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Publications of James G. Chappel    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds335510,
   Author = {Chappel, J},
   Title = {Catholic Modern The Challenge of Totalitarianism and the
             Remaking of the Church},
   Pages = {352 pages},
   Publisher = {Harvard University Press},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   ISBN = {0674972104},
   Abstract = {Yet by the 1960s its position was reversed. How did the
             world’s largest religious organization become modern?
             James Chappel finds answers in the shattering experiences of
             the 1930s.},
   Key = {fds335510}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds362720,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Democracy, Capitalism, and the Welfare State: Debating
             Social Order in Postwar West Germany, 1949–1989. By
             Peter C. Caldwell. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019.
             Pp. viii+226. $90.00.},
   Journal = {Journal of Modern History},
   Volume = {93},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {991-993},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {2021},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/716790},
   Doi = {10.1086/716790},
   Key = {fds362720}
}

@article{fds356327,
   Author = {Chappel, J},
   Title = {“Explaining the Catholic Turn to Rights in the
             1930s”},
   Pages = {63-80},
   Booktitle = {Christianity and Human Rights Reconsidered},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {September},
   ISBN = {1108424708},
   Abstract = {This volume showcases the work of a new generation of
             scholars interested in the historical connection between
             religion and human rights in the twentieth century, offering
             a truly global perspective on the internal diversity,
             theological ...},
   Key = {fds356327}
}

@article{fds356328,
   Author = {Chappel, J},
   Title = {“On the Border of Old Age”: An Entangled History of
             Eldercare in East Germany},
   Journal = {Central European History},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {353-371},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s000893892000014x},
   Abstract = {<jats:title>ABSTRACT</jats:title><jats:p>Historical research
             has turned in the last years more intensively toward
             entangled and transnational histories of biopolitics, the
             family, and the welfare state, but without renewed interest
             in aging and pension policy, a sphere of human experience
             that is often interrogated in parochial terms, if at all. An
             analysis of the culture and policies of old age in East
             Germany in the 1950s and 1960s shows the importance of a
             transnational history of this subject. The GDR, the
             Communist state with the greatest proportion of elderly
             citizens, needed to create a socialist model of aging.
             Neither the Communist tradition in Weimar Germany, nor the
             experience of the other states in the Communist bloc
             provided substantial guidance. East Germans looked instead
             for inspiration to West Germany, which was itself engaged in
             a debate about aging and pension policy. By grappling with
             the Western experience, including its perceived and real
             limitations, the GDR in the Ulbricht developed a vision of
             what it meant to age as a socialist.</jats:p>},
   Doi = {10.1017/s000893892000014x},
   Key = {fds356328}
}

@article{fds356329,
   Author = {Chappel, J},
   Title = {The God That Won: Eugen Kogon and the Origins of Cold War
             Liberalism},
   Journal = {Journal of Contemporary History},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {339-363},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022009419833439},
   Abstract = {<jats:p> Eugen Kogon (1903–87) was one of the most
             important German intellectuals of the late 1940s. His
             writings on the concentration camps and on the nature of
             fascism were crucial to West Germany’s fledgling
             transition from dictatorship to democracy. Previous scholars
             of Kogon have focused on his leftist Catholicism, which
             differentiated him from the mainstream. This article takes a
             different approach, asking instead how Kogon, a recovering
             fascist himself, came to have so much in common with his
             peers in West Germany and in the Cold War West. By 1948, he
             fluently spoke the new language of Cold War liberalism,
             pondering how human rights and liberal democracy could be
             saved from totalitarianism. He did not do so, the article
             argues, because he had decided to abandon his principles and
             embrace a militarized anti-Communist cause. Instead, he
             transitioned to Cold War liberalism because it provided a
             congenial home for a deeply Catholic thinker, committed to a
             carceral understanding of Europe’s fascist past and a
             federalist vision for its future. The analysis helps us to
             see how European Catholics made the Cold War their own –
             an important phenomenon, given that Christian Democrats held
             power almost everywhere on the continent that was not
             controlled by Communists. The analysis reveals a different
             portrait of Cold War liberalism than we usually see: less a
             smokescreen for American interests, and more a vessel for
             emancipatory projects and ideals that was strategically
             employed by diverse actors across the globe.
             </jats:p>},
   Doi = {10.1177/0022009419833439},
   Key = {fds356329}
}

