Psychology and Neuroscience Faculty Database
Psychology and Neuroscience
Arts & Sciences
Duke University

 HOME > Arts & Sciences > pn > Faculty    Search Help Login pdf version printable version 
Webpage

Psychology and Neuroscience Faculty: Publications since January 2017

List all publications in the database.    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:
%% Adcock, Rachel A.   
@article{fds319596,
   Author = {Scult, MA and Knodt, AR and Hanson, JL and Ryoo, M and Adcock, RA and Hariri, AR and Strauman, TJ},
   Title = {Individual differences in regulatory focus predict neural
             response to reward.},
   Journal = {Social Neuroscience},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {419-429},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17470919.2016.1178170},
   Abstract = {Although goal pursuit is related to both functioning of the
             brain's reward circuits and psychological factors, the
             literatures surrounding these concepts have often been
             separate. Here, we use the psychological construct of
             regulatory focus to investigate individual differences in
             neural response to reward. Regulatory focus theory proposes
             two motivational orientations for personal goal pursuit: (1)
             promotion, associated with sensitivity to potential gain,
             and (2) prevention, associated with sensitivity to potential
             loss. The monetary incentive delay task was used to
             manipulate reward circuit function, along with instructional
             framing corresponding to promotion and prevention in a
             within-subject design. We observed that the more promotion
             oriented an individual was, the lower their ventral striatum
             response to gain cues. Follow-up analyses revealed that
             greater promotion orientation was associated with decreased
             ventral striatum response even to no-value cues, suggesting
             that promotion orientation may be associated with relatively
             hypoactive reward system function. The findings are also
             likely to represent an interaction between the cognitive and
             motivational characteristics of the promotion system with
             the task demands. Prevention orientation did not correlate
             with ventral striatum response to gain cues, supporting the
             discriminant validity of regulatory focus theory. The
             results highlight a dynamic association between individual
             differences in self-regulation and reward system
             function.},
   Doi = {10.1080/17470919.2016.1178170},
   Key = {fds319596}
}

@article{fds310030,
   Author = {Murty, VP and Ballard, IC and Adcock, RA},
   Title = {Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex Predict Distinct
             Timescales of Activation in the Human Ventral Tegmental
             Area.},
   Journal = {Cerebral Cortex},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {1660-1669},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1047-3211},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhw005},
   Abstract = {The mesolimbic dopamine system contributes to a remarkable
             variety of behaviors at multiple timescales. Midbrain
             neurons have fast and slow signaling components, and
             specific afferent systems, such as the hippocampus (HPC) and
             prefrontal cortex (PFC), have been demonstrated to drive
             these components in anesthetized animals. Whether these
             interactions exist during behavior, however, is unknown. To
             address this question, we developed a novel analysis of
             human functional magnetic resonance imaging data that fits
             models of network excitation and inhibition on ventral
             tegmental area (VTA) activation. We show that specific
             afferent systems predict distinct temporal components of
             midbrain VTA signal. We found that PFC, but not HPC,
             positively predicted transient, event-evoked VTA activation.
             In contrast, HPC, but not PFC, positively predicted slow
             shifts in VTA baseline variability. Thus, unique functional
             contributions of afferent systems to VTA physiology are
             detectable at the network level in behaving humans. The
             findings support models of dopamine function in which
             dissociable neural circuits support different aspects of
             motivated behavior via active regulation of tonic and phasic
             signals.},
   Doi = {10.1093/cercor/bhw005},
   Key = {fds310030}
}


%% Appelbaum, Lawrence G.   
@article{fds324820,
   Author = {Klemish, D and Ramger, B and Vittetoe, K and Reiter, JP and Tokdar, ST and Appelbaum, LG},
   Title = {Visual abilities distinguish pitchers from hitters in
             professional baseball.},
   Journal = {Journal of Sports Sciences},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {171-179},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2017.1288296},
   Abstract = {This study aimed to evaluate the possibility that
             differences in sensorimotor abilities exist between hitters
             and pitchers in a large cohort of baseball players of
             varying levels of experience. Secondary data analysis was
             performed on 9 sensorimotor tasks comprising the Nike
             Sensory Station assessment battery. Bayesian hierarchical
             regression modelling was applied to test for differences
             between pitchers and hitters in data from 566 baseball
             players (112 high school, 85 college, 369 professional)
             collected at 20 testing centres. Explanatory variables
             including height, handedness, eye dominance, concussion
             history, and player position were modelled along with age
             curves using basis regression splines. Regression analyses
             revealed better performance for hitters relative to pitchers
             at the professional level in the visual clarity and depth
             perception tasks, but these differences did not exist at the
             high school or college levels. No significant differences
             were observed in the other 7 measures of sensorimotor
             capabilities included in the test battery, and no systematic
             biases were found between the testing centres. These
             findings, indicating that professional-level hitters have
             better visual acuity and depth perception than
             professional-level pitchers, affirm the notion that highly
             experienced athletes have differing perceptual skills.
             Findings are discussed in relation to deliberate practice
             theory.},
   Doi = {10.1080/02640414.2017.1288296},
   Key = {fds324820}
}

@misc{fds330473,
   Author = {Jack, J and Appelbaum, LG and Beam, E and Moody, J and Huettel,
             SA},
   Title = {Mapping rhetorical topologies in cognitive
             neuroscience},
   Pages = {125-150},
   Booktitle = {Topologies as Techniques for a Post-Critical
             Rhetoric},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9783319512686},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51268-6_7},
   Abstract = {© The Author(s) 2017. Many tools that neuroscientists use
             to trace the complex topography of the human brain draw on
             the neuroscience literature to yield “metanalyses” or
             “syntheses of data.” These approaches conflate
             rhetorical connections in the literature with physical
             connections in the brain. By contrast, the model presented
             in this chapter seeks not a topography of the brain but a
             topology of neuroscience. A social network analysis of
             titles and abstracts for cognitive neuroscience articles
             yields a topology of brain regions and functions. This map
             can help researchers identify underresearched areas (e.g.,
             the thalamus) or areas that are oversaturated (e.g., the
             amygdala). The map also helps researchers identify
             subdisciplines, such as “neuroeconomics,” that have not
             yet integrated with the broader field–“islands” where
             rhetorical work could yield benefits.},
   Doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-51268-6_7},
   Key = {fds330473}
}


%% Asher, Steven R.   
@article{fds322939,
   Author = {Rose, AJ and Asher, SR},
   Title = {The Social Tasks of Friendship: Do Boys and Girls Excel in
             Different Tasks?},
   Journal = {Child Development Perspectives},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3-8},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12214},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdep.12214},
   Key = {fds322939}
}


%% Bennett, Gary G.   
@article{fds329767,
   Author = {Bennett, GG and Shelton, RC},
   Title = {Extending Our Reach for Greater Impact.},
   Journal = {Health Education & Behavior},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {835-838},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1090198117736354},
   Doi = {10.1177/1090198117736354},
   Key = {fds329767}
}

@article{fds330845,
   Author = {Buscemi, J and Bennett, GG and Gorin, SS and Pagoto, SL and Sallis, JF and Wilson, DK and Fitzgibbon, ML},
   Title = {A 6-year update of the health policy and advocacy priorities
             of the Society of Behavioral Medicine.},
   Journal = {Translational Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {903-911},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13142-017-0507-z},
   Abstract = {Government policy affects virtually every topic of interest
             to health behavior researchers, from research funding to
             reimbursement for clinical services to application of
             evidence to impact health outcomes. This paper provides a
             6-year update on the expansion of Society of Behavioral
             Medicine's (SBM) public policy and advocacy agenda and
             proposed future directions. SBM's Health Policy Council is
             responsible for ensuring coordination of the policy-related
             activities of the Health Policy Committee (HPC), the Civic
             and Public Engagement Committee (CPEC), and the Scientific
             and Professional Liaison Council (SPLC). These committees
             and councils have written letters to Congress, signed onto
             advocacy letters with hundreds of organizations, and
             developed and disseminated 15 health policy briefs, the
             majority of which have been presented to legislative
             staffers on Capitol Hill. With the assistance of the SPLC,
             SBM has collaborated on policy efforts with like-minded
             organizations to increase the impact of the Society's policy
             work. Moving forward, SBM plans to continue to increase
             efforts to disseminate policy work more broadly and develop
             long-term relationships with Congressional staffers. SBM
             leadership realizes that to remain relevant, demonstrate
             impact, and advance the role of behavioral medicine, we must
             advance a policy agenda that reflects our mission of better
             health through behavior change.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13142-017-0507-z},
   Key = {fds330845}
}

@article{fds329768,
   Author = {Greaney, ML and Askew, S and Wallington, SF and Foley, PB and Quintiliani, LM and Bennett, GG},
   Title = {The effect of a weight gain prevention intervention on
             moderate-vigorous physical activity among black women: the
             Shape Program.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical
             Activity},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {139},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12966-017-0596-6},
   Abstract = {Rates of physical inactivity are high among Black women
             living in the United States with overweight or obesity,
             especially those living in the rural South. This study was
             conducted to determine if an efficacious weight gain
             prevention intervention increased moderate-vigorous physical
             activity (MVPA).The Shape Program, a weight gain prevention
             intervention implemented in community health centers in
             rural North Carolina, was designed for socioeconomically
             disadvantaged Black women with overweight or obesity. MVPA
             was measured using accelerometers, and summarized into 1-
             and 10-min bouts. We employed analyses of covariance
             (ANCOVA) to assess the relationship between changes in MVPA
             over 12 months, calculated as a change score, and
             intervention assignment (intervention versus usual
             care).Participants completing both baseline and 12-month
             accelerometer assessments (n = 121) had a mean age of 36.1
             (SD = 5.43) years and a mean body mass index of
             30.24 kg/m2 (SD = 2.60). At baseline, 38% met the
             physical activity recommendation (150 min of MVPA/week)
             when assessed using 10-min bouts, and 76% met the
             recommendation when assessed using 1-min bouts. There were
             no significant differences in change in MVPA participation
             among participants randomized to the intervention from
             baseline to 12-months using 1-min bouts (adjusted
             intervention mean [95% CI]: 20.50 [-109.09 to 150.10] vs.
             adjusted usual care mean [95% CI]: -80.04 [-209.21 to
             49.13], P = .29), or 10-min bouts (adjusted intervention
             mean [95% CI]: 7.39 [-83.57 to 98.35] vs. adjusted usual
             care mean [95% CI]: -17.26 [-107.93 to 73.40],
             P = .70).Although prior research determined that the Shape
             intervention promoted weight gain prevention, MVPA did not
             increase significantly among intervention participants from
             baseline to 12 months. The classification of bouts had a
             marked effect on the prevalence estimates of those meeting
             physical activity recommendations. More research is needed
             to understand how to promote increased MVPA in weight gain
             prevention interventions.This study is registered at
             www.clinicaltrials.gov database (No. NCT00938535.
             Retrospectively Registered 7/10/2009).},
   Doi = {10.1186/s12966-017-0596-6},
   Key = {fds329768}
}

@article{fds324092,
   Author = {Winkler, MR and Moore, ED and Bennett, GG and Armstrong, SC and Brandon,
             DH},
   Title = {Parent-adolescent influences on everyday dietary practices:
             Perceptions of adolescent females with obesity and their
             mothers.},
   Journal = {Maternal and Child Nutrition},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {4},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12416},
   Abstract = {Parents demonstrate an important influence on adolescent
             obesity and dietary behavior; yet, family-based obesity
             interventions continue to exhibit limited success among
             adolescents. To further inform family-based approaches for
             adolescent obesity treatment, we examined the perceptions of
             adolescent females with obesity and their mothers of the
             influences experienced within the parent-adolescent
             relationship that affect everyday dietary practices. We
             conducted six focus group interviews (three adolescent
             female and three mother) among 15 adolescent (12-17 years
             old) females with obesity and 12 of their mothers. Content
             analysis techniques were used to analyze the transcribed
             interviews. Adolescent females with obesity discussed a
             diverse set of parental influences (controlling, supporting
             and cultivating, overlooking and tempting, acquiescing,
             providing, attending, and not providing and avoiding) on
             their daily dietary practices. Among mother focus groups,
             mothers discussed specific intentional and unintentional
             types of influences from children that affected the food and
             drink they consumed, prepared, and acquired. Findings
             provide a fuller view of the varied social influences on
             everyday dietary practices within the parent-adolescent
             relationship. They indicate the importance of examining both
             parent-to-child and child-to-parent influences and begin to
             illuminate the value of attending to the social
             circumstances surrounding dietary behaviors to strengthen
             family-based obesity treatment approaches.},
   Doi = {10.1111/mcn.12416},
   Key = {fds324092}
}

@article{fds326827,
   Author = {Proeschold-Bell, RJ and Turner, EL and Bennett, GG and Yao, J and Li,
             X-F and Eagle, DE and Meyer, RA and Williams, RB and Swift, RY and Moore,
             HE and Kolkin, MA and Weisner, CC and Rugani, KM and Hough, HJ and Williams, VP and Toole, DC},
   Title = {A 2-Year Holistic Health and Stress Intervention: Results of
             an RCT in Clergy.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {290-299},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2017.04.009},
   Abstract = {This study sought to determine the effect of a 2-year,
             multicomponent health intervention (Spirited Life) targeting
             metabolic syndrome and stress simultaneously.An RCT using a
             three-cohort multiple baseline design was conducted in
             2010-2014.Participants were United Methodist clergy in North
             Carolina, U.S., in 2010, invited based on occupational
             status. Of invited 1,745 clergy, 1,114 consented, provided
             baseline data, and were randomly assigned to immediate
             intervention (n=395), 1-year waitlist (n=283), or 2-year
             waitlist (n=436) cohorts for a 48-month trial duration.The
             2-year intervention consisted of personal goal setting and
             encouragement to engage in monthly health coaching, an
             online weight loss intervention, a small grant, and three
             workshops delivering stress management and theological
             content supporting healthy behaviors. Participants were not
             blinded to intervention.Trial outcomes were metabolic
             syndrome (primary) and self-reported stress and depressive
             symptoms (secondary). Intervention effects were estimated in
             2016 in an intention-to-treat framework using generalized
             estimating equations with adjustment for baseline level of
             the outcome and follow-up time points. Log-link Poisson
             generalized estimating equations with robust SEs was used to
             estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) for binary outcomes; mean
             differences were used for continuous/score outcomes.Baseline
             prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 50.9% and depression
             was 11.4%. The 12-month intervention effect showed a benefit
             for metabolic syndrome (PR=0.86, 95% CI=0.79, 0.94,
             p<0.001). This benefit was sustained at 24 months of
             intervention (PR=0.88; 95% CI=0.78, 1.00, p=0.04). There was
             no significant effect on depression or stress scores.The
             Spirited Life intervention improved metabolic syndrome
             prevalence in a population of U.S. Christian clergy and
             sustained improvements during 24 months of intervention.
             These findings offer support for long-duration behavior
             change interventions and population-level interventions that
             allow participants to set their own health goals.This study
             is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01564719.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.amepre.2017.04.009},
   Key = {fds326827}
}

@article{fds327016,
   Author = {Herring, SJ and Cruice, JF and Bennett, GG and Darden, N and Wallen, JJ and Rose, MZ and Davey, A and Foster, GD},
   Title = {Intervening during and after pregnancy to prevent weight
             retention among African American women.},
   Journal = {Preventive Medicine Reports},
   Volume = {7},
   Pages = {119-123},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.05.015},
   Abstract = {Efforts to prevent postpartum weight retention in extant
             clinical trials of African American women have proven
             exceedingly challenging. The primary purpose of this pilot
             study was to determine whether a behavioral intervention
             implemented in early pregnancy through 6 months postpartum
             could increase the proportion of African American women who
             were at or below their early pregnancy weights by 6 months
             postpartum. We additionally evaluated whether mothers'
             postpartum weight loss could be maintained at 12 months
             postpartum. Participants were 66 socioeconomically
             disadvantaged African American women (36% overweight, 64%
             obese) randomly assigned to a behavioral intervention or
             usual care group. The intervention, implemented from early
             pregnancy to 6 months postpartum, promoted weight control
             through: (1) empirically supported behavior change goals;
             (2) interactive self-monitoring text messages; (3) weekly to
             monthly health coach calls; and (4) skills training and
             support through Facebook. In modified intent-to-treat
             analyses, participants assigned to the intervention were
             significantly more likely to be at or below their early
             pregnancy weights by 6 months postpartum compared to usual
             care (56% vs. 29%, p = 0.04). At 12 months postpartum,
             the maternal weight difference between intervention and
             usual care groups was not maintained (41% vs. 38%
             respectively at or below early pregnancy weights,
             p = 0.83). Findings suggest that a combined pregnancy and
             postpartum weight control intervention improves 6 month
             weight outcomes in socioeconomically disadvantaged African
             American women with obesity. Longer interventions may be
             needed to overcome late postpartum weight gain among this
             high risk group. Clinical trial registration number:
             ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01530776.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.05.015},
   Key = {fds327016}
}

@article{fds324090,
   Author = {Steinberg, DM and Christy, J and Batch, BC and Askew, S and Moore, RH and Parker, P and Bennett, GG},
   Title = {Preventing Weight Gain Improves Sleep Quality Among Black
             Women: Results from a RCT.},
   Journal = {Annals of Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {555-566},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12160-017-9879-z},
   Abstract = {Obesity and poor sleep are highly prevalent among Black
             women.We examined whether a weight gain prevention
             intervention improved sleep among Black women.We conducted a
             randomized trial comparing a 12-month weight gain prevention
             intervention that included self-monitoring through mobile
             technologies and phone coaching to usual care in community
             health centers. We measured sleep using the Medical Outcomes
             Study Sleep Scale at baseline, 12 months, and 18 months.
             The scale examines quantity of sleep, sleep disturbance,
             sleep adequacy, daytime somnolence, snoring, shortness of
             breath, and global sleep problems (sleep problem indices I
             and II).Participants (n = 184) were on average 35.4 years
             and obese (BMI 30.2 kg/m2); 74% made <$30,000/year. At
             baseline, average sleep duration was 6.4 (1.5) hours.
             Controlling for weight change and sleep medication, the
             intervention group reported greater improvements in sleep
             disturbance [-8.35 (-16.24, -0.45)] and sleep problems at
             12 months: sleep problem index I [-8.35 (-16.24, -0.45)];
             sleep problem index II [-8.35 (-16.24, -0.45)]. However,
             these findings did not persist at 18 months.Preventing
             weight gain may afford clinical benefit on improving sleep
             quality.The trial was registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov
             database (NCT00938535).},
   Doi = {10.1007/s12160-017-9879-z},
   Key = {fds324090}
}

@article{fds324093,
   Author = {Greaney, ML and Askew, S and Foley, P and Wallington, SF and Bennett,
             GG},
   Title = {Linking patients with community resources: use of a free
             YMCA membership among low-income black women.},
   Journal = {Translational Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {341-348},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13142-016-0431-7},
   Abstract = {Given the increasing interest in expanding obesity
             prevention efforts to cover community-based programs, we
             examined whether individuals would access a YMCA for
             physical activity promotion. We provided a no-cost 12-month
             YMCA membership to socioeconomically disadvantaged black
             women who were randomized to the intervention arm of a
             weight gain prevention trial (n = 91). Analyses examined
             associations of membership activation and use with baseline
             psychosocial, contextual, health-related, and
             sociodemographic factors. Many participants (70.3 %)
             activated their memberships; however, use was low (42.2 %
             had no subsequent visits, 46.9 % had one to ten visits).
             There were no predictors of membership activation, but
             individuals living below/borderline the federal poverty line
             were more likely to use the center (1+ visits), as were
             those who met physical activity guidelines at baseline. More
             comprehensive and intensive interventions may be necessary
             to promote use of community resources-even when provided
             free-among high-risk populations of women with obesity that
             live in rural areas of the USA.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13142-016-0431-7},
   Key = {fds324093}
}

@article{fds328845,
   Author = {Steinberg, D and Bennett, GG and Svetkey, L},
   Title = {The DASH Diet, 20 Years Later.},
   Journal = {JAMA : the journal of the American Medical
             Association},
   Volume = {317},
   Number = {15},
   Pages = {1529-1530},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2017.1628},
   Doi = {10.1001/jama.2017.1628},
   Key = {fds328845}
}

@article{fds324091,
   Author = {Benjamin Neelon and SE and Østbye, T and Bennett, GG and Kravitz, RM and Clancy, SM and Stroo, M and Iversen, E and Hoyo, C},
   Title = {Cohort profile for the Nurture Observational Study examining
             associations of multiple caregivers on infant growth in the
             Southeastern USA.},
   Journal = {BMJ Open},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {e013939},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013939},
   Abstract = {Childcare has been associated with obesity in children in
             cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, although some
             observed no association. Few studies have focused on care
             during infancy, a period when children may be especially
             vulnerable.The Nurture Study is an observational birth
             cohort designed to assess longitudinal associations of
             childcare and the presence of multiple caregivers on infant
             adiposity and weight trajectories throughout the first year
             of life. We examine as potential mediators feeding, physical
             activity, sleep and stress. We completed recruitment in
             2015. Of the 860 women who enrolled during pregnancy, 799
             delivered a single live infant who met our inclusion
             criteria. Of those, 666 mothers (77.4%) agreed to
             participate in the study for themselves and their
             infants.Among the 666 women in the study, 472 (71%)
             identified as black, 127 (19%) as white, 7 (1%) as Asian or
             Asian American, 6 (1%) as Native American and 49 (7%) as
             other race or more than one race; 43 (7%) identified as
             Hispanic/Latina. Just under half (48%) had a high school
             diploma or less, 61% had household incomes <$20 000/year
             and 59% were married or living with a partner. The mean (SD)
             infant gestational age was 41.28 weeks (2.29) and birth
             weight for gestational age z-score was -0.31 (0.93). Just
             under half (49%) of infants were females, 69% received some
             human milk and 40% were exclusively breast fed at hospital
             discharge. Data collection began in 2013, is currently
             underway, and is scheduled to conclude in late 2016.Results
             will help assess the magnitude of associations between
             childcare in infancy and subsequent obesity. Findings will
             also inform intervention and policy efforts to improve
             childcare environments and help prevent obesity in settings
             where many infants spend time.Clinicaltrials.gov,
             NCT01788644.},
   Doi = {10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013939},
   Key = {fds324091}
}

@article{fds315310,
   Author = {Winkler, MR and Bennett, GG and Brandon, DH},
   Title = {Factors related to obesity and overweight among Black
             adolescent girls in the United States.},
   Journal = {Women & Health},
   Volume = {57},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {208-248},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0363-0242},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03630242.2016.1159267},
   Abstract = {In the United States, Black adolescents have the highest
             prevalence of pediatric obesity and overweight among girls.
             While Black girls are disproportionately affected, the
             reasons for this health disparity remain unclear. The
             authors conducted a systematic review to investigate the
             factors related to obesity and overweight among Black
             adolescent girls. The authors searched four databases for
             relevant English-language publications using all publication
             years through 2015. Fifty-one studies met the inclusion
             criteria and were used for this review. Using a
             configuration approach to synthesis, three categories were
             identified, paralleling the bioecological theory of human
             development: (1) individual, (2) interpersonal, and (3)
             community and societal factors. A description of each
             factor's association with obesity among Black adolescent
             girls is presented. From this review, the authors identified
             a diverse and vast set of individual, interpersonal, and
             community and societal factors explored for their
             relationship with obesity and overweight. Given the
             insufficient repetition and limited significant findings
             among most factors, the authors believe that multiple gaps
             in knowledge exist across all categories regarding the
             factors related to obesity and overweight among Black
             adolescent girls. To improve the quality of research in this
             area, suggested research directions and methodological
             recommendations are provided.},
   Doi = {10.1080/03630242.2016.1159267},
   Key = {fds315310}
}


%% Bergelson, Elika   
@article{fds330846,
   Author = {Bergelson, E and Aslin, RN},
   Title = {Nature and origins of the lexicon in 6-mo-olds.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {114},
   Number = {49},
   Pages = {12916-12921},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1712966114},
   Abstract = {Recent research reported the surprising finding that even
             6-mo-olds understand common nouns [Bergelson E, Swingley D
             (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109:3253-3258]. However, is
             their early lexicon structured and acquired like older
             learners? We test 6-mo-olds for a hallmark of the mature
             lexicon: cross-word relations. We also examine whether
             properties of the home environment that have been linked
             with lexical knowledge in older children are detectable in
             the initial stage of comprehension. We use a new dataset,
             which includes in-lab comprehension and home measures from
             the same infants. We find evidence for cross-word structure:
             On seeing two images of common nouns, infants looked
             significantly more at named target images when the
             competitor images were semantically unrelated (e.g., milk
             and foot) than when they were related (e.g., milk and
             juice), just as older learners do. We further find initial
             evidence for home-lab links: common noun "copresence" (i.e.,
             whether words' referents were present and attended to in
             home recordings) correlated with in-lab comprehension. These
             findings suggest that, even in neophyte word learners,
             cross-word relations are formed early and the home learning
             environment measurably helps shape the lexicon from the
             outset.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.1712966114},
   Key = {fds330846}
}

