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Management and Organizations
Fuqua School of Business
Duke University

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Publications of Sim B. Sitkin    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds335841,
   Author = {Searle, RH and Nienaber, AMI and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Implications for future directions in trust
             research},
   Pages = {536-541},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781138817593},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315745572},
   Abstract = {This book’s 31 chapters reflect trust as an important and
             vibrant field of study, both in terms of what has already
             been done, but more significantly in the fruitful future
             research agendas our contributing authors have outlined. The
             chapters that comprise the book’s six parts highlight some
             of the foundational approaches and building blocks in this
             field. In this last chapter, we do not merely repeat what
             our contributors have identified, but instead offer a
             meta-level perspective that identifies eight challenges and
             future directions for study.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9781315745572},
   Key = {fds335841}
}

@book{fds327481,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Cardinal, LB and Bijlsma-Frankema,
             KM},
   Title = {Organizational control},
   Pages = {1-541},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780521517447},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511777899},
   Abstract = {Organization scholars have long acknowledged that control
             processes are integral to the way in which organizations
             function. While control theory research spans many decades
             and draws on several rich traditions, theoretical
             limitations have kept it from generating consistent and
             interpretable empirical findings and from reaching consensus
             concerning the nature of key relationships. This book
             reveals how we can overcome such problems by synthesising
             diverse, yet complementary, streams of control research into
             a theoretical framework and empirical tests that more fully
             describe how types of control mechanisms (e.G., the use of
             rules, norms, direct supervision or monitoring) aimed at
             particular control targets (e.g., input, behavior, output)
             are applied within particular types of control systems
             (i.e., market, clan, bureaucracy, integrative). Written by a
             team of distinguished scholars, this book not only sheds
             light on the long-neglected phenomenon of organizational
             control, it also provides important directions for future
             research..},
   Doi = {10.1017/CBO9780511777899},
   Key = {fds327481}
}

@book{fds327482,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Cardinal, L and Bijlsma-Frankema,
             K},
   Title = {Control in organizations: New directions in theory and
             research},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds327482}
}

@book{fds327512,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Bies, RJ},
   Title = {The Legalistic organization},
   Pages = {389 pages},
   Publisher = {SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC},
   Year = {1994},
   Abstract = {In this volume, a multidisciplinary group of scholars
             investigate the changing attitudes towards management
             decisions in today's workplace.},
   Key = {fds327512}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds361821,
   Author = {Leroy, HL and Anisman-Razin, M and Avolio, BJ and Bresman, H and Stuart
             Bunderson, J and Burris, ER and Claeys, J and Detert, JR and Dragoni, L and Giessner, SR and Kniffin, KM and Kolditz, T and Petriglieri, G and Pettit, NC and Sitkin, SB and Van Quaquebeke and N and Vongswasdi,
             P},
   Title = {Walking Our Evidence-Based Talk: The Case of Leadership
             Development in Business Schools},
   Journal = {Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {5-32},
   Year = {2022},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/15480518211062563},
   Abstract = {Academics have lamented that practitioners do not always
             adopt scientific evidence in practice, yet while academics
             preach evidence-based management (EBM), they do not always
             practice it. This paper extends prior literature on
             difficulties to engage in EBM with insights from behavioral
             integrity (i.e., the study of what makes individuals and
             collectives walk their talk). We focus on leader
             development, widely used but often critiqued for lacking
             evidence. Analyzing 60 interviews with academic directors of
             leadership centers at top business schools, we find that the
             selection of programs does not always align with scientific
             recommendations nor do schools always engage in high-quality
             program evaluation. Respondents further indicated a wide
             variety of challenges that help explain the disconnect
             between business schools claiming A but practicing B.
             Behavioral Integrity theory would argue these difficulties
             are rooted in the lack of an individually owned and
             collectively endorsed identity, an identity of an
             evidence-based leader developer (EBLD). A closer inspection
             of our data confirmed that the lack of a clear and salient
             EBLD identity makes it difficult for academics to walk their
             evidence-based leader development talk. We discuss how these
             findings can help facilitate more evidence-based leader
             development in an academic context.},
   Doi = {10.1177/15480518211062563},
   Key = {fds361821}
}

@article{fds364289,
   Author = {Fox, CR and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {editors’ note},
   Journal = {Behavioral Science and Policy},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {ii-iii},
   Year = {2022},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds364289}
}

@article{fds359106,
   Author = {Chon, D and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Disentangling the process and content of self-awareness: A
             review, critical assessment, and synthesis},
   Journal = {The Academy of Management Annals},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {607-651},
   Year = {2021},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/annals.2018.0079},
   Abstract = {Are self-aware leaders more effective? Are self-aware
             workers more productive and satisfied? Studies of
             self-awareness, which have been undertaken in a range of
             fields, have implications for a wide variety of topics in
             organizational behavior. Yet, this research has been
             scattered, resulting in gaps, siloed insights, a lack of
             clear and consistent conceptualization, andtheconfoundingof
             causesandeffectswithself-awarenessitself. We review the
             organizational behavior and psychology literatures to
             distinguish, summarize, and assess research on
             self-awareness as both process and content. Our synthesis of
             past work on the content of self-awareness is organized
             around three distinct targets: internal, external, and
             social. Our paper concludes with an evaluation of the
             implications of our findings for future research.},
   Doi = {10.5465/annals.2018.0079},
   Key = {fds359106}
}

@article{fds351443,
   Author = {Hernandez, M and Fox, CR and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Editors’ note},
   Journal = {Behavioral Science and Policy},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {ii-iii},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/BSP.2021.0006},
   Doi = {10.1353/BSP.2021.0006},
   Key = {fds351443}
}

@article{fds341390,
   Author = {Ashford, SJ and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {From problems to progress: A dialogue on prevailing issues
             in leadership research},
   Journal = {The Leadership Quarterly},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {454-460},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2019.01.003},
   Abstract = {This paper presents a dialogue between two scholars who have
             come to contribute to the leadership literature rather late
             in their careers and, as such, embody a combined
             insider/outsider perspective. From this perspective, they
             raise and discuss various observations about the current
             state of the leadership literature and where that literature
             might profitably go in the future. The hope is that this
             dialogue will stimulate other dialogues and, ultimately,
             foster progress in the leadership literature.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.leaqua.2019.01.003},
   Key = {fds341390}
}