@article{fds356330,
   Author = {Chappel, J},
   Title = {The Logic of Sanctuary: Towards a New Spatial Metaphor for
             the Study of Global Religion},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Religion},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {15-34},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jaarel/lfz106},
   Doi = {10.1093/jaarel/lfz106},
   Key = {fds356330}
}

@article{fds356331,
   Author = {Chappel, J},
   Title = {Nudging Toward Theocracy: Adrian Vermeule's War on
             Liberalism},
   Journal = {Dissent},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {41-48},
   Publisher = {Project Muse},
   Year = {2020},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/dss.2020.0033},
   Doi = {10.1353/dss.2020.0033},
   Key = {fds356331}
}

@article{fds356332,
   Author = {Chappel, J},
   Title = {OldVolk:Aging in 1950s Germany, East and
             West},
   Journal = {Journal of Modern History},
   Volume = {90},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {792-833},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/700298},
   Doi = {10.1086/700298},
   Key = {fds356332}
}

@article{fds356333,
   Author = {Chappel, J},
   Title = {“Can a Rich Man Enter the Kingdom of God? The Catholic
             Debate over Private Property During the Great
             Depression”},
   Pages = {21-38},
   Booktitle = {So What's New About Scholasticism? How Neo-Thomism Helped
             Shape the Twentieth Century},
   Publisher = {Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   ISBN = {3110588250},
   Abstract = {This volume reconstructs how Neo-Thomism sought to resolve
             disparities, annul contradictions and reconcile incongruent,
             new developments.},
   Key = {fds356333}
}

@article{fds356334,
   Author = {CHAPPEL, J},
   Title = {Nuclear Families in a Nuclear Age: Theorising the Family in
             1950s West Germany},
   Journal = {Contemporary European History},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {85-109},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0960777316000539},
   Abstract = {<jats:p>This essay explores the imagination of the family in
             1950s West Germany, where the family emerged at the heart of
             political, economic and moral reconstruction. To uncover the
             intellectual origins of familialism, the essay presents
             trans-war intellectual biographies of Franz-Josef
             Würmeling, Germany's first family minister, and Helmut
             Schelsky, the most prominent family sociologist of the
             period. Their stories demonstrate that the new centrality of
             the family was not a retreat from ideology, as is often
             argued, but was in fact a reinstatement of interwar
             ideologies in a new key: social Catholicism in the former
             case, National Socialism in the latter. These divergent
             trajectories explain why Würmeling and Schelsky, despite
             being two central defenders of the family in the 1950s,
             could not work together. The essay follows their careers
             into the 1960s, suggesting that the fractious state of
             familialism in the 1950s helps us to understand its collapse
             in the face of the sexual revolution.</jats:p>},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0960777316000539},
   Key = {fds356334}
}

@article{fds356335,
   Author = {Chappel, J},
   Title = {Modern Family},
   Journal = {Dissent},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {147-151},
   Publisher = {Project Muse},
   Year = {2017},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/dss.2017.0082},
   Doi = {10.1353/dss.2017.0082},
   Key = {fds356335}
}

@article{fds314784,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Holy Wars: Secularism and the Invention of
             Religion},
   Journal = {Boston Review},
   Number = {May/June 2016},
   Year = {2016},
   url = {http://bostonreview.net/books-ideas/james-chappel-secularism-religion},
   Key = {fds314784}
}

@article{fds356336,
   Author = {Chappel, J},
   Title = {Catholicism and the Economy of Miracles in West Germany,
             1920–1960},
   Journal = {New German Critique},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {9-40},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1215/0094033x-3136985},
   Doi = {10.1215/0094033x-3136985},
   Key = {fds356336}
}

@article{fds305474,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Review of Thomas Großbölting, "Der verlorene Himmel,
             Glaube in Deutschland seit 1945"},
   Journal = {Journal of Modern History},
   Volume = {87},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {2015},
   ISSN = {1537-5358},
   Key = {fds305474}
}

@article{fds314318,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {A Servant Heart: How Neoliberalism Came to
             Be},
   Journal = {Boston Review},
   Year = {2015},
   url = {http://bostonreview.net/books-ideas/james-chappel-servant-heart-religion-neoliberalism},
   Key = {fds314318}
}

@article{fds305477,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Entries on Friedrich von Hayek, Karl Mannheim, Jacques
             Maritain, Charles Maurras, and Joseph Schumpeter},
   Booktitle = {Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds305477}
}

@article{fds295284,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Nihilism and the Cold War: The Catholic Reception of
             Nihilism between Nietzsche and Adenauer},
   Journal = {Rethinking History: the Journal of Theory and
             Practice},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Publisher = {Taylor & Francis (Routledge)},
   Year = {2014},
   ISSN = {1470-1154},
   Key = {fds295284}
}