@article{fds325486,
   Author = {Frank, MC and Bergelson, E and Bergmann, C and Cristia, A and Floccia,
             C and Gervain, J and Hamlin, JK and Hannon, EE and Kline, M and Levelt, C and Lew-Williams, C and Nazzi, T and Panneton, R and Rabagliati, H and Soderstrom, M and Sullivan, J and Waxman, S and Yurovsky,
             D},
   Title = {A Collaborative Approach to Infant Research: Promoting
             Reproducibility, Best Practices, and Theory-Building},
   Journal = {Infancy},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {421-435},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/infa.12182},
   Abstract = {© 2017 International Congress of Infant Studies (ICIS).The
             ideal of scientific progress is that we accumulate
             measurements and integrate these into theory, but recent
             discussion of replicability issues has cast doubt on whether
             psychological research conforms to this model. Developmental
             research-especially with infant participants-also has
             discipline-specific replicability challenges, including
             small samples and limited measurement methods. Inspired by
             collaborative replication efforts in cognitive and social
             psychology, we describe a proposal for assessing and
             promoting replicability in infancy research: large-scale,
             multi-laboratory replication efforts aiming for a more
             precise understanding of key developmental phenomena. The
             ManyBabies project, our instantiation of this proposal, will
             not only help us estimate how robust and replicable these
             phenomena are, but also gain new theoretical insights into
             how they vary across ages, linguistic communities, and
             measurement methods. This project has the potential for a
             variety of positive outcomes, including less-biased
             estimates of theoretically important effects, estimates of
             variability that can be used for later study planning, and a
             series of best-practices blueprints for future infancy
             research.},
   Doi = {10.1111/infa.12182},
   Key = {fds325486}
}

@article{fds327239,
   Author = {Bergelson, E and Swingley, D},
   Title = {Young Infants' Word Comprehension Given An Unfamiliar Talker
             or Altered Pronunciations.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12888},
   Abstract = {To understand spoken words, listeners must appropriately
             interpret co-occurring talker characteristics and speech
             sound content. This ability was tested in 6- to
             14-months-olds by measuring their looking to named food and
             body part images. In the new talker condition (n = 90),
             pictures were named by an unfamiliar voice; in the
             mispronunciation condition (n = 98), infants' mothers
             "mispronounced" the words (e.g., nazz for nose). Six- to
             7-month-olds fixated target images above chance across
             conditions, understanding novel talkers, and mothers'
             phonologically deviant speech equally. Eleven- to
             14-months-olds also understood new talkers, but performed
             poorly with mispronounced speech, indicating sensitivity to
             phonological deviation. Between these ages, performance was
             mixed. These findings highlight the changing roles of
             acoustic and phonetic variability in early word
             comprehension, as infants learn which variations alter
             meaning.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.12888},
   Key = {fds327239}
}

@article{fds327381,
   Author = {Bergelson, E and Aslin, R},
   Title = {Semantic Specificity in One-Year-Olds' Word
             Comprehension.},
   Journal = {Language Learning and Development},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {481-501},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15475441.2017.1324308},
   Abstract = {The present study investigated infants' knowledge about
             familiar nouns. Infants (n = 46, 12-20-month-olds) saw
             two-image displays of familiar objects, or one familiar and
             one novel object. Infants heard either a matching word (e.g.
             "foot' when seeing foot and juice), a related word (e.g.
             "sock" when seeing foot and juice) or a nonce word (e.g.
             "fep" when seeing a novel object and dog). Across the whole
             sample, infants reliably fixated the referent on matching
             and nonce trials. On the critical related trials we found
             increasingly less looking to the incorrect (but related)
             image with age. These results suggest that one-year-olds
             look at familiar objects both when they hear them labeled
             and when they hear related labels, to similar degrees, but
             over the second year increasingly rely on semantic fit. We
             suggest that infants' initial semantic representations are
             imprecise, and continue to sharpen over the second postnatal
             year.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15475441.2017.1324308},
   Key = {fds327381}
}


%% Bettman, James R.   
@article{fds323857,
   Author = {Escalas, JE and Bettman, JR},
   Title = {Connecting With Celebrities: How Consumers Appropriate
             Celebrity Meanings for a Sense of Belonging},
   Journal = {Journal of Advertising},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {297-308},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00913367.2016.1274925},
   Doi = {10.1080/00913367.2016.1274925},
   Key = {fds323857}
}


%% Bilbo, Staci D.   
@article{fds326607,
   Author = {Bolton, JL and Marinero, S and Hassanzadeh, T and Natesan, D and Le, D and Belliveau, C and Mason, SN and Auten, RL and Bilbo,
             SD},
   Title = {Gestational exposure to air pollution alters cortical
             volume, microglial morphology, and microglia-neuron
             interactions in a sex-specific manner},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Synaptic Neuroscience},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {MAY},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnsyn.2017.00010},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Bolton, Marinero, Hassanzadeh, Natesan, Le,
             Belliveau, Mason, Auten and Bilbo.Microglia are the resident
             immune cells of the brain, important for normal neural
             development in addition to host defense in response to
             inflammatory stimuli. Air pollution is one of the most
             pervasive and harmful environmental toxicants in the modern
             world, and several large scale epidemiological studies have
             recently linked prenatal air pollution exposure with an
             increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as
             autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Diesel exhaust particles
             (DEP) are a primary toxic component of air pollution, and
             markedly activate microglia in vitro and in vivo in adult
             rodents. We have demonstrated that prenatal exposure to DEP
             in mice, i.e., to the pregnant dams throughout gestation,
             results in a persistent vulnerability to behavioral deficits
             in adult offspring, especially in males, which is intriguing
             given the greater incidence of ASD in males to females
             (4:1). Moreover, there is a striking upregulation of
             toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 gene expression within the brains
             of the same mice, and this expression is primarily in
             microglia. Here we explored the impact of gestational
             exposure to DEP or vehicle on microglial morphology in the
             developing brains of male and female mice. DEP exposure
             increased inflammatory cytokine protein and altered the
             morphology of microglia, consistent with activation or a
             delay in maturation, only within the embryonic brains of
             male mice; and these effects were dependent on TLR4. DEP
             exposure also increased cortical volume at embryonic day
             (E)18, which switched to decreased volume by post-natal day
             (P)30 in males, suggesting an impact on the developing
             neural stem cell niche. Consistent with this hypothesis, we
             found increased microglial-neuronal interactions in male
             offspring that received DEP compared to all other groups.
             Taken together, these data suggest a mechanism by which
             prenatal exposure to environmental toxins may affect
             microglial development and long-term function, and thereby
             contribute to the risk of neurodevelopmental
             disorders.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fnsyn.2017.00010},
   Key = {fds326607}
}

@article{fds326608,
   Author = {Bilbo, SD},
   Title = {Sex differences in microglial appetites during development:
             Inferences and implications.},
   Journal = {Brain, Behavior, and Immunity},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2017.05.010},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bbi.2017.05.010},
   Key = {fds326608}
}

@article{fds326354,
   Author = {Parker, W and Hornik, CD and Bilbo, S and Holzknecht, ZE and Gentry, L and Rao, R and Lin, SS and Herbert, MR and Nevison, CD},
   Title = {The role of oxidative stress, inflammation and acetaminophen
             exposure from birth to early childhood in the induction of
             autism.},
   Journal = {The Journal of international medical research},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {407-438},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0300060517693423},
   Abstract = {The wide range of factors associated with the induction of
             autism is invariably linked with either inflammation or
             oxidative stress, and sometimes both. The use of
             acetaminophen in babies and young children may be much more
             strongly associated with autism than its use during
             pregnancy, perhaps because of well-known deficiencies in the
             metabolic breakdown of pharmaceuticals during early
             development. Thus, one explanation for the increased
             prevalence of autism is that increased exposure to
             acetaminophen, exacerbated by inflammation and oxidative
             stress, is neurotoxic in babies and small children. This
             view mandates extreme urgency in probing the long-term
             effects of acetaminophen use in babies and the possibility
             that many cases of infantile autism may actually be induced
             by acetaminophen exposure shortly after birth.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0300060517693423},
   Key = {fds326354}
}

@article{fds325332,
   Author = {Kopec, AM and Rivera, PD and Lacagnina, MJ and Hanamsagar, R and Bilbo,
             SD},
   Title = {Optimized solubilization of TRIzol-precipitated protein
             permits Western blotting analysis to maximize data available
             from brain tissue.},
   Journal = {Journal of Neuroscience Methods},
   Volume = {280},
   Pages = {64-76},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2017.02.002},
   Abstract = {Techniques simultaneously assessing multiple levels of
             molecular processing are appealing because molecular
             signaling underlying complex neural phenomena occurs at
             complementary levels. The TRIzol method isolates RNA and
             DNA, but protein retrieval is difficult due to inefficient
             solubilization of precipitated protein pellets.We optimized
             a buffer for the efficient solubilization of protein from
             TRIzol-precipitated brain tissue for Western blotting
             analysis, which was also more effective at directly
             homogenizing brain tissue than RIPA buffer.Protein yield
             during solubilization, in addition to protein yield via
             direct homogenization, is increased by optimizing
             concentrations of chemicals in a standard lysis buffer.
             Effective incubation parameters for both total protein yield
             and the analysis of post-translational modifications is
             remarkably flexible. Importantly, different neural cell
             types and protein classes are represented in solubilized
             protein samples. Moreover, we used dissociated mouse brain
             tissue to isolate microglia from other cell types and
             successfully resolved cell type-specific proteins from these
             small and difficult to attain samples.Solubilization buffers
             to date have been comprised primarily of SDS or urea; the
             data herein demonstrate that components common to lysis
             buffers can also enhance protein solubilization both after
             direct homogenization and after precipitation.This method is
             suitable for assessing gene and protein expression from a
             single brain sample, allowing for a more comprehensive
             evaluation of neural phenomena while minimizing the number
             of subjects.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jneumeth.2017.02.002},
   Key = {fds325332}
}

@article{fds321831,
   Author = {Lacagnina, MJ and Rivera, PD and Bilbo, SD},
   Title = {Glial and Neuroimmune Mechanisms as Critical Modulators of
             Drug Use and Abuse.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology (Nature)},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {156-177},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2016.121},
   Abstract = {Drugs of abuse cause persistent alterations in synaptic
             plasticity that may underlie addiction behaviors. Evidence
             suggests glial cells have an essential and underappreciated
             role in the development and maintenance of drug abuse by
             influencing neuronal and synaptic functions in multifaceted
             ways. Microglia and astrocytes perform critical functions in
             synapse formation and refinement in the developing brain,
             and there is growing evidence that disruptions in glial
             function may be implicated in numerous neurological
             disorders throughout the lifespan. Linking evidence of
             function in health and under pathological conditions, this
             review will outline the glial and neuroimmune mechanisms
             that may contribute to drug-abuse liability, exploring
             evidence from opioids, alcohol, and psychostimulants. Drugs
             of abuse can activate microglia and astrocytes through
             signaling at innate immune receptors, which in turn
             influence neuronal function not only through secretion of
             soluble factors (eg, cytokines and chemokines) but also
             potentially through direct remodeling of the synapses. In
             sum, this review will argue that neural-glial interactions
             represent an important avenue for advancing our
             understanding of substance abuse disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1038/npp.2016.121},
   Key = {fds321831}
}


%% Blumenthal, James A.   
@article{fds330457,
   Author = {Farquhar, JM and Smith, PJ and Snyder, L and Gray, AL and Reynolds, JM and Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {Patterns and predictors of pain following lung
             transplantation.},
   Journal = {General Hospital Psychiatry},
   Volume = {50},
   Pages = {125-130},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2017.11.007},
   Abstract = {Our objective was to examine variability in pain levels
             following lung transplantation, and examine individual
             biopsychosocial factors influencing changes in pain.We
             performed a retrospective study of a cohort of 150 patients
             transplanted and discharged from Duke University Hospital
             between January 2015 and September 2016. During
             hospitalization and at clinic visits up to two months after
             discharge, subjective pain ratings were obtained using a
             0-10 Numeric Rating Scale. Psychiatric diagnoses of anxiety
             and depression and Center for Epidemiological Studies -
             Depression (CES-D) scores collected after hospital discharge
             were examined as predictors of post-surgery pain. Medical
             and surgical variables were examined as covariates.During
             hospitalization, pain ratings decreased over time (p<0.001).
             Predictors of higher pain levels included pre-transplant
             history of depression (p=0.001) and anxiety (p=0.04),
             bilateral lung transplant (p=0.03), and lower six-minute
             walk distance (p=0.02). Two months after discharge, 18% of
             patients reported continued pain and 34% remained on opioid
             pain medications. Two months after discharge, more frequent
             post-operative complications predicted higher pain levels in
             a univariate analysis (p=0.02) although this relationship
             was attenuated after adjustment for depression. In a
             multivariate analysis, elevated CES-D scores (p=0.002), and
             greater opioid use (p=0.031) predicted higher pain levels
             2-months post-discharge.We conclude that patients with
             psychiatric comorbidities may be at risk for greater pain,
             and may require additional strategies for more effective
             pain management.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2017.11.007},
   Key = {fds330457}
}

@article{fds330347,
   Author = {Nieuwsma, JA and Williams, JW and Namdari, N and Washam, JB and Raitz,
             G and Blumenthal, JA and Jiang, W and Yapa, R and McBroom, AJ and Lallinger, K and Schmidt, R and Kosinski, AS and Sanders,
             GD},
   Title = {Diagnostic Accuracy of Screening Tests and Treatment for
             Post-Acute Coronary Syndrome Depression: A Systematic
             Review.},
   Journal = {Annals of internal medicine},
   Volume = {167},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {725-735},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.7326/m17-1811},
   Abstract = {Patients who have had an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event
             have an increased risk for depression.To evaluate the
             diagnostic accuracy of depression screening instruments and
             to compare safety and effectiveness of depression treatments
             in adults within 3 months of an ACS event.MEDLINE, EMBASE,
             PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane Database of Systematic
             Reviews from January 2003 to August 2017, and a manual
             search of citations from key primary and review
             articles.English-language studies of post-ACS patients that
             evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of depression screening
             tools or compared the safety and effectiveness of a broad
             range of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic depression
             treatments.2 investigators independently screened each
             article for inclusion; abstracted the data; and rated the
             quality, applicability, and strength of evidence.Evidence
             from 6 of the 10 included studies showed that a range of
             depression screening instruments produces acceptable levels
             of diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and negative
             predictive values (70% to 100%) but low positive predictive
             values (below 50%). The Beck Depression Inventory-II was the
             most studied tool. A large study found that a combination of
             cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and antidepressant
             medication improved depression symptoms, mental
             health-related function, and overall life satisfaction more
             than usual care.Few studies, no evaluation of the influence
             of screening on clinical outcomes, and no studies addressing
             several clinical interventions of interest.Depression
             screening instruments produce diagnostic accuracy metrics
             that are similar in post-ACS patients and other clinical
             populations. Depression interventions have an uncertain
             effect on cardiovascular outcomes, but CBT combined with
             antidepressant medication produces modest improvement in
             psychosocial outcomes.Agency for Healthcare Research and
             Quality (PROSPERO: CRD42016047032).},
   Doi = {10.7326/m17-1811},
   Key = {fds330347}
}

@article{fds331180,
   Author = {Smith, PJ and Snyder, LD and Palmer, SM and Hoffman, BM and Stonerock,
             GL and Ingle, KK and Saulino, CK and Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {Depression, social support, and clinical outcomes following
             lung transplantation: a single-center cohort
             study.},
   Journal = {Transplant International},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tri.13094},
   Abstract = {Depressive symptoms are common among lung transplant
             candidates and have been associated with poorer clinical
             outcomes in some studies. Previous studies have been plagued
             by methodologic problems, including small sample sizes, few
             clinical events, and uncontrolled confounders, particularly
             perioperative complications. In addition, few studies have
             examined social support as a potential protective factor. We
             therefore examined the association between pretransplant
             depressive symptoms, social support, and mortality in a
             large sample of lung transplant recipients. As a secondary
             aim, we also examined the associations between psychosocial
             factors, perioperative outcomes [indexed by hospital length
             of stay (LOS)], and mortality. We hypothesized that
             depression would be associated with longer LOS and that the
             association between depression, social support, and
             mortality would be moderated by LOS. Participants included
             lung transplant recipients, transplanted at Duke University
             Medical Center from January 2009 to December 2014.
             Depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Beck Depression
             Inventory (BDI-II) and social support using the Perceived
             Social Support Scale (PSSS). Medical risk factors included
             forced vital capacity (FVC), partial pressure of carbon
             dioxide (PCO2 ), donor age, acute rejection, and transplant
             type. Functional status was assessed using six-minute walk
             distance (6MWD). We also controlled for demographic factors,
             including age, gender, and native disease. Transplant
             hospitalization LOS was examined as a marker of
             perioperative clinical outcomes. Participants included 273
             lung recipients (174 restrictive, 67 obstructive, 26 cystic
             fibrosis, and six "other"). Pretransplant depressive
             symptoms were common, with 56 participants (21%) exhibiting
             clinically elevated levels (BDI-II ≥ 14). Greater
             depressive symptoms were associated with longer LOS
             [adjusted b = 0.20 (2 days per 7-point higher BDI-II score),
             P < 0.01]. LOS moderated the associations between depressive
             symptoms (P = 0.019), social support (P < 0.001), and
             mortality, such that greater depressive symptoms and lower
             social support were associated with greater mortality only
             among individuals with longer LOS. For individuals with LOS
             ≥ 1 month, clinically elevated depressive symptoms (BDI-II
             ≥ 14) were associated with a threefold increased risk of
             mortality (HR = 2.97). Greater pretransplant depressive
             symptoms and lower social support may be associated with
             greater mortality among a subset of individuals with worse
             perioperative outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1111/tri.13094},
   Key = {fds331180}
}

@article{fds330458,
   Author = {Smith, PJ and Blumenthal, JA and Hoffman, BM and Davis, RD and Palmer,
             SM},
   Title = {Postoperative cognitive dysfunction and mortality following
             lung transplantation.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Transplantation},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajt.14570},
   Abstract = {Preliminary evidence suggests that postoperative cognitive
             dysfunction (POCD) is common after lung transplantation. The
             impact of POCD on clinical outcomes has yet to be studied.
             The association between POCD and longer-term survival was
             therefore examined in a pilot study of posttransplantation
             survivors. Forty-nine participants from a prior randomized
             clinical trial underwent a neurocognitive assessment battery
             pretransplantation and 6 months posttransplantation,
             including assessments of the domains of Executive Function
             (Trail Making Test, Stroop, Digit Span), Processing Speed
             (Ruff 2 and 7 Test, Digit Symbol Substitution Test), and
             Verbal Memory (Verbal Paired Associates, Logical Memory,
             Animal Naming, and Controlled Oral Word Association Test).
             During a 13-year follow-up, 33 (67%) participants died.
             Greater neurocognition was associated with longer survival
             (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49 [0.25-0.96], P = .039), and
             this association was strongest on tests assessing Processing
             Speed (HR = 0.58 [0.36-0.95], P = .03) and Executive
             Function (HR = 0.52 [0.28-0.97], P = .040). In addition,
             unadjusted analyses suggested an association between greater
             Memory performance and lower risk of CLAD (HR = 0.54
             [0.29-1.00], P = .050). Declines in Executive Function
             tended to be predictive of worse survival. These preliminary
             findings suggest that postoperative neurocognition is
             predictive of subsequent mortality among lung transplant
             recipients. Further research is needed to confirm these
             findings in a larger sample and to examine mechanisms
             responsible for this relationship.},
   Doi = {10.1111/ajt.14570},
   Key = {fds330458}
}

@article{fds330037,
   Author = {Tyson, CC and Smith, PJ and Sherwood, A and Mabe, S and Hinderliter, AL and Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {Association between normal or mildly reduced kidney
             function, cardiovascular risk and biomarkers for
             atherosclerosis: results from the ENCORE
             trial.},
   Journal = {CKJ: Clinical Kidney Journal},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {666-671},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ckj/sfx025},
   Abstract = {Moderate-to-severe kidney dysfunction is associated with
             atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Gradations
             of normal or mildly reduced kidney function may also
             associate with ASCVD risk.We conducted a secondary analysis
             using baseline data from the Exercise and Nutritional
             Interventions for Cardiovascular Health (ENCORE) trial.
             Participants were sedentary, overweight and obese adults
             with unmedicated pre-hypertension or Stage I hypertension
             and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60
             mL/min/1.73 m2. The Pooled Cohorts Equations were used to
             estimate a 10-year risk for first ASCVD event. Carotid
             artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and brachial artery
             flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were measured to assess
             subclinical atherosclerosis and vascular endothelial
             function, respectively. Using linear regression, we examined
             the association between eGFR and ASCVD risk, IMT and
             FMD.Participants (N = 139) were predominantly women
             (65%), white (60%), with a mean age of 52.0 ± 9.6 years
             and mean eGFR of 89.1 ± 15.0 mL/min/1.73 m2. Lower
             eGFR of 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 was associated with higher
             ASCVD risk [b = -2.7% (95% confidence interval: -3.7,
             -1.8%), P < 0.001], higher IMT [b = 0.05 mm (0.03,
             0.08 mm), P < 0.001] and lower FMD [b = -0.87%
             (-1.64, -0.11%), P = 0.026]. Compared with
             eGFR ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2, those with eGFR
             60-89 mL/min/1.73 m2 had higher mean ASCVD risk (7.6%
             versus 2.7%; P < 0.001), greater mean IMT (0.74 mm
             versus 0.66 mm; P < 0.001) and lower mean FMD (2.0%
             versus 3.7%; P = 0.026). After controlling for CVD risk
             factors, the association between eGFR and IMT remained
             significant (P < 0.001), and eGFR and FMD trended toward
             significance (P = 0.08).Among overweight and obese
             adults with unmedicated high blood pressure and
             eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2, lower eGFR is associated
             with a greater 10-year risk for first ASCVD event, higher
             IMT and relatively impaired FMD.},
   Doi = {10.1093/ckj/sfx025},
   Key = {fds330037}
}

@article{fds329487,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Hill, LK and Blumenthal, JA and Hinderliter,
             AL},
   Title = {Circadian hemodynamics in men and women with high blood
             pressure: dipper vs. nondipper and racial
             differences.},
   Journal = {Journal of Hypertension},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/hjh.0000000000001533},
   Abstract = {The 'nondipping' pattern of circadian blood pressure (BP)
             variation is an established independent predictor of adverse
             cardiovascular outcomes. Although this phenomenon has been
             widely studied, its underlying circadian hemodynamics of
             cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) have
             not been well characterized. We evaluated the hypothesis
             that BP nondipping would be associated with a blunted
             night-time reduction in SVR in a biracial sample of 140 (63
             African-American and 77 white) men and women with elevated
             clinic BP (130-159/85-99 mmHg).Twenty-four-hour ambulatory
             hemodynamics were assessed using standard ambulatory BP
             monitoring coupled with synchronized ambulatory impedance
             cardiography. Using the criterion of less than 10% dip in
             SBP, there were 51 nondippers (SBP dip = 7.3 ± 2.6%)
             and 89 dippers (SBP dip = 15.5 ± 3.4%). There was
             minimal change in cardiac output from daytime to night-time
             in both dippers and nondippers. However, SVR decreased from
             daytime to night-time, but nondippers compared with dippers
             exhibited a significantly attenuated decrease in SVR from
             daytime to night-time (7.8 vs. 16.1%, P < 0.001).
             Relative to their white counterparts, African-Americans also
             exhibited blunted SBP dipping (10.9 vs. 14.6%,
             P < 0.001) as well as an attenuated decrease in SVR
             (10.8 vs. 15.6%, P < 0.001).Overall, these findings
             indicate that blunted night-time BP dipping is associated
             with impairment of the systemic vasodilation that is
             characteristic of the night-time sleep period and is
             especially prominent among African-Americans. In the context
             of high BP, these findings suggest that nondipping may be a
             manifestation, or marker, of more advanced vascular
             disease.},
   Doi = {10.1097/hjh.0000000000001533},
   Key = {fds329487}
}

@article{fds327848,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Hill, LK and Blumenthal, JA and Adams, KF and Paine, NJ and Koch, GG and O'Connor, CM and Johnson, KS and Hinderliter,
             AL},
   Title = {Blood pressure reactivity to psychological stress is
             associated with clinical outcomes in patients with heart
             failure.},
   Journal = {American Heart Journal},
   Volume = {191},
   Pages = {82-90},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2017.07.003},
   Abstract = {Cardiovascular (CV) reactivity to psychological stress has
             been implicated in the development and exacerbation of
             cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although high CV reactivity
             traditionally is thought to convey greater risk of CVD, the
             relationship between reactivity and clinical outcomes is
             inconsistent and may depend on the patient population under
             investigation. The present study examined CV reactivity in
             patients with heart failure (HF) and its potential
             association with long-term clinical outcomes.One hundred
             ninety-nine outpatients diagnosed with HF, with ejection
             fraction ≤40%, underwent an evaluation of blood pressure
             (BP) and heart rate reactivity to a laboratory-based
             simulated public-speaking stressor. Cox proportional hazards
             regression models were used to examine the prospective
             association between BP and heart rate reactivity on a
             combined end point of death or CV hospitalization over a
             5-year median follow-up period.Both systolic blood pressure
             (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) reactivity,
             quantified as continuous variables, were inversely related
             to risk of death or CV hospitalization (Ps < .01) after
             controlling for established risk factors, including HF
             disease severity and etiology. In similar models, heart rate
             reactivity was unrelated to outcome (P = .12). In models
             with tertiles of reactivity, high SBP reactivity, compared
             with intermediate SBP reactivity, was associated with lower
             risk (hazard ratio [HR] = .498, 95% CI .335-.742, P =.001),
             whereas low SBP reactivity did not differ from intermediate
             reactivity. For DBP, high reactivity was marginally
             associated with lower risk compared with intermediate DBP
             reactivity (HR = .767, 95% CI .515-1.14, P =.193), whereas
             low DBP reactivity was associated with greater risk (HR =
             1.49, 95% CI 1.027-2.155, P =.0359). No relationship of
             heart rate reactivity to outcome was identified.For HF
             patients with reduced ejection fraction, a robust increase
             in BP evoked by a laboratory-based psychological challenge
             was associated with lower risk for adverse CVD events and
             may be a novel and unique marker of left ventricular
             systolic reserve that is accompanied by a more favorable
             long-term prognosis.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ahj.2017.07.003},
   Key = {fds327848}
}

