000 and 3000/s, more complex patterns
             were observed. After the first millisecond of each train at
             even higher rates, uniform EPs again were observed across
             pulses, although the absolute magnitude of the EPs was much
             lower than that observed for low rates of stimulation. The
             approximate rates corresponding to boundaries between these
             different regions varied among subjects and among electrodes
             within subjects. EP magnitudes for the modulated pulse train
             reflected the gross periodicity of the modulation waveform
             but did not reflect temporal details within the periods.
             Conclusions: Population responses of the human auditory
             nerve, as indicated by EP magnitudes, reflect the amplitudes
             of electrical pulses for pulse rates below about 200/s and
             above about 3000/s. Use of intermediate rates may introduce
             distortions in the transmission of stimulus information with
             cochlear implants.},
   Key = {Wilson97}
}

@article{fds246822,
   Author = {Wilson, BS and Finley, CC and Lawson, DT and Zerbi,
             M},
   Title = {Temporal representations with cochlear implants.},
   Journal = {The American journal of otology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {6 Suppl},
   Pages = {S30-S34},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0192-9763},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9391587},
   Keywords = {Cochlear Implantation* • Deafness • Electric
             Stimulation • Evoked Potentials, Auditory • Humans
             • Time Factors • Vestibulocochlear Nerve •
             surgery},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To record and characterize intracochlear evoked
             potentials (EPs) for a variety of electrical stimuli in
             studies with cochlear implant patients. METHODS: Recordings
             were made with patients having direct percutaneous access to
             their implanted electrodes. Intracochlear voltages were
             recorded via unstimulated electrodes. The stimuli included
             trains of identical pulses, with pulse rates ranging from
             100 to 4065/s, and a modulated pulse train produced by a
             single-channel speech processor, with the pulse rate of
             824/s. RESULTS: Magnitudes of EPs for each pulse in trains
             of identical pulses were uniform for pulse rates below about
             200/s. For rates between about 400 and 1000/s, an
             alternating pattern of EP magnitudes was observed, with
             relatively large EPs following the odd-numbered pulses. For
             rates between about 1000 and 3000/s, more complex patterns
             were observed. After the first millisecond of each train at
             even higher rates, uniform EPs again were observed across
             pulses, although the absolute magnitude of the EPs was much
             lower than that observed for low rates of stimulation. The
             approximate rates corresponding to boundaries between these
             different regions varied among subjects and among electrodes
             within subjects. EP magnitudes for the modulated pulse train
             reflected the gross periodicity of the modulation waveform
             but did not reflect temporal details within the periods.
             CONCLUSIONS: Population responses of the human auditory
             nerve, as indicated by EP magnitudes, reflect the amplitudes
             of electrical pulses for pulse rates below about 200/s and
             above about 3000/s. Use of intermediate rates may introduce
             distortions in the transmission of stimulus information with
             cochlear implants.},
   Key = {fds246822}
}

@booklet{Lawson97,
   Author = {Lawson, DT and Wilson, BS and Finley, CC and Zerbi, M and Cartee, LA and Roush, PA and Farmer, JC and Tucci, DL},
   Title = {Cochlear implant studies at Research Triangle Institute and
             Duke University Medical Center.},
   Journal = {Scandinavian Audiology, Supplement},
   Volume = {46},
   Pages = {50-64},
   Year = {1997},
   ISSN = {0107-8593},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9309839},
   Abstract = {Examples from several areas of cochlear implant research are
             presented, with emphasis on the continuous interleaved
             sampling (CIS) approach to speech processor design.
             Within-subject comparisons of such processors with the
             compressed analog (CA) approach of the clinical Ineraid
             device are reviewed, and ongoing similar comparisons with
             the clinical Nucleus spectral peak (SPEAK) strategy are
             outlined. Correlations between chronic performance levels
             with clinical CA processors and initial performance levels
             with CIS, data on further improvements in performance with
             chronic use of CIS, and instances of substantial benefit
             from custom fitting of CIS parameters are presented as
             examples of findings with immediate clinical implications.
             New studies are described, involving the measurement of
             intracochlear evoked potentials in response to cochlear
             implant stimulation, and the integration of such work with
             computer modeling studies.},
   Key = {Lawson97}
}

