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Publications of Prasenjit Duara    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds311939,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian traditions and a
             sustainable future},
   Pages = {1-328},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781107082250},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139998222},
   Abstract = {© Prasenjit Duara 2015. In this major new study, Prasenjit
             Duara expands his influential theoretical framework to
             present circulatory, transnational histories as an
             alternative to nationalist history. Duara argues that the
             present day is defined by the intersection of three global
             changes: the rise of non-western powers, the crisis of
             environmental sustainability and the loss of authoritative
             sources of what he terms transcendence-the ideals,
             principles and ethics once found in religions or political
             ideologies. The physical salvation of the world is becoming
             - and must become - the transcendent goal of our times, but
             this goal must transcend national sovereignty if it is to
             succeed. Duara suggests that a viable foundation for
             sustainability might be found in the traditions of Asia,
             which offer different ways of understanding the relationship
             between the personal, ecological and universal. These
             traditions must be understood through the ways they have
             circulated and converged with contemporary
             developments.},
   Doi = {10.1017/CBO9781139998222},
   Key = {fds311939}
}

@book{fds329926,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Afterword: A comparative glance at politics and religion in
             modern Japan},
   Pages = {305-313},
   Publisher = {Palgrave Macmillan UK},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {August},
   ISBN = {9780230240735},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/9780230336681},
   Doi = {10.1057/9780230336681},
   Key = {fds329926}
}

@book{fds312063,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The global and regional in China's nation-formation},
   Pages = {1-253},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {December},
   ISBN = {020388437X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203884379},
   Abstract = {© 2009 Prasenjit Duara. All rights reserved. China's
             history tends to be studied from a national perspective
             only. The Global and Regional in China's Nation-Formation
             attempts to train our eyes to see the picture of China less
             as a self-contained entity, a "geobody", than as part of a
             broader set of global and regional processes; from the
             "outside-in". It covers the major historical problems of
             China in the twentieth century, namely imperialism,
             nationalism, state-building, religion and the role of
             history. Part I views imperialism and nationalism in China
             from the perspective of global and regional circulations and
             interactions. It also examines the changing role of history
             over the twentieth century from the same perspective. Part
             II focuses on how myth, religion and Chinese conceptions of
             society and polity are re-shaped by external influences and
             forces, as well as how these internal practices themselves
             shape the external impact. Part III is a comparative
             section, examining how global processes become unique
             developments in China. The Global and Regional in China's
             Nation-Formation is an ideal resource for anyone studying
             China's history, society and culture.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203884379},
   Key = {fds312063}
}

@book{fds347172,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Decolonization: Perspectives from now and
             then},
   Pages = {1-312},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {041524840x},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203485521},
   Abstract = {© 2003 Prasenjit Duara. All rights reserved. Decolonization
             brings together the most cutting-edge thinking by major
             historians of decolonization, including previously
             unpublished essays and writings by leaders of decolonizing
             countries including Ho Chi-Minh and Jawaharlal Nehru. The
             chapters in this volume present a move away from Western
             analysis of decolonizaton and instead move towards the angle
             of vision of the former colonies. This is a ground-breaking
             study of a subject central to recent global
             history.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203485521},
   Key = {fds347172}
}

@book{fds312003,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Sovereignty and Authenticity Manchukuo and the East Asian
             Modern},
   Pages = {306 pages},
   Publisher = {Rowman & Littlefield},
   Year = {2004},
   ISBN = {0742530914},
   Abstract = {With its sweepingly original theoretical and comparative
             perspectives on nationalism and imperialism, this book will
             be essential reading for all those interested in
             contemporary history. Visit our website for sample
             chapters!},
   Key = {fds312003}
}

@book{fds312002,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Rescuing History from the Nation Questioning Narratives of
             Modern China},
   Pages = {286 pages},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {November},
   ISBN = {0226167232},
   Abstract = {In this book, Duara offers a way out of the impasse between
             constructionism and the evolving nation; he redefines
             history as a series of multiple, often conflicting
             narratives produced simultaneously at national, local, and
             transnational ...},
   Key = {fds312002}
}

@book{fds347174,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Rescuing History from the Nation-state},
   Pages = {32 pages},
   Year = {1992},
   Key = {fds347174}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds347165,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Book review: China and the West: Crossroads of
             Civilisation},
   Journal = {China Information},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {375-377},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0920203x19878364b},
   Doi = {10.1177/0920203x19878364b},
   Key = {fds347165}
}

@article{fds347166,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Circulatory and competitive histories},
   Pages = {18-41},
   Booktitle = {China, India and Alternative Asian Modernities},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {April},
   ISBN = {9781138339781},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780429260865},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780429260865},
   Key = {fds347166}
}

@article{fds347167,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Time and tide wait for no man: A response to warwick
             anderson and michael m. j. fischer},
   Journal = {East Asian Science, Technology and Society},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {541-547},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1215/18752160-7219395},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan. The two
             leading scholars of EASTS reflect on two approaches of STS
             studies in East Asia and Southeast Asia: one that discusses
             the reactions, reflections, and recreations of scientific
             interventions and the other that looks for more strictly
             scientific contributions. I propose a third methodology that
             compares historical processes with oceanic flows. Scientific
             breakthroughs and attendant practices and emergences
             circulate beyond their controlling agents to interact with
             other currents and forces beyond their initial space-time
             horizons. They merge, converge, submerge, reemerge, create
             countercurrents, upwell, and return in other forms. Agency
             is important but deeply limited in historical processes. The
             ocean-atmosphere-land flows are both metaphorical and
             material. As material, they condition life and history on
             earth. The question that arises today is the extent to which
             the Anthropocene, an era where human activity represents the
             greatest influence on climate and the environment, will
             ravage the ocean and the degree to which the ocean will
             avenge our depredations. The social and historical study of
             science could do worse than track these flows and
             exchanges.},
   Doi = {10.1215/18752160-7219395},
   Key = {fds347167}
}

@article{fds312060,
   Author = {Ambrus, Á and Hamilton, D},
   Title = {Foreword.},
   Volume = {53},
   Pages = {341-342},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   ISBN = {9781409428183},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03601234.2018.1439771},
   Doi = {10.1080/03601234.2018.1439771},
   Key = {fds312060}
}

