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Publications of Kerry L. Haynie    :chronological  combined listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds249850,
   Author = {Haynie, K},
   Title = {African American Legislators in the American
             States},
   Publisher = {New York: Columbia University Press},
   Year = {2001},
   Key = {fds249850}
}

@book{fds249852,
   Author = {Junn, J and Haynie, KL},
   Title = {New race politics in America: Understanding minority and
             immigrant politics},
   Pages = {1-195},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780521854276},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511790577},
   Abstract = {Foreign migration to the United States is dramatically
             altering the demographic profile of the American electorate.
             Nearly a third of all Americans are of non-white and
             non-European descent. Latinos and Hispanics have recently
             eclipsed African Americans as the largest minority group in
             the United States. Between 1990 and 2000, Asians doubled the
             size of their population to more than 4 percent of
             Americans. Though immigration has altered the racial and
             ethnic composition of every state in the nation,
             surprisingly little is known about the consequences of this
             new heterogeneity for American politics. This book explores
             the impact and political consequences of immigration. After
             considering the organizations that mobilize new citizens to
             politics, the authors examine the political psychology of
             group consciousness for political mobilization. Finally,
             they consider the emerging patterns and choices of new
             voters.},
   Doi = {10.1017/CBO9780511790577},
   Key = {fds249852}
}

@book{fds218823,
   Author = {K. Haynie},
   Title = {New Race Politics: Understanding Minority and Immigrant
             Politics},
   Publisher = {New York: Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {Co-edited and Jane Junn},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds218823}
}

@book{fds358247,
   Author = {Reingold, B and Haynie, KL and Widner, K},
   Title = {Race, Gender, and Political Representation Toward a More
             Intersectional Approach},
   Pages = {240 pages},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {October},
   ISBN = {0197502180},
   Abstract = {In sum, our move toward a more intersectional approach to
             the study of political representation in the United States
             demonstrates how the presence and ...},
   Key = {fds358247}
}

@book{fds358246,
   Author = {Reingold, B and Haynie, KL and Widner, K},
   Title = {Race, gender, and political representation: Toward a more
             intersectional approach},
   Pages = {1-232},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press, USA},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780197502174},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780197502174.001.0001},
   Abstract = {Who gets elected? Who do they represent? What issues do they
             prioritize? Does diversity in representation make a
             difference? Race, Gender, and Political Representation
             approaches these questions about the politics of identity in
             the United States differently. It is not about women’s
             representation or minority representation; it is about how
             race and gender interact to affect the election, behavior,
             and impact of all individuals-raced women and gendered
             minorities alike. By putting women of color at the center of
             the analysis and re-evaluating traditional, one-at-a-time
             approaches to studying the politics of race or gender, the
             authors demonstrate what an intersectional approach to
             political representation can reveal. With a wealth of
             original data on the presence, policy leadership, and policy
             impact of Black women and men, Latinas and Latinos, and
             White women and men in state legislative office in the late
             20th and early 21st centuries, each chapter shows how the
             politics of race, gender, and representation are far more
             complex than recurring “Year of the Woman” frameworks
             suggest. An array of race-gender similarities and
             differences is evident in the experiences, activities, and
             accomplishments of these state legislators. Yet one thing is
             clear: the representation of those marginalized by multiple,
             intersecting systems of power and inequality is intricately
             bound to the representation of women of color.},
   Doi = {10.1093/oso/9780197502174.001.0001},
   Key = {fds358246}
}

@book{fds309865,
   Title = {The Encyclopedia of Minorities in American Politics, Vol. I:
             African Americans and Asian Americans},
   Publisher = {Oryx Press},
   Editor = {Haynie, KL and Schultz, J and Aoki, A and McCulluch,
             A},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds309865}
}