@article{fds305475,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Review of "Foreign Front: Third World Politics in Sixties
             West Germany" by Quinn Slobodian},
   Journal = {Journal of Contemporary History},
   Volume = {49},
   Publisher = {Journal of Contemporary History},
   Year = {2014},
   ISSN = {1461-7250},
   Key = {fds305475}
}

@article{fds305476,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Review of "Grenzen des katholischen Milieus, Stabilitat und
             Gefahrdung katolischer Milieus in der Endphase der Weimarer
             republic und der NS-Zeit" edited by Joachim
             Kuropka},
   Journal = {Catholic Historical Review},
   Volume = {100},
   Year = {2014},
   ISSN = {1534-0708},
   Key = {fds305476}
}

@article{fds295286,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {“Beyond Tocquville: A Plea to Stop ‘Taking Religion
             Seriously’.”},
   Journal = {Modern Intellectual History},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {697-708},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {October},
   Abstract = {We have all heard the admonition to “take religion
             seriously.” It is a perplexing command, since AHA
             statistics indicate that graduate students have been
             flocking to religious topics for years. Library shelves
             groan under the weight of recent works that take religion
             seriously. What, then, might it mean to take religion more
             seriously, as it has been such a booming academic field for
             decades now? As Elizabeth Pritchard has pointed out, the
             imperative is not a methodological recommendation at all,
             but an ethical–political one. To take religion
             “seriously” is to grant it its rightful place as an
             independent variable amidst others, without reducing it to
             the old categories of politics or class or gender. It is
             implicitly frivolous to see religion as a superstructural
             manifestation of a deeper social or economic reality, as
             have many functionalist theories from Marx onwards. These
             accounts are routinely pilloried as condescending towards
             the past, and as failing to take historical actors at their
             word when they claim to act for religious reasons. There is
             much to this; nonetheless, the currently reigning assumption
             of religious autonomy, like that of other cultural
             artifacts, has been perilously undertheorized. In this joint
             review, I would like to show how this understanding of
             religion impedes historical understanding. It might be the
             case that, to paraphrase Oscar Wilde, religion is too
             important to take seriously.},
   Key = {fds295286}
}

@article{fds295277,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {The Fox Is Still Running: Isaiah Berlin's Continuing
             Relevance},
   Pages = {368 pages},
   Booktitle = {The Book of Isaiah},
   Publisher = {Boydell & Brewer Ltd},
   Editor = {Hardy, H},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {September},
   ISBN = {1843838761},
   Abstract = {This collection of pen-portraits of the renowned public
             intellectual Isaiah Berlin, published to mark the centenary
             of his birth, brings him vividly to life from many
             vantage-points.},
   Key = {fds295277}
}

@article{fds295283,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {A Mechanical Style in Our Joys: Time, Space, and Discipline
             in British Sports},
   Journal = {Crossings: a Counter Disciplinary Journal},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {77-115},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds295283}
}

@article{fds295282,
   Author = {CHAPPEL, J},
   Title = {THE CATHOLIC ORIGINS OF TOTALITARIANISM THEORY IN INTERWAR
             EUROPE},
   Journal = {Modern Intellectual History},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {561-590},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1479-2443},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s1479244311000357},
   Abstract = {<jats:p>Totalitarianism theory was one of the ratifying
             principles of the Cold War, and remains an important
             component of contemporary political discourse. Its origins,
             however, are little understood. Although widely seen as a
             secular product of anticommunist socialism, it was
             originally a theological notion, rooted in the political
             theory of Catholic personalism. Specifically,
             totalitarianism theory was forged by Catholic intellectuals
             in the mid-1930s, responding to Carl Schmitt's turn to the
             “total state” in 1931. In this essay I explore the
             notion's formation and circulation through the Catholic
             public sphere in both France and Austria, where
             “antitotalitarianism” was born as a new form of the
             traditional Catholic animus against the nation state
             project.</jats:p>},
   Doi = {10.1017/s1479244311000357},
   Key = {fds295282}
}

@article{fds295274,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Review of "Robert Schuman: Neo-Scholastic Humanism and the
             Reunification of Europe" by Alan Paul Fimister},
   Journal = {Journal of Ecclesiastical History},
   Number = {62},
   Pages = {269-270},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {1469-7637},
   Key = {fds295274}
}