@article{fds347168,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Transpacific Studies: Framing an Emerging Field. Edited by
             Janet Hoskins and Viet Thanh Nguyen . Honolulu: University
             of Hawai‘i Press, 2014. Pp. 236. ISBN 10: 0824839986; ISBN
             13: 978-0824839987.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {99-100},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s1479591416000255},
   Doi = {10.1017/s1479591416000255},
   Key = {fds347168}
}

@article{fds329923,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Afterword: The Chinese World Order as a Language
             Game—David Kang’s East Asia before the West and Its
             Commentaries},
   Journal = {Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies},
   Volume = {77},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {123-129},
   Publisher = {Project Muse},
   Year = {2017},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/jas.2017.0008},
   Doi = {10.1353/jas.2017.0008},
   Key = {fds329923}
}

@article{fds324703,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The temporal analytics of nationalism},
   Journal = {Nations and Nationalism},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {419-423},
   Publisher = {WILEY-BLACKWELL},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {fds324703}
}

@article{fds329924,
   Author = {Carlson, AR and Costa, A and Duara, P and Leibold, J and Carrico, K and Gries, PH and Eto, N and Zhao, S and Weiss, JC},
   Title = {Nations and Nationalism roundtable discussion on Chinese
             nationalism and national identity},
   Journal = {Nations and Nationalism},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {415-446},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nana.12232},
   Doi = {10.1111/nana.12232},
   Key = {fds329924}
}

@article{fds324704,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Rogers Brubaker.Grounds for Difference.},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Volume = {121},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {907-908},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ahr/121.3.907},
   Doi = {10.1093/ahr/121.3.907},
   Key = {fds324704}
}

@article{fds312223,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The Great Leap Forward in China: An Analysis of the Nature
             of Socialist Transformation},
   Journal = {Economic and Political Weekly},
   Publisher = {Economic & Political Weekly},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0012-9976},
   Key = {fds312223}
}

@article{fds343292,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {A Tale of Two Chinas},
   Journal = {Development and Change},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {3},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dech.12157},
   Doi = {10.1111/dech.12157},
   Key = {fds343292}
}

@article{fds311935,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Taming Tibet: Landscape Transformation and the Gift of
             Chinese Development},
   Journal = {Development and Change},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {562-569},
   Publisher = {WILEY-BLACKWELL},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0012-155X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000354260900008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1111/dech.12157},
   Key = {fds311935}
}

@article{fds329925,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Decolonization and its legacy},
   Pages = {395-419},
   Booktitle = {The Cambridge World History},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781107000209},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139196079.016},
   Abstract = {© Cambridge University Press 2015. Although decolonization
             has been one of the most significant events in the twentieth
             century, transforming colonies and dependent territories
             into nation states, it remains an amorphous term because of
             the different phases and varieties of decolonization. This
             chapter excludes the pre-twentieth-century movements of
             independence in the Americas, Europe, and Australia and New
             Zealand, and focuses on the movements for independence from
             Western and Japanese colonial rule principally in Asia and
             Africa from the early part of the century until the 1980s. I
             do include the "decolonization" of several countries in this
             region that were never fully or formally colonized, eg.
             China, Iran, Siam, and others, because they shared several
             important characteristics and most especially a world view
             with the anti-colonial movements mentioned above, that,
             while transformed, continues to be relevant today. Conceived
             narrowly, decolonization refers to the transfer of
             institutional and legal control by colonial governments over
             their territories and dependencies to indigenously based,
             formally sovereign states. But the movement was a much wider
             one, championing claims to human justice that had been
             denied by imperialism. Decolonization can be approached from
             a very wide range of perspectives including those of
             economic and social, cultural, and environmental histories,
             among others. I have chosen to focus on political and
             ideological themes in the relationship of decolonization to
             imperialism, nationalism, and especially the Cold War,
             because this is a neglected issue and has the potential to
             change the ways we look at several of the other approaches.
             The victory of Japan over Russia in 1905, symbolizing the
             first military defeat of a modern European state by an Asian
             one, gave the nascent decolonization movement a fillip. A
             number of anti-colonial resistance groups began to perceive
             their movements as part of a worldwide and world-redeeming
             project. While the movement is seen to have reached a climax
             in the Bandung Conference of Afro-Asian solidarity in 1955,
             decolonization movements particularly in smaller countries
             in Africa and Caribbean and Pacific islands continued until
             the 1980s.},
   Doi = {10.1017/CBO9781139196079.016},
   Key = {fds329925}
}

@article{fds347169,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The Agenda of Asian Studies and Digital Media in the
             Anthropocene},
   Journal = {Asiascape: Digital Asia},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {11-19},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/22142312-12340018},
   Abstract = {© 2015 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands. I
             explore the intersection of three forces: the changing
             status of humanities and, in particular, of Area Studies in
             the neoliberal era; the unsustainability of contemporary
             vision of humanity and the world in the Anthropocene; and
             the new methods, technologies, and partnerships that may
             help us re-prioritize and renew the intellectual goals and
             paradigm of Asian Studies globally.},
   Doi = {10.1163/22142312-12340018},
   Key = {fds347169}
}

@article{fds312027,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Culture and History in Post-Revolutionary China: The
             Perspective of Global Modernity. By Arif Dirlik. Hong Kong:
             Chinese University Press, 2012. 356 pp. $42.00
             (cloth).},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {440-441},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000319522200023&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0021911813000120},
   Key = {fds312027}
}

@article{fds312052,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {History and competition of the times: The case of East
             Asia},
   Journal = {Vingtième Siècle. Revue D'Histoire},
   Volume = {117},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {27-41},
   Publisher = {CAIRN},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0294-1759},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3917/vin.117.0026},
   Doi = {10.3917/vin.117.0026},
   Key = {fds312052}
}

@article{fds312057,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Hong Kong and the new imperialism in East Asia,
             1941-66},
   Pages = {197-211},
   Booktitle = {Twentieth-Century Colonialism and China: Localities, the
             Everyday and the World},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {December},
   ISBN = {9780203125458},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203125458},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203125458},
   Key = {fds312057}
}