@article{fds330038,
   Author = {Hayano, J and Yasuma, F and Watanabe, E and Carney, RM and Stein, PK and Blumenthal, JA and Arsenos, P and Gatzoulis, KA and Takahashi, H and Ishii, H and Kiyono, K and Yamamoto, Y and Yoshida, Y and Yuda, E and Kodama, I},
   Title = {Blunted cyclic variation of heart rate predicts mortality
             risk in post-myocardial infarction, end-stage renal disease,
             and chronic heart failure patients.},
   Journal = {Europace (Elsevier)},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1392-1400},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/europace/euw222},
   Abstract = {Cyclic variation of heart rate (CVHR) associated with
             sleep-disordered breathing is thought to reflect cardiac
             autonomic responses to apnoeic/hypoxic stress. We examined
             whether blunted CVHR observed in ambulatory ECG could
             predict the mortality risk.CVHR in night-time Holter ECG was
             detected by an automated algorithm, and the prognostic
             relationships of the frequency (FCV) and amplitude (ACV) of
             CVHR were examined in 717 patients after myocardial
             infarction (post-MI 1, 6% mortality, median follow-up 25
             months). The predictive power was prospectively validated in
             three independent cohorts: a second group of 220 post-MI
             patients (post-MI 2, 25.5% mortality, follow-up 45 months);
             299 patients with end-stage renal disease on chronic
             haemodialysis (ESRD, 28.1% mortality, follow-up 85 months);
             and 100 patients with chronic heart failure (CHF, 35%
             mortality, follow-up 38 months). Although CVHR was observed
             in ≥96% of the patients in all cohorts, FCV did not
             predict mortality in any cohort. In contrast, decreased ACV
             was a powerful predictor of mortality in the post-MI 1
             cohort (hazard ratio [95% CI] per 1 ln [ms] decrement, 2.9
             [2.2-3.7], P < 0.001). This prognostic relationship was
             validated in the post-MI 2 (1.8 [1.4-2.2], P < 0.001), ESRD
             (1.5 [1.3-1.8], P < 0.001), and CHF (1.4 [1.1-1.8], P =
             0.02) cohorts. The prognostic value of ACV was independent
             of age, gender, diabetes, β-blocker therapy, left
             ventricular ejection fraction, sleep-time mean R-R interval,
             and FCV.Blunted CVHR detected by decreased ACV in a
             night-time Holter ECG predicts increased mortality risk in
             post-MI, ESRD, and CHF patients.},
   Doi = {10.1093/europace/euw222},
   Key = {fds330038}
}

@article{fds326740,
   Author = {Tussing-Humphreys, L and Lamar, M and Blumenthal, JA and Babyak, M and Fantuzzi, G and Blumstein, L and Schiffer, L and Fitzgibbon,
             ML},
   Title = {Building research in diet and cognition: The BRIDGE
             randomized controlled trial.},
   Journal = {Contemporary Clinical Trials},
   Volume = {59},
   Pages = {87-97},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2017.06.003},
   Abstract = {Obesity has been linked to cognitive impairment, cognitive
             decline and dementia. Given that 38.5% of U.S. adults
             60years and older are obese and these numbers are rapidly
             increasing, strategies to decouple obesity from cognitive
             decline are needed. Innovative lifestyle strategies that may
             postpone the onset of subclinical symptoms or even arrest
             the transition to overt dementia in at-risk individuals are
             critically needed. Poor diet is central to the development
             of obesity and diet may affect cognition. Adherence to a
             Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) is associated with reduced risk
             of cognitive impairment and dementia. Furthermore, weight
             loss through caloric restriction improves cognitive
             function. This paper describes the Building Research in Diet
             and CoGnition (BRIDGE) study, a randomized trial examining
             the effect of the MedDiet, with and without weight loss, on
             cognitive functioning in obese older adults. Obese (BMI≥30
             and ≤50kg/m2) older adults (≥55years) (n=180) will be
             randomized in a 2:2:1 allocation scheme to: Typical Diet
             Control; MedDiet alone, without weight loss; or MedDiet
             lifestyle intervention to promote weight loss and weight
             loss maintenance. Both MedDiet intervention groups will meet
             for one individual session and 27 group sessions over an
             8-month period. Individuals in the control group will not
             receive instruction on changing lifestyle habits. Outcomes
             will be assessed at baseline, 8 and 14months. The primary
             outcome is cognitive functioning; secondary outcomes will
             include changes in body weight, diet, cardiovascular,
             metabolic, and inflammatory biomarkers.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cct.2017.06.003},
   Key = {fds326740}
}

@article{fds326855,
   Author = {Blumenthal, JA and Smith, PJ and Mabe, S and Hinderliter, A and Welsh-Bohmer, K and Browndyke, JN and Lin, P-H and Kraus, W and Doraiswamy, PM and Burke, J and Sherwood, A},
   Title = {Lifestyle and Neurocognition in Older Adults With
             Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Cognitive
             Impairment.},
   Journal = {Psychosomatic Medicine},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {719-727},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/psy.0000000000000474},
   Abstract = {The aim of the study was to determine the relationship of
             lifestyle factors and neurocognitive functioning in older
             adults with vascular risk factors and cognitive impairment,
             no dementia (CIND).One hundred sixty adults (M [SD] = 65.4
             [6.8] years) with CIND completed neurocognitive assessments
             of executive function, processing speed, and memory.
             Objective measures of physical activity using accelerometry,
             aerobic capacity determined by exercise testing, and dietary
             habits quantified by the Food Frequency Questionnaire and
             4-Day Food Diary to assess adherence to the Mediterranean
             and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diets
             were obtained to assess direct effects with neurocognition.
             Potential indirect associations of high-sensitivity
             C-reactive protein and the Framingham Stroke Risk Profile
             also were examined.Greater aerobic capacity (β = 0.24) and
             daily physical activity (β = 0.15) were associated with
             better executive functioning/processing speed and verbal
             memory (βs = 0.24; 0.16). Adherence to the DASH diet was
             associated with better verbal memory (β = 0.17). Greater
             high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (βs = -0.14; -0.21) and
             Framingham Stroke Risk Profile (β = -0.18; -0.18) were
             associated with poorer executive functioning/processing
             speed and verbal memory. Greater stroke risk partially
             mediated the association of aerobic capacity with executive
             functioning/processing speed, and verbal memory and greater
             inflammation partially mediated the association of physical
             activity and aerobic fitness, with verbal memory.Higher
             levels of physical activity, aerobic fitness, and adherence
             to the DASH diet are associated with better neurocognitive
             performance in adults with CIND. These findings suggest that
             the adoption of healthy lifestyle habits could reduce the
             risk of neurocognitive decline in vulnerable older
             adults.NCT01573546.},
   Doi = {10.1097/psy.0000000000000474},
   Key = {fds326855}
}

@article{fds326632,
   Author = {Hill, LK and Watkins, LL and Hinderliter, AL and Blumenthal, JA and Sherwood, A},
   Title = {Racial differences in the association between heart rate
             variability and left ventricular mass.},
   Journal = {Experimental Physiology},
   Volume = {102},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {764-772},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1113/ep086228},
   Abstract = {What is the central question of this study? Decreased heart
             rate variability (HRV) is associated with increased
             cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, including greater left
             ventricular mass (LVM). Despite their enhanced CVD risk
             profile, African Americans have been shown to exhibit higher
             HRV, relative to Whites; however, it is unclear whether this
             pattern extends to the association between HRV and LVM. What
             is the main finding and its importance? Using ECG and
             echocardiographic data, HRV was positively associated with
             LVM in a non-clinical sample of African Americans. These
             findings suggest that current assumptions regarding the
             meaning of higher HRV might not be universal, which might
             have implications for HRV as a risk marker among African
             Americans. Increased left ventricular mass (LVM) is an early
             precursor of target organ damage attributable to
             hypertension. Diminished parasympathetic cardiac control has
             been linked to both hypertension onset and left ventricular
             impairment; however, emerging evidence suggests that this
             pattern might be different in African Americans. The present
             study sought to determine whether race impacts the
             relationship between parasympathetic cardiac control and
             LVM. The LVM was assessed via echocardiography in a sample
             (n = 148) of African American and White adults (mean
             age 33.20 ± 5.71 years) with normal or mildly elevated
             blood pressure. Parasympathetic cardiac control was assessed
             by a measure of high-frequency heart rate variability
             (HF-HRV) determined from ECG recordings during 5 min of
             rest. In regression analysis, greater HF-HRV was associated
             with greater LVM among African Americans (P = 0.002) but
             was not related to LVM in Whites (P = 0.919). These are
             the first data to demonstrate that race moderates the
             relationship between HRV and LVM and further suggest that
             race might be an important factor in the association between
             parasympathetic cardiac control and other cardiovascular
             disease risk factors.},
   Doi = {10.1113/ep086228},
   Key = {fds326632}
}

@article{fds325510,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Hill, LK and Blumenthal, JA and Johnson, KS and Hinderliter, AL},
   Title = {Race and sex differences in cardiovascular α-adrenergic and
             β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness in men and women with
             high blood pressure.},
   Journal = {Journal of Hypertension},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {975-981},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/hjh.0000000000001266},
   Abstract = {Hypertension is associated with unfavorable changes in
             adrenergic receptor responsiveness, but the relationship of
             race and sex to adrenergic receptor responsiveness in the
             development of cardiovascular disease is unclear. This study
             examined α-adrenergic and ß-adrenergic receptor
             responsiveness in African-American and white men and women
             with untreated high blood pressure (BP) (HBP) and with
             normal BP.The study sample comprised 161 African-American
             and white men and women in the age range 25-45 years.
             Isoproterenol, a nonselective ß-adrenergic receptor
             agonist, was administered intravenously to determine the
             bolus dose required to increase heart rate by 25 bpm, an
             index of β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness. Similarly,
             phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, was
             administered to determine the bolus dose required to
             increase BP by 25 mmHg, an index of vascular
             α1-adrenergic receptor responsiveness. HBP (P < 0.01),
             male sex (P = 0.04), and higher BMI (P < 0.01) were
             all associated with reduced β-adrenergic receptor
             responsiveness, with a similar trend observed for
             African-American race (P = 0.07). Conversely,
             α1-adrenergic receptor responsiveness was increased in
             association with HBP (P < 0.01), female sex
             (P < 0.01), and African-American race (P < 0.01).In
             the early stages of hypertension, cardiovascular
             β-adrenergic receptors demonstrate blunted responsiveness,
             whereas conversely α1-adrenergic receptors exhibit
             increased responsiveness. This pattern of receptor changes
             is especially evident in men and African-Americans, is
             exacerbated by obesity, and may contribute to the
             development of cardiovascular disease.},
   Doi = {10.1097/hjh.0000000000001266},
   Key = {fds325510}
}

@article{fds329488,
   Author = {Hill, LK and Sherwood, A and Blumenthal, JA and Hinderliter,
             AL},
   Title = {SYNERGISTIC IMPACT OF PERCEIVED DISCRIMINATION AND HOSTILITY
             ON ADRENERGIC RESPONSIVITY},
   Journal = {Psychosomatic Medicine},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {A85-A85},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {fds329488}
}

@article{fds321706,
   Author = {Stonerock, GL and Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {Role of Counseling to Promote Adherence in Healthy Lifestyle
             Medicine: Strategies to Improve Exercise Adherence and
             Enhance Physical Activity.},
   Journal = {Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {455-462},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcad.2016.09.003},
   Abstract = {Although healthy lifestyles (HL) offer a number of health
             benefits, nonadherence to recommended lifestyle changes
             remains a frequent and difficult obstacle to realizing these
             benefits. Behavioral counseling can improve adherence to an
             HL. However, individuals' motivation for change and
             resistance to altering unhealthy habits must be considered
             when developing an effective approach to counseling. In the
             present article, we review psychological, behavioral, and
             environmental factors that may promote adherence and
             contribute to nonadherence. We discuss two established
             models for counseling, motivational interviewing and the
             transtheoretical model of behavior change, and provide an
             example of how these approaches can be used to counsel
             patients to exercise and increase their levels of physical
             activity.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.pcad.2016.09.003},
   Key = {fds321706}
}

@article{fds323315,
   Author = {Smith, PJ and Blumenthal, JA and Snyder, LD and Mathew, JP and Durheim,
             MT and Hoffman, BM and Rivelli, SK and Palmer, SM},
   Title = {Depressive symptoms and early mortality following lung
             transplantation: A pilot study.},
   Journal = {Clinical Transplantation},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {2},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ctr.12874},
   Abstract = {Impaired psychological function is common among lung
             transplant candidates and may affect clinical outcomes
             following transplantation. Although numerous studies have
             examined the relationship between pretransplant depression,
             quality of life (QoL), and post-transplant outcomes, few
             have examined the relationship between depression and QoL
             shortly following transplantation and subsequent clinical
             outcomes. We therefore examined the association between
             depression, QoL, and short-term mortality in a consecutive
             series of lung transplant recipients.Depression (Patient
             Health Questionnaire-9; Hospital Anxiety and Depression
             Scale; Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale)
             and QoL (UCSD Shortness of Breath Questionnaire; Pulmonary
             Quality of Life Scale) were assessed prior to
             transplantation (median 0.9 months [IQR=1.6]) and again
             approximately 2 weeks following transplantation
             (median=0.5 months [IQR=0.5]), in a series of 66 patients
             transplanted between March 2013 and April 2014. The
             association between psychiatric diagnoses from participants'
             comprehensive pretransplant assessment and mortality also
             was examined. Cox proportional hazards models were used to
             examine the association between depression, QoL, and
             mortality.During a median follow-up of 2.8 years (range
             0.4-3.3), 21 patients died (32%). Greater depressive
             symptoms assessed shortly after transplant were associated
             with subsequent mortality (HR=2.17 [1.01, 4.67], P=.048),
             and this relationship persisted after controlling for
             primary graft dysfunction, duration of transplant
             hospitalization, and gender. In contrast, neither
             pretransplant depression, history of depression, nor QoL was
             associated with mortality.Greater post-transplant depressive
             symptoms are independently associated with mortality among
             lung transplant recipients.},
   Doi = {10.1111/ctr.12874},
   Key = {fds323315}
}

@article{fds329489,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Smith, PJ and Hinderliter, AL and Georgiades, A and Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {Effects of exercise and stress management training on
             nighttime blood pressure dipping in patients with coronary
             heart disease: A randomized, controlled trial.},
   Journal = {American Heart Journal},
   Volume = {183},
   Pages = {85-90},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2016.10.011},
   Abstract = {Blunted nighttime blood pressure (BP) dipping is prognostic
             of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Patients with
             coronary heart disease (CHD) are often characterized by a
             blunted nighttime BP dipping pattern. The present study
             compared the effects of 2 behavioral intervention programs,
             aerobic exercise (EX) and stress management (SM) training,
             with a usual care (UC) control group on BP dipping in a
             sample of CHD patients.This was a secondary analysis of a
             randomized, controlled trial with allocation concealment and
             blinded outcome assessment in 134 patients with stable CHD
             and exercise-induced myocardial ischemia. Nighttime BP
             dipping was assessed by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, at
             prerandomization baseline and after 16 weeks of one of the
             following treatments: usual medical care; UC plus supervised
             aerobic EX for 35 minutes, 3 times per week; UC plus weekly
             1.5-hour sessions of SM training.The EX and SM groups
             exhibited greater improvements in systolic BP dipping
             (P=.052) and diastolic BP dipping (P=.031) compared with UC.
             Postintervention systolic BP percent-dipping means were
             12.9% (SE=1.5) for SM, 11.1% (SE=1.4) for EX, and 8.6%
             (SE=1.4) for UC. Postintervention diastolic BP
             percent-dipping means were 13.3% (SE=1.9) for SM, 14.1%
             (SE=1.8) for EX, and 8.8% (1.8) for UC.For patients with
             stable CHD, EX or SM training resulted in improved nighttime
             BP dipping compared with usual medical care. These favorable
             effects of healthy lifestyle modifications may help reduce
             the risk of adverse clinical events.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ahj.2016.10.011},
   Key = {fds329489}
}

@article{fds329490,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Blumenthal, JA and Koch, GG and Hoffman, BM and Watkins,
             LL and Smith, PJ and O'Connor, CM and Adams, KF and Rogers, JG and Sueta,
             C and Chang, PP and Johnson, KS and Schwartz, J and Hinderliter,
             AL},
   Title = {Effects of Coping Skills Training on Quality of Life,
             Disease Biomarkers, and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With
             Heart Failure: A Randomized Clinical Trial.},
   Journal = {Circulation: Heart Failure},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/circheartfailure.116.003410},
   Abstract = {Heart failure (HF) is a chronic disease that compromises
             patients' quality of life (QoL). Interventions designed to
             reduce distress and improve disease self-management are
             needed. We evaluated the efficacy of a telephone-based
             coping skills training (CST) intervention.This randomized
             clinical trial involved 180 HF outpatients with reduced
             ejection fraction. Participants ranged in age from 29 to 87
             years (mean=58 years); 27% were women, and 47% were
             nonwhite. Participants were randomized to either a CST
             intervention or heart failure education, both delivered over
             16 weeks. The primary outcomes were (1) postintervention
             effects on QoL and HF disease biomarkers (both with
             α=0.01), and (2) a composite measure of time to death or
             first hospitalization (with α=0.03) over a median follow-up
             period of 3 years. CST resulted in greater improvements in
             QoL compared with heart failure education (P<0.01),
             including the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire
             (P=0.009), depressive symptoms (P=0.027), and the 6-minute
             walk test (P=0.012). However, it did not differentially
             improve HF disease biomarkers or reduce risk of all-cause
             hospitalizations or death (hazard ratio=0.84 [95% confidence
             interval, 0.59-1.12]). Interestingly, exploratory analyses
             showed that participants randomized to CST experienced a
             reduction in the composite end point of worsening HF
             hospitalization or death during the 3-year follow-up period
             (hazard ratio=0.65 [95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.98];
             P=0.040).CST improved QoL in patients with HF. Monitoring
             and improving QoL is emerging as an important aspect of the
             clinical management of HF that can reduce disease burden and
             may help improve clinical outcomes in this vulnerable
             patient population.URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov.
             Unique identifier: NCT00873418.},
   Doi = {10.1161/circheartfailure.116.003410},
   Key = {fds329490}
}


%% Bonner, Melanie J.   
@article{fds319600,
   Author = {Allen, TM and Anderson, LM and Rothman, JA and Bonner,
             MJ},
   Title = {[Formula: see text]Executive functioning and health-related
             quality of life in pediatric sickle cell
             disease.},
   Journal = {Child Neuropsychology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {889-906},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09297049.2016.1205011},
   Abstract = {Research consistently indicates that children with sickle
             cell disease (SCD) face multiple risk factors for
             neurocognitive impairment. Despite this, no empirical
             research to date has examined the impact of neurocognitive
             functioning on quality of life for this pediatric group.
             Thus, the current study aims to examine the relationship
             between executive functioning and quality of life in a
             sample of children with SCD and further explore psychosocial
             and family/caregiver resources as moderators of this
             relationship. A total of 45 children with SCD aged 8 to 16
             years and their caregivers completed measures of quality of
             life, behavioral ratings of executive functioning, and
             psychosocial functioning. Hierarchical linear regression
             models were utilized to determine the impact of executive
             functioning on quality of life and further test the
             interaction effects of proposed moderating variables.
             Controlling for age, pain, and socioeconomic status (SES),
             executive functioning was found to significantly predict
             child- and parent-reported quality of life among youth with
             SCD. Psychosocial resources of the primary caregiver or
             family was not found to moderate the relationship between
             executive functioning and quality of life. These results
             provide the first empirical evidence that lower executive
             skills negatively predict quality of life for children with
             SCD, supporting clinical and research efforts which aim to
             establish efficacious interventions that target cognitive
             decrements within this pediatric population.},
   Doi = {10.1080/09297049.2016.1205011},
   Key = {fds319600}
}

@article{fds330040,
   Author = {Schreiber, JE and Palmer, SL and Conklin, HM and Mabbott, DJ and Swain,
             MA and Bonner, MJ and Chapieski, ML and Huang, L and Zhang, H and Gajjar,
             A},
   Title = {Posterior fossa syndrome and long-term neuropsychological
             outcomes among children treated for medulloblastoma on a
             multi-institutional, prospective study.},
   Journal = {Neuro-Oncology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1673-1682},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/neuonc/nox135},
   Abstract = {Patients treated for medulloblastoma who experience
             posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) demonstrate increased risk
             for neurocognitive impairment at one year post diagnosis.
             The aim of the study was to examine longitudinal
             trajectories of neuropsychological outcomes in patients who
             experienced PFS compared with patients who did
             not.Participants were 36 patients (22 males) who experienced
             PFS and 36 comparison patients (21 males) who were matched
             on age at diagnosis and treatment exposure but did not
             experience PFS. All patients underwent serial evaluation of
             neurocognitive functioning spanning 1 to 5 years post
             diagnosis.The PFS group demonstrated lower estimated mean
             scores at 1, 3, and 5 years post diagnosis on measures of
             general intellectual ability, processing speed, broad
             attention, working memory, and spatial relations compared
             with the non-PFS group. The PFS group exhibited estimated
             mean scores that were at least one standard deviation below
             the mean for intellectual ability, processing speed, and
             broad attention across all time points and for working
             memory by 5 years post diagnosis. Processing speed was
             stable over time. Attention and working memory declined over
             time. Despite some change over time, caregiver ratings of
             executive function and behavior problem symptoms remained
             within the average range.Compared with patients who do not
             experience PFS, patients who experience PFS exhibit greater
             neurocognitive impairment, show little recovery over time,
             and decline further in some domains. Findings highlight the
             particularly high risk for long-term neurocognitive problems
             in patients who experience PFS and the need for close
             follow-up and intervention.},
   Doi = {10.1093/neuonc/nox135},
   Key = {fds330040}
}

@article{fds330041,
   Author = {Gallentine, WB and Shinnar, S and Hesdorffer, DC and Epstein, L and Nordli, DR and Lewis, DV and Frank, LM and Seinfeld, S and Shinnar, RC and Cornett, K and Liu, B and Moshé, SL and Sun, S and FEBSTAT Investigator
             Team},
   Title = {Plasma cytokines associated with febrile status epilepticus
             in children: A potential biomarker for acute hippocampal
             injury.},
   Journal = {Epilepsia},
   Volume = {58},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1102-1111},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.13750},
   Abstract = {Our aim was to explore the association between plasma
             cytokines and febrile status epilepticus (FSE) in children,
             as well as their potential as biomarkers of acute
             hippocampal injury.Analysis was performed on residual
             samples of children with FSE (n = 33) as part of the
             Consequences of Prolonged Febrile Seizures in Childhood
             study (FEBSTAT) and compared to children with fever
             (n = 17). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained as
             part of FEBSTAT within 72 h of FSE. Cytokine levels and
             ratios of antiinflammatory versus proinflammatory cytokines
             in children with and without hippocampal T2 hyperintensity
             were assessed as biomarkers of acute hippocampal injury
             after FSE.Levels of interleukin (IL)-8 and epidermal growth
             factor (EGF) were significantly elevated after FSE in
             comparison to controls. IL-1β levels trended higher and
             IL-1RA trended lower following FSE, but did not reach
             statistical significance. Children with FSE were found to
             have significantly lower ratios of IL-1RA/IL-1β and
             IL-1RA/IL-8. Specific levels of any one individual cytokine
             were not associated with FSE. However, lower ratios of
             IL-1RA/IL-1β, IL-1RA/1L-6, and IL-1RA/ IL-8 were all
             associated with FSE. IL-6 and IL-8 levels were significantly
             higher and ratios of IL-1RA/IL-6 and IL-1RA/IL-8 were
             significantly lower in children with T2 hippocampal
             hyperintensity on MRI after FSE in comparison to those
             without hippocampal signal abnormalities. Neither individual
             cytokine levels nor ratios of IL-1RA/IL-1β or IL-1RA/IL-8
             were predictive of MRI changes. However, a lower ratio of
             IL-1RA/IL-6 was strongly predictive (odds ratio [OR] 21.5,
             95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-393) of hippocampal T2
             hyperintensity after FSE.Our data support involvement of the
             IL-1 cytokine system, IL-6, and IL-8 in FSE in children. The
             identification of the IL-1RA/IL-6 ratio as a potential
             biomarker of acute hippocampal injury following FSE is the
             most significant finding. If replicated in another study,
             the IL-1RA/IL-6 ratio could represent a serologic biomarker
             that offers rapid identification of patients at risk for
             ultimately developing mesial temporal lobe epilepsy
             (MTLE).},
   Doi = {10.1111/epi.13750},
   Key = {fds330041}
}