@article{fds98967,
   Author = {DT Lawson and BS Wilson and CC Finley and M Zerbi and LA Cartee and PA
             Roush, JC Farmer and DL Tucci},
   Title = {Cochlear implant studies at Research Triangle Institute and
             Duke University Medical Center.},
   Journal = {Scandinavian audiology. Supplementum, DENMARK},
   Volume = {46},
   Pages = {50-64},
   Year = {1997},
   ISSN = {0107-8593},
   Keywords = {Cochlear Implants* • Deafness • Equipment Design
             • Evoked Potentials • Female • Humans •
             Male • rehabilitation*},
   Abstract = {Examples from several areas of cochlear implant research are
             presented, with emphasis on the continuous interleaved
             sampling (CIS) approach to speech processor design.
             Within-subject comparisons of such processors with the
             compressed analog (CA) approach of the clinical Ineraid
             device are reviewed, and ongoing similar comparisons with
             the clinical Nucleus spectral peak (SPEAK) strategy are
             outlined. Correlations between chronic performance levels
             with clinical CA processors and initial performance levels
             with CIS, data on further improvements in performance with
             chronic use of CIS, and instances of substantial benefit
             from custom fitting of CIS parameters are presented as
             examples of findings with immediate clinical implications.
             New studies are described, involving the measurement of
             intracochlear evoked potentials in response to cochlear
             implant stimulation, and the integration of such work with
             computer modeling studies.},
   Key = {fds98967}
}

@booklet{Wilson95,
   Author = {Wilson, BS and Lawson, DT and Zerbi, M and Finley, CC and Wolford,
             RD},
   Title = {New processing strategies in cochlear implantation.},
   Journal = {The American journal of otology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {669-675},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0192-9763},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8588675},
   Abstract = {New strategies for representing acoustic information with
             multichannel cochlear implants have produced substantial
             improvements in speech recognition for implant users. This
             report reviews within-subject comparison of a new continuous
             interleaved sampling (CIS) strategy with a compressed analog
             (CA) strategy used in a standard clinical device. In
             general, the comparison show higher levels of open-set
             speech recognition with CIS for each of the 11 subjects
             studied. Data on the importance of the patients variable in
             determining outcomes with cochlear implants are presented. A
             brief description of another new strategy, the spectral
             maxima sound processor (SMSP) strategy is given as well as
             information on the availability of CIS in various implant
             systems.},
   Key = {Wilson95}
}

@article{fds98976,
   Author = {BS Wilson and DT Lawson and M Zerbi and CC Finley and RD
             Wolford},
   Title = {New processing strategies in cochlear implantation.},
   Journal = {The American journal of otology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {669-75},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0192-9763},
   Keywords = {Cochlear Implants* • Equipment Design • Humans
             • Phonetics • Speech Acoustics* • Speech
             Perception* • standards • trends},
   Abstract = {New strategies for representing acoustic information with
             multichannel cochlear implants have produced substantial
             improvements in speech recognition for implant users. This
             report reviews within-subject comparison of a new continuous
             interleaved sampling (CIS) strategy with a compressed analog
             (CA) strategy used in a standard clinical device. In
             general, the comparison show higher levels of open-set
             speech recognition with CIS for each of the 11 subjects
             studied. Data on the importance of the patients variable in
             determining outcomes with cochlear implants are presented. A
             brief description of another new strategy, the spectral
             maxima sound processor (SMSP) strategy is given as well as
             information on the availability of CIS in various implant
             systems.},
   Key = {fds98976}
}

@article{fds246823,
   Author = {Wilson, BS and Lawson, DT and Finley, CC and Wolford,
             RD},
   Title = {Importance of patient and processor variables in determining
             outcomes with cochlear implants.},
   Journal = {Journal of Speech and Hearing Research},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {373-379},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0022-4685},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8487529},
   Keywords = {Acoustic Stimulation • Auditory Pathways • Cochlea
             • Cochlear Diseases • Cochlear Implants* •
             Equipment Design • Female • Humans • Loudness
             Perception • Male • Speech Perception* •
             physiopathology* • rehabilitation},
   Abstract = {Within-subjects comparisons of processing strategies for
             cochlear implants are reviewed. Compressed analog strategies
             were compared to interleaved pulses strategies in tests with
             one group of 8 subjects, and to continuous interleaved
             sampling strategies in tests with another group of 11
             subjects. The tests included open-set recognition of words
             and sentences. The results show that, while different
             strategies may produce quite different outcomes across
             subjects, individual performances with one processing
             strategy are significantly correlated with those of
             alternative strategies. These findings emphasize the
             importance of patient variables in determining outcomes
             across a variety of prosthesis designs.},
   Key = {fds246823}
}