@article{fds312067,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Modern Imperialism},
   Booktitle = {The Oxford Handbook of World History},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {September},
   ISBN = {9780199235810},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199235810.013.0022},
   Abstract = {© Oxford University Press, 2014. The renewed interest in
             imperialism after the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq has
             re-cast a vexed problem regarding the delimitation of the
             scope of the term imperialism. The urge to distinguish
             'imperialism' from 'empire' has surfaced as some scholars
             seek to dissociate the United States' actions from the term
             imperialism and affiliate it with the less negative, if not
             positive, vision of empire. In that light, this article
             describes empire and imperialism in history; the
             historiography of imperialism; principal developments in
             modern imperialism; and the mid-nineteenth century
             transformation of imperialism or 'new imperialism'.
             Imperialist competition in the first half of the twentieth
             century was catalyzed by a particular configuration of
             capitalism and nationalism. The nationalist foundations of
             modern imperialism have made it very difficult for the
             imperialist nation, whether Japan in Manchukuo or the United
             States in Iraq, to transition to a federated polity or
             cooperative economic entities or even 'empire'.},
   Doi = {10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199235810.013.0022},
   Key = {fds312067}
}

@article{fds312006,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {THE POLITICS OF IMAGINING ASIA},
   Journal = {Pacific Affairs},
   Volume = {85},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {377-379},
   Publisher = {PACIFIC AFFAIRS UNIV BRITISH COLUMBIA},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0030-851X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000304793200009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds312006}
}

@article{fds312074,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Migration and Diaspora in Modern Asia. By Sunil S. Amrith.
             Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. xvi, 217 pp.
             $85.00 (cloth); $30.00 (paper).},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {71},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {499-501},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000304016200015&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0021911812000137},
   Key = {fds312074}
}

@article{fds312084,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Southeast Asia. Strange parallels: Southeast Asia in global
             context, c. 800–1830, vol. 2. By Victor Lieberman. New
             York: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. 947. Maps,
             Notes, Bibliography, Index.},
   Journal = {Journal of Southeast Asian Studies},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {181-184},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-4634},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000299878400009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0022463411000713},
   Key = {fds312084}
}

@article{fds312065,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Between empire and nation: Settler colonialism in
             Manchukuo},
   Pages = {59-78},
   Booktitle = {Settler Colonialism in the Twentieth Century: Projects,
             Practices, Legacies},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780203621042},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203621042},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203621042},
   Key = {fds312065}
}

@article{fds312054,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Concluding remarks},
   Pages = {313-318},
   Booktitle = {Sun Yat-Sen Nanyang and the 1911 Revolution},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {December},
   ISBN = {9789814345460},
   Key = {fds312054}
}

@article{fds312046,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The Cold War as a historical period: an interpretive
             essay},
   Journal = {Journal of Global History},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {03},
   Pages = {457-480},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {November},
   Abstract = {<italic>As a historical period, the Cold War may be seen as
             a rivalry between two nuclear superpowers that threatened
             global destruction. The rivalry took place within a common
             frame of reference, in which a new historical relationship
             between imperialism and nationalism worked in remarkably
             parallel ways across the superpower divide. The new
             imperial–national relationship between superpowers and the
             client states also accommodated developments such as
             decolonization, multiculturalism, and new ideologies, thus
             producing a hegemonic configuration characterizing the
             period. The models of development, structures of clientage,
             unprecedented militarization of societies, designs of
             imperial enlightenment, and even many gender and
             racial/cultural relationships followed similar tracks
             within, and often between, the two camps. Finally,
             counter-hegemonic forces emerged in regions of the
             non-Western world, namely China and some Islamic societies.
             Did this portend the beginning of the end of a long period
             of Western hegemony?</italic>},
   Key = {fds312046}
}

@article{fds312048,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The Cold War as a historical period: An interpretive
             essay},
   Journal = {Journal of Global History},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {457-480},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1740-0228},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1740022811000416},
   Abstract = {As a historical period, the Cold War may be seen as a
             rivalry between two nuclear superpowers that threatened
             global destruction. The rivalry took place within a common
             frame of reference, in which a new historical relationship
             between imperialism and nationalism worked in remarkably
             parallel ways across the superpower divide. The new
             imperial-national relationship between superpowers and the
             client states also accommodated developments such as
             decolonization, multiculturalism, and new ideologies, thus
             producing a hegemonic configuration characterizing the
             period. The models of development, structures of clientage,
             unprecedented militarization of societies, designs of
             imperial enlightenment, and even many gender and
             racial/cultural relationships followed similar tracks
             within, and often between, the two camps. Finally,
             counter-hegemonic forces emerged in regions of the
             non-Western world, namely China and some Islamic societies.
             Did this portend the beginning of the end of a long period
             of Western hegemony? © 2011 London School of Economics and
             Political Science.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S1740022811000416},
   Key = {fds312048}
}

@article{fds312005,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Asia as Method: Toward Deimperialization. By Kuan-hsing
             Chen. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2010. Pp. 344.
             ISBN 10: 0822346761; 13: 9780822346760.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {221-223},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1479-5914},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000311162100004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1017/s1479591411000064},
   Key = {fds312005}
}

@article{fds312050,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The Chinese revolution and insurgent maoism in India: A
             spatial analysis},
   Journal = {Economic and Political Weekly},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {18},
   Pages = {33-36},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0012-9976},
   Abstract = {This article identifies the spatial conditions of peasant
             revolutionary uprisings principally by comparing the Indian
             Maoist movement with the Chinese peasant revolution that
             established the People's Republic of China in 1949. The
             spatial factors were by no means sufficient to grasp the
             revolution, but they represent necessary initial
             conditions.},
   Key = {fds312050}
}

@article{fds312075,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Spectacle and Sacrifice: The Ritual Foundations of Village
             Life in North China},
   Journal = {Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies},
   Volume = {71},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {163-168},
   Publisher = {Project Muse},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {0073-0548},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000301895400007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1353/jas.2011.0014},
   Key = {fds312075}
}

@article{fds312044,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Guest Editor’s Introduction Shaping Transnational Asian
             Studies},
   Journal = {China Report},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {327-332},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {fds312044}
}

@article{fds312049,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Guest editor's introduction shaping transnational asian
             studies: New directions in China-India research},
   Journal = {China Report},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {327-332},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0009-4455},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/000944551104600401},
   Doi = {10.1177/000944551104600401},
   Key = {fds312049}
}

@article{fds312062,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Asia redux: Conceptualizing a region for our
             times},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {69},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {963-983},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021911810002858},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0021911810002858},
   Key = {fds312062}
}

@article{fds312066,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Response to comments on "asia Redux"},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {69},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1027-1029},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021911810002846},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0021911810002846},
   Key = {fds312066}
}