@article{fds338550,
   Author = {Long, CP and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Control–trust dynamics in organizations: Identifying
             shared perspectives and charting conceptual fault
             lines},
   Journal = {The Academy of Management Annals},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {725-751},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/annals.2016.0055},
   Abstract = {Our review of control–trust research reveals that although
             scholars have advanced our understanding of these dynamics
             in significant ways, many important questions remain to be
             answered about these issues. This article contributes to
             debates in this domain by distilling key findings from
             existing theoretical perspectives in ways that also
             highlight important conceptual inconsistencies that are
             limiting scholars’ capacities to develop a consistent,
             cumulative knowledge base about control–trust dynamics. To
             help scholars course-correct and address current challenges
             in the literature, we identify several potential areas of
             convergence, present a map of the area’s conceptual
             landscape, and propose an agenda for future research that
             provides scholars with suggestions about how to generate
             more complete and coherent pictures of relationships between
             control, trust, and performance.},
   Doi = {10.5465/annals.2016.0055},
   Key = {fds338550}
}

@article{fds349074,
   Author = {Patierno, S and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Editors’ note},
   Journal = {Behavioral Science and Policy},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {ii-iii},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bsp.2019.0006},
   Doi = {10.1353/bsp.2019.0006},
   Key = {fds349074}
}

@article{fds331421,
   Author = {Kitzmiller, RR and Sitkin, SB and Vidyarthi, AR},
   Title = {Handoffs: what's good for residents is good for nurses…so
             what's next?},
   Journal = {Bmj Quality & Safety},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {944-946},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs-2017-007010},
   Doi = {10.1136/bmjqs-2017-007010},
   Key = {fds331421}
}

@article{fds327845,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Miller, CC and See, KE},
   Title = {The Stretch Goal Paradox},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {93-99},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds327845}
}

@article{fds327460,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Miller, CC and See, KE},
   Title = {The stretch goal paradox},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {2017},
   Number = {January-February},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds327460}
}

@article{fds327461,
   Author = {Long, CP and Sitkin, SB and Cardinal, LB and Burton,
             RM},
   Title = {How controls influence organizational information
             processing: insights from a computational modeling
             investigation},
   Journal = {Computational and Mathematical Organization
             Theory},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {406-436},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10588-015-9191-z},
   Abstract = {In this study, we use a series of computational models to
             investigate an information processing perspective on
             organizational control use. We evaluate and compare the
             information processing capabilities of various formal and
             informal control configurations under different information
             uncertainty conditions. We find that a wide range of formal
             controls can be used to direct subordinates performing
             interdependent tasks while a more narrow range of informal
             controls are most effective for directing subordinates who
             perform complex tasks. Results of this study provide a basis
             for formalizing an information processing perspective on
             organizational control implementation that differs but is
             complementary to the current emphasis on agency in
             organizational control research.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10588-015-9191-z},
   Key = {fds327461}
}

@article{fds327462,
   Author = {Bijlsma-Frankema, K and Sitkin, SB and Weibel,
             A},
   Title = {Distrust in the balance: The emergence and development of
             intergroup distrust in a court of law},
   Journal = {Organization Science},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1018-1039},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/orsc.2015.0977},
   Abstract = {Despite recent attention to trust, comparatively little is
             known about distrust as distinct from trust. In this paper,
             we drew on case study data of a reorganized court of law,
             where intergroup distrust had grown between judges and
             administrators, to develop a dynamic theory of distrust. We
             used insights from the literatures on distrust, conflict
             escalation, and professional-organization relations to guide
             the analysis of our case data. Our research is consistent
             with insights on distrust previously postulated, but we were
             able to extend and make more precise the perceptions and
             behaviors that make up the elements of the self-amplifying
             cycle of distrust development, how these elements are
             related, and the mechanisms of amplification that drive the
             cycle. To help guide and focus future research, we modeled
             the process by which distrust emerges and develops, and we
             drew inferences on how it can be repaired.},
   Doi = {10.1287/orsc.2015.0977},
   Key = {fds327462}
}

@article{fds327464,
   Author = {Hernandez, M and Long, CP and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Cultivating Follower Trust: Are All Leader Behaviors Equally
             Influential?},
   Journal = {Organization Studies},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1867-1892},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0170840614546152},
   Abstract = {We draw on the relevant extant literatures to examine the
             pathways to building trust through leader behaviors with
             three distinct emphases: the leader (personal leadership),
             the leader-follower relationship (relational leadership),
             and the situation (contextual leadership). We test this
             model using experimental data collected from experienced
             managers (Study 1) and field data collected from the peers
             and direct reports of business executives (Study 2). The
             results from these two studies both build on and challenge
             current views in the trust and leadership literatures about
             how leaders influence trust. Consistent with past
             literature, our findings indicate that various leadership
             behaviors appear to directly promote follower trust when
             analyzed independently. However, when these behaviors are
             analyzed jointly, relational leadership behaviors were found
             to mediate the effects of personal and contextual leadership
             behaviors on follower trust. The implications for theory and
             practice are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0170840614546152},
   Key = {fds327464}
}

@article{fds327463,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Rader, CA},
   Title = {Denise M. Rousseau, ed.: The Oxford Handbook of
             Evidence-based Management},
   Journal = {Administrative Science Quarterly},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {NP46-NP48},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0001839214529545},
   Doi = {10.1177/0001839214529545},
   Key = {fds327463}
}

@article{fds327469,
   Author = {van Knippenberg, D and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {A critical assessment of charismatic—transformational
             leadership research: Back to the drawing
             board?},
   Journal = {The Academy of Management Annals},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-60},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19416520.2013.759433},
   Abstract = {There is a widely shared consensus that charismatic–transformational
             leadership is a particularly effective form of leadership.
             In a critical assessment of the state-of-the-science in this
             area of research, we question the validity of that
             conclusion. We identify four problems with theory and
             research in charismatic– transformational leadership.
             First, a clear conceptual definition of charismatic–transformational
             leadership is lacking. Current theories advance
             multi-dimensional conceptualizations of charismatic–transformational
             leadership without specifying how these different dimensions
             combine to form charismatic–transformational leadership,
             or how dimensions are selected for inclusion or exclusion.
             Second, theories fail to sufficiently specify the causal
             model capturing how each dimension has a distinct influence
             on mediating processes and outcomes and how this is
             contingent on moderating influences. Third,
             conceptualization and operationalization confounds
             charismatic– transformational leadership with its effects.
             Fourth, the most frequently used measurement tools are
             invalid in that they fail to reproduce the dimensional
             structure specified by theory and fail to achieve empirical
             distinctiveness from other aspects of leadership. Given that
             these problems are fundamental and inherent in the
             approaches analyzed, it is recommended that current
             approaches be abandoned, and that the field forego the label
             of charismatic– transformational leadership in favor of
             the study of more clearly defined and empirically distinct
             aspects of leadership.},
   Doi = {10.1080/19416520.2013.759433},
   Key = {fds327469}
}