@booklet{Wilson93,
   Author = {WILSON, BS and FINLEY, CC and LAWSON, DT and WOLFORD, RD and ZERBI,
             M},
   Title = {DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF A CONTINUOUS INTERLEAVED SAMPLING
             (CIS) PROCESSING STRATEGY FOR MULTICHANNEL COCHLEAR
             IMPLANTS},
   Journal = {Bulletin of Prosthetics Research},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {110-116},
   Year = {1993},
   ISSN = {0007-506X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1993MD71800010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Wilson93}
}

@booklet{Lawson93,
   Author = {Lawson, DT and Wilson, BS and Finley, CC},
   Title = {New processing strategies for multichannel cochlear
             prostheses.},
   Journal = {Progress in Brain Research},
   Volume = {97},
   Pages = {313-321},
   Year = {1993},
   ISSN = {0079-6123},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8234758},
   Abstract = {Various strategies for representing speech information with
             multichannel cochlear prostheses were compared in tests with
             implant patients. The strategies included the compressed
             analog (CA) approach of a standard clinical device, and
             alternative interleaved pulses (IP) and continuous
             interleaved sampling (CIS) strategies. CA and IP strategies
             had been compared in previous studies with a wide range of
             subjects. The present studies compared all three types in
             tests with one subject and CA and CIS strategies in tests
             with six additional subjects. Subjects for the present
             studies were selected for their excellent performance with
             the clinical CA processor, and the tests included closed-set
             identification of consonants and open-set recognition of
             words and sentences. For every test, every subject obtained
             his or her highest score, or repeated a score of 100%
             correct, using a CIS strategy. In the comparisons of all
             three approaches, IP processor scores were between those
             obtained with CA and CIS processors. The results are
             discussed in terms of their implications for processor
             design.},
   Key = {Lawson93}
}

@article{fds98965,
   Author = {DT Lawson and BS Wilson and CC Finley},
   Title = {New processing strategies for multichannel cochlear
             prostheses.},
   Journal = {Progress in brain research, NETHERLANDS},
   Volume = {97},
   Pages = {313-21},
   Year = {1993},
   ISSN = {0079-6123},
   Keywords = {Cochlear Implants* • Hearing • Humans •
             Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted* • Speech
             Perception • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Various strategies for representing speech information with
             multichannel cochlear prostheses were compared in tests with
             implant patients. The strategies included the compressed
             analog (CA) approach of a standard clinical device, and
             alternative interleaved pulses (IP) and continuous
             interleaved sampling (CIS) strategies. CA and IP strategies
             had been compared in previous studies with a wide range of
             subjects. The present studies compared all three types in
             tests with one subject and CA and CIS strategies in tests
             with six additional subjects. Subjects for the present
             studies were selected for their excellent performance with
             the clinical CA processor, and the tests included closed-set
             identification of consonants and open-set recognition of
             words and sentences. For every test, every subject obtained
             his or her highest score, or repeated a score of 100%
             correct, using a CIS strategy. In the comparisons of all
             three approaches, IP processor scores were between those
             obtained with CA and CIS processors. The results are
             discussed in terms of their implications for processor
             design.},
   Key = {fds98965}
}