@article{fds312061,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Chinese reforms in historical and comparative
             perspective},
   Pages = {71-81},
   Booktitle = {Reform and Development in China: What Can China Offer the
             Developing World},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {August},
   ISBN = {0203846303},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203846308},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203846308},
   Key = {fds312061}
}

@article{fds312051,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The historical roots and character of secularism in
             China},
   Pages = {58-71},
   Booktitle = {China and International Relations: The Chinese View and the
             Contribution of Wang Gungwu},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {August},
   ISBN = {0203850033},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203850039},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203850039},
   Key = {fds312051}
}

@article{fds347170,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {An east Asian perspective on religion and
             secularism},
   Pages = {1-6},
   Booktitle = {State and Secularism: Perspectives from Asia},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9814282375},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1142/9789814282383_0001},
   Doi = {10.1142/9789814282383_0001},
   Key = {fds347170}
}

@article{fds312055,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Between sovereignty and capitalism:The historical
             experiences of migrant Chinese},
   Pages = {95-109},
   Booktitle = {Diasporic Histories: Cultural Archives of Chinese
             Transnationalism},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   ISBN = {9789622090798},
   Abstract = {The present moment is one of high visibility for diasporic
             and migrant communities. Indeed, they are often celebrated
             as cosmopolitan, in-between communities who are
             self-starters and drivers of success of the countries from
             which they or their ancestors emigrated. Yet to this day,
             there are entire classes of immigrants who occupy a
             desperate niche in the economic and political system of
             nation-states that is a kind of purgatory. It is estimated
             that about 100,000 Chinese are smuggled out of China every
             year by triads and other snakeheads under the most dangerous
             conditions that makes human smuggling during the early
             twentieth century seem benevolent. The conditions of work in
             the sweatshops are numbing and unhealthy, and the
             intermittent raids by the authorities make their lives full
             of terrifying suspense. © 2009 Hong Kong University Press,
             HKU. All rights reserved.},
   Key = {fds312055}
}

@article{fds312004,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Pan-Asianism in Modern Japanese History: Colonialism,
             Regionalism and Borders},
   Journal = {Journal of Japanese Studies},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {185-188},
   Publisher = {SOC JAPANESE STUD},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0095-6848},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000263250100023&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds312004}
}

@article{fds312038,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Worlds at War: The 2,500 Year Struggle between East and
             West},
   Journal = {Common Knowledge},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {511-511},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0961-754X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1215/0961754x-2009-039},
   Doi = {10.1215/0961754x-2009-039},
   Key = {fds312038}
}

@article{fds312080,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Featured Reviews:The Theft of History},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Volume = {114},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {405-407},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0002-8762},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000265230600007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1086/ahr.114.2.405},
   Key = {fds312080}
}

@article{fds312079,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Disciplining the State: Virtue, Violence, and State‐Making
             in Modern China. By Patricia M. Thornton. (Cambridge, Mass.:
             Harvard University Asia Center, 2007. Pp.247.
             $39.95.)},
   Journal = {The Historian},
   Volume = {71},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {144-145},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0018-2370},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000264020500043&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1540-6563.2008.00233_39.x},
   Key = {fds312079}
}

@article{fds312043,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The limits of legal sovereignty: China and India in recent
             history},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {68},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {122-127},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021911809000138},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0021911809000138},
   Key = {fds312043}
}

@article{fds347171,
   Author = {Ocko, JK and Gilmartin, D and Shue, V and Kahn, PW and Peerenboom, R and Benton, L and Duara, P},
   Title = {Response to comments on our paper},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {68},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {127-133},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S002191180900014X},
   Doi = {10.1017/S002191180900014X},
   Key = {fds347171}
}

@article{fds312053,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Religion and citizenship in China and the
             diaspora},
   Pages = {43-64},
   Booktitle = {Chinese Religiosities: Afflictions of Modernity and State
             Formation},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {November},
   ISBN = {9780520098640},
   Key = {fds312053}
}

@article{fds312042,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The global and regional constitution of nations: The view
             from East Asia},
   Journal = {Nations and Nationalism},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {323-345},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1354-5078},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8129.2008.00328.x},
   Abstract = {While the origins of nationalism are sought in global
             historical trends, few analysts have shown how nations
             themselves are constituted and re-shaped by circulating
             global power, ideas and models. The view from East Asia
             shows that these circulations are mediated by regional
             developments and interactions which bind these nations
             together in rivalry and interdependence. The histories of
             China, Japan and Korea have been closely tied together since
             the end of the nineteenth century and, with a gap of about
             thirty years during the Cold War, have intensified once
             again. The global and regional constitution of nations
             produces a dialectic between its global form and aspirations
             and misrecognition of this constitution arising from the
             self-perception of nationalism as historically immanent.
             This tension between the global constitution and national
             misrecognition contributes to the tenacity of nationalism.
             It also allows us to get a better grasp of the relationship
             between historical change and structure in nationalism and
             the relationship between state and popular nationalisms in
             the countries of the region. © The author 2008. Journal
             compilation © ASEN/Blackwell Publishing Ltd
             2008.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1469-8129.2008.00328.x},
   Key = {fds312042}
}

@article{fds312069,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Historical consciousness and national identity},
   Pages = {46-67},
   Booktitle = {The Cambridge Companion to Modern Chinese
             Culture},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780521863223},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CCOL9780521863223.003},
   Abstract = {© Cambridge University Press 2008 and Cambridge University
             Press, 2009. Most Chinese are extremely proud of their long
             and continuous historical civilization, which some claim
             extends for five thousand years. But for much of the
             twentieth century, Chinese revolutionaries had a very
             ambivalent and mostly negative view of these millennia,
             believing that they produced a slavish and feudal mentality.
             The vicissitudes of modern historical consciousness in China
             closely reflect the kind of nation and society that regimes
             and intellectuals battled over in their search for a new
             China and an identity for the Chinese people. In other
             words, if we want to understand how Chinese leaders and
             people see their society and their role in the world, we
             need to consider their changing views of history. For much
             of the last hundred years, one of the central historical
             questions that has preoccupied scholars and statesmen
             seeking to make sense of China’s present relates to the
             transition from a Confucian, imperial society to a modern
             nation-state. In contrast to many other non-Western
             societies, imperial China possessed several characteristics
             that would facilitate this transition - as well as several
             that would hinder it. The former included the existence of a
             unified bureaucratic state, a politicized gentry elite with
             a sense of societal responsibility, a relatively open
             society largely free of ascriptive roles, and a highly
             developed preindustrial economy and entrepreneurial
             expertise.},
   Doi = {10.1017/CCOL9780521863223.003},
   Key = {fds312069}
}