@article{fds327476,
   Author = {Stahl, GK and Larsson, R and Kremershof, I and Sitkin,
             SB},
   Title = {Trust dynamics in acquisitions: A case survey},
   Journal = {Human Resource Management},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {575-603},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Editor = {Weber, Y and Fried, Y},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hrm.20448},
   Abstract = {Drawing on the organizational trust literature and research
             on postmerger integration, the authors develop a model that
             conceptually synthesizes the antecedents and consequences of
             trust in acquired organizations. The model proposes that the
             acquiring and target firms' relationship history, the
             interfirm distance, and the acquirer's integration approach
             will affect target firm member trust in the acquiring firm's
             management. Target firm member trust, in turn, may influence
             several sociocultural integration outcomes as well as
             postacquisition performance. The results of a case survey
             suggest that certain aspects of the relationship history and
             interfirm distance, such as the firms' collaboration history
             and preacquisition performance differences, are poor
             predictors of trust, whereas integration process variables,
             such as speed of integration, communication quality, and
             acquirer multiculturalism are major factors influencing
             trust. The implications for postmerger integration research
             and practice are discussed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals,
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hrm.20448},
   Key = {fds327476}
}

@article{fds327473,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Hackman, JR},
   Title = {Developing team leadership: An interview with coach Mike
             Krzyzewski},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Learning & Education},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {494-501},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/amle.2011.0005},
   Doi = {10.5465/amle.2011.0005},
   Key = {fds327473}
}

@article{fds327475,
   Author = {Hargrove, D and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Next generation leadership development in a changing and
             complex environment: An interview with general Martin E.
             Dempsey},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Learning & Education},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {528-533},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/amle.2011.0006},
   Doi = {10.5465/amle.2011.0006},
   Key = {fds327475}
}

@article{fds327474,
   Author = {DeRue, DS and Sitkin, SB and Podolny, JM},
   Title = {From the guest editors: Teaching leadership - Issues and
             insights},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Learning & Education},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {369-372},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/amle.2011.0004},
   Doi = {10.5465/amle.2011.0004},
   Key = {fds327474}
}

@article{fds327477,
   Author = {Sitkin, S and See, K and Miller, C and Lawless, M and Carton,
             A},
   Title = {The paradox of stretch goals: Organizations in pursuit of
             the seemingly impossible},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Review},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {544-566},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/AMR.2011.61031811},
   Abstract = {We investigate the organizational pursuit of seemingly
             impossible goals-commonly known as stretch goals. Building
             from our analysis of the mechanisms through which stretch
             goals could influence organizational learning and
             performance, we offer a contingency framework evaluating
             which organizations are positioned to benefit from such
             extreme goals and which are most likely to pursue them. We
             conclude that stretch goals are, paradoxically, most
             seductive for organizations that can least afford the risks
             associated with them. © 2011 Academy of Management
             Review.},
   Doi = {10.5465/AMR.2011.61031811},
   Key = {fds327477}
}

@article{fds327478,
   Author = {Stahl, GK and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Trust dynamics in acquisitions: The role of relationship
             history, interfirm distance, and acquirer's integration
             approach},
   Journal = {Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions},
   Volume = {9},
   Pages = {51-82},
   Publisher = {Emerald Group Publishing},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/S1479-361X(2010)0000009006},
   Abstract = {Drawing on the trust literature and research on
             sociocultural integration in mergers and acquisitions
             (M&As), we develop a model of the antecedents and
             consequences of trust dynamics in acquisitions. The model
             proposes that target firm members' perceptions of the
             acquiring firm management's trustworthiness are affected by
             the relationship history of the firms, the interfirm
             distance, and the integration approach taken by the
             acquirer. Ability, benevolence, integrity, and value
             congruence perceptions are proposed to converge into a
             generalized trust judgment or result in a state of
             ambivalence, depending on whether the trustworthiness
             attributions are consistent or conflicting. The model
             explains the mechanisms by which trust and ambivalence may
             affect a variety of attitudinal and behavioral outcomes. A
             number of testable propositions are derived from this model,
             and the implications for M&A research and practice are
             discussed. Copyright © 2010 by Emerald Group Publishing
             Limited.},
   Doi = {10.1108/S1479-361X(2010)0000009006},
   Key = {fds327478}
}

@article{fds327483,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Chapter 27: Sense-making in organizational
             research},
   Journal = {Research in the Sociology of Organizations},
   Volume = {28},
   Pages = {409-418},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/s0733-558x(2010)0000028031},
   Doi = {10.1108/s0733-558x(2010)0000028031},
   Key = {fds327483}
}

@article{fds327485,
   Author = {Stickel, D and Mayer, RC and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Understanding social capital: In whom do we
             trust?},
   Pages = {304-318},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {fds327485}
}

@article{fds327488,
   Author = {Webster, J and Brown, G and Zweig, D and Connelly, CE and Brodt, S and Sitkin, S},
   Title = {Beyond knowledge sharing: Withholding knowledge at
             work},
   Journal = {Research in Personnel and Human Resources
             Management},
   Volume = {27},
   Pages = {1-37},
   Publisher = {Emerald (MCB UP )},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0742-7301(08)27001-5},
   Abstract = {This chapter discusses why employees keep their knowledge to
             themselves. Despite managers' best efforts, many employees
             tend to hoard knowledge or are reluctant to share their
             expertise with coworkers or managers. Although many firms
             have introduced specialized initiatives to encourage a
             broader dissemination of ideas and knowledge among
             organizational members, these initiatives often fail. This
             chapter provides reasons as to why this is so. Instead of
             focusing on why individuals might share their knowledge,
             however, we explain why individuals keep their knowledge to
             themselves. Multiple perspectives are offered, including
             social exchange, norms of secrecy, and territorial
             behaviors. © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing
             Limited.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0742-7301(08)27001-5},
   Key = {fds327488}
}