@article{fds316069,
   Author = {Willard, VW and Allen, TM and Hardy, KK and Bonner,
             MJ},
   Title = {Social functioning in survivors of pediatric brain tumors:
             Contribution of neurocognitive and social-cognitive
             skills},
   Journal = {Children's Health Care},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {181-195},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0273-9615},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02739615.2015.1124769},
   Doi = {10.1080/02739615.2015.1124769},
   Key = {fds316069}
}

@article{fds324821,
   Author = {Shashi, V and Pena, LDM and Kim, K and Burton, B and Hempel, M and Schoch,
             K and Walkiewicz, M and McLaughlin, HM and Cho, M and Stong, N and Hickey,
             SE and Shuss, CM and Undiagnosed Diseases Network, and Freemark, MS and Bellet, JS and Keels, MA and Bonner, MJ and El-Dairi, M and Butler, M and Kranz, PG and Stumpel, CTRM and Klinkenberg, S and Oberndorff, K and Alawi, M and Santer, R and Petrovski, S and Kuismin, O and Korpi-Heikkilä, S and Pietilainen, O and Aarno, P and Kurki, MI and Hoischen, A and Need, AC and Goldstein, DB and Kortüm,
             F},
   Title = {De Novo Truncating Variants in ASXL2 Are Associated with a
             Unique and Recognizable Clinical Phenotype.},
   Journal = {The American Journal of Human Genetics},
   Volume = {100},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {179},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.12.004},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.12.004},
   Key = {fds324821}
}


%% Brownell, Kelly D.   
@article{fds331325,
   Author = {Cooksey-Stowers, K and Schwartz, MB and Brownell,
             KD},
   Title = {Food swamps predict obesity rates better than food deserts
             in the United States},
   Journal = {International journal of environmental research and public
             health},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {11},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14111366},
   Abstract = {© 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
             This paper investigates the effect of food environments,
             characterized as food swamps, on adult obesity rates. Food
             swamps have been described as areas with a high-density of
             establishments selling high-calorie fast food and junk food,
             relative to healthier food options. This study examines
             multiple ways of categorizing food environments as food
             swamps and food deserts, including alternate versions of the
             Retail Food Environment Index. We merged food outlet,
             sociodemographic and obesity data from the United States
             Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Environment Atlas, the
             American Community Survey, and a commercial street reference
             dataset. We employed an instrumental variables (IV) strategy
             to correct for the endogeneity of food environments (i.e.,
             that individuals self-select into neighborhoods and may
             consider food availability in their decision). Our results
             suggest that the presence of a food swamp is a stronger
             predictor of obesity rates than the absence of full-service
             grocery stores. We found, even after controlling for food
             desert effects, food swamps have a positive, statistically
             significant effect on adult obesity rates. All three food
             swamp measures indicated the same positive association, but
             reflected different magnitudes of the food swamp effect on
             rates of adult obesity (p values ranged from 0.00 to 0.16).
             Our adjustment for reverse causality, using an IV approach,
             reveale d a stronger effect of food swamps than would have
             been obtained by naïve ordinary least squares (OLS)
             estimates. The food swamp effect was stronger in counties
             with greater income inequality (p < 0.05) and where
             residents are less mobile (p < 0.01). Based on these
             findings, local government policies such as zoning laws
             simultaneously restricting access to unhealthy food outlets
             and incentivizing healthy food retailers to locate in
             underserved neighborhoods warrant consideration as
             strategies to increase health equity.},
   Doi = {10.3390/ijerph14111366},
   Key = {fds331325}
}

@article{fds331326,
   Author = {Bragg, MA and Roberto, CA and Harris, JL and Brownell, KD and Elbel,
             B},
   Title = {Marketing Food and Beverages to Youth Through
             Sports},
   Journal = {Journal of Adolescent Health},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.06.016},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.06.016},
   Key = {fds331326}
}

@article{fds324189,
   Author = {Roberto, CA and Brownell, KD},
   Title = {Strategic science for eating disorders research and policy
             impact.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Eating Disorders},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {312-314},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.22678},
   Abstract = {Scientific research often fails to have relevance and impact
             because scientists do not engage policy makers and
             influencers in the process of identifying information needs
             and generating high priority questions. To address this
             scholarship-policy gap, we have developed a model of
             Strategic Science. This research approach involves working
             with policy makers and influencers to craft research
             questions that will answer important and timely
             policy-related questions. The goal is to create tighter
             links between research and policy and ensure findings are
             communicated efficiently to change agents best positioned to
             apply the research to policy debates. In this article, we
             lay out a model for Strategic Science and describe how this
             approach may help advance policy research and action for
             eating disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1002/eat.22678},
   Key = {fds324189}
}

@article{fds326083,
   Author = {Bleich, SN and Rimm, EB and Brownell, KD},
   Title = {U.S. Nutrition Assistance, 2018 - Modifying SNAP to Promote
             Population Health.},
   Journal = {The New England journal of medicine},
   Volume = {376},
   Number = {13},
   Pages = {1205-1207},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/nejmp1613222},
   Doi = {10.1056/nejmp1613222},
   Key = {fds326083}
}


%% Cabeza, Roberto   
@article{fds329045,
   Author = {Davis, SW and Luber, B and Murphy, DLK and Lisanby, SH and Cabeza,
             R},
   Title = {Frequency-specific neuromodulation of local and distant
             connectivity in aging and episodic memory
             function.},
   Journal = {Human Brain Mapping},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {5987-6004},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23803},
   Abstract = {A growing literature has focused on the brain's ability to
             augment processing in local regions by recruiting distant
             communities of neurons in response to neural decline or
             insult. In particular, both younger and older adult
             populations recruit bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) as a
             means of compensating for increasing neural effort to
             maintain successful cognitive function. However, it remains
             unclear how local changes in neural activity affect the
             recruitment of this adaptive mechanism. To address this
             problem, we combined graph theoretical measures from
             functional MRI with diffusion weighted imaging and
             repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to
             resolve a central hypothesis: how do aged brains flexibly
             adapt to local changes in cortical activity? Specifically,
             we applied neuromodulation to increase or decrease local
             activity in a cortical region supporting successful memory
             encoding (left dorsolateral PFC or DLPFC) using 5 or 1 Hz
             rTMS, respectively. We then assessed a region's local
             within-module degree, or the distributed between-module
             degree (BMD) between distant cortical communities. We
             predicted that (1) local stimulation-related deficits may be
             counteracted by boosting BMD between bilateral PFC, and that
             this effect should be (2) positively correlated with
             structural connectivity. Both predictions were confirmed; 5
             Hz rTMS increased local success-related activity and local
             increases in PFC connectivity, while 1 Hz rTMS decreases
             local activity and triggered a more distributed pattern of
             bilateral PFC connectivity to compensate for this local
             inhibitory effect. These results provide an integrated,
             causal explanation for the network interactions associated
             with successful memory encoding in older adults. Hum Brain
             Mapp 38:5987-6004, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals,
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hbm.23803},
   Key = {fds329045}
}

@article{fds330539,
   Author = {Browndyke, JN and Berger, M and Smith, PJ and Harshbarger, TB and Monge,
             ZA and Panchal, V and Bisanar, TL and Glower, DD and Alexander, JH and Cabeza, R and Welsh-Bohmer, K and Newman, MF and Mathew, JP and Duke
             Neurologic Outcomes Research Group (NORG)},
   Title = {Task-related changes in degree centrality and local
             coherence of the posterior cingulate cortex after major
             cardiac surgery in older adults.},
   Journal = {Human Brain Mapping},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23898},
   Abstract = {Older adults often display postoperative cognitive decline
             (POCD) after surgery, yet it is unclear to what extent
             functional connectivity (FC) alterations may underlie these
             deficits. We examined for postoperative voxel-wise FC
             changes in response to increased working memory load demands
             in cardiac surgery patients and nonsurgical controls.Older
             cardiac surgery patients (n = 25) completed a verbal
             N-back working memory task during MRI scanning and cognitive
             testing before and 6 weeks after surgery; nonsurgical
             controls with cardiac disease (n = 26) underwent these
             assessments at identical time intervals. We measured
             postoperative changes in degree centrality, the number of
             edges attached to a brain node, and local coherence, the
             temporal homogeneity of regional functional correlations,
             using voxel-wise graph theory-based FC metrics. Group ×
             time differences were evaluated in these FC metrics
             associated with increased N-back working memory load
             (2-back > 1-back), using a two-stage partitioned
             variance, mixed ANCOVA.Cardiac surgery patients demonstrated
             postoperative working memory load-related degree centrality
             increases in the left dorsal posterior cingulate cortex
             (dPCC; p < .001, cluster p-FWE < .05). The dPCC also
             showed a postoperative increase in working memory
             load-associated local coherence (p < .001, cluster
             p-FWE < .05). dPCC degree centrality and local coherence
             increases were inversely associated with global cognitive
             change in surgery patients (p < .01), but not in
             controls.Cardiac surgery patients showed postoperative
             increases in working memory load-associated degree
             centrality and local coherence of the dPCC that were
             inversely associated with postoperative global cognitive
             outcomes and independent of perioperative cerebrovascular
             damage.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hbm.23898},
   Key = {fds330539}
}

@article{fds327833,
   Author = {Monge, ZA and Wing, EA and Stokes, J and Cabeza, R},
   Title = {Search and recovery of autobiographical and laboratory
             memories: Shared and distinct neural components.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychologia},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.07.030},
   Abstract = {Functional neuroimaging evidence suggests that there are
             differences in the neural correlates of episodic memory for
             laboratory stimuli (laboratory memory) and for events from
             one's own life (autobiographical memory). However, this
             evidence is scarce and often confounded with differences in
             memory testing procedures. Here, we directly compared the
             neural mechanisms underlying the search and recovery of
             autobiographical and laboratory memories while minimizing
             testing differences. Before scanning, participants completed
             a laboratory memory encoding task in which they studied
             four-word "chains" spread across three word pairs. During
             scanning, participants completed a laboratory memory
             retrieval task, in which they recalled the word chains, and
             an autobiographical memory retrieval task, in which they
             recalled specific personal events associated with word cues.
             Importantly, response times were similar in the two tasks,
             allowing for a direct comparison of the activation time
             courses. We found that during memory search (searching for
             the memory target), similar brain regions were activated
             during both the autobiographical and laboratory tasks,
             whereas during memory recovery (accessing the memory traces;
             i.e., ecphory), clear differences emerged: regions of the
             default mode network (DMN) were activated greater during
             autobiographical than laboratory memory, whereas the
             bilateral superior parietal lobules were activated greater
             during laboratory than autobiographical memory. Also,
             multivariate functional connectivity analyses revealed that
             regardless of memory stage, the DMN and ventral attention
             network exhibited a more integrated topology in the
             functional network underlying autobiographical (vs.
             laboratory) memory retrieval, whereas the fronto-parietal
             task control network exhibited a more integrated topology in
             the functional network underlying laboratory (vs.
             autobiographical) memory retrieval. These findings further
             characterize the shared and distinct neural components
             underlying autobiographical and laboratory memories, and
             suggest that differences in autobiographical vs. laboratory
             memory brain activation previously reported in the
             literature reflect memory recovery rather than search
             differences.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.07.030},
   Key = {fds327833}
}

@article{fds326734,
   Author = {Brashier, NM and Umanath, S and Cabeza, R and Marsh,
             EJ},
   Title = {Competing cues: Older adults rely on knowledge in the face
             of fluency.},
   Journal = {Psychology and Aging},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {331-337},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pag0000156},
   Abstract = {Consumers regularly encounter repeated false claims in
             political and marketing campaigns, but very little empirical
             work addresses their impact among older adults. Repeated
             statements feel easier to process, and thus more truthful,
             than new ones (i.e., illusory truth). When judging truth,
             older adults' accumulated general knowledge may offset this
             perception of fluency. In two experiments, participants read
             statements that contradicted information stored in memory; a
             post-experimental knowledge check confirmed what individual
             participants knew. Unlike young adults, older adults
             exhibited illusory truth only when they lacked knowledge
             about claims. This interaction between knowledge and fluency
             extends dual-process theories of aging. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/pag0000156},
   Key = {fds326734}
}

@article{fds323839,
   Author = {Geib, BR and Stanley, ML and Dennis, NA and Woldorff, MG and Cabeza,
             R},
   Title = {From hippocampus to whole-brain: The role of integrative
             processing in episodic memory retrieval.},
   Journal = {Human Brain Mapping},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {2242-2259},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23518},
   Abstract = {Multivariate functional connectivity analyses of
             neuroimaging data have revealed the importance of complex,
             distributed interactions between disparate yet
             interdependent brain regions. Recent work has shown that
             topological properties of functional brain networks are
             associated with individual and group differences in
             cognitive performance, including in episodic memory. After
             constructing functional whole-brain networks derived from an
             event-related fMRI study of memory retrieval, we examined
             differences in functional brain network architecture between
             forgotten and remembered words. This study yielded three
             main findings. First, graph theory analyses showed that
             successfully remembering compared to forgetting was
             associated with significant changes in the connectivity
             profile of the left hippocampus and a corresponding increase
             in efficient communication with the rest of the brain.
             Second, bivariate functional connectivity analyses indicated
             stronger interactions between the left hippocampus and a
             retrieval assembly for remembered versus forgotten items.
             This assembly included the left precuneus, left caudate,
             bilateral supramarginal gyrus, and the bilateral
             dorsolateral superior frontal gyrus. Integrative properties
             of the retrieval assembly were greater for remembered than
             forgotten items. Third, whole-brain modularity analyses
             revealed that successful memory retrieval was marginally
             significantly associated with a less segregated modular
             architecture in the network. The magnitude of the decreases
             in modularity between remembered and forgotten conditions
             was related to memory performance. These findings indicate
             that increases in integrative properties at the nodal,
             retrieval assembly, and whole-brain topological levels
             facilitate memory retrieval, while also underscoring the
             potential of multivariate brain connectivity approaches for
             providing valuable new insights into the neural bases of
             memory processes. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2242-2259, 2017. © 2017
             Wiley Periodicals, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hbm.23518},
   Key = {fds323839}
}

@article{fds320544,
   Author = {Davis, SW and Stanley, ML and Moscovitch, M and Cabeza,
             R},
   Title = {Resting-state networks do not determine cognitive function
             networks: a commentary on Campbell and Schacter
             (2016).},
   Journal = {Language Cognition and Neuroscience},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {669-673},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23273798.2016.1252847},
   Doi = {10.1080/23273798.2016.1252847},
   Key = {fds320544}
}


%% Caspi, Avshalom   
@article{fds329541,
   Author = {Baldwin, JR and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Fisher, HL and Moffitt,
             TE and Odgers, CL and Pariante, C and Ambler, A and Dove, R and Kepa, A and Matthews, T and Menard, A and Sugden, K and Williams, B and Danese,
             A},
   Title = {Childhood victimization and inflammation in young adulthood:
             A genetically sensitive cohort study.},
   Journal = {Brain, Behavior, and Immunity},
   Volume = {67},
   Pages = {211-217},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2017.08.025},
   Abstract = {Childhood victimization is an important risk factor for
             later immune-related disorders. Previous evidence has
             demonstrated that childhood victimization is associated with
             elevated levels of inflammation biomarkers measured decades
             after exposure. However, it is unclear whether this
             association is (1) already detectable in young people, (2)
             different in males and females, and (3) confounded by
             genetic liability to inflammation. Here we sought to address
             these questions.Participants were 2232 children followed
             from birth to age 18years as part of the Environmental Risk
             (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study. Childhood victimization
             was measured prospectively from birth to age 12years.
             Inflammation was measured through C-reactive protein (CRP)
             levels in dried blood spots at age 18years. Latent genetic
             liability for high inflammation levels was assessed through
             a twin-based method.Greater exposure to childhood
             victimization was associated with higher CRP levels at age
             18 (serum-equivalent means were 0.65 in non-victimized Study
             members, 0.74 in those exposed to one victimization type,
             and 0.81 in those exposed to poly-victimization; p=0.018).
             However, this association was driven by a significant
             association in females (serum-equivalent means were 0.75 in
             non-victimized females, 0.87 in those exposed to one type of
             victimization, and 1.19 in those exposed to
             poly-victimization; p=0.010), while no significant
             association was observed in males (p=0.19). Victimized
             females showed elevated CRP levels independent of latent
             genetic influence, as well as childhood socioeconomic
             status, and waist-hip ratio and body temperature at the time
             of CRP assessment.Childhood victimization is associated with
             elevated CRP levels in young women, independent of latent
             genetic influences and other key risk factors. These results
             strengthen causal inference about the effects of childhood
             victimization on inflammation levels in females by
             accounting for potential genetic confounding.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bbi.2017.08.025},
   Key = {fds329541}
}

@article{fds329982,
   Author = {Newbury, JB and Arseneault, L and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Danese,
             A and Baldwin, JR and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {Measuring childhood maltreatment to predict early-adult
             psychopathology: Comparison of prospective informant-reports
             and retrospective self-reports.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychiatric Research},
   Volume = {96},
   Pages = {57-64},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.09.020},
   Abstract = {Both prospective informant-reports and retrospective
             self-reports may be used to measure childhood maltreatment,
             though both methods entail potential limitations such as
             underestimation and memory biases. The validity and utility
             of standard measures of childhood maltreatment requires
             clarification in order to inform the design of future
             studies investigating the mental health consequences of
             maltreatment. The present study assessed agreement between
             prospective informant-reports and retrospective self-reports
             of childhood maltreatment, as well as the comparative
             utility of both reports for predicting a range of
             psychiatric problems at age 18. Data were obtained from the
             Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a
             nationally-representative birth cohort of 2232 children
             followed to 18 years of age (with 93% retention). Childhood
             maltreatment was assessed in two ways: (i) prospective
             informant-reports from caregivers, researchers, and
             clinicians when children were aged 5, 7, 10 and 12; and (ii)
             retrospective self-reports of maltreatment experiences
             occurring up to age 12, obtained at age 18 using the
             Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Participants were privately
             interviewed at age 18 concerning several psychiatric
             problems including depression, anxiety, self-injury,
             alcohol/cannabis dependence, and conduct disorder. There was
             only slight to fair agreement between prospective and
             retrospective reports of childhood maltreatment (all
             Kappa's ≤ 0.31). Both prospective and retrospective
             reports of maltreatment were associated with age-18
             psychiatric problems, though the strongest associations were
             found when maltreatment was retrospectively self-reported.
             These findings indicate that prospective and retrospective
             reports of childhood maltreatment capture largely
             non-overlapping groups of individuals. Young adults who
             recall being maltreated have a particularly elevated risk
             for psychopathology.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.09.020},
   Key = {fds329982}
}

@article{fds331398,
   Author = {Rivenbark, JG and Odgers, CL and Caspi, A and Harrington, H and Hogan,
             S and Houts, RM and Poulton, R and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {The high societal costs of childhood conduct problems:
             evidence from administrative records up to age 38 in a
             longitudinal birth cohort.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12850},
   Abstract = {Children with conduct problems that persist into adulthood
             are at increased risk for future behavioral, health, and
             social problems. However, the longer term public service
             usage among these children has not been fully documented. To
             aid public health and intervention planning, adult service
             usage across criminal justice, health care, and social
             welfare domains is compared among all individuals from a
             representative cohort who followed different conduct problem
             trajectories from childhood into adulthood.Participants are
             from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development
             Study, a prospective, representative cohort of consecutive
             births (N = 1,037) from April 1972 to March 1973 in
             Dunedin, New Zealand. Regression analyses were used to
             compare levels of public service usage up to age 38,
             gathered via administrative and electronic medical records,
             between participants who displayed distinct subtypes of
             childhood conduct problems (low, childhood-limited,
             adolescent-onset, and life-course persistent).Children
             exhibiting life-course persistent conduct problems used
             significantly more services as adults than those with low
             levels of childhood conduct problems. Although this group
             comprised only 9.0% of the population, they accounted for
             53.3% of all convictions, 15.7% of emergency department
             visits, 20.5% of prescription fills, 13.1% of injury claims,
             and 24.7% of welfare benefit months. Half of this group
             (50.0%) also accrued high service use across all three
             domains of criminal justice, health, and social welfare
             services, as compared to only 11.3% of those with low
             conduct problems (OR = 7.27, 95% CI = 4.42-12.0).Conduct
             problems in childhood signal high future costs in terms of
             service utilization across multiple sectors. Future
             evaluations of interventions aimed at conduct problems
             should also track potential reductions in health burden and
             service usage that stretch into midlife.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jcpp.12850},
   Key = {fds331398}
}

@article{fds331468,
   Author = {Newbury, JB and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Odgers,
             CL and Baldwin, JR and Zavos, HMS and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {In the eye of the beholder: Perceptions of neighborhood
             adversity and psychotic experiences in adolescence.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1823-1837},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579417001420},
   Abstract = {Adolescent psychotic experiences increase risk for
             schizophrenia and other severe psychopathology in adulthood.
             Converging evidence implicates urban and adverse
             neighborhood conditions in the etiology of adolescent
             psychotic experiences, but the role of young people's
             personal perceptions of disorder (i.e., physical and social
             signs of threat) in their neighborhood is unknown. This was
             examined using data from the Environmental Risk Longitudinal
             Twin Study, a nationally representative birth cohort of
             2,232 British twins. Participants were interviewed at age 18
             about psychotic phenomena and perceptions of disorder in the
             neighborhood. Multilevel, longitudinal, and genetically
             sensitive analyses investigated the association between
             perceptions of neighborhood disorder and adolescent
             psychotic experiences. Adolescents who perceived higher
             levels of neighborhood disorder were significantly more
             likely to have psychotic experiences, even after accounting
             for objectively/independently measured levels of crime and
             disorder, neighborhood- and family-level socioeconomic
             status, family psychiatric history, adolescent substance and
             mood problems, and childhood psychotic symptoms: odds ratio
             = 1.62, 95% confidence interval [1.27, 2.05], p < .001. The
             phenotypic overlap between adolescent psychotic experiences
             and perceptions of neighborhood disorder was explained by
             overlapping common environmental influences, rC = .88, 95%
             confidence interval [0.26, 1.00]. Findings suggest that
             early psychological interventions to prevent adolescent
             psychotic experiences should explore the role of young
             people's (potentially modifiable) perceptions of threatening
             neighborhood conditions.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579417001420},
   Key = {fds331468}
}

@article{fds330402,
   Author = {Schaefer, JD and Scult, MA and Caspi, A and Arseneault, L and Belsky,
             DW and Hariri, AR and Harrington, H and Houts, R and Ramrakha, S and Poulton, R and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Is low cognitive functioning a predictor or consequence of
             major depressive disorder? A test in two longitudinal birth
             cohorts.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Pages = {1-15},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s095457941700164x},
   Abstract = {Cognitive impairment has been identified as an important
             aspect of major depressive disorder (MDD). We tested two
             theories regarding the association between MDD and cognitive
             functioning using data from longitudinal cohort studies. One
             theory, the cognitive reserve hypothesis, suggests that
             higher cognitive ability in childhood decreases risk of
             later MDD. The second, the scarring hypothesis, instead
             suggests that MDD leads to persistent cognitive deficits
             following disorder onset. We tested both theories in the
             Dunedin Study, a population-representative cohort followed
             from birth to midlife and assessed repeatedly for both
             cognitive functioning and psychopathology. We also used data
             from the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study to test
             whether childhood cognitive functioning predicts future MDD
             risk independent of family-wide and genetic risk using a
             discordant twin design. Contrary to both hypotheses, we
             found that childhood cognitive functioning did not predict
             future risk of MDD, nor did study members with a past
             history of MDD show evidence of greater cognitive decline
             unless MDD was accompanied by other comorbid psychiatric
             conditions. Our results thus suggest that low cognitive
             functioning is related to comorbidity, but is neither an
             antecedent nor an enduring consequence of MDD. Future
             research may benefit from considering cognitive deficits
             that occur during depressive episodes from a transdiagnostic
             perspective.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s095457941700164x},
   Key = {fds330402}
}

@article{fds328903,
   Author = {Williams, MJA and Milne, BJ and Ambler, A and Theodore, R and Ramrakha,
             S and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Poulton, R},
   Title = {Childhood body mass index and endothelial dysfunction
             evaluated by peripheral arterial tonometry in early
             midlife.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Obesity},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1355-1360},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2017.108},
   Abstract = {Endothelial dysfunction predicts mortality but it is unknown
             whether childhood obesity predicts adult endothelial
             dysfunction. The aim of this study was to determine whether
             anthropometric indices of body fat in childhood, adolescence
             and early midlife are associated with endothelial
             dysfunction in early midlife.Participants belonged to a
             representative birth cohort of 1037 individuals born in
             Dunedin, New Zealand in 1972 and 1973 and followed to age 38
             years, with 95% retention (the Dunedin Multidisciplinary
             Health and Development Study). We assessed anthropometric
             indices of obesity at ages 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 18, 21,
             26, 32 and 38 years. We tested associations between
             endothelial function assessed by peripheral arterial
             tonometry (PAT) at age 38 and; age 38 cardiovascular risk
             factors; age 3 body mass index (BMI); and four BMI
             trajectory groups from childhood to early midlife.Early
             midlife endothelial dysfunction was associated with BMI,
             large waist circumference, low high-density lipoprotein
             cholesterol, low cardiorespiratory fitness and increased
             high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. After adjustment for
             sex and childhood socioeconomic status, 3-year-olds with BMI
             1 s.d. above the mean had Framingham-reactive hyperemia
             index (F-RHI) ratios that were 0.10 below those with normal
             BMI (β=-0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.17 to -0.03,
             P=0.007) at age 38. Cohort members in the 'overweight',
             'obese' and 'morbidly obese' trajectories had F-RHI ratios
             that were 0.08 (β=-0.08, 95% CI -0.14 to -0.03, P=0.003),
             0.13 (β=-0.13, 95% CI -0.21 to -0.06, P<0.001) and 0.17
             (β=-0.17, 95% CI -0.33 to -0.01, P=0.033), respectively,
             below age-peers in the 'normal' trajectory.Childhood BMI and
             the trajectories of BMI from childhood to early midlife
             predict endothelial dysfunction evaluated by PAT in early
             midlife.},
   Doi = {10.1038/ijo.2017.108},
   Key = {fds328903}
}