@article{fds312076,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Collaboration: Japanese Agents and Local Elites in Wartime
             China. Timothy Brook},
   Journal = {The China Journal},
   Volume = {59},
   Pages = {142-144},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1324-9347},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000253882600010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1086/tcj.59.20066387},
   Key = {fds312076}
}

@article{fds312078,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {History and globalization in China's long twentieth
             century},
   Journal = {Modern China},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {152-164},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0097-7004},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0097700407308141},
   Abstract = {This commentary reflects on the contributions of the five
             principal essayists in this volume of Modern China. It seeks
             to grasp the role and weight of historical and distinctively
             Chinese factors in relation to global forces operating in
             China since the early twentieth century in these macroscopic
             essays. Building on their contributions, I develop a
             "globalization paradigm" in which the embeddedness of
             nations in global discourses and practices are often
             misrecognized as national and domestic. But while many
             national practices represent globally familiar reactions to
             recognized global tendencies, several of these essays help
             us to identify often unarticulated historical tendencies and
             emergent practices, including those from the Chinese
             socialist experience. They suggest ways in which Chinese and
             global practices become intertwined, as for instance
             adaptations of the Qing imperial idea to the current day.
             These practices not only make China different from other
             nations, but also have the potential to make a difference in
             the world. © 2008 Sage Publications.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0097700407308141},
   Key = {fds312078}
}

@article{fds312072,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Postcolonial History},
   Pages = {417-431},
   Booktitle = {A Companion to Western Historical Thought},
   Publisher = {Blackwell Publishers Inc.},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {December},
   ISBN = {0631217142},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9780470998748.ch22},
   Doi = {10.1002/9780470998748.ch22},
   Key = {fds312072}
}

@article{fds312012,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {TO THINK LIKE AN EMPIRE},
   Journal = {History and Theory},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {292-298},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0018-2656},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000246009600013&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1468-2303.2007.00409.x},
   Key = {fds312012}
}

@article{fds312014,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {China's unequal treaties: Narrating national
             history.},
   Journal = {Pacific Affairs},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {314-315},
   Publisher = {PACIFIC AFFAIRS UNIV BRITISH COLUMBIA},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0030-851X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000241970100018&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds312014}
}

@article{fds312034,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The Teleology of the Modern Nation-state: Japan and China
             (review)},
   Journal = {The Journal of Japanese Studies},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {490-492},
   Publisher = {Project Muse},
   Year = {2005},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/jjs.2005.0040},
   Doi = {10.1353/jjs.2005.0040},
   Key = {fds312034}
}

@article{fds312056,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {China unbound: Evolving perspectives on the
             Chinese},
   Journal = {Pacific Affairs},
   Volume = {77},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {742-743},
   Publisher = {PACIFIC AFFAIRS UNIV BRITISH COLUMBIA},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0030-851X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000228938000022&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds312056}
}

@article{fds312039,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The discourse of civilization and decolonization},
   Journal = {Journal of World History},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-6},
   Publisher = {Johns Hopkins University Press},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/jwh.2004.0006},
   Abstract = {This short introduction to the following collection of
             essays seeks to map out the different ways in which the
             discourse of civilization has been understood and deployed
             over the past century. We can find tensions in the
             understanding of civilization between conceptions of it as
             singular and multiple, between civilization is a process and
             an achieved state, between spiritual and material
             civilizations, and between elite and popular or ethnographic
             versions. These tensions reflect the ambivalence of
             civilization as subservient to the goals of the nation-state
             and as encompassing a higher, authorizing ideal that
             continues to this day. © 2004 by University of Hawai'i
             Press.},
   Doi = {10.1353/jwh.2004.0006},
   Key = {fds312039}
}

@article{fds347173,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Introduction: The decolonization of Asia and Africa in the
             twentieth century},
   Pages = {1-18},
   Booktitle = {Decolonization: Perspectives from Now and
             Then},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {041524840x},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203485521-4},
   Abstract = {© 2003 Prasenjit Duara. All rights reserved. From a
             historian’s perspective, decolonization was one of the
             most important political developments of the twentieth
             century because it turned the world into the stage of
             history. Until World War I, historical writing had been the
             work of the European conquerors that, in the words of Oswald
             Spengler, had made the world appear to ‘revolve around the
             pole of this little part-world’ that is Europe. With few
             exceptions, the regions outside Europe were seen to be
             inhabited by people without the kind of history capable of
             shaping the world. The process of decolonizaton, which began
             towards the end of World War I, was accompanied by the
             appearance of national historical consciousness in these
             regions, that is, the history, not of dynasties or the work
             of God/gods, but of a people as a whole. To be sure,
             historical writing continues to be filtered through national
             preoccupations, but the rapid spread of modern historical
             writing to most of the world also enabled us to see how
             happenings in one region - no matter how peripheral or
             advanced - were often linked to processes and events in
             other parts. It became possible to grasp, as did the leaders
             of decolonization, the entire globe as an interconnected
             entity for understanding and action.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203485521-4},
   Key = {fds347173}
}

@article{fds312040,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Nationalism and transnationalism in the globalisation of
             China},
   Journal = {China Report},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-19},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0009-4455},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/000944550303900101},
   Abstract = {This paper is an effort to chart a genealogy of
             globalisation. A genealogy is a 'history of the present in
             terms of its past'. Thus, genealogy is not the story of the
             past in itself, but an examination of the historical
             possibilities of the present in the past. Basically, the
             problem posed by globalisation is how the flow of resources,
             people and ideas-whether enabled by economic expansion or
             capitalism, or by other push factors-can be regulated,
             controlled or fixed for both productive and sectional
             purposes. Our understanding of this problematic of flow and
             control has necessarily been shaped by nationalism as the
             principal normative regulator of fixity and identity in the
             world. I want to throw this normative understanding into
             relief by looking at what pre-existed it, as well as what is
             now coming into being, specifically in the context of China
             in the East Asian region. I consider a tripartite
             division-starting with the imperial Chinese order, the
             period of classical nationalism from about 1900 until 1980,
             followed by the current trend of globalisation-to examine
             the problem of flow and control in the region. Historically
             the paper considers differences and continuities in how
             political power-and what came to be conceived as sovereignty
             over the last hundred years or so-in the region has been
             conceived, as well as in the forces that have eluded or
             sought to elude political control. At stake in this broad
             historical sweep is not to see what is old or new in
             globalisation per se, but how these changes in the region
             have affected different sectors of society and their vision
             of the world.},
   Doi = {10.1177/000944550303900101},
   Key = {fds312040}
}