@article{fds327487,
   Author = {Janson, A and Levy, L and Sitkin, SB and Lind, EA},
   Title = {Fairness and other leadership heuristics: A four-nation
             study},
   Journal = {European Journal of Work and Organizational
             Psychology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {251-272},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13594320701746510},
   Abstract = {Leaders' fairness may be just one of several heuristics -
             cognitive shortcuts - that followers use to decide quickly
             whether they can rely on a given leader to lead them to ends
             that are good for the collective, rather than just good for
             the leader. Other leadership heuristics might include leader
             prototypicality and leader self-sacrifice. We hypothesized
             that if these other factors do function as leadership
             heuristics they would interact with fairness such that the
             correlation of fairness with leadership evaluations would be
             lower when either of the other factors was high. In two
             studies, both using the Lind-Sitkin Multiple Domain
             Leadership Instrument, we measured followers' impressions of
             their supervisors' interactional fairness, and
             prototypicality, and their leadership evaluations and
             ratings of team community; in Study 2 we also measured
             impressions of leaders' sacrifice. To test the generality of
             the phenomena, Study 1 included data from respondents in the
             US, India, and Germany; Study 2 included data from
             respondents in New Zealand and the US. The results supported
             the hypotheses.},
   Doi = {10.1080/13594320701746510},
   Key = {fds327487}
}

@article{fds327489,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Promoting a more generative and sustainable organizational
             science},
   Journal = {Journal of Organizational Behavior},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {841-848},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/job.458},
   Doi = {10.1002/job.458},
   Key = {fds327489}
}

@article{fds327490,
   Author = {Long, CP and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Trust in the balance: How managers integrate trust-building
             and task control},
   Pages = {87-106},
   Publisher = {Edward Elgar Publishing},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4337/9781847202819.00012},
   Doi = {10.4337/9781847202819.00012},
   Key = {fds327490}
}

@article{fds327493,
   Author = {George, E and Chattopadhyay, P and Sitkin, SB and Barden,
             J},
   Title = {Cognitive underpinnings of institutional persistence and
             change: A framing perspective},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Review},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {347-365},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/AMR.2006.20208685},
   Abstract = {We integrate the predictions of prospect theory, the
             threat-rigidity hypothesis, and institutional theory to
             suggest how patterns of institutional persistence and change
             depend on whether decision makers view environmental shifts
             as potential opportunities for or threats to gaining
             legitimacy. We argue that in the event that decision makers
             face ambiguity in their reading of the environment, they
             initiate decoupled substantive and symbolic actions that
             simultaneously accommodate the predictions of prospect
             theory and the threat-rigidity hypothesis.},
   Doi = {10.5465/AMR.2006.20208685},
   Key = {fds327493}
}

@article{fds327494,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and George, E},
   Title = {Managerial trust-building through the use of legitimating
             formal and informal control mechanisms},
   Journal = {International Sociology},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {307-338},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0268580905055479},
   Abstract = {This article examines formal and informal decision criteria
             used by organizational decision-makers when making
             potentially controversial, legitimacy-relating decisions
             that could damage trust. Two experimental studies found
             consistent patterns of persistent use of formal controls and
             reduced use of informal controls under higher levels of
             perceived threat to trust. Institutional theory is
             consistent with the proposition that increased use of
             legitimated control uniformly enhances trust. In contrast,
             this article posits and finds support for an attenuated
             legalistic institutional proposition that increased use of
             even legitimated control can predictably foster, or
             undermine, trust - but such predictions can be made only if
             we systematically distinguish formal and informal control.
             Results suggest institutional pressures manifest at the
             individual level provide a complementary focus to
             macro-organizational institutionalization.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0268580905055479},
   Key = {fds327494}
}

@article{fds327497,
   Author = {Cardinal, LB and Sitkin, SB and Long, CP},
   Title = {Balancing and rebalancing in the creation and evolution of
             organizational control},
   Journal = {Organization Science},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {411-431},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/orsc.1040.0084},
   Abstract = {This research examines data collected as part of a 10-year
             case study of the creation and evolution of organizational
             control during organizational founding. Past research has
             taken a cross-sectional approach to examining control use in
             mature, stable organizations. In contrast, this study
             examines organizational controls during the founding period
             and takes a longitudinal perspective on organizational
             control. By examining how organizational controls are
             created and evolve through specific phases of the founding
             period, the research also provides new data and insights
             about what drives shifts in the use of various types of
             control. Specifically, this research sheds light on the role
             of imbalance among formal and informal controls as the key
             driver of shifts in control configurations, and provides a
             step toward making organizational control theory more
             dynamic.},
   Doi = {10.1287/orsc.1040.0084},
   Key = {fds327497}
}

@article{fds327498,
   Author = {Wong, S-S and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Book Reviews},
   Journal = {Administrative Science Quarterly},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {577-580},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3094857},
   Doi = {10.2307/3094857},
   Key = {fds327498}
}

@article{fds327499,
   Author = {Heath, C and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Big-B versus big-O: What is organizational about
             organizational behavior?},
   Journal = {Journal of Organizational Behavior},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {43-58},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/job.77},
   Abstract = {This paper is an empirically grounded essay about the
             current state of organizational behavior (OB) research and
             productive future directions. We report the results of a
             survey of OB scholars about the current importance of
             various research topics and their importance in an ideal
             world. We compare the survey responses with an archival
             analysis of papers published in leading OB journals over a
             10-year period. We suggest that many of the topics that our
             respondents perceive to be 'under researched' can be
             summarized with one particular definition of OB that
             emphasizes organizing behavior. Considering all three
             definitions together, we highlight the limitations of the
             traditional (Big-B and Contextualized-B) definitions and
             discuss the benefits of a more organizational (Big-O)
             approach. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons,
             Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/job.77},
   Key = {fds327499}
}

@article{fds327500,
   Author = {Dillard, C and Browning, LD and Sitkin, SB and Sutcliffe,
             KM},
   Title = {Impression management and the use of procedures at the
             Ritz‐Carlton: Moral standards and dramaturgical
             discipline},
   Journal = {Communication Studies},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {404-414},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10510970009388534},
   Abstract = {This article uses Goffman's work on moral standards and
             dramaturgical discipline to inform a case study featuring a
             hotel's procedures for guaranteeing reliable impression
             management. Through an analysis of archival material and 18
             interviews at two sites, we developed four categories of
             impression management behaviors. Viewing our analysis
             through Goffman's lens, we argue that procedures codify
             moral standards thereby offering employees specific means by
             which they can enact dramaturgical discipline. In our
             discussion we suggest several ways in which our case study
             reinforces and expands Goffman's original concepts. Our
             findings are (a) procedures can function as codified moral
             standards within the organizational setting, (b) procedures
             can serve as the basis for employee enactment of
             dramaturgical discipline, (c) the use of databases in
             collecting and storing information offers a new wrinkle to
             impression management theory, and (d) the use of incentives
             to pacify guests expands the defensive practices available
             to those engaging in impression management. © 2000, Taylor
             & Francis Group, LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1080/10510970009388534},
   Key = {fds327500}
}