@article{fds328625,
   Author = {Matthews, T and Danese, A and Gregory, AM and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Arseneault, L},
   Title = {Sleeping with one eye open: loneliness and sleep quality in
             young adults},
   Journal = {Psychological Medicine},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {2177-2186},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291717000629},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0033291717000629},
   Key = {fds328625}
}

@article{fds327017,
   Author = {Suppli, NP and Bukh, JD and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Johansen, C and Tjønneland, A and Kessing, LV and Dalton, SO},
   Title = {Genetic variants in 5-HTTLPR, BDNF, HTR1A, COMT, and FKBP5
             and risk for treated depression after cancer
             diagnosis.},
   Journal = {Depression and Anxiety},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {845-855},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/da.22660},
   Abstract = {The role of gene-environment interactions in the
             pathogenesis of depression is unclear. Previous studies
             addressed vulnerability for depression after childhood
             adversity and stressful life events among carriers of
             numerous specific genetic variants; however, the importance
             of individual genetic variants, the environmental exposures
             with which they interact, and the magnitude of the risk
             conveyed by these interactions remain elusive.We included
             7,320 people with a first primary cancer identified in the
             prospective Diet, Cancer and Health study in an exposed-only
             cohort study. The mean age of the individuals was 68 years
             (5th, 95th percentiles: 58, 78) at cancer diagnosis. Using
             Cox regression models and cumulative incidence plots, we
             analyzed the associations between genetic variants in
             5-HTTLPR, BDNF, HTR1A, COMT, and FKBP5 and use of
             antidepressants as well as hospital contact for depression
             after diagnosis of cancer.Overall, we observed no
             statistically significant associations, with nonsignificant
             hazard ratio estimates for use of antidepressants of
             0.95-1.07.This study of elderly people indicates that it is
             unlikely that the investigated genetic variants are
             clinically relevantly associated with depression after
             diagnosis of cancer. The mechanisms for gene-environment
             interactions in younger individuals are probably different,
             and we advise caution in extrapolating our results to early
             life stress. However, conclusion from the present study
             might be generalizable to elderly persons exposed to other
             stressful life events.},
   Doi = {10.1002/da.22660},
   Key = {fds327017}
}

@article{fds326204,
   Author = {Belsky, DW and Caspi, A and Cohen, HJ and Kraus, WE and Ramrakha, S and Poulton, R and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Impact of early personal-history characteristics on the Pace
             of Aging: implications for clinical trials of therapies to
             slow aging and extend healthspan.},
   Journal = {Aging Cell},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {644-651},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acel.12591},
   Abstract = {Therapies to extend healthspan are poised to move from
             laboratory animal models to human clinical trials.
             Translation from mouse to human will entail challenges,
             among them the multifactorial heterogeneity of human aging.
             To inform clinical trials about this heterogeneity, we
             report how humans' pace of biological aging relates to
             personal-history characteristics. Because geroprotective
             therapies must be delivered by midlife to prevent
             age-related disease onset, we studied young-adult members of
             the Dunedin Study 1972-73 birth cohort (n = 954). Cohort
             members' Pace of Aging was measured as coordinated decline
             in the integrity of multiple organ systems, by quantifying
             rate of decline across repeated measurements of 18
             biomarkers assayed when cohort members were ages 26, 32, and
             38 years. The childhood personal-history characteristics
             studied were known predictors of age-related disease and
             mortality, and were measured prospectively during childhood.
             Personal-history characteristics of familial longevity,
             childhood social class, adverse childhood experiences, and
             childhood health, intelligence, and self-control all
             predicted differences in cohort members' adulthood Pace of
             Aging. Accumulation of more personal-history risks predicted
             faster Pace of Aging. Because trials of anti-aging therapies
             will need to ascertain personal histories retrospectively,
             we replicated results using cohort members' retrospective
             personal-history reports made in adulthood. Because many
             trials recruit participants from clinical settings, we
             replicated results in the cohort subset who had recent
             health system contact according to electronic medical
             records. Quick, inexpensive measures of trial participants'
             early personal histories can enable clinical trials to study
             who volunteers for trials, who adheres to treatment, and who
             responds to anti-aging therapies.},
   Doi = {10.1111/acel.12591},
   Key = {fds326204}
}

@article{fds328904,
   Author = {Meier, MH and Caspi, A and Danese, A and Fisher, HL and Houts, R and Arseneault, L and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Associations between adolescent cannabis use and
             neuropsychological decline: a longitudinal co-twin control
             study.},
   Journal = {Addiction},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/add.13946},
   Abstract = {This study tested whether adolescents who used cannabis or
             met criteria for cannabis dependence showed
             neuropsychological impairment prior to cannabis initiation
             and neuropsychological decline from before to after cannabis
             initiation.A longitudinal co-twin control study.Participants
             were 1989 twins from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk)
             Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally representative birth
             cohort of twins born in England and Wales from 1994 to
             1995.Frequency of cannabis use and cannabis dependence were
             assessed at age 18. Intelligence quotient (IQ) was obtained
             at ages 5, 12 and 18. Executive functions were assessed at
             age 18.Compared with adolescents who did not use cannabis,
             adolescents who used cannabis had lower IQ in childhood
             prior to cannabis initiation and lower IQ at age 18, but
             there was little evidence that cannabis use was associated
             with IQ decline from ages 12-18. For example, adolescents
             with cannabis dependence had age 12 and age 18 IQ scores
             that were 5.61 (t = -3.11, P = 0.002) and 7.34 IQ points
             (t = -5.27, P < 0.001) lower than adolescents without
             cannabis dependence, but adolescents with cannabis
             dependence did not show greater IQ decline from age 12-18
             (t = -1.27, P = 0.20). Moreover, adolescents who used
             cannabis had poorer executive functions at age 18 than
             adolescents who did not use cannabis, but these associations
             were generally not apparent within twin pairs. For example,
             twins who used cannabis more frequently than their co-twin
             performed similarly to their co-twin on five of six
             executive function tests (Ps > 0.10). The one exception
             was that twins who used cannabis more frequently than their
             co-twin performed worse on one working memory test (Spatial
             Span reversed; β = -0.07, P = 0.036).Short-term
             cannabis use in adolescence does not appear to cause IQ
             decline or impair executive functions, even when cannabis
             use reaches the level of dependence. Family background
             factors explain why adolescent cannabis users perform worse
             on IQ and executive function tests.},
   Doi = {10.1111/add.13946},
   Key = {fds328904}
}

@article{fds331469,
   Author = {Newbury, J and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Odgers,
             CL and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {Cumulative Effects of Neighborhood Social Adversity and
             Personal Crime Victimization on Adolescent Psychotic
             Experiences.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbx060},
   Abstract = {Little is known about the impact of urbanicity, adverse
             neighborhood conditions and violent crime victimization on
             the emergence of adolescent psychotic experiences.Participants
             were from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin
             Study, a nationally-representative cohort of 2232 British
             twins who were interviewed about adolescent psychotic
             experiences at age 18. Urbanicity, neighborhood
             characteristics, and personal victimization by violent crime
             were measured during childhood and adolescence via geocoded
             census data, surveys of over 5000 immediate neighbors of the
             E-Risk participants, and interviews with participants
             themselves.Adolescents raised in urban vs rural
             neighborhoods were significantly more likely to have
             psychotic experiences (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.21-2.30, P =
             .002). This association remained significant after
             considering potential confounders including family
             socioeconomic status, family psychiatric history, and
             adolescent substance problems (OR = 1.43, 95% CI =
             1.01-2.03, P = .042), but became nonsignificant after
             considering adverse social conditions in urban neighborhoods
             such as low social cohesion and high neighborhood disorder
             (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.94-1.92, P = .102). The combined
             association of adverse neighborhood social conditions and
             personal crime victimization with adolescent psychotic
             experiences (adjusted OR = 4.86, 95% CI = 3.28-7.20, P <
             .001) was substantially greater than for either exposure
             alone, highlighting a potential interaction between
             neighborhood conditions and crime victimization (interaction
             contrast ratio = 1.81, 95% CI = -0.03 to 3.65) that was
             significant at the P = .054 level.Cumulative effects of
             adverse neighborhood social conditions and personal
             victimization by violent crime during upbringing partly
             explain why adolescents in urban settings are more likely to
             report psychotic experiences. Early intervention efforts for
             psychosis could be targeted towards victimized youth living
             in urban and socially adverse neighborhoods.},
   Doi = {10.1093/schbul/sbx060},
   Key = {fds331469}
}

@article{fds325848,
   Author = {Kotov, R and Krueger, RF and Watson, D and Achenbach, TM and Althoff,
             RR and Bagby, RM and Brown, TA and Carpenter, WT and Caspi, A and Clark,
             LA and Eaton, NR and Forbes, MK and Forbush, KT and Goldberg, D and Hasin,
             D and Hyman, SE and Ivanova, MY and Lynam, DR and Markon, K and Miller, JD and Moffitt, TE and Morey, LC and Mullins-Sweatt, SN and Ormel, J and Patrick, CJ and Regier, DA and Rescorla, L and Ruggero, CJ and Samuel,
             DB and Sellbom, M and Simms, LJ and Skodol, AE and Slade, T and South, SC and Tackett, JL and Waldman, ID and Waszczuk, MA and Widiger, TA and Wright,
             AGC and Zimmerman, M},
   Title = {The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP): A
             dimensional alternative to traditional nosologies.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {126},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {454-477},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/abn0000258},
   Abstract = {The reliability and validity of traditional taxonomies are
             limited by arbitrary boundaries between psychopathology and
             normality, often unclear boundaries between disorders,
             frequent disorder co-occurrence, heterogeneity within
             disorders, and diagnostic instability. These taxonomies went
             beyond evidence available on the structure of
             psychopathology and were shaped by a variety of other
             considerations, which may explain the aforementioned
             shortcomings. The Hierarchical Taxonomy Of Psychopathology
             (HiTOP) model has emerged as a research effort to address
             these problems. It constructs psychopathological syndromes
             and their components/subtypes based on the observed
             covariation of symptoms, grouping related symptoms together
             and thus reducing heterogeneity. It also combines
             co-occurring syndromes into spectra, thereby mapping out
             comorbidity. Moreover, it characterizes these phenomena
             dimensionally, which addresses boundary problems and
             diagnostic instability. Here, we review the development of
             the HiTOP and the relevant evidence. The new classification
             already covers most forms of psychopathology. Dimensional
             measures have been developed to assess many of the
             identified components, syndromes, and spectra. Several
             domains of this model are ready for clinical and research
             applications. The HiTOP promises to improve research and
             clinical practice by addressing the aforementioned
             shortcomings of traditional nosologies. It also provides an
             effective way to summarize and convey information on risk
             factors, etiology, pathophysiology, phenomenology, illness
             course, and treatment response. This can greatly improve the
             utility of the diagnosis of mental disorders. The new
             classification remains a work in progress. However, it is
             developing rapidly and is poised to advance mental health
             research and care significantly as the relevant science
             matures. (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/abn0000258},
   Key = {fds325848}
}

@article{fds326205,
   Author = {Romer, AL and Knodt, AR and Houts, R and Brigidi, BD and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {Structural alterations within cerebellar circuitry are
             associated with general liability for common mental
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Abstract = {Accumulating mental-health research encourages a shift in
             focus toward transdiagnostic dimensional features that are
             shared across categorical disorders. In support of this
             shift, recent studies have identified a general liability
             factor for psychopathology-sometimes called the 'p factor'-
             that underlies shared risk for a wide range of mental
             disorders. Identifying neural correlates of this general
             liability would substantiate its importance in
             characterizing the shared origins of mental disorders and
             help us begin to understand the mechanisms through which the
             'p factor' contributes to risk. Here we believe we first
             replicate the 'p factor' using cross-sectional data from a
             volunteer sample of 1246 university students, and then using
             high-resolution multimodal structural neuroimaging, we
             demonstrate that individuals with higher 'p factor' scores
             show reduced structural integrity of white matter pathways,
             as indexed by lower fractional anisotropy values, uniquely
             within the pons. Whole-brain analyses further revealed that
             higher 'p factor' scores are associated with reduced gray
             matter volume in the occipital lobe and left cerebellar
             lobule VIIb, which is functionally connected with prefrontal
             regions supporting cognitive control. Consistent with the
             preponderance of cerebellar afferents within the pons, we
             observed a significant positive correlation between the
             white matter integrity of the pons and cerebellar gray
             matter volume associated with higher 'p factor' scores. The
             results of our analyses provide initial evidence that
             structural alterations in corticocerebellar circuitry
             supporting core functions related to the basic integration,
             coordination and monitoring of information may contribute to
             a general liability for common mental disorders.Molecular
             Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 April 2017;
             doi:10.1038/mp.2017.57.},
   Doi = {10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Key = {fds326205}
}

@article{fds324429,
   Author = {Danese, A and Moffitt, TE and Arseneault, L and Bleiberg, BA and Dinardo, PB and Gandelman, SB and Houts, R and Ambler, A and Fisher, HL and Poulton, R and Caspi, A},
   Title = {The Origins of Cognitive Deficits in Victimized Children:
             Implications for Neuroscientists and Clinicians.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {174},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {349-361},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.16030333},
   Abstract = {Individuals reporting a history of childhood violence
             victimization have impaired brain function. However, the
             clinical significance, reproducibility, and causality of
             these findings are disputed. The authors used data from two
             large cohort studies to address these research questions
             directly.The authors tested the association between
             prospectively collected measures of childhood violence
             victimization and cognitive functions in childhood,
             adolescence, and adulthood among 2,232 members of the U.K.
             E-Risk Study and 1,037 members of the New Zealand Dunedin
             Study who were followed up from birth until ages 18 and 38
             years, respectively. Multiple measures of victimization and
             cognition were used, and comparisons were made of cognitive
             scores for twins discordant for victimization.Individuals
             exposed to childhood victimization had pervasive impairments
             in clinically relevant cognitive functions, including
             general intelligence, executive function, processing speed,
             memory, perceptual reasoning, and verbal comprehension in
             adolescence and adulthood. However, the observed cognitive
             deficits in victimized individuals were largely explained by
             cognitive deficits that predated childhood victimization and
             by confounding genetic and environmental risks.Findings from
             two population-representative birth cohorts totaling more
             than 3,000 individuals and born 20 years and 20,000 km apart
             suggest that the association between childhood violence
             victimization and later cognition is largely noncausal, in
             contrast to conventional interpretations. These findings
             support the adoption of a more circumspect approach to
             causal inference in the neuroscience of stress. Clinically,
             cognitive deficits should be conceptualized as individual
             risk factors for victimization as well as potential
             complicating features during treatment.},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.16030333},
   Key = {fds324429}
}

@article{fds325847,
   Author = {Reuben, A and Caspi, A and Belsky, DW and Broadbent, J and Harrington,
             H and Sugden, K and Houts, RM and Ramrakha, S and Poulton, R and Moffitt,
             TE},
   Title = {Association of Childhood Blood Lead Levels With Cognitive
             Function and Socioeconomic Status at Age 38 Years and With
             IQ Change and Socioeconomic Mobility Between Childhood and
             Adulthood.},
   Journal = {JAMA : the journal of the American Medical
             Association},
   Volume = {317},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1244-1251},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2017.1712},
   Abstract = {Many children in the United States and around the world are
             exposed to lead, a developmental neurotoxin. The long-term
             cognitive and socioeconomic consequences of lead exposure
             are uncertain.To test the hypothesis that childhood lead
             exposure is associated with cognitive function and
             socioeconomic status in adulthood and with changes in IQ and
             socioeconomic mobility between childhood and midlife.A
             prospective cohort study based on a population-representative
             1972-1973 birth cohort from New Zealand; the Dunedin
             Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study observed
             participants to age 38 years (until December 2012).Childhood
             lead exposure ascertained as blood lead levels measured at
             age 11 years. High blood lead levels were observed among
             children from all socioeconomic status levels in this
             cohort.The IQ (primary outcome) and indexes of Verbal
             Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Working Memory, and
             Processing Speed (secondary outcomes) were assessed at age
             38 years using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV
             (WAIS-IV; IQ range, 40-160). Socioeconomic status (primary
             outcome) was assessed at age 38 years using the New Zealand
             Socioeconomic Index-2006 (NZSEI-06; range, 10 [lowest]-90
             [highest]).Of 1037 original participants, 1007 were alive at
             age 38 years, of whom 565 (56%) had been lead tested at age
             11 years (54% male; 93% white). Mean (SD) blood lead level
             at age 11 years was 10.99 (4.63) µg/dL. Among blood-tested
             participants included at age 38 years, mean WAIS-IV score
             was 101.16 (14.82) and mean NZSEI-06 score was 49.75
             (17.12). After adjusting for maternal IQ, childhood IQ, and
             childhood socioeconomic status, each 5-µg/dL higher level
             of blood lead in childhood was associated with a 1.61-point
             lower score (95% CI, -2.48 to -0.74) in adult IQ, a
             2.07-point lower score (95% CI, -3.14 to -1.01) in
             perceptual reasoning, and a 1.26-point lower score (95% CI,
             -2.38 to -0.14) in working memory. Associations of childhood
             blood lead level with deficits in verbal comprehension and
             processing speed were not statistically significant. After
             adjusting for confounders, each 5-µg/dL higher level of
             blood lead in childhood was associated with a 1.79-unit
             lower score (95% CI, -3.17 to -0.40) in socioeconomic
             status. An association between greater blood lead levels and
             a decline in IQ and socioeconomic status from childhood to
             adulthood was observed with 40% of the association with
             downward mobility mediated by cognitive decline from
             childhood.In this cohort born in New Zealand in 1972-1973,
             childhood lead exposure was associated with lower cognitive
             function and socioeconomic status at age 38 years and with
             declines in IQ and with downward social mobility. Childhood
             lead exposure may have long-term ramifications.},
   Doi = {10.1001/jama.2017.1712},
   Key = {fds325847}
}

@article{fds321660,
   Author = {Schaefer, JD and Caspi, A and Belsky, DW and Harrington, H and Houts, R and Horwood, LJ and Hussong, A and Ramrakha, S and Poulton, R and Moffitt,
             TE},
   Title = {Enduring mental health: Prevalence and prediction.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {126},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {212-224},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/abn0000232},
   Abstract = {We review epidemiological evidence indicating that most
             people will develop a diagnosable mental disorder,
             suggesting that only a minority experience enduring mental
             health. This minority has received little empirical study,
             leaving the prevalence and predictors of enduring mental
             health unknown. We turn to the population-representative
             Dunedin cohort, followed from birth to midlife, to compare
             people never-diagnosed with mental disorder (N = 171; 17%
             prevalence) to those diagnosed at 1-2 study waves, the
             cohort mode (N = 409). Surprisingly, compared to this modal
             group, never-diagnosed Study members were not born into
             unusually well-to-do families, nor did their enduring mental
             health follow markedly sound physical health, or unusually
             high intelligence. Instead, they tended to have an
             advantageous temperament/personality style, and negligible
             family history of mental disorder. As adults, they report
             superior educational and occupational attainment, greater
             life satisfaction, and higher-quality relationships. Our
             findings draw attention to "enduring mental health" as a
             revealing psychological phenotype and suggest it deserves
             further study. (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/abn0000232},
   Key = {fds321660}
}

@article{fds328127,
   Author = {Moffitt, TE and Belsky, DW and Danese, A and Poulton, R and Caspi,
             A},
   Title = {The Longitudinal Study of Aging in Human Young Adults:
             Knowledge Gaps and Research Agenda.},
   Journal = {Journals of Gerontology: Series A},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {210-215},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glw191},
   Abstract = {To prevent onset of age-related diseases and physical and
             cognitive decline, interventions to slow human aging and
             extend health span must eventually be applied to people
             while they are still young and healthy. Yet most human aging
             research examines older adults, many with chronic disease,
             and little is known about aging in healthy young humans.This
             article explains how this knowledge gap is a barrier to
             extending health span and puts forward the case that
             geroscience should invest in researching the pace of aging
             in young adults. As one illustrative example, we describe an
             initial effort to study the pace of aging in a young-adult
             birth cohort by using repeated waves of biomarkers collected
             across the third and fourth decades to quantify the pace of
             coordinated physiological deterioration across multiple
             organ systems (eg, pulmonary, periodontal, cardiovascular,
             renal, hepatic, metabolic, and immune function).Findings
             provided proof of principle that it is possible to quantify
             individual variation in the pace of aging in young adults
             still free of age-related diseases.This article articulates
             research needs to improve longitudinal measurement of the
             pace of aging in young people, to pinpoint factors that slow
             or speed the pace of aging, to compare pace of aging against
             genomic clocks, to explain slow-aging young adults, and to
             apply pace of aging in preventive clinical trials of
             antiaging therapies. This article puts forward a research
             agenda to fill the knowledge gap concerning lifelong causes
             of aging.},
   Doi = {10.1093/gerona/glw191},
   Key = {fds328127}
}


%% Chartrand, Tanya L.   
@article{fds327053,
   Author = {Leander, NP and Chartrand, TL},
   Title = {On thwarted goals and displaced aggression: A compensatory
             competence model},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {72},
   Pages = {88-100},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2017.04.010},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2017.04.010},
   Key = {fds327053}
}

@article{fds327054,
   Author = {Leander, NP and Kay, AC and Chartrand, TL and Payne,
             BK},
   Title = {An Affect Misattribution Pathway to Perceptions of Intrinsic
             Reward},
   Journal = {Social Cognition},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {163-180},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1521/soco.2017.35.2.163},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Guilford Publications, Inc. Intrinsic rewards are
             typically thought to stem from an activity's inherent
             properties and not from separable rewards one receives from
             it. Yet, people may not consciously notice or remember all
             the subtle external rewards that correspond with an activity
             and may misattribute some directly to the activity itself.
             We propose that perceptions of intrinsic reward can often be
             byproducts of misattributed causal inference, and present
             some initial evidence that perceptions of intrinsic reward
             can in fact increase when words pertaining to an activity
             are subtly paired with pleasant context cues. Importantly,
             these effects follow classic boundary conditions of both
             misattribution and intrinsic motivation, insofar as they
             were extinguished when participants could make a proper
             source attribution and/or when the activity became
             associated with a blatant external reward. We further
             propose a distinction can be made between authentically
             "intrinsic" rewards and the illusion of intrinsic rewards
             caused by misattributed positive affect.},
   Doi = {10.1521/soco.2017.35.2.163},
   Key = {fds327054}
}

@article{fds323533,
   Author = {Duffy, KA and Harris, LT and Chartrand, TL and Stanton,
             SJ},
   Title = {Women recovering from social rejection: The effect of the
             person and the situation on a hormonal mechanism of
             affiliation.},
   Journal = {Psychoneuroendocrinology},
   Volume = {76},
   Pages = {174-182},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.11.017},
   Abstract = {Rejection can motivate either affiliation or withdrawal. In
             order to study how personality and situational variables
             influence whether women will be motivated to affiliate
             versus withdraw, we manipulate social feedback (rejection
             vs. acceptance) and opportunity for face-to-face interaction
             (blocked vs. face-to-face) and measure the individual
             difference variables rejection sensitivity and social
             anxiety. We test how these variables affect endogenous
             progesterone and cortisol concentrations, which are presumed
             to signal motivational responses to rejection. We find that
             three-way interactions involving social feedback,
             opportunity for face-to-face interactions, and either social
             anxiety or rejection sensitivity significantly predict
             progesterone change, but not cortisol change. Both
             interactions are driven by sharp progesterone decreases for
             women high in social anxiety/rejection sensitivity who have
             been rejected and who have no opportunity to reaffiliate in
             a face-to-face interaction. This progesterone change may be
             a physiological marker of motivation for social avoidance
             following rejection for women who cannot reaffiliate and who
             are particularly socially anxious or sensitive to
             rejection.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.11.017},
   Key = {fds323533}
}