@book{fds309866,
   Title = {The Encyclopedia of Minorities in American Politics, Vol.
             II: Hispanic Americans and Native Americans},
   Publisher = {Oryx Press},
   Editor = {Haynie, KL and Schultz, J and Aoki, A and McCulluch,
             A},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds309866}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds249837,
   Author = {Haynie, K},
   Title = {"Daniel T. Blue"},
   Booktitle = {Biographical entry in The Encyclopedia of Minorities in
             American Politics},
   Publisher = {Colorado Springs, CO: Oryx Press},
   Editor = {Schultz, JD and al, E},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds249837}
}

@misc{fds249836,
   Author = {Haynie, K},
   Title = {"Henry Frye"},
   Booktitle = {Biographical entry in The Encyclopedia of Minorities in
             Amerian Politics},
   Publisher = {Colorado Springs, CO: Oryx Press},
   Editor = {Schultz, JD and al, E},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds249836}
}

@misc{fds249838,
   Author = {Haynie, K},
   Title = {African Americans and the New Politics of Inclusion: A
             Representational Dilemma?},
   Series = {8th},
   Booktitle = {Congress Reconsidered},
   Publisher = {CQ Press},
   Editor = {Dodd, LC and Oppenheimer, BI},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds249838}
}

@misc{fds318531,
   Author = {Bratton, KA and Haynie, KL and Reingold, B},
   Title = {Agenda setting and African American women in state
             legislatures},
   Volume = {28},
   Pages = {71-96},
   Booktitle = {Intersectionality and Politics: Recent Research on Gender,
             Race, and Political Representation in the United
             States},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780203726303},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J501v28n03_04},
   Abstract = {Political scientists have, in recent years, uncovered
             substantial evidence that political representation in the
             United States is influenced by gender and race, yet
             generally examine the effects of gender entirely separate
             from the effects of race. In this article, we explore the
             agenda-setting behavior of African American female state
             legislators. We find that African American women do respond
             to both women’s interests and black interests. We also
             find that while the sponsorship of black interest measures
             by African American women (or other legislators) is not
             influenced by the proportion of African Americans within the
             chamber, African American women are less likely to sponsor
             women’s interest measures in legislatures with a
             relatively high proportion of women present. We conclude
             that because of their focus on multiple groups, black women
             occupy a unique place in representation, and that their
             choices are influenced by the institutional context in which
             they work.},
   Doi = {10.1300/J501v28n03_04},
   Key = {fds318531}
}

@misc{fds249840,
   Author = {Bratton, KA and Haynie, KL and Reingold, B},
   Title = {Gender, Race, Ethnicity and Representation: The Changing
             Landscape of Legislative Diversity},
   Booktitle = {The Book of States, 2008 Edition},
   Publisher = {Council of State Governments},
   Address = {Lexington, KY},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds249840}
}

@misc{fds249839,
   Author = {Haynie, KL},
   Title = {Racial and Ethnic Diversity in American Elections},
   Booktitle = {New Race Politics: Understanding Minority and Immigrant
             Voting},
   Publisher = {New York: Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {Junn, J and Haynie, KL},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds249839}
}

@misc{fds249844,
   Author = {Haynie, K and Reingold, B},
   Title = {Representing Women’s Interests and Intersections of
             Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in U.S. State
             Legislatures},
   Booktitle = {Representation: The Case of Women, Maria Escobar-Lemmon and
             Michelle M. Taylor},
   Publisher = {New York: Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds249844}
}