@article{fds327503,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Browning, L and Sutcliffe, K},
   Title = {Keep em' Flying: The Constitutive Dynamics of an
             Organizational Change in the U.S. Air Force},
   Journal = {Electronic Journal of Communication},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds327503}
}

@article{fds327505,
   Author = {Rousseau, DM and Sitkin, SB and Burt, RS and Camerer,
             C},
   Title = {Not so different after all: A cross-discipline view of
             trust},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Review},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {393-404},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/AMR.1998.926617},
   Doi = {10.5465/AMR.1998.926617},
   Key = {fds327505}
}

@article{fds327507,
   Author = {Pablo, AL and Sitkin, SB and Jemison, DB},
   Title = {Acquisition decision-making processes: The central role of
             risk},
   Journal = {Journal of Management},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {723-746},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0149-2063(96)90020-3},
   Abstract = {This paper builds upon the work of organizational and
             strategic management scholars who have conceptualized
             acquisitions as decision-making processes. We suggest that
             behavioral concepts of risk, specifically decision-maker
             risk perceptions and propensities, are key to understanding
             the process by which acquisition candidates are selected,
             the characteristics of pre-acquisition evaluation and
             negotiations, and approaches to post-acquisition
             integration. By drawing upon past work concerning the
             effects of these risk-related variables in other
             decision-making contexts, we develop propositions that
             conceptualize their impact on acquisition decision
             processes. Incorporation of risk as a key variable in
             process theories of acquisitions provides a stronger
             theoretical grounding for these theories, and suggests some
             important practical implications for managers. © 1996 JAI
             Press Inc. All rights of reproduction in any form
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0149-2063(96)90020-3},
   Key = {fds327507}
}

@article{fds327508,
   Author = {SITKIN, SB and WEINGART, LR},
   Title = {DETERMINANTS OF RISKY DECISION-MAKING BEHAVIOR: A TEST OF
             THE MEDIATING ROLE OF RISK PERCEPTIONS AND
             PROPENSITY.},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Journal},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1573-1592},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/256844},
   Doi = {10.2307/256844},
   Key = {fds327508}
}

@article{fds327510,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {On the Positive Effect of Legalization on
             Trust},
   Journal = {Research on Negotiation in Organizations},
   Volume = {5},
   Pages = {185-217},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds327510}
}

@article{fds327511,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Sutcliffe, KM and Schroeder, RG},
   Title = {Distinguishing Control from Learning in Total Quality
             Management: A Contingency Perspective},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Review},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {537-537},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/258938},
   Doi = {10.2307/258938},
   Key = {fds327511}
}

@article{fds327519,
   Author = {Bies, RJ and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Law without justice: The dilemmas of formalization and
             fairness in the legalistic organization},
   Journal = {Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {271-275},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01385017},
   Abstract = {There is growing evidence of a "litigation mentality"
             rampant in organizations, which has created a legalistic
             mindset in many managers. Increasingly, managerial decisions
             are becoming dominated by a concern for what is legally
             defensible at the expense of broader social considerations
             such as justice and fairness. The papers in this special
             issue explore how this legalistic mindset has created new
             organizational and social dilemmas, and situations of "law
             whithout justice." © 1993 Plenum Publishing
             Corporation.},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF01385017},
   Key = {fds327519}
}

@article{fds327520,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Roth, NL},
   Title = {Legalistic organizational responses to catastrophic illness:
             The effect of stigmatization on reactions to
             HIV/AIDS},
   Journal = {Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {291-312},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01385019},
   Abstract = {The HIV/AIDS epidemic has focused increased attention on
             catastrophic illnesses in the workplace, and because of the
             stigmas associated with HIV/AIDS, it raises three primary
             concerns for organizations: (1) organizational avoidance of
             legal sanctions and litigation; (2) the maintenance of
             organizational legitimacy; and (3) organizational protection
             of employee rights. Although many organizations adopt
             legalistic responses to cope with these concerns, the
             analysis presented in this article suggests that while
             legalistic approaches function well to protect
             organizational interests in terms of both legal liability
             and legitimacy, the are only partially able to protect
             employee rights. Drawing upon the limited literature on
             HIV/AIDS in the workplace, this article presents an agenda
             for future research on organizational responses to HIV/AIDS.
             © 1993 Plenum Publishing Corporation.},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF01385019},
   Key = {fds327520}
}

@article{fds327515,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Bies, RJ},
   Title = {The Legalistic Organization: Definitions, Dimensions, and
             Dilemmas},
   Journal = {Organization Science},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {345-351},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/orsc.4.3.345},
   Abstract = {<jats:p> The worse the society, the more law there will be.
             In Hell, there will be nothing but law, and due process will
             be meticulously observed. </jats:p><jats:p> Grant Gilmore
             (The Ages of American Law 1977, p. 111) </jats:p>},
   Doi = {10.1287/orsc.4.3.345},
   Key = {fds327515}
}

@article{fds327516,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Roth, NL},
   Title = {Explaining the Limited Effectiveness of Legalistic
             “Remedies” for Trust/Distrust},
   Journal = {Organization Science},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {367-392},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/orsc.4.3.367},
   Abstract = {<jats:p> Organizations frequently adopt formal rules,
             contracts, or other legalistic mechanisms when interpersonal
             trust is lacking. But recent research has shown such
             legalistic “remedies” for trust-related problems to be
             ineffective in restoring trust. To explain this apparent
             ineffectiveness, this paper outlines a theory that
             distinguishes two dimensions of trust—task-specific
             reliability and value congruence—and shows how legalistic
             mechanisms respond only to reliability concerns, while
             ignoring value-related concerns. Organizational responses to
             employees with HIV/AIDS are used as a case illustration that
             supports the theory's major propositions. The paper
             concludes with an agenda for future research.
             </jats:p>},
   Doi = {10.1287/orsc.4.3.367},
   Key = {fds327516}
}