%% Compton, Scott N.   
@article{fds330474,
   Author = {Peris, TS and Caporino, NE and O'Rourke, S and Kendall, PC and Walkup,
             JT and Albano, AM and Bergman, RL and McCracken, JT and Birmaher, B and Ginsburg, GS and Sakolsky, D and Piacentini, J and Compton,
             SN},
   Title = {Therapist-Reported Features of Exposure Tasks That Predict
             Differential Treatment Outcomes for Youth With
             Anxiety.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1043-1052},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.10.001},
   Abstract = {Exposure tasks are recognized widely as a key component of
             cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for child and adolescent
             anxiety. However, little research has examined specific
             exposure characteristics that predict outcomes for youth
             with anxiety and that may guide its application in
             therapy.This study draws on a sample of 279 children and
             adolescents (48.4% male; 79.6% white) with a principal
             anxiety disorder who received 14 sessions of CBT, either
             alone or in combination with medication, through the
             Child/adolescent Anxiety Multimodal treatment Study (CAMS).
             The present study examines therapist-reported quantity,
             difficulty level, compliance, and mastery of exposure tasks
             as they related to CBT response (i.e., Clinical Global
             Impressions-Improvement ratings). Secondary treatment
             outcomes included reduction in anxiety symptom severity on
             the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale, global impairment
             measured via the Children's Global Assessment Scale, and
             parent-report of anxiety-specific functional impairment on
             the Child Anxiety Impairment Scale.Regression analyses
             indicated a dose-response relationship between
             therapist-reported quantity of exposure and independent
             evaluations of treatment outcome, with more time devoted to
             exposure linked to better outcomes. Similarly, greater time
             spent on more difficult (rather than mild or moderate)
             exposure tasks predicted better outcomes, as did therapist
             ratings of child compliance and mastery.The present findings
             highlight the importance of challenging children and
             adolescents with difficult exposure tasks and of
             collaborating to ensure compliance and mastery.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2017.10.001},
   Key = {fds330474}
}

@article{fds330044,
   Author = {Højgaard, DR and Hybel, KA and Ivarsson, T and Skarphedinsson, G and Becker Nissen and J and Weidle, B and Melin, K and Torp, NC and Valderhaug,
             R and Dahl, K and Mortensen, EL and Compton, S and Jensen, S and Lenhard,
             F and Thomsen, PH},
   Title = {One-Year Outcome for Responders of Cognitive-Behavioral
             Therapy for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive
             Disorder},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {940-947.e1},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.09.002},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2017.09.002},
   Key = {fds330044}
}

@article{fds323540,
   Author = {Caporino, NE and Read, KL and Shiffrin, N and Settipani, C and Kendall,
             PC and Compton, SN and Sherrill, J and Piacentini, J and Walkup, J and Ginsburg, G and Keeton, C and Birmaher, B and Sakolsky, D and Gosch, E and Albano, AM},
   Title = {Sleep-Related Problems and the Effects of Anxiety Treatment
             in Children and Adolescents.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {675-685},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2015.1063429},
   Abstract = {This study examined (a) demographic and clinical
             characteristics associated with sleep-related problems
             (SRPs) among youth with anxiety disorders, and (b) the
             impact of anxiety treatment: cognitive-behavioral therapy
             (CBT; Coping Cat), medication (sertraline), their
             combination, and pill placebo on SRPs. Youth (N = 488,
             ages 7-17, 50% female, 79% White) with a principal diagnosis
             of generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety
             disorder, or social phobia participated. SRPs were reported
             by parents and youth. Findings differed by informant and by
             type of SRP, with evidence that SRPs are associated with
             age, anxiety severity, externalizing problems, functional
             impairment, and family burden at pretreatment. Anxiety
             treatment reduced SRPs; effect sizes were small to medium.
             Reductions in parent-reported separation-related sleep
             difficulties were significantly greater in active treatment
             than in the placebo condition, with the greatest reductions
             reported by parents of youth whose active treatment was
             multimodal or included sertraline. Youth whose anxiety
             treatment involved CBT reported significantly greater
             decreases in dysregulated sleep (e.g., sleeplessness). Both
             CBT for anxiety and sertraline appear to be somewhat
             effective in reducing SRPs, and multimodal treatment may be
             preferable depending on the symptom presentation. To inform
             practice, future research should examine a broad range of
             SRPs, incorporate objective measures of sleep, and evaluate
             the impact of behavioral strategies that directly target
             SRPs in youth with anxiety disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374416.2015.1063429},
   Key = {fds323540}
}

@article{fds327204,
   Author = {Hoff, AL and Kendall, PC and Langley, A and Ginsburg, G and Keeton, C and Compton, S and Sherrill, J and Walkup, J and Birmaher, B and Albano, AM and Suveg, C and Piacentini, J},
   Title = {Developmental Differences in Functioning in Youth With
             Social Phobia.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {686-694},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2015.1079779},
   Abstract = {Social phobia (SoP) in youth may manifest differently across
             development as parent involvement in their social lives
             changes and social and academic expectations increase. This
             cross-sectional study investigated whether self-reported and
             parent-reported functioning in youth with SoP changes with
             age in social, academic, and home/family domains. Baseline
             anxiety impairment data from 488 treatment-seeking
             anxiety-disordered youth (ages 7-17, N = 400 with a SoP
             diagnosis) and their parents were gathered using the Child
             Anxiety Impact Scale and were analyzed using generalized
             estimating equations. According to youth with SoP and their
             parents, overall difficulties, social difficulties, and
             academic difficulties increased with age, even when
             controlling for SoP severity. These effects significantly
             differed for youth with anxiety disorders other than SoP.
             Adolescents may avoid social situations as parental
             involvement in their social lives decreases, and their
             withdrawn behavior may result in increasing difficulty in
             the social domain. Their avoidance of class participation
             and oral presentations may increasingly impact their
             academic performance as school becomes more demanding.
             Implications are discussed for the early detection and
             intervention of SoP to prevent increased impairment over the
             course of development.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374416.2015.1079779},
   Key = {fds327204}
}

@article{fds327200,
   Author = {Strawn, JR and Dobson, ET and Mills, JA and Cornwall, GJ and Sakolsky,
             D and Birmaher, B and Compton, SN and Piacentini, J and McCracken, JT and Ginsburg, GS and Kendall, PC and Walkup, JT and Albano, AM and Rynn,
             MA},
   Title = {Placebo Response in Pediatric Anxiety Disorders: Results
             from the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal
             Study.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {501-508},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cap.2016.0198},
   Abstract = {The aim of this study is to identify predictors of pill
             placebo response and to characterize the temporal course of
             pill placebo response in anxious youth.Data from
             placebo-treated patients (N = 76) in the
             Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS), a
             multisite, randomized controlled trial that examined the
             efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy, sertraline, their
             combination, and placebo for the treatment of separation,
             generalized, and social anxiety disorders, were evaluated.
             Multiple linear regression models identified features
             associated with placebo response and models were confirmed
             with leave-one-out cross-validation. The likelihood of
             improvement in patients receiving pill placebo-over
             time-relative to improvement associated with active
             treatment was determined using probabilistic Bayesian
             analyses.Based on a categorical definition of response
             (Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement Scale score ≤2),
             nonresponders (n = 48), and pill placebo responders
             (n = 18) did not differ in age (p = 0.217), sex
             (p = 0.980), race (p = 0.743), or primary diagnosis
             (all ps > 0.659). In terms of change in anxiety symptoms,
             separation anxiety disorder and treatment expectation were
             associated with the degree of pill placebo response. Greater
             probability of placebo-related anxiety symptom improvement
             was observed early in the course of treatment (baseline to
             week 4, p < 0.0001). No significant change in the
             probability of placebo-related improvement was observed
             after week 4 (weeks 4-8, p = 0.07; weeks 8-12,
             p = 0.85), whereas the probability of improvement, in
             general, significantly increased week over week with active
             treatment.Pill placebo-related improvement occurs early in
             the course of treatment and both clinical factors and
             expectation predict this improvement. Additionally,
             probabilistic approaches may refine our understanding and
             prediction of pill placebo response.},
   Doi = {10.1089/cap.2016.0198},
   Key = {fds327200}
}

@article{fds328085,
   Author = {Selles, RR and Franklin, M and Sapyta, J and Compton, SN and Tommet, D and Jones, RN and Garcia, A and Freeman, J},
   Title = {Children's and Parents' Ability to Tolerate Child Distress:
             Impact on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric
             Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.},
   Journal = {Child Psychiatry & Human Development},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10578-017-0748-6},
   Abstract = {The present study explored the concept of tolerance for
             child distress in 46 children (ages 5-8), along with their
             mothers and fathers, who received family-based CBT for OCD.
             The study sought to describe baseline tolerance, changes in
             tolerance with treatment, and the predictive impact of
             tolerance on symptom improvement. Tolerance was rated by
             clinicians on a single item and the CY-BOCS was used to
             measure OCD severity. Descriptive results suggested that all
             participants had some difficulty tolerating the child's
             distress at baseline while paired t tests indicated large
             improvements were made over treatment (d = 1.2-2.0).
             Fathers' initial tolerance was significantly related to
             symptom improvement in a multivariate regression as were
             fathers' and children's changes in distress tolerance over
             the course of treatment. Overall, results provide support
             for examining tolerance of child distress including its
             predictive impact and potential as a supplemental
             intervention target.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10578-017-0748-6},
   Key = {fds328085}
}

@article{fds326112,
   Author = {Gonzalez, A and Rozenman, M and Langley, AK and Kendall, PC and Ginsburg, GS and Compton, S and Walkup, JT and Birmaher, B and Albano,
             AM and Piacentini, J},
   Title = {Social Interpretation Bias in Children and Adolescents with
             Anxiety Disorders: Psychometric Examination of the
             Self-report of Ambiguous Social Situations for Youth (SASSY)
             Scale.},
   Journal = {Child & Youth Care Forum},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {395-412},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10566-016-9381-y},
   Abstract = {Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health
             problems in youth, and faulty interpretation bias has been
             positively linked to anxiety severity, even within
             anxiety-disordered youth. Quick, reliable assessment of
             interpretation bias may be useful in identifying youth with
             certain types of anxiety or assessing changes on cognitive
             bias during intervention.This study examined the factor
             structure, reliability, and validity of the Self-report of
             Ambiguous Social Situations for Youth (SASSY) scale, a
             self-report measure developed to assess interpretation bias
             in youth.Participants (N=488, age 7 to 17) met diagnostic
             criteria for Social Phobia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder,
             and/or Separation Anxiety Disorder. An exploratory factor
             analysis was performed on baseline data from youth
             participating in a large randomized clinical
             trial.Exploratory factor analysis yielded two factors
             (Accusation/Blame, Social Rejection). The SASSY full scale
             and Social Rejection factor demonstrated adequate internal
             consistency, convergent validity with social anxiety, and
             discriminant validity as evidenced by non-significant
             correlations with measures of non-social anxiety. Further,
             the SASSY Social Rejection factor accurately distinguished
             children and adolescents with Social Phobia from those with
             other anxiety disorders, supporting its criterion validity,
             and revealed sensitivity to changes with treatment. Given
             the relevance to youth with social phobia, pre- and
             post-intervention data were examined for youth social phobia
             to test sensitivity to treatment effects; results suggested
             that SASSY scores reduced for treatment responders.Findings
             suggest the potential utility of the SASSY Social Rejection
             factor as a quick, reliable, and efficient way of assessing
             interpretation bias in anxious youth, particularly as
             related to social concerns, in research and clinical
             settings.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10566-016-9381-y},
   Key = {fds326112}
}

@article{fds326330,
   Author = {Lee, P and Zehgeer, A and Ginsburg, GS and McCracken, J and Keeton, C and Kendall, PC and Birmaher, B and Sakolsky, D and Walkup, J and Peris, T and Albano, AM and Compton, S},
   Title = {Child and Adolescent Adherence With Cognitive Behavioral
             Therapy for Anxiety: Predictors and Associations With
             Outcomes.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology},
   Pages = {1-12},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2017.1310046},
   Abstract = {Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders is
             effective, but nonadherence with treatment may reduce the
             benefits of CBT. This study examined (a) four baseline
             domains (i.e., demographic, youth clinical characteristics,
             therapy related, family/parent factors) as predictors of
             youth adherence with treatment and (b) the associations
             between youth adherence and treatment outcomes. Data were
             from 279 youth (7-17 years of age, 51.6% female; 79.6%
             White, 9% African American), with Diagnostic and Statistical
             Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) diagnoses of
             separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder,
             and/or social phobia, who participated in CBT in the
             Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study. Adherence was
             defined in three ways (session attendance, therapist-rated
             compliance, and homework completion). Multiple regressions
             revealed several significant predictors of youth adherence
             with CBT, but predictors varied according to the definition
             of adherence. The most robust predictors of greater
             adherence were living with both parents and fewer youth
             comorbid externalizing disorders. With respect to outcomes,
             therapist ratings of higher youth compliance with CBT
             predicted several indices of favorable outcome: lower
             anxiety severity, higher global functioning, and treatment
             responder status after 12 weeks of CBT. Number of sessions
             attended and homework completion did not predict treatment
             outcomes. Findings provide information about risks for youth
             nonadherence, which can inform treatment and highlight the
             importance of youth compliance with participating in therapy
             activities, rather than just attending sessions or
             completing homework assignments.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374416.2017.1310046},
   Key = {fds326330}
}

@article{fds327201,
   Author = {Alexander, JR and Houghton, DC and Twohig, MP and Franklin, ME and Saunders, SM and Neal-Barnett, AM and Compton, SN and Woods,
             DW},
   Title = {Clarifying the Relationship between Trichotillomania and
             Anxiety.},
   Journal = {Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related
             Disorders},
   Volume = {13},
   Pages = {30-34},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jocrd.2017.02.004},
   Abstract = {Although research has consistently linked unidimensional
             anxiety with Trichotillomania (TTM) severity, the
             relationships between TTM severity and anxiety dimensions
             (i.e., cognitive and somatic anxiety) are unknown. This
             knowledge gap limits current TTM conceptualization and
             treatment. The current study examined these relationships
             with data collected from ninety-one adults who participated
             in a randomized clinical trial for TTM treatment. To examine
             whether the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI; Beck, Epstein,
             Brown, & Steer, 1988) could be used to measure
             multidimensional anxiety in TTM samples, we conducted a
             factor analysis. Results showed four emergent factors,
             including a cognitive factor and three somatic factors
             (neurophysiological, autonomic, and panic). Based on prior
             research, it was hypothesized that TTM severity would be
             related to the cognitive anxiety dimension and that
             psychological inflexibility would mediate the association.
             Hypotheses were not made regarding the relationship between
             TTM severity and somatic anxiety. Regression analyses
             indicated that only cognitive dimensions of anxiety
             predicted TTM severity and that psychological inflexibility
             mediated this relationship. Implications for the
             conceptualization and treatment of TTM are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jocrd.2017.02.004},
   Key = {fds327201}
}

@article{fds327202,
   Author = {Hale, AE and Ginsburg, GS and Chan, G and Kendall, PC and McCracken, JT and Sakolsky, D and Birmaher, B and Compton, SN and Albano, AM and Walkup,
             JT},
   Title = {Mediators of Treatment Outcomes for Anxious Children and
             Adolescents: The Role of Somatic Symptoms.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology},
   Pages = {1-11},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2017.1280804},
   Abstract = {Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and selective serotonin
             reuptake inhibitors are effective treatments for pediatric
             anxiety disorders. However, the mechanisms of these
             treatments are unknown. Previous research indicated that
             somatic symptoms are reduced following treatment, but it is
             unclear if their reductions are merely a consequence of
             treatment gains. This study examined reductions in somatic
             symptoms as a potential mediator of the relationship between
             treatment and anxiety outcomes. Participants were 488
             anxious youth ages 7-17 (M = 10.7), 50.4% male, 78.9%
             Caucasian, enrolled in Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal
             Study, a large randomized control trial comparing 12-week
             treatments of CBT, sertraline, a combination of CBT and
             sertraline, and a pill placebo. Causal mediation models were
             tested in R using data from baseline, 8-, and 12-week
             evaluations. Somatic symptoms were assessed using the
             Panic/Somatic subscale from the Screen for Child Anxiety
             Related Emotional Disorders. Youth outcomes were assessed
             using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale and Children's
             Global Assessment Scale. Reductions in somatic symptoms
             mediated improvement in anxiety symptoms and global
             functioning for those in the sertraline-only condition based
             on parent report. Conditions involving CBT and data based on
             child reported somatic symptoms did not show a mediation
             effect. Findings indicate that reductions in somatic
             symptoms may be a mediator of improvements for treatments
             including pharmacotherapy and not CBT. Although the overall
             efficacy of sertraline and CBT for anxiety may be similar,
             the treatments appear to function via different
             mechanisms.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374416.2017.1280804},
   Key = {fds327202}
}

@article{fds327203,
   Author = {Strawn, JR and Compton, SN and Robertson, B and Albano, AM and Hamdani,
             M and Rynn, MA},
   Title = {Extended Release Guanfacine in Pediatric Anxiety Disorders:
             A Pilot, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {29-37},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cap.2016.0132},
   Abstract = {This is a feasibility study evaluating the safety,
             tolerability, and potential anxiolytic efficacy of the α2
             agonist guanfacine extended-release (GXR) in children and
             adolescents with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD),
             separation anxiety disorder (SAD), or social phobia/social
             anxiety disorder.Youth aged 6-17 years with a primary
             diagnosis of GAD, SAD, and/or social anxiety disorder were
             treated with flexibly dosed GXR (1-6 mg daily, n = 62)
             or placebo (n = 21) for 12 weeks. The primary aim of
             this study was to determine the safety and tolerability of
             GXR in youth with anxiety disorders, which involved the
             analysis of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), the
             emergence of suicidal ideation and behaviors, vital signs,
             and electrocardiographic/laboratory parameters. Exploratory
             efficacy measures included dimensional anxiety scales
             (Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale [PARS] and Screen for Child
             Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders [SCARED]), as well as
             the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. As
             this was an exploratory study, no inferential statistical
             analyses were performed.GXR was safe and well tolerated.
             Treatment-related mean ± standard deviation changes in
             heart rate (GXR: 1.8 ± 12 beats per minute [bpm]
             decrease; placebo: 0.5 ± 11 bpm decrease), systolic
             blood pressure (GXR: 2.3 ± 11 mm Hg decrease;
             placebo: 1.7 ± 11 mm Hg decrease), or diastolic blood
             pressure (GXR: 1.3 ± 9 mm Hg decrease; placebo:
             0.9 ± 7 mm Hg increase) were similar between
             treatment groups. TEAEs, including headache,
             somnolence/fatigue, abdominal pain, and dizziness, were
             consistent with the known safety profile of GXR. No
             differences were observed between treatment groups for PARS
             and SCARED scores, although at endpoint, a higher proportion
             of subjects receiving GXR versus placebo demonstrated CGI-I
             scores ≤2 (54.2% vs. 31.6%), as rated by the clinician
             investigator.GXR was well tolerated in pediatric subjects
             with GAD, SAD, and/or social anxiety disorder.
             ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01470469.},
   Doi = {10.1089/cap.2016.0132},
   Key = {fds327203}
}


%% Cooper, Harris M.   
@article{fds324856,
   Author = {Sanchez, CE and Atkinson, KM and Koenka, AC and Moshontz, H and Cooper,
             H},
   Title = {Self-grading and peer-grading for formative and summative
             assessments in 3rd through 12th grade classrooms: A
             meta-analysis},
   Journal = {Journal of Educational Psychology},
   Volume = {109},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1049-1066},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/edu0000190},
   Abstract = {© 2017 American Psychological Association. The "assessment
             for learning" movement in education has increased attention
             to self-grading and peer-grading practices in primary and
             secondary schools. This research synthesis examined several
             questions pertaining to the use of self-grading and
             peer-grading in conjunction with criterion-referenced
             testing in 3rd- through 12th-grade-level classrooms. We
             investigated (a) the effects of students' participation in
             grading on subsequent test performance, (b) the difference
             between grades when assigned by students or teachers, and
             (c) the correlation between grades assigned by students and
             teachers. Students who engaged in self-grading performed
             better (g = .34) on subsequent tests than did students who
             did not. Moderator analyses suggested that the benefits of
             self-grading were estimated to be greater when the study
             controlled for group differences through random assignment.
             Students who engaged in peergrading performed better on
             subsequent tests than did students who did not (g = .29). On
             average, students did not grade themselves or peers
             significantly differently than teachers (self-grades, g =
             .04; peer-grades, g = .04) and showed moderate correlation
             (self-grading, r = .67; peer-grading, r = .68) with teacher
             grades. Further, other moderator analyses and examination of
             studies suggested that self- and peer-grading practices can
             be implemented to positive effect in primary and secondary
             schools with the use of rubrics and training for students in
             a formative assessment environment. However, because of a
             limited number of studies, these mediating variables need
             more research to allow more conclusive findings.},
   Doi = {10.1037/edu0000190},
   Key = {fds324856}
}

@book{fds326524,
   Author = {Cooper, H},
   Title = {Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis: A Step-by-Step
             Approach, 5th Edition},
   Volume = {2},
   Pages = {384 pages},
   Publisher = {Sage Publications, Inc.},
   Year = {2017},
   ISBN = {1483331156},
   Abstract = {The Fifth Edition of Harris Cooper's bestselling Research
             Synthesis and Meta-Analysis: A Step-by-Step Approach offers
             practical advice on how to conduct a synthesis of research
             in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. The book is
             written in plain language with four running examples drawn
             from psychology, education, and health science. With ample
             coverage of literature searching and the technical aspects
             of meta-analysis, this one-of-a-kind book applies the basic
             principles of sound data gathering to the task of producing
             a comprehensive assessment of existing research.},
   Key = {fds326524}
}


%% Costanzo, Philip R.   
@article{fds326697,
   Author = {Golonka, MM and Peairs, KF and Malone, PS and Grimes, CL and Costanzo,
             PR},
   Title = {Natural Peer Leaders as Substance Use Prevention Agents: the
             Teens' Life Choice Project.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {555-566},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-017-0790-4},
   Abstract = {In adolescent social groups, natural peer leaders have been
             found to engage in more frequent experimentation with
             substance use and to possess disproportionate power to
             affect the behavior and social choices of their associated
             peer followers. In the current exploratory study, we used
             sociometrics and social cognitive mapping to identify
             natural leaders of cliques in a seventh grade population and
             invited the leaders to develop anti-drug presentations for
             an audience of younger peers. The program employed
             social-psychological approaches directed at having leaders
             proceed from extrinsic inducements to intrinsic
             identification with their persuasive products in the context
             of the group intervention process. The goals of the
             intervention were to induce substance resistant
             self-persuasion in the leaders and to produce a spread of
             this resistance effect to their peer followers. To test the
             intervention, we compared the substance use behaviors of the
             selected leaders and their peers to a control cohort. The
             study found preliminary support that the intervention
             produced changes in the substance use behavior among the
             leaders who participated in the intervention, but did not
             detect a spread to non-leader peers in the short term. This
             descriptive study speaks to the plausibility of employing
             self-persuasion paradigms to bring about change in high-risk
             behaviors among highly central adolescents. In addition, it
             highlights the viability of applying social psychological
             principles to prevention work and calls for more research in
             this area.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-017-0790-4},
   Key = {fds326697}
}

@article{fds331136,
   Author = {Rothenberg, WA and Hussong, AM and Langley, HA and Egerton, GA and Halberstadt, AG and Coffman, JL and Mokrova, I and Costanzo,
             PR},
   Title = {Grateful parents raising grateful children: Niche selection
             and the socialization of child gratitude.},
   Journal = {Applied Developmental Science},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {106-120},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2016.1175945},
   Abstract = {Given that children's exposure to gratitude-related
             activities may be one way that parents can socialize
             gratitude in their children, we examined whether parents'
             niche selection (i.e., tendency to choose perceived
             gratitude-inducing activities for their children) mediates
             the association between parents' reports of their own and
             their children's gratitude. Parent-child dyads (N =101;
             children aged 6-9; 52% girls; 80% Caucasian; 85% mothers)
             participated in a laboratory visit and parents also
             completed a seven-day online diary regarding children's
             gratitude. Decomposing specific indirect effects within a
             structural equation model, we found that parents high in
             gratitude were more likely to set goals to use niche
             selection as a gratitude socialization strategy, and thereby
             more likely to place their children in gratitude-related
             activities. Placement in these activities, in turn, was
             associated with more frequent expression of gratitude in
             children. We describe future directions for research on
             parents' role in socializing gratitude in their
             children.},
   Doi = {10.1080/10888691.2016.1175945},
   Key = {fds331136}
}


%% Costello, Elizabeth J.   
@article{fds329142,
   Author = {Hill, S and Shanahan, L and Costello, EJ and Copeland,
             W},
   Title = {Predicting Persistent, Limited, and Delayed Problematic
             Cannabis Use in Early Adulthood: Findings From a
             Longitudinal Study.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {966-974.e4},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.08.012},
   Abstract = {To identify risk profiles associated with patterns of
             problematic cannabis use in early adulthood.Data came from
             1,229 participants in the Great Smoky Mountains Study, a
             prospective 20-year cohort study from 1993 to 2015 that is
             representative of western North Carolina with yearly
             assessments conducted from ages 9 and 16 years, and
             assessments at ages 19, 21, 26, and 30 years. Patterns of
             problematic cannabis use (i.e., DSM-5 cannabis use disorder
             or daily use) in early adulthood included the following:
             nonproblematic use in late adolescence (ages 19-21) and
             early adulthood (ages 26-30); limited problematic use in
             late adolescence only; persistent problematic use in late
             adolescence and early adulthood; and delayed problematic use
             in early adulthood only. Multinominal logistic regression
             models examined pairwise associations between these patterns
             and risk factors in childhood/early adolescence (ages 9-16)
             and late adolescence (ages 19-21). Risk factors included
             psychiatric disorders (e.g., anxiety, depressive), other
             substance use (smoking, alcohol, illicit drugs), and
             challenging social factors (e.g., low socioeconomic status,
             family functioning, peers). Sex and race/ethnicity (white,
             African American, American Indian) interactions were
             tested.The persistent pattern (6.7% of sample) was
             characterized by more anxiety disorders across development
             and more DSM-5 CUD symptoms during late adolescence compared
             to the limited pattern (13.3%), which, in turn, had more
             childhood family instability and dysfunction. The delayed
             pattern (3.7%) was characterized by more externalizing
             disorders, maltreatment, and peer bullying in childhood
             compared to those in nonproblematic users. There were no
             significant interactions of sex or race/ethnicity.Problematic
             cannabis use patterns during early adulthood have
             distinctive risk profiles, which may be useful in tailoring
             targeted interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2017.08.012},
   Key = {fds329142}
}