@article{fds98970,
   Author = {BS Wilson and CC Finley and DT Lawson and RD Wolford and M
             Zerbi},
   Title = {Design and evaluation of a continuous interleaved sampling
             (CIS) processing strategy for multichannel cochlear
             implants.},
   Journal = {Journal of rehabilitation research and development, UNITED
             STATES},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {110-6},
   Year = {1993},
   ISSN = {0748-7711},
   Keywords = {Acoustic Stimulation • Auditory Threshold •
             Cochlear Implants* • Humans • Learning •
             Practice (Psychology) • Prosthesis Design • Signal
             Processing, Computer-Assisted* • Speech Perception
             • methods*},
   Abstract = {Two approaches for representing speech information with
             multichannel cochlear prostheses are being compared in tests
             with implant patients. Included in these studies are the
             compressed analog (CA) approach of a standard clinical
             device and research processors utilizing continuous
             interleaved sampling (CIS). Initial studies have been
             completed with nine subjects, seven of whom were selected on
             the basis of excellent performance with the Ineraid clinical
             processor, and the remaining two for their relatively poor
             performance with the same device. The tests include open-set
             recognition of words and sentences. Every subject has
             obtained a higher score--or repeated a score of 100%
             correct--on every test when using a CIS processor. These
             results are discussed in terms of their implications for
             processor design.},
   Key = {fds98970}
}

@booklet{Wilson91,
   Author = {Wilson, BS and Finley, CC and Lawson, DT and Wolford, RD and Eddington,
             DK and Rabinowitz, WM},
   Title = {Better speech recognition with cochlear implants.},
   Journal = {Nature},
   Volume = {352},
   Number = {6332},
   Pages = {236-238},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0028-0836},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1857418},
   Abstract = {HIGH levels of speech recognition have been achieved with a
             new sound processing strategy for multielectrode cochlear
             implants. A cochlear implant system consists of one or more
             implanted electrodes for direct electrical activation of the
             auditory nerve, an external speech processor that transforms
             a microphone input into stimuli for each electrode, and a
             transcutaneous (rf-link) or percutaneous (direct) connection
             between the processor and the electrodes. We report here the
             comparison of the new strategy and a standard clinical
             processor. The standard compressed analogue (CA) processor
             presented analogue waveforms simultaneously to all
             electrodes, whereas the new continuous interleaved sampling
             (CIS) strategy presented brief pulses to each electrode in a
             nonoverlapping sequence. Seven experienced implant users,
             selected for their excellent performance with the CA
             processor, participated as subjects. The new strategy
             produced large improvements in the scores of speech
             reception tests for all subjects. These results have
             important implications for the treatment of deafness and for
             minimal representations of speech at the auditory
             periphery.},
   Doi = {10.1038/352236a0},
   Key = {Wilson91}
}

@article{fds98966,
   Author = {BS Wilson and CC Finley and DT Lawson and RD Wolford and DK Eddington and WM Rabinowitz},
   Title = {Better speech recognition with cochlear implants.},
   Journal = {Nature, ENGLAND},
   Volume = {352},
   Number = {6332},
   Pages = {236-8},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0028-0836},
   Keywords = {Cochlear Implants* • Hearing Tests • Humans •
             Prosthesis Design • Speech Intelligibility*},
   Abstract = {HIGH levels of speech recognition have been achieved with a
             new sound processing strategy for multielectrode cochlear
             implants. A cochlear implant system consists of one or more
             implanted electrodes for direct electrical activation of the
             auditory nerve, an external speech processor that transforms
             a microphone input into stimuli for each electrode, and a
             transcutaneous (rf-link) or percutaneous (direct) connection
             between the processor and the electrodes. We report here the
             comparison of the new strategy and a standard clinical
             processor. The standard compressed analogue (CA) processor
             presented analogue waveforms simultaneously to all
             electrodes, whereas the new continuous interleaved sampling
             (CIS) strategy presented brief pulses to each electrode in a
             nonoverlapping sequence. Seven experienced implant users,
             selected for their excellent performance with the CA
             processor, participated as subjects. The new strategy
             produced large improvements in the scores of speech
             reception tests for all subjects. These results have
             important implications for the treatment of deafness and for
             minimal representations of speech at the auditory
             periphery.},
   Key = {fds98966}
}

@booklet{Wilson91a,
   Author = {WILSON, BS and LAWSON, DT and FINLEY, CC and WOLFORD,
             RD},
   Title = {CODING STRATEGIES FOR MULTICHANNEL COCHLEAR
             PROSTHESES},
   Journal = {The American journal of otology},
   Volume = {12},
   Pages = {56-61},
   Year = {1991},
   ISSN = {0192-9763},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1991FL41600014&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Wilson91a}
}