@article{fds327517,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Sutcliffe, KM and Reed, GL},
   Title = {Prescriptions for justice: using social accounts to
             legitimate the exercise of professional control.},
   Journal = {Social Justice Research},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {87-111},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf01048734},
   Doi = {10.1007/bf01048734},
   Key = {fds327517}
}

@article{fds327518,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Bies, RJ},
   Title = {Social Accounts in Conflict Situations: Using Explanations
             to Manage Conflict},
   Journal = {Human Relations},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {349-370},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/001872679304600303},
   Abstract = {Considerable attention has been given to different
             behavioral strategies of conflict management (e.g.,
             avoidance, compromise, collaboration). However, conflict
             theory and research has overlooked a simple, but effective
             strategy for managing conflict: the use of social accounts
             or explanations. In this paper, we review the literature on
             the use of social accounts in conflict situations and find
             it supports the argument that social accounts can be an
             effective conflict- management strategy. Based on this
             analysis, we propose several promising directions for future
             theory development and research concerning the role of
             social accounts in conflict situations. In addition, we
             identify tradeoffs and dilemmas created when social accounts
             are used to manage conflict. © 1993, Sage Publications. All
             rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/001872679304600303},
   Key = {fds327518}
}

@article{fds327522,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Pablo, AL},
   Title = {Reconceptualizing the Determinants of Risk
             Behavior},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Review},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {9-9},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/258646},
   Doi = {10.2307/258646},
   Key = {fds327522}
}

@article{fds327523,
   Author = {SITKIN, SB},
   Title = {LEARNING THROUGH FAILURE - THE STRATEGY OF SMALL
             LOSSES},
   Journal = {Research in Organizational Behavior},
   Volume = {14},
   Pages = {231-266},
   Publisher = {JAI PRESS INC},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds327523}
}

@article{fds327524,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Roth, NL and Nelkin, D and Tancredi,
             L},
   Title = {Dangerous Diagnostics: The Social Power of Biological
             Information.},
   Journal = {Contemporary Sociology},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {86-86},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2072102},
   Doi = {10.2307/2072102},
   Key = {fds327524}
}

@article{fds327526,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Sutcliffe, K},
   Title = {Dispensing Legitimacy: Professional, Organization, and Legal
             Influences on Pharmacist Behavior},
   Journal = {Research in the Sociology of Organizations},
   Volume = {8},
   Pages = {269-295},
   Year = {1991},
   Key = {fds327526}
}

@article{fds327527,
   Author = {Berlinger, LR and Sitkin, SB and Quinn, RE and Cameron,
             KS},
   Title = {Paradox and Transformation: Toward a Theory of Change in
             Organization and Management.},
   Journal = {Administrative Science Quarterly},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {740-740},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2393523},
   Doi = {10.2307/2393523},
   Key = {fds327527}
}

@article{fds327528,
   Author = {Brittain, J and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Facts, figures, and organizational decisions: Carter racing
             and quantitative analysis in the organizational behavior
             classroom},
   Journal = {Journal of Management Education},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {62-81},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/105256298901400108},
   Doi = {10.1177/105256298901400108},
   Key = {fds327528}
}

@article{fds327530,
   Author = {JEMISON, DB and SITKIN, SB},
   Title = {ACQUISITIONS AND MARRIAGE - REPLY},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {148-148},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {fds327530}
}

@article{fds327531,
   Author = {JEMISON, DB and SITKIN, SB},
   Title = {ACQUISITIONS - THE PROCESS CAN BE A PROBLEM},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {107-116},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {fds327531}
}

@article{fds327529,
   Author = {Jemison, DB and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Corporate Acquisitions: A Process Perspective},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Review},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {145-163},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/amr.1986.4282648},
   Doi = {10.5465/amr.1986.4282648},
   Key = {fds327529}
}

@article{fds327533,
   Author = {Martin, J and Feldman, MS and Hatch, MJ and Sitkin,
             SB},
   Title = {The Uniqueness Paradox in Organizational
             Stories},
   Journal = {Administrative Science Quarterly},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {438-438},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1983},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2392251},
   Doi = {10.2307/2392251},
   Key = {fds327533}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds362633,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Learning about scholarship and being a scholar: The courage
             of foolishness},
   Journal = {Research in the Sociology of Organizations},
   Volume = {76},
   Pages = {255-260},
   Year = {2021},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/S0733-558X20210000076013},
   Abstract = {James March was a bundle of wisdom and contradiction.
             Numerous lessons learned from him as a doctoral student have
             guided the author’s career as a scholar. Using simple
             models to achieve complex understanding, but also looking
             for deeper insights rather than being satisfied with readily
             recognizable patterns – together they exemplify how the
             seemingly contradictory form a tapestry of wise advice.
             Being humble enough to be open to criticism without
             defensiveness and to be open to reconsidering your old
             ideas, these represent other important lessons. Finally,
             maintaining the ability to be playful with important ideas
             as a way to make deeper discoveries offers not only the
             promise of great impact but, as important, offers the
             promise of a fun journey.},
   Doi = {10.1108/S0733-558X20210000076013},
   Key = {fds362633}
}

@misc{fds342559,
   Author = {Cardinal, LB and Sitkin, SB and Long, CP and Chet Miller,
             C},
   Title = {The genesis of control configurations during organizational
             founding},
   Volume = {40},
   Pages = {83-114},
   Booktitle = {Advances in Strategic Management},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/S0742-332220180000040003},
   Abstract = {In this chapter, the authors argue that organizational
             controls are best depicted and studied as sets of control
             configurations. Concepts from extant control research
             streams describing basic control elements as well as ideal
             types of control systems are used to identify and classify
             control configurations. The authors present compositional
             distinctions among four control configurations using a
             decade-long case study of a start-up company. By displaying
             how specific control elements are simultaneously distinct
             and intertwined in this company, the authors reveal
             significant theoretical insights that can assist scholars in
             distinguishing between different configurational patterns
             and in comprehending dynamics present in holistic
             perspectives of control. The authors conclude by discussing
             how conceptualizing controls as configurations most
             accurately reflects both organizational and managerial
             practice in ways that can motivate the development of new
             theories and approaches to studying this key aspect of
             organizational design. Because control configurations
             inherently reflect interdisciplinary concerns, and because
             such configurations affect the attainment of strategic
             goals, this work provides findings and ideas that fit the
             interests of a broad audience.},
   Doi = {10.1108/S0742-332220180000040003},
   Key = {fds342559}
}