@misc{fds318532,
   Author = {Haynie, KL},
   Title = {Understanding the new race politics: Conclusions and
             challenges},
   Pages = {166-174},
   Booktitle = {New Race Politics in America: Understanding Minority and
             Immigrant Politics},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780521854276},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511790577.009},
   Abstract = {With significant waves of new immigration to the United
             States, overwhelmingly from Asia and Latin America, the
             electoral significance of minority voters is becoming
             increasingly apparent. As the studies in this volume make
             clear, how increases in the racial and ethnic diversity of
             the voting public will influence political representation,
             policy outcomes, and democratic politics, more generally,
             remains to be seen. For example, despite the growing size of
             minority groups in the United States, political
             representation by minority officials lags far behind their
             numbers in the population. The 109th Congress, elected in
             2004, is a specific case in point. This Congress is the most
             racially diverse Congress in the history of the United
             States. That year, voters sent a record number of minority
             Americans to both the United States House and Senate. The
             109th House of Representatives included forty-two African
             Americans, twenty-four Latinos, five Asian Americans, and
             one American Indian, whereas the 109th Senate had one
             African American, two Asian Americans, and two Latinos.
             Nevertheless, the Senate and the House were 95 percent and
             83 percent white, respectively. At the same time, nearly
             one-third of the U.S. population considered itself to be a
             race other than white. One of the most intriguing questions
             for the new race politics of the United States in the
             twenty-first century is whether those proportions will
             change as a function of changing patterns in minority and
             immigrant voting.},
   Doi = {10.1017/CBO9780511790577.009},
   Key = {fds318532}
}

@misc{fds249842,
   Author = {Haynie, K},
   Title = {Understanding Visible Minorities in Politics: Beyond the
             Single Axes},
   Booktitle = {’Minorités visibles en politique’},
   Publisher = {CNRS éditions},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds249842}
}

@misc{fds249843,
   Author = {K.L. Haynie and Haynie, K and Watts, CS},
   Title = {“Blacks and the Democratic Party: A Resilient
             Coalition,”},
   Booktitle = {New Directions in American Political Parties},
   Publisher = {Routledge, Taylor Francis},
   Editor = {Stonecash, J},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds249843}
}

@misc{fds249841,
   Author = {Haynie, K and Watts, CS},
   Title = {“Blacks and the Democratic Party: A Resilient
             Coalition,”},
   Booktitle = {New Directions in American Political Parties},
   Publisher = {Routledge, Taylor Francis},
   Editor = {Stonecash, J},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds249841}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds249858,
   Author = {Haynie, K},
   Title = {African-American Representatives in the New Jersey
             Legislature: 1970-1989},
   Journal = {International Journal of Africana Studies},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds249858}
}

@article{fds249853,
   Author = {K.L. Haynie and Bratton, KA and Haynie, KL and Reingold, B},
   Title = {Agenda setting and African American women in state
             legislatures},
   Journal = {Journal of Women, Politics & Policy},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {3-4},
   Pages = {71-96},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1554-477X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000250014000004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Political scientists have, in recent years, uncovered
             substantial evidence that political representation in the
             United States is influenced by gender and race, yet
             generally examine the effects of gender entirely separate
             from the effects of race. In this article, we explore the
             agenda-setting behavior of African American female state
             legislators. We find that African American women do respond
             to both women's interests and black interests. We also find
             that while the sponsorship of black interest measures by
             African American women (or other legislators) is not
             influenced by the proportion of African Americans within the
             chamber, African American women are less likely to sponsor
             women's interest measures in legislatures with a relatively
             high proportion of women present. We conclude that because
             of their focus on multiple groups, black women occupy a
             unique place in representation, and that their choices are
             influenced by the institutional context in which they work.
             © Copyright (c) by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1300/J501v28n03_04},
   Key = {fds249853}
}

@article{fds318534,
   Author = {Bratton, KA and Haynie, KL},
   Title = {Agenda setting and legislative success in state
             legislatures: The effects of gender and race},
   Journal = {Journal of Politics},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {658-679},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2647822},
   Abstract = {In this paper, we investigate the agenda-setting behavior of
             female and black state legislators, and examine whether
             women and blacks are as successful as white men in passing
             legislation. Using a six-state, three-year sample, we test a
             descriptive representation model in which group members
             (blacks and women) represent group interests above and
             beyond the extent motivated by constituency and party
             pressures. Moreover, in keeping with the social distance
             between the races, we expect blacks to be less successful
             than whites at passing legislation. We find that although
             constituency influences sponsorship agendas, blacks and
             women share a set of distinctive policy interests. Women are
             generally as likely as men to achieve passage of the
             legislation they introduce, whereas blacks are, in three
             states, significantly less likely than whites to pass
             legislation.},
   Doi = {10.2307/2647822},
   Key = {fds318534}
}