@article{fds329547,
   Author = {Copeland, WE and Goldston, DB and Costello, EJ},
   Title = {Adult Associations of Childhood Suicidal Thoughts and
             Behaviors: A Prospective, Longitudinal Analysis.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {958-965.e4},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.08.015},
   Abstract = {Suicidal thoughts and behavior (STBs) have their peak period
             of onset in adolescence, but little is known about how such
             behavior is associated with later functioning. The aim of
             this study is to test whether childhood STBs are related to
             adult psychiatric, suicidal, and functional outcomes.This is
             a prospective, population-based community study of 1,420
             participants assessed with structured interviews up to 7
             times in childhood/adolescence (ages 9-16 years; 6,674
             observations) for STBs including passive and active
             ideation, plans, and attempts. Participants were then
             assessed 4 times in young adulthood (ages 19, 21, 24, and 30
             years; 4,556 observations of 1,273 participants) for
             psychiatric diagnoses, STBs, and functional outcomes.By age
             16 years, 7.0% of participants had reported some type of
             STBs, with 3.9% reporting an attempt. Both ideation only and
             suicide attempts were associated with higher levels of
             anxiety disorders and STBs in adulthood, as well as poor
             functioning across financial, health, risky/illegal, and
             social domains. These observed effects generally were
             attenuated after adjusting for other psychiatric and
             psychosocial factors that predict childhood STBs
             (particularly maltreatment, depression, and disruptive
             behavior disorders). The exception was adult suicidal
             behavior, which was predicted by both childhood ideation and
             attempts, even in the fully adjusted model. Children and
             adolescents with STBs were more likely to have had a
             disrupted transition to adulthood.Childhood STBs are a
             marker for a multitude of poor psychiatric and functional
             outcomes in adulthood, but these effects are largely
             accounted for by other factors. In contrast, childhood STBs
             are a robust risk factor for adult suicidal thoughts and
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2017.08.015},
   Key = {fds329547}
}

@article{fds326255,
   Author = {Clark, SL and McClay, JL and Adkins, DE and Kumar, G and Aberg, KA and Nerella, S and Xie, L and Collins, AL and Crowley, JJ and Quackenbush,
             CR and Hilliard, CE and Shabalin, AA and Vrieze, SI and Peterson, RE and Copeland, WE and Silberg, JL and McGue, M and Maes, H and Iacono, WG and Sullivan, PF and Costello, EJ and van den Oord,
             EJ},
   Title = {Deep Sequencing of 71 Candidate Genes to Characterize
             Variation Associated with Alcohol Dependence.},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {711-718},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acer.13352},
   Abstract = {Previous genomewide association studies (GWASs) have
             identified a number of putative risk loci for alcohol
             dependence (AD). However, only a few loci have replicated
             and these replicated variants only explain a small
             proportion of AD risk. Using an innovative approach, the
             goal of this study was to generate hypotheses about
             potentially causal variants for AD that can be explored
             further through functional studies.We employed targeted
             capture of 71 candidate loci and flanking regions followed
             by next-generation deep sequencing (mean coverage 78X) in
             806 European Americans. Regions included in our targeted
             capture library were genes identified through published GWAS
             of alcohol, all human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases,
             reward system genes including dopaminergic and opioid
             receptors, prioritized candidate genes based on previous
             associations, and genes involved in the absorption,
             distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs. We
             performed single-locus tests to determine if any single
             variant was associated with AD symptom count. Sets of
             variants that overlapped with biologically meaningful
             annotations were tested for association in aggregate.No
             single, common variant was significantly associated with AD
             in our study. We did, however, find evidence for association
             with several variant sets. Two variant sets were significant
             at the q-value <0.10 level: a genic enhancer for ADHFE1
             (p = 1.47 × 10-5 ; q = 0.019), an alcohol
             dehydrogenase, and ADORA1 (p = 5.29 × 10-5 ;
             q = 0.035), an adenosine receptor that belongs to a
             G-protein-coupled receptor gene family.To our knowledge,
             this is the first sequencing study of AD to examine variants
             in entire genes, including flanking and regulatory regions.
             We found that in addition to protein coding variant sets,
             regulatory variant sets may play a role in AD. From these
             findings, we have generated initial functional hypotheses
             about how these sets may influence AD.},
   Doi = {10.1111/acer.13352},
   Key = {fds326255}
}

@article{fds323141,
   Author = {Copeland, WE and Hill, S and Costello, EJ and Shanahan,
             L},
   Title = {Cannabis Use and Disorder From Childhood to Adulthood in a
             Longitudinal Community Sample With American
             Indians.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {124-132.e2},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2016.11.006},
   Abstract = {Recent changes in DSM criteria require new documentation of
             the prevalence and developmental sequences of cannabis use
             disorder (CUD). The goal of this study was to investigate
             the early course of DSM-5 CUD and its overlap with DSM-IV
             and consumption constructs in a community-representative
             sample of American Indians.Data came from the prospective,
             longitudinal, population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study
             in North Carolina (N = 1,420, including 349 American
             Indians). Cannabis use and disorder were assessed during
             yearly interviews from 9 to 16 years of age and at 19, 21,
             26, and 30 years of age (up to 11 assessments per
             participant from 1993 through 2015).By 30 years of age,
             approximately 70% of participants had used cannabis, 34% had
             used cannabis daily, and 18% had met criteria for DSM-5 CUD.
             Approximately 1 in 4 cannabis users met criteria for CUD at
             some point. Those who met criteria initiated use more than 2
             years previously (at 13.3 years old) compared with other
             users. Despite higher risks from increased poverty, American
             Indians' patterns of use were similar to those of the rest
             of the sample. Concordance between DSM-5 CUD and DSM-IV
             abuse or dependence was substantial but was even higher
             between DSM-5 CUD and daily use.It was common to have used
             cannabis daily or to have met criteria for DSM-5 CUD by
             adulthood. DSM-5 CUD was an improvement over DSM-IV
             diagnostic constructs by raising the threshold for
             diagnosis.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2016.11.006},
   Key = {fds323141}
}


%% Curry, John F.   
@article{fds328869,
   Author = {Meyer, AE and Curry, JF},
   Title = {Pathways from anxiety to stressful events: An expansion of
             the stress generation hypothesis.},
   Journal = {Clinical Psychology Review},
   Volume = {57},
   Pages = {93-116},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2017.08.003},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cpr.2017.08.003},
   Key = {fds328869}
}

@article{fds327307,
   Author = {Shepherd-Banigan, M and Kelley, ML and Katon, JG and Curry, JF and Goldstein, KM and Brancu, M and Wagner, HR and Fecteau, TE and VA
             Mid-Atlantic MIRECC Women Veterans Workgroup, and VA
             Mid-Atlantic MIRECC Workgroup, and Van Houtven,
             CH},
   Title = {Paternal history of mental illness associated with
             posttraumatic stress disorder among veterans.},
   Journal = {Psychiatry Research},
   Volume = {256},
   Pages = {461-468},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2017.06.053},
   Abstract = {This study examined the association between parent and
             family reported history of non-PTSD mental illness (MI),
             PTSD specifically, and substance use problems, and
             participant clinical diagnosis of PTSD. Participants were
             drawn from the US Department of Veterans Affairs
             Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical
             Center (MIRECC) Post-Deployment Mental Health (PDMH) study
             (n = 3191), an ongoing multi-site cohort study of US
             Afghanistan and Iraq conflict era veterans. Participants who
             recalled a father history of PTSD had a 26-percentage point
             higher likelihood of meeting criteria for PTSD; while
             participants reporting any family history of PTSD had a
             15-percentage point higher probability of endorsing symptoms
             consistent with PTSD. Mother history of substance use
             problems was associated with Veteran current PTSD, but
             results were sensitive to model specification. Current PTSD
             was not associated with family/parent history of non-PTSD
             mental illness, mother history of PTSD, or family/father
             history of substance use problems. Family history of PTSD
             may increase PTSD risk among veterans exposed to trauma,
             particularly when a father history is reported. Knowledge of
             family history could improve clinical decision-making for
             trauma-exposed individuals and allow for more effective
             targeting of programs and clinical services.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psychres.2017.06.053},
   Key = {fds327307}
}


%% Dawson, Geraldine   
@article{fds327659,
   Title = {Meta-analysis of GWAS of over 16,000 individuals with autism
             spectrum disorder highlights a novel locus at 10q24.32 and a
             significant overlap with schizophrenia},
   Journal = {Molecular Autism},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13229-017-0137-9},
   Doi = {10.1186/s13229-017-0137-9},
   Key = {fds327659}
}

@article{fds331234,
   Author = {Murias, M and Major, S and Davlantis, K and Franz, L and Harris, A and Rardin, B and Sabatos-DeVito, M and Dawson, G},
   Title = {Validation of eye-tracking measures of social attention as a
             potential biomarker for autism clinical trials.},
   Journal = {Autism Research},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aur.1894},
   Abstract = {Social communication impairments are a core feature of
             autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and this class of symptoms
             is a target for treatments for the disorder. Measures of
             social attention, assessed via eye-gaze tracking (EGT), have
             been proposed as an early efficacy biomarker for clinical
             trials targeting social communication skills. EGT measures
             have been shown to differentiate children with ASD from
             typical children; however, there is less known about their
             relationships with social communication outcome measures
             that are typically used in ASD clinical trials. In the
             present study, an EGT task involving viewing a videotape of
             an actor making bids for a child's attention was evaluated
             in 25 children with ASD aged 24-72 months. Children's
             attention to the actor during the dyadic bid condition
             measured via EGT was found to be strongly associated with
             five well-validated caregiver-reported outcome measures that
             are commonly used to assess social communication in clinical
             trials. These results highlight the convergent validity of
             EGT measures of social attention in relation to
             caregiver-reported clinical measures. EGT holds promise as a
             non-invasive, quantitative, and objective biomarker that is
             associated with social communication abilities in children
             with ASD. Autism Res 2017,. © 2017 International Society
             for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.Lay Summary:
             Eye-gaze tracking (EGT), an automated tool that tracks
             eye-gaze patterns, might help measure outcomes in clinical
             trials investigating interventions to treat autism spectrum
             disorders. In this study, an EGT task was evaluated in
             children with ASD, who watched a video with an actor talking
             directly to them. Patterns of eye-gaze were associated with
             caregiver-reported measures of social communication that are
             used in clinical trials. We show EGT may be a promising
             objective tool measuring outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1002/aur.1894},
   Key = {fds331234}
}

@article{fds326793,
   Author = {Bangerter, A and Ness, S and Aman, MG and Esbensen, AJ and Goodwin, MS and Dawson, G and Hendren, R and Leventhal, B and Khan, A and Opler, M and Harris, A and Pandina, G},
   Title = {Autism Behavior Inventory: A Novel Tool for Assessing Core
             and Associated Symptoms of Autism Spectrum
             Disorder.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {814-822},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cap.2017.0018},
   Abstract = {Autism Behavior Inventory (ABI) is a new measure for
             assessing changes in core and associated symptoms of autism
             spectrum disorder (ASD) in participants (ages: 3
             years-adulthood) diagnosed with ASD. It is a web-based tool
             with five domains (two ASD core domains: social
             communication, restrictive and repetitive behaviors; three
             associated domains: mental health, self-regulation, and
             challenging behavior). This study describes design,
             development, and initial psychometric properties of the
             ABI.ABI items were generated following review of existing
             measures and inputs from expert clinicians. Initial ABI
             scale contained 161 items that were reduced to fit a factor
             analytic model, retaining items of adequate reliability. Two
             versions of the scale, ABI-full (ABI-F; 93 items) and
             ABI-short version (ABI-S; 36 items), were developed and
             evaluated for psychometric properties, including validity
             comparisons with commonly used measures. Both scales were
             administered to parents and healthcare professionals (HCPs)
             involved with study participants.Test-retest reliability
             (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.79) for
             parent ratings on ABI was robust and compared favorably to
             existing scales. Test-retest correlations for HCP ratings
             were generally lower versus parent ratings. ABI core domains
             and comparison measures strongly correlated
             (r ≥ 0.70), demonstrating good concurrent
             validity.Overall, ABI demonstrates promise as a tool for
             measuring change in core symptoms of autism in ASD clinical
             studies, with further validation required.},
   Doi = {10.1089/cap.2017.0018},
   Key = {fds326793}
}

@article{fds329121,
   Author = {St John and T and Dawson, G and Estes, A},
   Title = {Brief Report: Executive Function as a Predictor of Academic
             Achievement in School-Aged Children with
             ASD.},
   Journal = {Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-017-3296-9},
   Abstract = {The contributions of Executive Function (EF) to academic
             achievement in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
             are not well understood. Academic achievement and its
             association with EF is described in 32, 9-year-old children
             with ASD. EF at age 6 and 9, and academic achievement at age
             9 were assessed as part of a larger longitudinal study.
             Better performance on a Spatial Reversal task but not
             A-not-B with Invisible Displacement at age 6 was associated
             with better math achievement at age 9. No relationship was
             found between these EF measures at age 6 and reading or
             spelling achievement at age 9. Future studies are needed to
             explore whether improving early EF skills can increase math
             achievement in children with ASD.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10803-017-3296-9},
   Key = {fds329121}
}

@article{fds329122,
   Author = {Cidav, Z and Munson, J and Estes, A and Dawson, G and Rogers, S and Mandell, D},
   Title = {Cost Offset Associated With Early Start Denver Model for
             Children With Autism.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {777-783},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.06.007},
   Abstract = {To determine the effect of the Early Start Denver Model
             (ESDM) for treatment of young children with autism on health
             care service use and costs.We used data from a randomized
             trial that tested the efficacy of the ESDM, which is based
             on developmental and applied behavioral analytic principles
             and delivered by trained therapists and parents, for 2
             years. Parents were interviewed about their children's
             service use every 6 months from the onset of the
             intervention to follow-up (age 6 years). The sample for this
             study consisted of 39 children with autism who participated
             in the original randomized trial at age 18 to 30 months, and
             were also assessed at age 6 years. Of this sample, 21
             children were in the ESDM group, and 18 children were in the
             community care (COM) group. Reported services were
             categorized and costed by applying unit hourly costs.
             Annualized service use and costs during the intervention and
             post intervention for the two study arms were
             compared.During the intervention, children who received the
             ESDM had average annualized total health-related costs that
             were higher by about $14,000 than those of children who
             received community-based treatment. The higher cost of ESDM
             was partially offset during the intervention period because
             children in the ESDM group used less applied behavior
             analysis (ABA)/early intensive behavioral intervention
             (EIBI) and speech therapy services than children in the
             comparison group. In the postintervention period, compared
             with children who had earlier received treatment as usual in
             community settings, children in the ESDM group used less
             ABA/EIBI, occupational/physical therapy, and speech therapy
             services, resulting in significant cost savings in the
             amount of about $19,000 per year per child.Costs associated
             with ESDM treatment were fully offset within a few years
             after the intervention because of reductions in other
             service use and associated costs.Early Characteristics of
             Autism; http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT0009415.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2017.06.007},
   Key = {fds329122}
}

@article{fds327660,
   Author = {Weiner, DJ and Wigdor, EM and Ripke, S and Walters, RK and Kosmicki, JA and Grove, J and Samocha, KE and Goldstein, JI and Okbay, A and Bybjerg-Grauholm, J and Werge, T and Hougaard, DM and Taylor, J and iPSYCH-Broad Autism Group, and Psychiatric Genomics Consortium
             Autism Group, and Skuse, D and Devlin, B and Anney, R and Sanders, SJ and Bishop, S and Mortensen, PB and Børglum, AD and Smith, GD and Daly, MJ and Robinson, EB},
   Title = {Polygenic transmission disequilibrium confirms that common
             and rare variation act additively to create risk for autism
             spectrum disorders.},
   Journal = {Nature Genetics},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {978-985},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3863},
   Abstract = {Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk is influenced by common
             polygenic and de novo variation. We aimed to clarify the
             influence of polygenic risk for ASD and to identify
             subgroups of ASD cases, including those with strongly acting
             de novo variants, in which polygenic risk is relevant. Using
             a novel approach called the polygenic transmission
             disequilibrium test and data from 6,454 families with a
             child with ASD, we show that polygenic risk for ASD,
             schizophrenia, and greater educational attainment is
             over-transmitted to children with ASD. These findings hold
             independent of proband IQ. We find that polygenic variation
             contributes additively to risk in ASD cases who carry a
             strongly acting de novo variant. Lastly, we show that
             elements of polygenic risk are independent and differ in
             their relationship with phenotype. These results confirm
             that the genetic influences on ASD are additive and suggest
             that they create risk through at least partially distinct
             etiologic pathways.},
   Doi = {10.1038/ng.3863},
   Key = {fds327660}
}

@article{fds326792,
   Author = {Dawson, G},
   Title = {Questions Remain Regarding the Effectiveness of Many
             Commonly Used Autism Treatments.},
   Journal = {Pediatrics},
   Volume = {139},
   Number = {6},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-0730},
   Doi = {10.1542/peds.2017-0730},
   Key = {fds326792}
}

@article{fds325854,
   Author = {Jones, EJH and Dawson, G and Kelly, J and Estes, A and Jane Webb,
             S},
   Title = {Parent-delivered early intervention in infants at risk for
             ASD: Effects on electrophysiological and habituation
             measures of social attention.},
   Journal = {Autism Research},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {961-972},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aur.1754},
   Abstract = {Prospective longitudinal studies of infants with older
             siblings with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have indicated
             that differences in the neurocognitive systems underlying
             social attention may emerge prior to the child meeting ASD
             diagnostic criteria. Thus, targeting social attention with
             early intervention might have the potential to alter
             developmental trajectories for infants at high risk for ASD.
             Electrophysiological and habituation measures of social
             attention were collected at 6, 12, and 18 months in a group
             of high-risk infant siblings of children with ASD
             (N = 33). Between 9 and 11 months of age, infant
             siblings received a parent-delivered intervention, promoting
             first relationships (PFR), (n = 19) or on-going
             assessment without intervention (n = 14). PFR has been
             previously shown to increase parental responsivity to infant
             social communicative cues and infant contingent responding.
             Compared to infants who only received assessment and
             monitoring, infants who received the intervention showed
             improvements in neurocognitive metrics of social attention,
             as reflected in a greater reduction in habituation times to
             face versus object stimuli between 6 and 12 months,
             maintained at 18 months; a greater increase in frontal EEG
             theta power between 6 and 12 months; and a more comparable
             P400 response to faces and objects at 12 months. The
             high-risk infants who received the intervention showed a
             pattern of responses that appeared closer to the normative
             responses of two groups of age-matched low-risk control
             participants. Though replication is necessary, these results
             suggest that early parent-mediated intervention has the
             potential to impact the brain systems underpinning social
             attention in infants at familial risk for ASD. Autism Res
             2017, 10: 961-972. © 2017 International Society for Autism
             Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/aur.1754},
   Key = {fds325854}
}

@article{fds326349,
   Author = {Dawson, G and Sun, JM and Davlantis, KS and Murias, M and Franz, L and Troy, J and Simmons, R and Sabatos-DeVito, M and Durham, R and Kurtzberg, J},
   Title = {Autologous Cord Blood Infusions Are Safe and Feasible in
             Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Results of a
             Single-Center Phase I Open-Label Trial.},
   Journal = {Stem cells translational medicine},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1332-1339},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sctm.16-0474},
   Abstract = {Despite advances in early diagnosis and behavioral
             therapies, more effective treatments for children with
             autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are needed. We hypothesized
             that umbilical cord blood-derived cell therapies may have
             potential in alleviating ASD symptoms by modulating
             inflammatory processes in the brain. Accordingly, we
             conducted a phase I, open-label trial to assess the safety
             and feasibility of a single intravenous infusion of
             autologous umbilical cord blood, as well as sensitivity to
             change in several ASD assessment tools, to determine
             suitable endpoints for future trials. Twenty-five children,
             median age 4.6 years (range 2.26-5.97), with a confirmed
             diagnosis of ASD and a qualified banked autologous umbilical
             cord blood unit, were enrolled. Children were evaluated with
             a battery of behavioral and functional tests immediately
             prior to cord blood infusion (baseline) and 6 and 12 months
             later. Assessment of adverse events across the 12-month
             period indicated that the treatment was safe and well
             tolerated. Significant improvements in children's behavior
             were observed on parent-report measures of social
             communication skills and autism symptoms, clinician ratings
             of overall autism symptom severity and degree of
             improvement, standardized measures of expressive vocabulary,
             and objective eye-tracking measures of children's attention
             to social stimuli, indicating that these measures may be
             useful endpoints in future studies. Behavioral improvements
             were observed during the first 6 months after infusion and
             were greater in children with higher baseline nonverbal
             intelligence quotients. These data will serve as the basis
             for future studies to determine the efficacy of umbilical
             cord blood infusions in children with ASD. Stem Cells
             Translational Medicine 2017;6:1332-1339.},
   Doi = {10.1002/sctm.16-0474},
   Key = {fds326349}
}

@article{fds326271,
   Author = {Jones, EJH and Dawson, G and Webb, SJ},
   Title = {Sensory hypersensitivity predicts enhanced attention capture
             by faces in the early development of ASD.},
   Journal = {Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2017.04.001},
   Abstract = {Sensory sensitivity is prevalent among young children with
             ASD, but its relation to social communication impairment is
             unclear. Recently, increased sensory hypersensitivity has
             been linked to greater activity of the neural salience
             network (Green et al., 2016). Increased neural sensitivity
             to stimuli, especially social stimuli, could provide greater
             opportunity for social learning and improved outcomes.
             Consistent with this framework, in Experiment 1 we found
             that parent report of greater sensory hypersensitivity at 2
             years in toddlers with ASD (N=27) was predictive of
             increased neural responsiveness to social stimuli (larger
             amplitude event-related potential/ERP responses to faces at
             P1, P400 and Nc) at 4 years, and this in turn was related to
             parent report of increased social approach at 4 years. In
             Experiment 2, parent report of increased perceptual
             sensitivity at 6 months in infants at low and high familial
             risk for ASD (N=35) predicted larger ERP P1 amplitude to
             faces at 18 months. Increased sensory hypersensitivity in
             early development thus predicted greater attention capture
             by faces in later development, and this related to more
             optimal social behavioral development. Sensory
             hypersensitivity may index a child's ability to benefit from
             supportive environments during development. Early sensory
             symptoms may not always be developmentally problematic for
             individuals with ASD.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.dcn.2017.04.001},
   Key = {fds326271}
}

@article{fds324049,
   Author = {Campbell, K and Carpenter, KLH and Espinosa, S and Hashemi, J and Qiu,
             Q and Tepper, M and Calderbank, R and Sapiro, G and Egger, HL and Baker,
             JP and Dawson, G},
   Title = {Use of a Digital Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers -
             Revised with Follow-up to Improve Quality of Screening for
             Autism.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Pediatrics},
   Volume = {183},
   Pages = {133-139.e1},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.01.021},
   Abstract = {To assess changes in quality of care for children at risk
             for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) due to process
             improvement and implementation of a digital screening
             form.The process of screening for ASD was studied in an
             academic primary care pediatrics clinic before and after
             implementation of a digital version of the Modified
             Checklist for Autism in Toddlers - Revised with Follow-up
             with automated risk assessment. Quality metrics included
             accuracy of documentation of screening results and
             appropriate action for positive screens (secondary screening
             or referral). Participating physicians completed pre- and
             postintervention surveys to measure changes in attitudes
             toward feasibility and value of screening for ASD. Evidence
             of change was evaluated with statistical process control
             charts and χ2 tests.Accurate documentation in the
             electronic health record of screening results increased from
             54% to 92% (38% increase, 95% CI 14%-64%) and appropriate
             action for children screening positive increased from 25% to
             85% (60% increase, 95% CI 35%-85%). A total of 90% of
             participating physicians agreed that the transition to a
             digital screening form improved their clinical assessment of
             autism risk.Implementation of a tablet-based digital version
             of the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers - Revised
             with Follow-up led to improved quality of care for children
             at risk for ASD and increased acceptability of screening for
             ASD. Continued efforts towards improving the process of
             screening for ASD could facilitate rapid, early diagnosis of
             ASD and advance the accuracy of studies of the impact of
             screening.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.01.021},
   Key = {fds324049}
}