@misc{fds340777,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Miller, CC and See, KE},
   Title = {Risks of addressing vs. ignoring our biggest societal
             problems: When and how moon shots make sense},
   Pages = {481-485},
   Booktitle = {The Routledge Companion to Risk, Crisis and Emergency
             Management},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781138208865},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315458175},
   Abstract = {Recent press reports as well as casual observations suggest
             we have serious societal problems, with most of them being
             addressed insuciently, or even being ignored. From the
             almost apocalyptic problems of war and famine in the South
             Sudan, to the disruption of Rocky Mountain ecosystems in
             North America and the uncontrolled population growth in many
             parts of the world, large-scale problems and their
             associated risks are threatening human societies. In
             recognition of these problems, the United Nations recently
             has set new goals in several critical areas related to
             sustainability, including: •Global poverty, health, and
             safety; •Education, food, water, and energy; •Climate
             sustainability; •Equality across people and
             countries.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9781315458175},
   Key = {fds340777}
}

@misc{fds327465,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Domains of leadership behaviors in organizations},
   Booktitle = {Leadership and women in statistics},
   Publisher = {Chapman and Hall},
   Editor = {Golbeck, A and Olkin, I and Gel, Y},
   Year = {2014},
   Key = {fds327465}
}

@misc{fds327466,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {What will it take to educate the next generation of
             thought-leaders for a complicated world?},
   Booktitle = {Educating tomorrow’s thought-leaders: Distinguished
             scholars answer a burning question},
   Publisher = {Strategic Management Society},
   Editor = {Wright, R and Brown, K},
   Year = {2014},
   Key = {fds327466}
}

@misc{fds343738,
   Author = {Bies, RJ and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Explanation as legitimation: Excuse-making in
             organizations},
   Pages = {183-198},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {December},
   ISBN = {9781315044521},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315044521},
   Doi = {10.4324/9781315044521},
   Key = {fds343738}
}

@misc{fds327467,
   Author = {Jemison, DB and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Corporate acquisitions: A process perspective: From academy
             of management review (1986)},
   Pages = {77-91},
   Booktitle = {Mergers and Acquisitions: A Critical Reader},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780203708071},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203708071},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203708071},
   Key = {fds327467}
}

@misc{fds327468,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Long, C and Cardinal, L},
   Title = {Managerial action to promote trust, fairness and control in
             organizations: The effect of conflict},
   Booktitle = {New Directions in Management and Organization
             Theory},
   Publisher = {Cambridge Scholars Publishing},
   Editor = {Miles, J},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds327468}
}

@misc{fds327470,
   Author = {Hernandez, M and Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Who is leading the leader? Follower influence on leader
             ethicality},
   Pages = {81-102},
   Booktitle = {Behavioral Business Ethics: Shaping an Emerging
             Field},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {March},
   ISBN = {9780415873246},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203803820},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203803820},
   Key = {fds327470}
}

@misc{fds327472,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Long, C and Cardinal, L},
   Title = {Management control systems},
   Booktitle = {Encyclopedia of Management Theory},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Editor = {Kessler, E},
   Year = {2012},
   Key = {fds327472}
}

@misc{fds327471,
   Author = {Emery, J and LeBoeuf, J and Siang, S and Sitkin, S},
   Title = {Developing leaders of consequence},
   Booktitle = {The Handbook for Teaching Leadership: Knowing, Doing, and
             Being},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Editor = {Nohria, N and Snook, S and Khuruna, R},
   Year = {2012},
   Key = {fds327471}
}

@misc{fds327480,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Cardinal, LB and Bijlsma-Frankema,
             KM},
   Title = {Control is fundamental},
   Pages = {3-15},
   Booktitle = {Organizational control},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780521517447},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511777899.002},
   Abstract = {Organizational control is a fundamental aspect of organizing
             that has been largely neglected by organizational scholars
             for several decades. This volume brings together new
             approaches to organizational control theory and research by
             a diverse group of scholars with different scholarly
             viewpoints to show the vibrancy and future potential of the
             domain for generative scholarship. The purpose is to provide
             a springboard and touchstone for a renewal of work in this
             area. Priming a renaissance in control research: Control
             systems have long been recognized as a fundamental aspect of
             all organizations (Scott, 1992) through which managers seek
             to align employee capabilities, activities, and performance
             with organizational goals and aspirations (Cyert and March,
             1963; Merchant, 1985). Despite the fundamental nature of the
             phenomenon, its recognized importance, and some significant
             foundational work on organizational control, this area of
             study has been and remains seriously neglected.
             Specifically, organizational control is today
             underconceptualized in terms of its key constructs and its
             determinants and effects. As a result, organizational
             control has been subjected to only minimal theoretical and
             cumulative empirical study in recent years. The atrophy of
             control research in the domain of organization and
             management presents a striking contrast with a rise in
             recent attention to control in the managerial accounting
             literature, where it has achieved some prominence (Birnberg
             and Snodgrass, 1988; Davila, 2005; Davila and Foster, 2007;
             Henri, 2006; Hopwood, 2005; Merchant and Simons, 1986;
             Simons, 1991, 1994, 1995; Whitley, 1999).},
   Doi = {10.1017/CBO9780511777899.002},
   Key = {fds327480}
}

@misc{fds327479,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Cardinal, L and Long, C},
   Title = {A configurational theory of control},
   Pages = {51-79},
   Booktitle = {Control in organizations: New directions in theory and
             research},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {Cardinal, LB and Bijlsma-Frankema, KM},
   Year = {2010},
   ISBN = {9780521517447},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511777899.004},
   Abstract = {Organization theory scholars have long acknowledged that
             control processes are integral to the way in which
             organizations function (Blau and Scott,1962; Etzioni, 1965;
             Tannenbaum, 1962). While control theory research spans many
             decades and draws on several rich traditions (Dunbar and
             Statler, Chapter 2), several theoretical problems have kept
             it from generating reasonably consistent and interpretable
             empirical findings and from reaching consensus concerning
             the nature of key relationships. As new forms of
             organizational relations (networks, alliances, mass
             customization, supply chains, consortia, contract employees,
             telecommuting, virtual teams, etc.) emerged in the late
             twentieth century, traditional organizational control
             theories were viewed as less and less relevant by
             organizational scholars. As a result, attention to
             organizational control research waned, with the exception of
             critical theorists (e.g., Adler, 2007; Tsoukas, 2007) and
             accounting researchers (e.g., Davilia and Foster, 2007;
             Whitley, 1999). For example, despite the importance of the
             topic and the pervasiveness of the control phenomenon in
             organizations, organizational control research has not been
             sufficiently cumulative. The control literature is rich, but
             deceptive. Although most organizational scholars might be
             shocked by our assertion, we observe that there is very
             little empirical work on control in the organizational
             literature relative to other classic and fundamental
             organizational phenomena (e.g., design-effectiveness,
             planning-performance, diversification-performance
             relationships). From a distance, it may appear as though
             there is a great deal of empirical work and that there is
             broad support for the few dominant control theories (e.g.,
             Merchant, 1985; Ouchi 1977, 1979).},
   Doi = {10.1017/CBO9780511777899.004},
   Key = {fds327479}
}