@article{fds249856,
   Author = {Haynie, KL and Bratton, A},
   Title = {Agenda-Setting and Legislative Success in State
             Legislatures: The Effects of Gender and Race},
   Journal = {The Journal of Politics},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {3},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds249856}
}

@article{fds348726,
   Author = {Haynie, KL},
   Title = {CONTAINING the RAINBOW COALITION: Political Consequences of
             Mass Racialized Incarceration},
   Journal = {Du Bois Review},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {243-251},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1742058X19000122},
   Abstract = {The emergence of an African American and Latino-dominated
             coalition with the potential to reconfigure American
             government and politics at the national, state, and local
             levels is one of the most noteworthy developments in U.S.
             politics over the past two decades. Racialized mass
             incarceration and felon disenfranchisement are impediments
             to this coalition's political power. Social scientists,
             legal scholars, and activists have long paid attention to
             how devices like poll taxes, English competency tests, voter
             intimidation, racial gerrymandering, and voter
             identification laws restrict participation and diluted the
             political influence of racial and ethnic minorities. This
             essay seeks to direct renewed scholarly attention to
             racialized mass incarceration and felon disenfranchisement
             as similar devices for suppressing and containing minority
             group political power.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S1742058X19000122},
   Key = {fds348726}
}

@article{fds344625,
   Author = {Outram, S and Graves, JL and Powell, J and Wolpert, C and Haynie, KL and Foster, MW and Blanchard, JW and Hoffmeyer, A and Agans, RP and Royal,
             CD},
   Title = {Genes, Race, and Causation: US Public Perspectives About
             Racial Difference.},
   Journal = {Race and Social Problems},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {79-90},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12552-018-9223-7},
   Abstract = {Concerns have been raised that the increase in popular
             interest in genetics may herald a new era within which
             racial inequities are seen as 'natural' or immutable. In the
             following study, we provide data from a nationally
             representative survey on how the US population perceives
             general ability, athleticism, and intellect being determined
             by race and/or genetics and whether they believe racial
             health inequities to be primarily the product of genetic or
             social factors. We find that self-described race is of
             primary importance in attributing general ability to race,
             increasing age is a significant factor in attributing
             athleticism and intellect to genes and race, and education
             is a significant factor in decreasing such racially and
             genetically deterministic views . Beliefs about the meaning
             of race are statistically significantly associated with
             respect to the perception of athletic abilities and
             marginally associated with the perception of racial health
             inequalities being either socially or genetically derived.
             Race, education, socioeconomic status, and concepts of race
             were frequently found to be multiplicative in their
             statistical effects. The persistent acceptance of a
             genetically and racially deterministic view of athleticism
             among the White and older population group is discussed in
             respect to its social impact, as is the high level of
             agreement that general abilities are determined by race
             among non-White respondents and those of lower socioeconomic
             status. We argue that these findings highlight that both
             biological and non-biological forms of understanding race
             continue to play a role into the politics of race and social
             difference within contemporary US society.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s12552-018-9223-7},
   Key = {fds344625}
}

@article{fds249845,
   Author = {Haynie, K},
   Title = {Katherine Tate, From Protest to Politics: The New Black
             Voters in American Elections},
   Journal = {Journal of Policy Analysis and Management},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {Winter},
   Key = {fds249845}
}

@article{fds249846,
   Author = {Haynie, K},
   Title = {Paul E. Peterson, ed. Classifying By Race},
   Journal = {Journal of Politics},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {fds249846}
}

@article{fds249847,
   Author = {Haynie, K},
   Title = {Paul M. Sniderman and Thomas Piazza. 2002. Black Pride and
             Black Prejudice},
   Journal = {Perspectives on Politics},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {fds249847}
}