@article{fds312021,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {North China at War: The Social Ecology of Revolution,
             1937–1945. Edited by Chongyi Feng and David S. Goodman.
             Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2000. xix,
             236 pp. $84.00 (cloth); $29.95 (paper).},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {1025-1027},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3096368},
   Doi = {10.2307/3096368},
   Key = {fds312021}
}

@article{fds311936,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Civilizations and nations in a globalizing
             world},
   Pages = {79-99},
   Year = {2002},
   ISBN = {90-04-12797-6},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000183428800005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311936}
}

@article{fds312081,
   Author = {Duara, P and Brook, T and Schmid, A},
   Title = {Nation Work: Asian Elites and National Identities},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Volume = {106},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {928-928},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0002-8762},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000169558800017&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2692338},
   Key = {fds312081}
}

@article{fds312045,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The discourse of civilization and pan-asianism},
   Journal = {Journal of World History},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {99-130},
   Publisher = {Johns Hopkins University Press},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/jwh.2001.0009},
   Abstract = {At the end of World War I, the idea of multiple
             civilizations as opposed to a singular Enlightenment
             Civilization gained acceptance with the emergence of
             anti-imperialist nationalism. The new civilization discourse
             was a product not only of the writings of Western thinkers
             like Oswald Spengler and Arnold J. Toynbee, but also of
             various intellectual, cultural, religious, and social
             movements in East Asia and elsewhere. Central to the
             understanding of civilization during this period was the
             extent to which it could be identified or conflated with a
             national ideal. The Japanese deployment of the Pan-Asianist
             civilizational rhetoric in China and elsewhere represents a
             complex case study of the potential of this discourse. As
             long as the civilizational idea could represent an ideal
             that transcended loyalty to the nation-state, it retained
             its critical possibilities.},
   Doi = {10.1353/jwh.2001.0009},
   Key = {fds312045}
}

@article{fds312064,
   Author = {Duara, P and Leifer, M},
   Title = {Asian Nationalism: China, Taiwan, Japan, India, Pakistan,
             Indonesia, the Philippines},
   Journal = {Pacific Affairs},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {583-583},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {2001},
   ISSN = {0030-851X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000174497800009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/3557811},
   Key = {fds312064}
}

@article{fds312025,
   Author = {Duara, P and Huang, R},
   Title = {Broadening the Horizons of Chinese History: Discourses,
             Syntheses, and Comparisons},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Volume = {105},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {880-880},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0002-8762},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000087627400010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2651815},
   Key = {fds312025}
}

@article{fds312059,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Response to Philip Huang’s “Biculturality in Modern
             China and in Chinese Studies”},
   Journal = {Modern China},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {32-37},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0097-7004},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/009770040002600102},
   Doi = {10.1177/009770040002600102},
   Key = {fds312059}
}

@article{fds312029,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Local Worlds: The Poetics and Politics of the Native Place
             in Modern China},
   Journal = {South Atlantic Quarterly},
   Volume = {99},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {13-48},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0038-2876},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1215/00382876-99-1-13},
   Doi = {10.1215/00382876-99-1-13},
   Key = {fds312029}
}

@article{fds312009,
   Author = {Duara, P and Poster, M and Jenkins, K},
   Title = {Cultural History and Postmodernity: Disciplinary Readings
             and Challenges.},
   Journal = {The Journal of American History},
   Volume = {86},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {740-740},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0021-8723},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2567061},
   Doi = {10.2307/2567061},
   Key = {fds312009}
}

@article{fds312071,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Culture and State in Chinese History: Conventions,
             Accommodations, and Critique. Edited by Theodore Huters R.
             Bin Wong and Pauline Yu. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford
             University Press, 1997. 500 pp. $65.00 (cloth); $24.95
             (paper).},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {57},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1124-1126},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2659323},
   Doi = {10.2307/2659323},
   Key = {fds312071}
}

@article{fds312020,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Purity and exile: Violence, memory, and national cosmology
             among Hutu refugees in Tanzania.},
   Journal = {Comparative Studies in Society and History},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {581-582},
   Publisher = {CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0010-4175},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000075651000008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds312020}
}

@article{fds312041,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The regime of authenticity: Timelessness, gender, and
             national history in modern China},
   Journal = {History and Theory},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {287-308},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0018-2656},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/0018-2656.00055},
   Abstract = {While there is much writing on the nation as the subject of
             linear history, considerably less attention has been paid to
             the dimension of the nation as the always identifiable,
             unchanging subject of history. This unchanging subject is
             necessitated by the ascendancy of the conception of linear
             time in capitalism in which change is viewed not only as
             accelerating, but can no longer be framed by an ultimate
             source of meaning such as God. Ostensibly, linear history is
             the falling of events into the "river of time," but national
             history also posits a continuous subject to gather these
             changes. Such a subject is recognizable only by the
             spiritual qualities of authenticity, purity, and sacrality.
             The nation-state and nationalists stake their claim to
             sovereign authority, in part, as custodians of this
             authenticity. A range of figures, human and non-human, come
             to symbolize a regime of authenticity manipulable to some
             extent by nationalists and state-builders. This essay
             focuses on the instance of women in early twentieth-century
             China. Nationalists and cultural essential- ists tended to
             depict women as embodying the eternal Chinese civilizational
             virtues of self-sacrifice and loyalty and to elevate them as
             national exemplars. The essay also examines cases of how
             women themselves may have perceived this role as exemplars
             and concludes that while there was considerable subversion
             in their enunciation of this role (to their advantage),
             there was sufficient reference to the prescriptive code of
             authenticity in their self-formation to sustain the regime
             of authenticity. The essay ends with some thoughts about the
             changing relationship between authenticity and intensifying
             globalization in the contemporary world.},
   Doi = {10.1111/0018-2656.00055},
   Key = {fds312041}
}