@misc{fds327484,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Understanding social capital: In whom do we
             trust?},
   Pages = {302-316},
   Booktitle = {Social capital: Multi-disciplinary perspectives},
   Publisher = {Edward Elgar Press},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds327484}
}

@misc{fds327486,
   Author = {Browning, LD and Greene, RW and Sitkin, SB and Sutcliffe, KM and Obstfeld, D},
   Title = {Constitutive complexity: Military entrepreneurs and the
             synthetic character of communication flows},
   Pages = {89-116},
   Booktitle = {Building Theories of Organization: The Constitutive Role of
             Communication},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {December},
   ISBN = {0203891023},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203891025},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203891025},
   Key = {fds327486}
}

@misc{fds327491,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {The ethics of reviewing},
   Booktitle = {Winning reviews: A guide for evaluating scholarly
             writing},
   Publisher = {Palgrave Macmillan},
   Editor = {Baruch, R and Sullivan, S and Schepmyer, H},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds327491}
}

@misc{fds327492,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Long, CP},
   Title = {Trust in the balance: How managers integrate trust-building
             and task control},
   Pages = {88-106},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of Trust Research},
   Publisher = {Edward Elgar Publishing},
   Editor = {Bachmann, R and Zaheer, A},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds327492}
}

@misc{fds327495,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Pablo, AL},
   Title = {Leadership and the M&A process},
   Booktitle = {Mergers and acquisitions: Creating integrative
             knowledge},
   Publisher = {BLACKWELL PUBLISHING},
   Editor = {Pablo, AL and Javidan, M},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {fds327495}
}

@misc{fds327496,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Pablo, AL},
   Title = {The neglected importance of leadership in mergers and
             acquisitions},
   Booktitle = {Mergers and acquisitions: Managing culture and human
             resources},
   Publisher = {Stanford University Press},
   Editor = {Stahl, GK and Mendenhall, M},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {fds327496}
}

@misc{fds327504,
   Author = {Browning, LD and Sitkin, SB and Sutcliffe, KM and Shetler, JC and Obstfeld, D},
   Title = {Task effectiveness and the implementation of process methods
             - Organizations in the dual pursuit of control and
             learning},
   Journal = {Advances in Interdisciplinary Studies of Work Teams, Vol 5
             2000},
   Volume = {5},
   Pages = {203-243},
   Publisher = {JAI PRESS INC},
   Editor = {Beyerlein, MM and Johnson, DA and Beyerlein, ST},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {0-7623-0360-3},
   Key = {fds327504}
}

@misc{fds327501,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {On the theoretical foundations of managerial and
             organizational cognition},
   Pages = {73-79},
   Booktitle = {Managerial and organizational cognition},
   Publisher = {Lawrence Erlbaum Associates},
   Editor = {Lant, T and Shapira, Z},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds327501}
}

@misc{fds327502,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Sutcliffe, K and Browning, L},
   Title = {Tailoring process management to situational requirements:
             Beyond the control and exploration dichotomy},
   Pages = {315-330},
   Booktitle = {The quality movement in America: Lessons for theory and
             research},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Editor = {Cole, R and Scott, WR},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds327502}
}

@misc{fds327506,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Sutcliffe, K and Weick, K},
   Title = {Organizational Learning},
   Pages = {70-76},
   Booktitle = {The technology management handbook},
   Publisher = {CRC Press and IEEE Press},
   Editor = {Dorf, RC},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds327506}
}

@misc{fds327509,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Stickel, D},
   Title = {The road to hell...The dynamics of distrust in an era of
             "quality" management},
   Booktitle = {Trust in Organizations},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Editor = {Kramer, R and Tyler, T},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds327509}
}

@misc{fds327513,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Roth, N and House, A},
   Title = {Stigma as a determinant of legalization},
   Pages = {137-168},
   Booktitle = {The legalistic organization},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Editor = {Sitkin, S and Bies, R},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds327513}
}

@misc{fds327514,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Bies, R},
   Title = {The legalization of organizations: A multi-theoretical
             perspective},
   Booktitle = {The Legalistic Organization},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds327514}
}

@misc{fds327521,
   Author = {SITKIN, SB and SUTCLIFFE, KM and BARRIOS‐CHOPLIN,
             JR},
   Title = {A Dual‐Capacity Model of Communication Media Choice in
             Organizations},
   Journal = {Human Communication Research},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {563-598},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2958.1992.tb00572.x},
   Abstract = {Most previous research concerning communication media choke
             in organizations has stressed the capacity of media to
             convey data. More recently, scholars have examined the
             capacity of media to convey and manifest meaning. Rarely
             have both functions been considered concurrently. In this
             artcle, a model is proposed that not only permits the
             simultaneous examination of these two functions but reflects
             that media use is influenced by characteristics of the task,
             individual and organizational capability constraints, and
             normative factors. By exploring the implications of this
             expanded dual‐capacity perspective, a more encompassing
             theory of the determinants of communkation media use in
             organizations is proposed. Copyright © 1992, Wiley
             Blackwell. All rights reserved},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1468-2958.1992.tb00572.x},
   Key = {fds327521}
}

@misc{fds327525,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB and Bies, R},
   Title = {Explanation as legitimation: Excuse-making in
             organizations},
   Pages = {183-198},
   Booktitle = {Explaining one's self to others: Reason-giving in a social
             context},
   Publisher = {Lawrence Erlbaum Associates},
   Editor = {McLaughlin, M and Cody, M and Read, S},
   Year = {1991},
   Key = {fds327525}
}

@misc{fds327532,
   Author = {Sitkin, SB},
   Title = {Founders and the elusiveness of a cultural
             legacy},
   Booktitle = {Organizational Culture},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Editor = {Frost, P and Moorw, L and Louis, M and Lundberg, C and Martin,
             J},
   Year = {1985},
   Key = {fds327532}
}


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