@article{fds249854,
   Author = {Humphreys, M and Boly, I and Costanzo, P and Haynie, K and Truls},
   Title = {Racial Disparities in Diabetes a Century Ago:
             Evidence},
   Journal = {Social Science and Medicine},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {8},
   Year = {2007},
   Key = {fds249854}
}

@article{fds318533,
   Author = {Humphreys, M and Costanzo, P and Haynie, KL and Ostbye, T and Boly, I and Belsky, D and Sloan, F},
   Title = {Racial disparities in diabetes a century ago: evidence from
             the pension files of US Civil War veterans.},
   Journal = {Social Science & Medicine},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1766-1775},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2006.12.004},
   Abstract = {Using a comprehensive database constructed from the pension
             files of US Civil War veterans, we explore characteristics
             and occurrence of type 2 diabetes among older black and
             white males, living circa 1900. We find that rates of
             diagnosed diabetes were much lower among males in this
             period than a century later. In contrast to the late 20th
             Century, the rates of diagnosed diabetes were lower among
             black than among white males, suggesting that the reverse
             pattern is of relatively recent origin. Two-thirds of both
             white and black veterans had body-mass indexes (BMIs) in the
             currently recommended weight range, a far higher proportion
             than documented by recent surveys. Longevity among persons
             with diabetes was not reduced among Civil War veterans, and
             those with diabetes suffered comparatively few sequelae of
             the condition. Over 90% of black veterans engaged in low
             paying, high-physical effort jobs, as compared to about half
             of white veterans. High rates of work-related physical
             activity may provide a partial explanation of low rates of
             diagnosed diabetes among blacks. We found no evidence of
             discrimination in testing by race, as indicated by rates of
             examinations in which a urinalysis was performed. This
             dataset is valuable for providing a national benchmark
             against which to compare modern diabetes prevalence
             patterns.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.socscimed.2006.12.004},
   Key = {fds318533}
}

@article{fds249857,
   Author = {Haynie, K},
   Title = {The Color of Their Skin or the Content of Their Behavior?:
             Race and Perceptions of African American
             Legislators},
   Journal = {Legislative Studies Quarterly},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {295-314},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2003},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3162/036298002X200602},
   Abstract = {Previous studies have shown that, because of their race,
             African American candidates for public office are often
             evaluated less favorably than their colleagues by voters
             Does this dynamic continue when black candidates become
             elected officials? Using data on the North Carolina General
             Assembly, I address this question by examining the effects
             of race on perceptions of legislative effectiveness. When
             the dependent variable is the average effectiveness rating
             given by three groups -lobbyists, journalists, and other
             legislators - there is evidence that African American
             representatives are evaluated negatively because of their
             race. When the dependent variable is disaggregated into the
             separate effectiveness ratings given by each of the
             respondent groups individually, these negative perceptions
             of blacks on account of race remain on the part of lobbyists
             and other legislators, but not for journalists. Moreover,
             the negative perceptions of black representatives are not
             mitigated by these representatives possessing certain
             characteristics (e.g., seniority and leadership positions)
             that previous studies have found to be correlated with
             positive effectiveness evaluations. The presence of an
             African American Speaker in one legislative session did,
             however, seem to attenuate the negative perceptions.},
   Doi = {10.3162/036298002X200602},
   Key = {fds249857}
}

@article{fds249848,
   Author = {Haynie, K and Bedolla, LG},
   Title = {The Obama Coalition and the Future of AMerican
             Politics},
   Journal = {Politics, Groups, and Identities},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds249848}
}

@article{fds249855,
   Author = {Bratton, A and Haynie, KL},
   Title = {When the Seniority Ladder Collapses: The Determinants of
             Leadership in Term Limited and Non-Term Limited State
             Legislatures},
   Journal = {State Politics and Policy Quarterly},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds249855}
}


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