@article{fds312047,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Transnationalism in the era of nation-states: China,
             1900-1945},
   Journal = {Development and Change},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {647-670},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0012-155X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-7660.00094},
   Abstract = {Transnationalism tends to be seen as a late twentieth
             century development associated with advanced capitalism,
             flexible production and post-modernism. However, if, as many
             claim, nationalism emerged in the era of capitalism, then it
             surely had to deal with the boundary-crossing and
             globvalizing impetus of capitalism from its inception. This
             article explores how nationalist regimes and spokesmen dealt
             with the transnational flows, demands, and ideals generated
             not only by capitalism, but by historical forces such as
             universalizing religiouns and the distribution and movement
             of populations across territorial nations. Focusing on East
             Asia in the first half of the 20th century, three cases are
             studied: the convergence of Chinese and Japanese ideals of
             pan-Asianism; the Chinese republican regime's effort to
             incorporate the non-Chinese peoples of the vast peripheries
             into the territorial nation-state; and this regime's efforts
             to cultivate the loyalty of overseas Chinese to the
             nation-state. Mobilizing and deploying these
             transterritorial phenomena was crucial to the nation-state's
             internal power, yet such a mobilization tended to transgress
             the conception of territorial sovereignty upon which the
             nation-state was equally dependent both domestically and
             internationally. The recent signs of a tendency for the
             territorially sovereign nation to develop into a
             deterritorialized nation has consequences that can only be
             understood in the context of the nation's relationship to
             transnational forces in this earlier period.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-7660.00094},
   Key = {fds312047}
}

@article{fds311937,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Why is history antitheoretical?},
   Journal = {Modern China},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {105-120},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0097-7004},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/009770049802400202},
   Doi = {10.1177/009770049802400202},
   Key = {fds311937}
}

@article{fds312024,
   Author = {Duara, P and Duus, P and Myers, RH and Peattie, MR},
   Title = {The Japanese Wartime Empire, 1931-1945.},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Volume = {102},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1553-1553},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0002-8762},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000071031800142&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2171203},
   Key = {fds312024}
}

@article{fds312033,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Rummaging through the dustbin of history - A
             response},
   Journal = {Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {67-68},
   Publisher = {BULLETIN CONCERNED ASIAN SCHOLARS},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0007-4810},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000072588000009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds312033}
}

@article{fds312022,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Transnationalism and the Predicament of Sovereignty: China,
             1900-1945},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Volume = {102},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1030-1030},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0002-8762},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1997YB82800003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2170628},
   Key = {fds312022}
}

@article{fds312007,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Short review},
   Journal = {Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {70-71},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0007-4810},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1997WW91800015&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1080/14672715.1997.10409707},
   Key = {fds312007}
}

@article{fds312030,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Remapping Memory: The Politics of Timespace. Edited by
             Jonathan Boyarin Afterword by Charles Tilly. Minneapolis:
             University of Minnesota Press, 1994. $44.95 (cloth); $18.95
             (paper).},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {141-142},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1997XA93700010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2646349},
   Key = {fds312030}
}

@article{fds312073,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {China's Motor: A Thousand Years of Petty Capitalism.Hill
             Gates},
   Journal = {American Journal of Sociology},
   Volume = {102},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1168-1169},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0002-9602},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1997WH33400010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1086/231046},
   Key = {fds312073}
}

@article{fds312008,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Memory, History, and Opposition Under State Socialism.Rubie
             S. Watson},
   Journal = {The China Journal},
   Volume = {36},
   Pages = {166-168},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1324-9347},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996VC09600023&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2950389},
   Key = {fds312008}
}

@article{fds312083,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Revolutionary Discourse in Mao's Republic.David E. Apter ,
             Tony Saich},
   Journal = {American Journal of Sociology},
   Volume = {101},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {231-233},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0002-9602},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1995RJ18300014&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1086/230709},
   Key = {fds312083}
}

@article{fds312032,
   Author = {DUARA, P},
   Title = {THE MAKING OF A HINTERLAND - STATE, SOCIETY AND ECONOMY IN
             INLAND NORTH CHINA, 1853-1937 - POMERANZ,K},
   Journal = {The China Quarterly},
   Number = {142},
   Pages = {631-632},
   Publisher = {CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0305-7410},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1995RL26400054&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds312032}
}

@article{fds312068,
   Author = {Duara, P and Winichakul, T},
   Title = {Siam Mapped: A History of the Geo-Body of a
             Nation.},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Volume = {100},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {477-477},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0002-8762},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1995QV03400010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2169009},
   Key = {fds312068}
}

@article{fds312028,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {China's Quest for National Identity. Edited by Lowell
             Dittmer and Samuel Kim. Ithaca and London: Cornell
             Univeristy Press, 1993. $42.50 (cloth); $16.95
             (paper).},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {165-167},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1994NG88800037&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2059553},
   Key = {fds312028}
}

@article{fds312011,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {De-Constructing the Chinese Nation},
   Journal = {The Australian Journal of Chinese Affairs},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {30},
   Pages = {1-26},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0156-7365},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1993LH41200001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2949990},
   Key = {fds312011}
}

@article{fds312023,
   Author = {Duara, P and Kemper, S},
   Title = {The Presence of the Past: Chronicles, Politics, and Culture
             in Sinhala Life.},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Volume = {98},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {930-930},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0002-8762},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1993LH60300139&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2167682},
   Key = {fds312023}
}

@article{fds312013,
   Author = {DUARA, P},
   Title = {THE DISPLACEMENT OF TENSION TO THE TENSION OF DISPLACEMENT +
             IMPERIALISM A USEFUL CATEGORY OF HISTORICAL-ANALYSIS},
   Journal = {Radical History Review},
   Number = {57},
   Pages = {60-64},
   Year = {1993},
   ISSN = {0163-6545},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1993MG37900007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds312013}
}

@article{fds312010,
   Author = {DUARA, P},
   Title = {THE PEASANT FAMILY AND RURAL-DEVELOPMENT IN THE YANGZI
             DELTA, 1350-1988 - HUANG,PCC},
   Journal = {Pacific Affairs},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {567-568},
   Publisher = {UNIV BRITISH COLUMBIA},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0030-851X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1992HJ10200037&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds312010}
}

@article{fds312085,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic.
             By Dru C. Gladney. Cambridge: Council on East Asian Studies,
             Harvard East Asian Monographs No. 149, 1991. $38.00 (cloth);
             $22.00 (paper).},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {644-646},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2057971},
   Doi = {10.2307/2057971},
   Key = {fds312085}
}