@article{fds98972,
   Author = {BS Wilson and DT Lawson and CC Finley and RD Wolford},
   Title = {Coding strategies for multichannel cochlear
             prostheses.},
   Journal = {The American journal of otology, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {12 Suppl},
   Pages = {56-61},
   Year = {1991},
   ISSN = {0192-9763},
   Keywords = {Adult • Child • Cochlear Implants* • Humans
             • Speech Discrimination Tests},
   Abstract = {Comparisons of analog and pulsatile coding strategies for
             multichannel cochlear prostheses are reviewed. The results
             are related to design considerations for pediatric implants,
             including efficacy, safety, ease of fitting, and access to
             future improvements.},
   Key = {fds98972}
}

@booklet{Wilson88a,
   Author = {Wilson, BS and Finley, CC and Farmer, JC and Lawson, DT and Weber, BA and Wolford, RD and Kenan, PD and White, MW and Merzenich, MM and Schindler,
             RA},
   Title = {Comparative studies of speech processing strategies for
             cochlear implants.},
   Journal = {The Laryngoscope},
   Volume = {98},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1069-1077},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0023-852X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3172953},
   Abstract = {A wide variety of speech processing strategies for
             multichannel auditory prostheses were compared in studies of
             two patients implanted with the UCSF electrode array. Each
             strategy was evaluated using tests of vowel and consonant
             confusions, with and without lipreading. Included among the
             strategies were the compressed analog processor of the
             present UCSF/Storz prosthesis and a group of interleaved
             pulses processors in which the amplitudes of nonsimultaneous
             pulses code the spectral variations of speech. For these
             patients, each with indications of poor nerve survival, test
             scores were significantly higher with the interleaved pulses
             processors. We believe this superior performance was a
             result of 1. the substantial release from channel
             interactions provided by nonsimultaneous stimuli and 2. a
             fast enough rotation among the channels to support adequate
             temporal and spectral resolution of perceived speech
             sounds.},
   Doi = {10.1288/00005537-198810000-00009},
   Key = {Wilson88a}
}

@article{fds98977,
   Author = {BS Wilson and CC Finley and JC Farmer and DT Lawson and BA Weber and RD
             Wolford, PD Kenan and MW White and MM Merzenich and RA
             Schindler},
   Title = {Comparative studies of speech processing strategies for
             cochlear implants.},
   Journal = {The Laryngoscope, UNITED STATES},
   Volume = {98},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1069-77},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0023-852X},
   Keywords = {Cochlear Implants* • Female • Humans • Male
             • Middle Aged • Prosthesis Design • Speech
             Discrimination Tests},
   Abstract = {A wide variety of speech processing strategies for
             multichannel auditory prostheses were compared in studies of
             two patients implanted with the UCSF electrode array. Each
             strategy was evaluated using tests of vowel and consonant
             confusions, with and without lipreading. Included among the
             strategies were the compressed analog processor of the
             present UCSF/Storz prosthesis and a group of interleaved
             pulses processors in which the amplitudes of nonsimultaneous
             pulses code the spectral variations of speech. For these
             patients, each with indications of poor nerve survival, test
             scores were significantly higher with the interleaved pulses
             processors. We believe this superior performance was a
             result of 1. the substantial release from channel
             interactions provided by nonsimultaneous stimuli and 2. a
             fast enough rotation among the channels to support adequate
             temporal and spectral resolution of perceived speech
             sounds.},
   Key = {fds98977}
}

@booklet{Wilson88,
   Author = {WILSON, BS and FINLEY, CC and LAWSON, DT and WOLFORD,
             RD},
   Title = {SPEECH PROCESSORS FOR COCHLEAR PROSTHESES},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics
             Engineers (IEEE)},
   Volume = {76},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1143-1154},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0018-9219},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1988Q748800010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1109/5.9660},
   Key = {Wilson88}
}