@article{fds295275,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Review of "Hitler's Priests: Catholic Clergy in Hitler's
             Germany" by Kevin Spicer},
   Journal = {Journal of Religious History},
   Number = {35},
   Pages = {107-109},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {1467-9809},
   Key = {fds295275}
}

@article{fds295281,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {The Poetics of Sainthood in Interwar Catholic Literature: A
             Reading of 'Sons le soleil de Satan' and 'The Power and the
             Glory.'},
   Journal = {Revue Belge De Philogie Et D'Histoire},
   Number = {88},
   Pages = {1229-1253},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds295281}
}

@article{fds295273,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Review of "Religion and Its Other: Secular and Sacral
             Concepts and Practices in Interaction"},
   Journal = {Journal of Religious History},
   Number = {34},
   Pages = {496-498},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {1467-9809},
   Key = {fds295273}
}

@article{fds314320,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Review of Religion and Its Other: Secular and Sacral
             Concepts and Practices in Interaction, ed. Heike Bock, et
             al. (Frankfurt: Campus Verlag, 2008).},
   Journal = {Journal of Religious History},
   Volume = {34},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds314320}
}

@article{fds295278,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {The God(s) That Failed: Secularization and the Early
             Alasdair MacIntyre},
   Journal = {Symposia},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-15},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds295278}
}

@article{fds295279,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {The Black International [Report on Research in
             Progress]},
   Journal = {European Studies Forum},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds295279}
}

@article{fds295276,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Ronald Knox: A Bibliographic Essay},
   Journal = {Theological Librarianship},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {49-53},
   Publisher = {American Theological Library Association},
   Year = {2008},
   ISSN = {1937-8904},
   Key = {fds295276}
}


%% Book Reviews   
@article{fds314319,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {Review of "Den Kapitalismus bändigen. Oswald von
             Nell-Breunings Impulse für die Sozialpolitik," ed. Bernhard
             Emunds and Hans Günter Hockerts.},
   Journal = {Central European History},
   Volume = {49},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP): HSS Journals - No
             Cambridge Open},
   Year = {2016},
   ISSN = {1569-1616},
   Key = {fds314319}
}

@article{fds314317,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {“The Weimar Century and the Transnational History of
             Ideas.” Review essay on Udi Greenberg, Weimar
             Century},
   Journal = {H Diplo},
   Year = {2015},
   url = {https://networks.h-net.org/node/28443/discussions/85233/h-diplo-roundtable-xvii-2-weimar-century-german-%C3%A9migr%C3%A9s-and#_Toc431067987},
   Key = {fds314317}
}

@article{fds314316,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {“All Churches Have Heretics: Catholicism, Human Rights,
             and the Uses of History for Life.”},
   Journal = {The Immanent Frame},
   Year = {2015},
   url = {http://blogs.ssrc.org/tif/2015/06/05/all-churches-have-heretics-on-catholicism-human-rights-and-the-advantages-of-history-for-life/},
   Key = {fds314316}
}

@article{fds225377,
   Author = {J.G. Chappel},
   Title = {Grenzen des katholischen Milieus. Stabilität und
             Gefährdung katholischer Milieus in der Endphase der
             Weimarer republic und der NS-Zeit, ed. Joachim Kuropka
             (Münster: Aschendorff, 2013},
   Journal = {Catholic Historical Review},
   Volume = {100},
   Pages = {628-30},
   Year = {2014},
   Key = {fds225377}
}

@article{fds225378,
   Author = {J.G. Chappel},
   Title = {Quinn Slobodian, Foreign Front: Third World Politics in
             Sixties West Germany (Durham, NC: Duke University Press,
             2012)},
   Journal = {Journal of Contemporary History},
   Volume = {49},
   Pages = {869-71},
   Year = {2014},
   Key = {fds225378}
}

@article{fds314315,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {“An Intended Absence? Democracy and the Unintended
             Reformation.”},
   Journal = {The Immanent Frame},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {Fall},
   url = {http://blogs.ssrc.org/tif/2013/09/05/an-intended-absence-democracy-and-the-unintended-reformation/},
   Key = {fds314315}
}


%% Other   
@misc{fds295280,
   Author = {Chappel, JG},
   Title = {"The Heretical Imperative:" Review of "God, Interrupted:
             Heresy and the European Imagination between the World Wars"
             by Benjamin Lazier},
   Journal = {Killing the Buddha},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://killingthebuddha.com/mag/exegesis/the-heretical-imperative},
   Key = {fds295280}
}


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