@article{fds312070,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {The Golden Age of the Chinese Bourgeoisie 1911–1937. By
             Marie-Claire BergÈre trans. Janet Lloyd. Cambridge
             University Press: Cambridge, 1989. Pp. x,
             356.},
   Journal = {Modern Asian Studies},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {632-634},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0026-749X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1992JH97400014&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0026749x00009963},
   Key = {fds312070}
}

@article{fds312036,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Chinese Village, Socialist State. By Edward Friedman, Paul
             G. Pickowicz and Mark Selden with Kay Ann Johnson. New Haven
             and London: Yale University Press, 1991. 336 pp.
             $35.00.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {143-145},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1992HL11100026&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2058369},
   Key = {fds312036}
}

@article{fds312035,
   Author = {Duara, P and Harrison, M and Martin, MF and Friedmann, H and Bhaduri, A and Chirwa, WC and Croll, EJ and Murray, MJ and Hakimian, H and Roseberry,
             W and Crook, N and Gordon, A and Raikes, P and Wells,
             R},
   Title = {Book reviews},
   Journal = {Journal of Peasant Studies},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {142-180},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0306-6150},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1991HJ73600009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1080/03066159108438475},
   Key = {fds312035}
}

@article{fds312077,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {National Polity and Local Power: The Transformation of Late
             Imperial China. By Min Tu-ki. Edited by Philip A. Kuhn and
             Timothy Brook. Cambridge, Mass.: Council on East Asian
             Studies/Harvard University and the Harvard Yenching
             Institute, 1990. 309 pp. $26.00.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {395-397},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2057235},
   Doi = {10.2307/2057235},
   Key = {fds312077}
}

@article{fds312026,
   Author = {Duara, P and Sheel, K},
   Title = {Peasant Society and Marxist Intellectuals in China: Fang
             Zhimin and the Origin of a Revolutionary Movement in the
             Xinjiang Region.},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Volume = {96},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {580-580},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0002-8762},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1991FK33500160&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2163370},
   Key = {fds312026}
}

@article{fds312082,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Knowledge and Power in the Discourse of Modernity: The
             Campaigns against Popular Religion in Early
             Twentieth-Century China},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {67-83},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2057476},
   Abstract = {<jats:p>Ever since the enlightenment—the dawn of the
             modern era—historical understanding has been much
             concerned with the passage to modernity. In our present
             century, questions and dilemmas of the transition to
             modernity and the evaluation of “tradition” in the
             non-Western world have been central to the historical
             problematique the world over. I have chosen to analyze the
             modernist understanding of this historical transition in
             China not only among professional historians in the West,
             but among Chinese advocates of modernity. Specifically, I
             will examine the campaigns attacking popular religion during
             the first three decades of this century. As a movement
             advocating the establishment of a rational society, these
             campaigns offer a view of the understanding of this
             transition, not just in theory and historiography, but in
             practice.</jats:p>},
   Doi = {10.2307/2057476},
   Key = {fds312082}
}

@article{fds311938,
   Author = {DUARA, P},
   Title = {ELITES AND THE STRUCTURES OF AUTHORITY IN THE VILLAGES OF
             NORTH CHINA, 1900-1949},
   Volume = {11},
   Pages = {261-281},
   Year = {1990},
   ISBN = {0-520-06763-0},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1990BR68C00010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311938}
}

@article{fds312037,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {: Xiang Lake: Nine Centuries of Chinese Life . R. Keith
             Schoppa.},
   Journal = {American Anthropologist},
   Volume = {91},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1083-1084},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0002-7294},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1989DB77000083&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1525/aa.1989.91.4.02a00790},
   Key = {fds312037}
}

@article{fds312019,
   Author = {Duara, P and Naquin, S and Rawski, ES},
   Title = {Chinese Society in The Eighteenth Century},
   Journal = {Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {241-241},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0073-0548},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1989AJ49300007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2719303},
   Key = {fds312019}
}

@article{fds312058,
   Author = {DUARA, P},
   Title = {THE ORIGINS OF THE BOXER UPRISING - ESHERICK,JW},
   Journal = {The International History Review},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {150-153},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0707-5332},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1988M250400017&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds312058}
}

@article{fds312017,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Superscribing Symbols: The Myth of Guandi, Chinese God of
             War},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {778-795},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2057852},
   Doi = {10.2307/2057852},
   Key = {fds312017}
}

@article{fds312016,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {State Involution: A Study of Local Finances in North China,
             1911–1935},
   Journal = {Comparative Studies in Society and History},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {132-161},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0010-4175},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1987G230500008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Beginning around the turn of the twentieth century, the
             Chinese state launched onto a course of development that
             seemed to resemble the process in early modern Europe that
             Charles Tilly and others have called state making (Tilly
             1975). The phenomenon of an expanding state structure
             penetrating levels of society untouched before,
             subordinating, co-opting, or destroying the relatively
             autonomous authority structures of local communities in a
             bid to increase its command of local resources, appeared to
             be repeating itself in late imperial and republican China.
             The similarities include the impulse toward centralization,
             bureaucratization, and rationalization; the insatiable drive
             to increase revenues for both military and civilian
             purposes; the violent resistance of local communities to
             this inexorable process of intrusion and extraction; and the
             formation of alliances between the state and local elites to
             consolidate their power (Duara 1983). © 1987, Society for
             the Comparative Study of Society and History. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0010417500014389},
   Key = {fds312016}
}

@article{fds312018,
   Author = {Duara, P and Huang, PCC},
   Title = {The Peasant Economy and Social Change in North
             China},
   Journal = {Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {283-283},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0073-0548},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1986D039300012&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2719084},
   Key = {fds312018}
}

@article{fds312031,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Party, State, and Local Elites in Republican China: Merchant
             Organizations and Politics in Shanghai, 1890–1930. By
             Joseph Fewsmith. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1985.
             xii, 275 pp. Map, Notes, Glossary, Selected Bibliography,
             Index. $25.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Asian Studies},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {117-118},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1985},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0021-9118},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2056835},
   Doi = {10.2307/2056835},
   Key = {fds312031}
}

@article{fds329927,
   Author = {Duara, P},
   Title = {Cultural Revolution and Industrial Organization in China:
             Changes in Management and the Division of Labor. By Charles
             Bettelheim. Monthly Review Press, New York. 1974. 128p.
             $6.95},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {325-326},
   Year = {1974},
   Month = {October},
   Key = {fds329927}
}


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