@article{fds325377,
   Author = {Wilson, BS and Finley, CC and White, MW and Lawson,
             DT},
   Title = {COMPARISONS OF PROCESSING STRATEGIES FOR MULTICHANNEL
             AUDITORY PROSTHESES.},
   Journal = {IEEE/Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Annual
             Conference},
   Pages = {1908-1910},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {December},
   Abstract = {A wide variety of processing strategies for auditory
             prostheses have been compared in studies with two patients
             implanted with the UCSF electrode array. Each strategy was
             evaluated using tests of vowel and consonant confusions.
             Included were the compressed-analog (CA) strategy of the
             present UCSF prosthesis and a group of interleaved-pulses
             (IP) strategies in which the amplitudes of nonsimultaneous
             pulses code the short-time spectra of speech. For these
             patients, each with indications of poor nerve survival,
             scores were significantly higher with the IP processors. It
             is believed that an important contributor to this superior
             performance is the substantial release from channel
             interactions provided by nonsimultaneous
             stimuli.},
   Key = {fds325377}
}

@booklet{Pape80,
   Author = {PAPE, DR and LAWSON, DT},
   Title = {ANALYSIS OF ZERO-SOUND ATTENUATION DATA FOR HE-3-A IN HIGH
             MAGNETIC-FIELDS},
   Journal = {Bulletin- American Physical Society},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {497-497},
   Year = {1980},
   ISSN = {0003-0503},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1980JM68800115&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {Pape80}
}

@booklet{Lawson80,
   Author = {LAWSON, DT},
   Title = {INTERVAL-BASED REPRESENTATIONS OF COMPLEX
             TONES},
   Journal = {American journal of physics},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {615-619},
   Year = {1980},
   ISSN = {0002-9505},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1980KF13600011&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1119/1.12330},
   Key = {Lawson80}
}

@article{fds324417,
   Author = {LAWSON, DT and BOZLER, HM and LEE, DM},
   Title = {ANISOTROPY IN SUPERFLUID HE-3 AND ATTENUATION OF ZERO
             SOUND},
   Journal = {Physical Review Letters},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {121-124},
   Year = {1975},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.34.121},
   Doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.34.121},
   Key = {fds324417}
}

@article{fds324418,
   Author = {Lawson, DT and Fairbank, HA},
   Title = {Thermal conductivity and isotopic impurities in single
             crystals of helium},
   Journal = {Journal of Low Temperature Physics},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {3-4},
   Pages = {363-394},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00656559},
   Abstract = {We have utilized the enhancement of thermal conductivity by
             Poiseuille flow of the phonon gas to obtain highly sensitive
             measurements of phonon scattering by isotopic impurities in
             single crystals of helium. Crystal orientation, size, and
             quality may be inferred from the thermal conductivity data
             themselves. Our hcp 4 He crystals were grown at a constant
             pressure of 85.1 atm using apparatus and techniques that
             made possible some control over crystal orientation. An
             isotopic impurity concentration of 1.0×10 -5 decreases the
             peak conductivity in these crystals by a factor of 1.9 along
             a direction perpendicular to the c axis. In the Poiseuille
             region a relaxation time limit has been achieved
             experimentally that allows our data to be fitted as a
             function of temperature and concentration with only one
             parameter. The observed scattering strength is a factor of
             2.7 greater than can be explained in terms of mass-defect
             scattering alone. A number of current theories are examined
             in the light of this result. Our pure 4 He data strongly
             support a T -3 dependence for the normal-process relaxation
             time. Measurements of the thermal conductivity parallel to
             the c axis reveal no anisotropy in either the normal-process
             relaxation time or the isotopic scattering strength. © 1973
             Plenum Publishing Corporation.},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF00656559},
   Key = {fds324418}
}

@article{fds324419,
   Author = {Lawson, DT},
   Title = {A technique for growing helium crystals in preferred
             orientations},
   Journal = {Cryogenics},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {276-281},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0011-2275(73)90204-X},
   Abstract = {An apparatus has been developed in which hcp He 4 single
             crystals of high quality are grown with a 0.3 probability of
             obtaining c-axis orientations of 0 or 90° with respect to
             the direction of growth. Methods of influencing the relative
             distribution of crystals between these two angles have been
             observed and are believed to depend on the anisotropy in the
             thermal conductivity of hcp He 4 . A simple computer
             simulation of the nucleation process supports our
             identification of the orientation angles and our explanation
             of the observed orientation preferences. Some possible
             applications of similar techniques have been surveyed. ©
             1973.},
   Doi = {10.1016/0011-2275(73)90204-X},
   Key = {fds324419}
}