@article{fds329542,
   Author = {Ness, SL and Manyakov, NV and Bangerter, A and Lewin, D and Jagannatha,
             S and Boice, M and Skalkin, A and Dawson, G and Janvier, YM and Goodwin,
             MS and Hendren, R and Leventhal, B and Shic, F and Cioccia, W and Pandina,
             G},
   Title = {JAKE® Multimodal Data Capture System: Insights from an
             Observational Study of Autism Spectrum Disorder.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Neuroscience},
   Volume = {11},
   Pages = {517},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2017.00517},
   Abstract = {Objective: To test usability and optimize the Janssen Autism
             Knowledge Engine (JAKE®) system's components, biosensors,
             and procedures used for objective measurement of core and
             associated symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in
             clinical trials. Methods: A prospective, observational study
             of 29 children and adolescents with ASD using the JAKE
             system was conducted at three sites in the United States.
             This study was designed to establish the feasibility of the
             JAKE system and to learn practical aspects of its
             implementation. In addition to information collected by web
             and mobile components, wearable biosensor data were
             collected both continuously in natural settings and
             periodically during a battery of experimental tasks
             administered in laboratory settings. This study is
             registered at clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02299700. Results:
             Feedback collected throughout the study allowed future
             refinements to be planned for all components of the system.
             The Autism Behavior Inventory (ABI), a parent-reported
             measure of ASD core and associated symptoms, performed well.
             Among biosensors studied, the eye-tracker, sleep monitor,
             and electrocardiogram were shown to capture high quality
             data, whereas wireless electroencephalography was difficult
             to use due to its form factor. On an exit survey, the
             majority of parents rated their overall reaction to JAKE as
             positive/very positive. No significant device-related events
             were reported in the study. Conclusion: The results of this
             study, with the described changes, demonstrate that the JAKE
             system is a viable, useful, and safe platform for use in
             clinical trials of ASD, justifying larger validation and
             deployment studies of the optimized system.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fnins.2017.00517},
   Key = {fds329542}
}


%% De Bellis, Michael D.   
@article{fds331438,
   Author = {Nooner, KB and Hooper, SR and De Bellis, MD},
   Title = {An Examination of Sex Differences on Neurocognitive
             Functioning and Behavior Problems in Maltreated
             Youth.},
   Journal = {Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and
             Policy},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/tra0000356},
   Abstract = {In the developmental traumatology model, the biological
             construct of sex is considered a moderator that may
             negatively influence child maltreatment sequelae including
             those pertaining to neurocognitive function.This study
             examined sex-differences in neurocognitive function and
             behavior problems in maltreated boys (n = 42), maltreated
             girls (n = 56) versus nonmaltreated boys (n = 45) and girls
             (n = 59). Maltreated boys were hypothesized to have poorer
             neurocognitive functioning than maltreated girls, and
             nonmaltreated boys and girls, in all neurocognitive domains,
             particularly pertaining to executive function and attention.
             We also examined correlations between cognitive function and
             parent report of child behavior problems for maltreated and
             nonmaltreated children.Maltreated boys performed more poorly
             on measures of intelligence, attention, language, memory,
             executive function, and academic achievement in both reading
             and math than nonmaltreated boys. Maltreated boys did not
             perform more poorly on these cognitive measures or
             behavioral measures than maltreated girls, except for one
             memory measure. Maltreated girls performed more poorly on
             measures of intelligence, language, memory, executive
             function, and academic achievement than nonmaltreated girls.
             Maltreated girls with better visual-spatial skills had more
             internalizing and externalizing problems. Effect sizes for
             these sex differences ranged from small to large.Both
             maltreated boys and girls showed poorer cognitive function
             than their nonmaltreated sex-matched controls. Maltreated
             girls had subtle sparing of attention and short-term memory
             (STM). Understanding sex differences in neurocognitive
             functioning may have implications for designing large
             population studies of maltreated youth. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/tra0000356},
   Key = {fds331438}
}

@article{fds330475,
   Author = {Sullivan, EV and Lane, B and Kwon, D and Meloy, MJ and Tapert, SF and Brown, SA and Colrain, IM and Baker, FC and De Bellis, MD and Clark, DB and Nagel, BJ and Pohl, KM and Pfefferbaum, A},
   Title = {Structural brain anomalies in healthy adolescents in the
             NCANDA cohort: relation to neuropsychological test
             performance, sex, and ethnicity.},
   Journal = {Brain Imaging and Behavior},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1302-1315},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11682-016-9634-2},
   Abstract = {Structural MRI of volunteers deemed "normal" following
             clinical interview provides a window into normal brain
             developmental morphology but also reveals unexpected
             dysmorphology, commonly known as "incidental findings."
             Although unanticipated, these anatomical findings raise
             questions regarding possible treatment that could even
             ultimately require neurosurgical intervention, which itself
             carries significant risk but may not be indicated if the
             anomaly is nonprogressive or of no functional consequence.
             Neuroradiological readings of 833 structural MRI from the
             National Consortium on Alcohol and NeuroDevelopment in
             Adolescence (NCANDA) cohort found an 11.8 % incidence of
             brain structural anomalies, represented proportionately
             across the five collection sites and ethnic groups.
             Anomalies included 26 mega cisterna magna, 15 subarachnoid
             cysts, 12 pineal cysts, 12 white matter dysmorphologies, 5
             tonsillar ectopias, 5 prominent perivascular spaces, 5 gray
             matter heterotopias, 4 pituitary masses, 4 excessively large
             or asymmetrical ventricles, 4 cavum septum pellucidum, 3
             developmental venous anomalies, 1 exceptionally large
             midsagittal vein, and single cases requiring clinical
             followup: cranio-cervical junction stenosis, parietal
             cortical mass, and Chiari I malformation. A case of possible
             demyelinating disorder (e.g., neuromyelitis optica or
             multiple sclerosis) newly emerged at the 1-year NCANDA
             followup, requiring clinical referral. Comparing test
             performance of the 98 anomalous cases with 619 anomaly-free
             no-to-low alcohol consuming adolescents revealed
             significantly lower scores on speed measures of attention
             and motor functions; these differences were not attributed
             to any one anomaly subgroup. Further, we devised an
             automated approach for quantifying posterior fossa CSF
             volumes for detection of mega cisterna magna, which
             represented 26.5 % of clinically identified anomalies.
             Automated quantification fit a Gaussian distribution with a
             rightward skew. Using a 3SD cut-off, quantification
             identified 22 of the 26 clinically-identified cases,
             indicating that cases with percent of CSF in the
             posterior-inferior-middle aspect of the posterior fossa
             ≥3SD merit further review, and support complementing
             clinical readings with objective quantitative analysis.
             Discovery of asymptomatic brain structural anomalies, even
             when no clinical action is indicated, can be disconcerting
             to the individual and responsible family members, raising a
             disclosure dilemma: refrain from relating the incidental
             findings to avoid unnecessary alarm or anxiety; or
             alternatively, relate the neuroradiological findings as
             "normal variants" to the study volunteers and family,
             thereby equipping them with knowledge for the future should
             they have the occasion for a brain scan following an illness
             or accident that the incidental findings predated the later
             event.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11682-016-9634-2},
   Key = {fds330475}
}

@article{fds326501,
   Author = {Hasler, BP and Franzen, PL and de Zambotti, M and Prouty, D and Brown,
             SA and Tapert, SF and Pfefferbaum, A and Pohl, KM and Sullivan, EV and De
             Bellis, MD and Nagel, BJ and Baker, FC and Colrain, IM and Clark,
             DB},
   Title = {Eveningness and Later Sleep Timing Are Associated with
             Greater Risk for Alcohol and Marijuana Use in Adolescence:
             Initial Findings from the National Consortium on Alcohol and
             Neurodevelopment in Adolescence Study.},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1154-1165},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acer.13401},
   Abstract = {Abundant cross-sectional evidence links eveningness (a
             preference for later sleep-wake timing) and increased
             alcohol and drug use among adolescents and young adults.
             However, longitudinal studies are needed to examine whether
             eveningness is a risk factor for subsequent alcohol and drug
             use, particularly during adolescence, which is marked by
             parallel peaks in eveningness and risk for the onset of
             alcohol use disorders. This study examined whether
             eveningness and other sleep characteristics were associated
             with concurrent or subsequent substance involvement in a
             longitudinal study of adolescents.Participants were 729
             adolescents (368 females; age 12 to 21 years) in the
             National Consortium on Alcohol and Neurodevelopment in
             Adolescence study. Associations between the sleep variables
             (circadian preference, sleep quality, daytime sleepiness,
             sleep timing, and sleep duration) and 3 categorical
             substance variables (at-risk alcohol use, alcohol bingeing,
             and past-year marijuana use [y/n]) were examined using
             ordinal and logistic regression with baseline age, sex,
             race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and psychiatric
             problems as covariates.At baseline, greater eveningness was
             associated with greater at-risk alcohol use, greater
             bingeing, and past-year use of marijuana. Later weekday and
             weekend bedtimes, but not weekday or weekend sleep duration,
             showed similar associations across the 3 substance outcomes
             at baseline. Greater baseline eveningness was also
             prospectively associated with greater bingeing and past-year
             use of marijuana at the 1-year follow-up, after covarying
             for baseline bingeing and marijuana use. Later baseline
             weekday and weekend bedtimes, and shorter baseline weekday
             sleep duration, were similarly associated with greater
             bingeing and past-year use of marijuana at the 1-year
             follow-up after covarying for baseline values.Findings
             suggest that eveningness and sleep timing may be under
             recognized risk factors and future areas of intervention for
             adolescent involvement in alcohol and marijuana that should
             be considered along with other previously identified sleep
             factors such as insomnia and insufficient
             sleep.},
   Doi = {10.1111/acer.13401},
   Key = {fds326501}
}

@article{fds325128,
   Author = {Sullivan, EV and Brumback, T and Tapert, SF and Prouty, D and Fama, R and Thompson, WK and Brown, SA and Cummins, K and Colrain, IM and Baker, FC and Clark, DB and Chung, T and De Bellis, MD and Hooper, SR and Nagel, BJ and Nichols, BN and Chu, W and Kwon, D and Pohl, KM and Pfefferbaum,
             A},
   Title = {Effects of prior testing lasting a full year in NCANDA
             adolescents: Contributions from age, sex, socioeconomic
             status, ethnicity, site, family history of alcohol or drug
             abuse, and baseline performance.},
   Journal = {Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience},
   Volume = {24},
   Pages = {72-83},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2017.01.003},
   Abstract = {Longitudinal study provides a robust method for tracking
             developmental trajectories. Yet inherent problems of
             retesting pose challenges in distinguishing biological
             developmental change from prior testing experience. We
             examined factors potentially influencing change scores on 16
             neuropsychological test composites over 1year in 568
             adolescents in the National Consortium on Alcohol and
             NeuroDevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA) project. The
             twice-minus-once-tested method revealed that performance
             gain was mainly attributable to testing experience
             (practice) with little contribution from predicted
             developmental effects. Group mean practice slopes for 13
             composites indicated that 60% to ∼100% variance was
             attributable to test experience; General Ability accuracy
             showed the least practice effect (29%). Lower baseline
             performance, especially in younger participants, was a
             strong predictor of greater gain. Contributions from age,
             sex, ethnicity, examination site, socioeconomic status, or
             family history of alcohol/substance abuse were nil to small,
             even where statistically significant. Recognizing that a
             substantial proportion of change in longitudinal testing,
             even over 1-year, is attributable to testing experience
             indicates caution against assuming that performance gain
             observed during periods of maturation necessarily reflects
             development. Estimates of testing experience, a form of
             learning, may be a relevant metric for detecting interim
             influences, such as alcohol use or traumatic episodes, on
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.dcn.2017.01.003},
   Key = {fds325128}
}

@article{fds330476,
   Author = {Stave, EA and De Bellis, MD and Hooper, SR and Woolley, DP and Chang,
             SK and Chen, SD},
   Title = {Dimensions of Attention Associated With the Microstructure
             of Corona Radiata White Matter.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child Neurology},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {458-466},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0883073816685652},
   Abstract = {Mirsky proposed a model of attention that included these
             dimensions: focus/execute, sustain, stabilize, encode, and
             shift. The neural correlates of these dimensions were
             investigated within corona radiata subregions in healthy
             youth. Diffusion tensor imaging and neuropsychological
             assessments were conducted in 79 healthy, right-handed youth
             aged 4-17 years. Diffusion tensor imaging maps were analyzed
             using standardized parcellation methods. Partial Pearson
             correlations between neuropsychological standardized scores,
             representing these attention dimensions, and diffusion
             tensor imaging measures of corona radiata subregions were
             calculated after adjusting for gender and IQ. Significant
             correlations were found between the focus/execute, sustain,
             stabilize, and shift dimensions and imaging metrics in
             hypothesized corona radiata subregions. Results suggest that
             greater microstructural white matter integrity of the corona
             radiata is partly associated with attention across 4
             attention dimensions. Findings suggest that white matter
             microstructure of the corona radiata is a neural correlate
             of several, but not all, attention dimensions.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0883073816685652},
   Key = {fds330476}
}

@article{fds326856,
   Author = {Sege, RD and Amaya-Jackson, L and AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS
             Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect, Council on Foster
             Care and Adoption and Kinship Care and AMERICAN ACADEMY OF CHILD
             AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY Committee on Child Maltreatment and Violence and NATIONAL CENTER FOR CHILD TRAUMATIC
             STRESS},
   Title = {Clinical Considerations Related to the Behavioral
             Manifestations of Child Maltreatment.},
   Journal = {Pediatrics},
   Volume = {139},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {e20170100-e20170100},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-0100},
   Abstract = {Children who have suffered early abuse or neglect may later
             present with significant health and behavior problems that
             may persist long after the abusive or neglectful environment
             has been remediated. Neurobiological research suggests that
             early maltreatment may result in an altered psychological
             and physiologic response to stressful stimuli, a response
             that deleteriously affects the child's subsequent
             development. Pediatricians can assist caregivers by helping
             them recognize the abused or neglected child's emotional and
             behavioral responses associated with child maltreatment and
             guide them in the use of positive parenting strategies,
             referring the children and families to evidence-based
             therapeutic treatment and mobilizing available community
             resources.},
   Doi = {10.1542/peds.2017-0100},
   Key = {fds326856}
}


%% De Brigard, Felipe   
@article{fds329948,
   Author = {De Brigard and F and Parikh, N and Stewart, GW and Szpunar, KK and Schacter, DL},
   Title = {Neural activity associated with repetitive simulation of
             episodic counterfactual thoughts},
   Journal = {Neuropsychologia},
   Volume = {106},
   Pages = {123-132},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.09.022},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.09.022},
   Key = {fds329948}
}

@article{fds329104,
   Author = {Stanley, ML and Dougherty, AM and Yang, BW and Henne, P and De Brigard,
             F},
   Title = {Reasons Probably Won't Change Your Mind: The Role of Reasons
             in Revising Moral Decisions},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology: General},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xge0000368},
   Abstract = {© 2017 APA, all rights reserved). Although many
             philosophers argue that making and revising moral decisions
             ought to be a matter of deliberating over reasons, the
             extent to which the consideration of reasons informs
             people's moral decisions and prompts them to change their
             decisions remains unclear. Here, after making an initial
             decision in 2-option moral dilemmas, participants examined
             reasons for only the option initially chosen (affirming
             reasons), reasons for only the option not initially chosen
             (opposing reasons), or reasons for both options. Although
             participants were more likely to change their initial
             decisions when presented with only opposing reasons compared
             with only affirming reasons, these effect sizes were
             consistently small. After evaluating reasons, participants
             were significantly more likely not to change their initial
             decisions than to change them, regardless of the set of
             reasons they considered. The initial decision accounted for
             most of the variance in predicting the final decision,
             whereas the reasons evaluated accounted for a relatively
             small proportion of the variance in predicting the final
             decision. This resistance to changing moral decisions is at
             least partly attributable to a biased, motivated evaluation
             of the available reasons: participants rated the reasons
             supporting their initial decisions more favorably than the
             reasons opposing their initial decisions, regardless of the
             reported strategy used to make the initial decision.
             Overall, our results suggest that the consideration of
             reasons rarely induces people to change their initial
             decisions in moral dilemmas. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/xge0000368},
   Key = {fds329104}
}

@article{fds329949,
   Author = {De Brigard and F},
   Title = {Memory and imagination},
   Pages = {127-140},
   Booktitle = {The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Memory},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   ISBN = {9781315687315},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315687315},
   Doi = {10.4324/9781315687315},
   Key = {fds329949}
}

@article{fds326194,
   Author = {Stanley, ML and Henne, P and Iyengar, V and Sinnott-Armstrong, W and De
             Brigard, F},
   Title = {I'm not the person I used to be: The self and
             autobiographical memories of immoral actions.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology: General},
   Volume = {146},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {884-895},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xge0000317},
   Abstract = {People maintain a positive identity in at least two ways:
             They evaluate themselves more favorably than other people,
             and they judge themselves to be better now than they were in
             the past. Both strategies rely on autobiographical memories.
             The authors investigate the role of autobiographical
             memories of lying and emotional harm in maintaining a
             positive identity. For memories of lying to or emotionally
             harming others, participants judge their own actions as less
             morally wrong and less negative than those in which other
             people lied to or emotionally harmed them. Furthermore,
             people judge those actions that happened further in the past
             to be more morally wrong than those that happened more
             recently. Finally, for periods of the past when they
             believed that they were very different people than they are
             now, participants judge their actions to be more morally
             wrong and more negative than those actions from periods of
             their pasts when they believed that they were very similar
             to who they are now. The authors discuss these findings in
             relation to theories about the function of autobiographical
             memory and moral cognition in constructing and perceiving
             the self over time. (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/xge0000317},
   Key = {fds326194}
}

@article{fds327002,
   Author = {De Brigard and F},
   Title = {Cognitive systems and the changing brain},
   Journal = {Philosophical Explorations},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {224-241},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13869795.2017.1312503},
   Doi = {10.1080/13869795.2017.1312503},
   Key = {fds327002}
}

@article{fds327003,
   Author = {De Brigard and F and Rodriguez, DC and Montañés,
             P},
   Title = {Exploring the experience of episodic past, future, and
             counterfactual thinking in younger and older adults: A study
             of a Colombian sample},
   Journal = {Consciousness and Cognition},
   Volume = {51},
   Pages = {258-267},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2017.04.007},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.concog.2017.04.007},
   Key = {fds327003}
}

@article{fds318357,
   Author = {Henne, P and Pinillos, Á and De Brigard and F},
   Title = {Cause by Omission and Norm: Not Watering
             Plants},
   Journal = {Australasian Journal of Philosophy},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {270-283},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00048402.2016.1182567},
   Doi = {10.1080/00048402.2016.1182567},
   Key = {fds318357}
}

@article{fds323231,
   Author = {Stanley, ML and Parikh, N and Stewart, GW and De Brigard,
             F},
   Title = {Emotional intensity in episodic autobiographical memory and
             counterfactual thinking},
   Journal = {Consciousness and Cognition},
   Volume = {48},
   Pages = {283-291},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2016.12.013},
   Abstract = {© 2016Episodic counterfactual thoughts—imagined
             alternative ways in which personal past events might have
             occurred—are frequently accompanied by intense emotions.
             Here, participants recollected positive and negative
             autobiographical memories and then generated better and
             worse episodic counterfactual events from those memories.
             Our results suggest that the projected emotional intensity
             during the simulated remembered/imagined event is
             significantly higher than but typically positively related
             to the emotional intensity while remembering/imagining the
             event. Furthermore, repeatedly simulating counterfactual
             events heightened the emotional intensity felt while
             simulating the counterfactual event. Finally, for both the
             emotional intensity accompanying the experience of
             remembering/imagining and the projected emotional intensity
             during the simulated remembered/imagined event, the
             emotional intensity of negative memories was greater than
             the emotional intensity of upward counterfactuals generated
             from them but lower than the emotional intensity of downward
             counterfactuals generated from them. These findings are
             discussed in relation to clinical work and functional
             theories of counterfactual thinking.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.concog.2016.12.013},
   Key = {fds323231}
}

@article{fds323662,
   Author = {De Brigard and F and Brady, TF and Ruzic, L and Schacter,
             DL},
   Title = {Tracking the emergence of memories: A category-learning
             paradigm to explore schema-driven recognition.},
   Journal = {Memory & Cognition},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {105-120},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-016-0643-6},
   Abstract = {Previous research has shown that prior knowledge structures
             or schemas affect recognition memory. However, since the
             acquisition of schemas occurs over prolonged periods of
             time, few paradigms allow the direct manipulation of schema
             acquisition to study their effect on memory performance.
             Recently, a number of parallelisms in recognition memory
             between studies involving schemas and studies involving
             category learning have been identified. The current paper
             capitalizes on these findings and offers a novel
             experimental paradigm that allows manipulation of category
             learning between individuals to study the effects of schema
             acquisition on recognition. First, participants learn to
             categorize computer-generated items whose category-inclusion
             criteria differ between participants. Next, participants
             study items that belong to either the learned category, the
             non-learned category, both, or neither. Finally,
             participants receive a recognition test that includes old
             and new items, either from the learned, the non-learned, or
             neither category. Using variations on this paradigm, four
             experiments were conducted. The results from the first three
             studies suggest that learning a category increases hit rates
             for old category-consistent items and false alarm rates for
             new category-consistent lures. Absent the category learning,
             no such effects are evident, even when participants are
             exposed to the same learning trials as those who learned the
             categories. The results from the fourth experiment suggest
             that, at least for false alarm rates, the effects of
             category learning are not solely attributable to frequency
             of occurrence of category-consistent items during learning.
             Implications for recognition memory as well as advantages of
             the proposed paradigm are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13421-016-0643-6},
   Key = {fds323662}
}


%% Dodge, Kenneth A.   
@article{fds327155,
   Author = {Deater-Deckard, K and Godwin, J and Lansford, JE and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring,
             E and Steinberg, L and Tapanya, S and Alampay, LP and Uribe Tirado and LM and Zelli, A and Al-Hassan, SM},
   Title = {Within- and between-person and group variance in behavior
             and beliefs in cross-cultural longitudinal
             data.},
   Journal = {Journal of Adolescence},
   Volume = {62},
   Pages = {207-217},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.06.002},
   Abstract = {This study grapples with what it means to be part of a
             cultural group, from a statistical modeling perspective. The
             method we present compares within- and between-cultural
             group variability, in behaviors in families. We demonstrate
             the method using a cross-cultural study of adolescent
             development and parenting, involving three biennial waves of
             longitudinal data from 1296 eight-year-olds and their
             parents (multiple cultures in nine countries). Family
             members completed surveys about parental negativity and
             positivity, child academic and social-emotional adjustment,
             and attitudes about parenting and adolescent behavior.
             Variance estimates were computed at the cultural group,
             person, and within-person level using multilevel models. Of
             the longitudinally consistent variance, most was within and
             not between cultural groups-although there was a wide range
             of between-group differences. This approach to quantifying
             cultural group variability may prove valuable when applied
             to quantitative studies of acculturation.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.06.002},
   Key = {fds327155}
}

@article{fds327289,
   Author = {Berlin, LJ and Martoccio, TL and Appleyard Carmody and K and Goodman,
             WB and O'Donnell, K and Williams, J and Murphy, RA and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Can typical US home visits affect infant attachment?
             Preliminary findings from a randomized trial of Healthy
             Families Durham.},
   Journal = {Attachment & Human Development},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {559-579},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14616734.2017.1339359},
   Abstract = {US government-funded early home visiting services are
             expanding significantly. The most widely implemented home
             visiting models target at-risk new mothers and their
             infants. Such home visiting programs typically aim to
             support infant-parent relationships; yet, such programs'
             effects on infant attachment quality per se are as yet
             untested. Given these programs' aims, and the crucial role
             of early attachments in human development, it is important
             to understand attachment processes in home visited families.
             The current, preliminary study examined 94 high-risk
             mother-infant dyads participating in a randomized evaluation
             of the Healthy Families Durham (HFD) home visiting program.
             We tested (a) infant attachment security and disorganization
             as predictors of toddler behavior problems and (b) program
             effects on attachment security and disorganization. We found
             that (a) infant attachment disorganization (but not
             security) predicted toddler behavior problems and (b)
             participation in HFD did not significantly affect infant
             attachment security or disorganization. Findings are
             discussed in terms of the potential for attachment-specific
             interventions to enhance the typical array of home visiting
             services.},
   Doi = {10.1080/14616734.2017.1339359},
   Key = {fds327289}
}

@article{fds330211,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Godwin, J and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Steinberg, L and Tapanya, S and Alampay, LP and Uribe Tirado and LM and Al-Hassan, SM and Bacchini, D},
   Title = {Reward sensitivity, impulse control, and social cognition as
             mediators of the link between childhood family adversity and
             externalizing behavior in eight countries.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1675-1688},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579417001328},
   Abstract = {Using data from 1,177 families in eight countries (Colombia,
             Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and
             the United States), we tested a conceptual model of direct
             effects of childhood family adversity on subsequent
             externalizing behaviors as well as indirect effects through
             psychological mediators. When children were 9 years old,
             mothers and fathers reported on financial difficulties and
             their use of corporal punishment, and children reported
             perceptions of their parents' rejection. When children were
             10 years old, they completed a computerized battery of tasks
             assessing reward sensitivity and impulse control and
             responded to questions about hypothetical social
             provocations to assess their hostile attributions and
             proclivity for aggressive responding. When children were 12
             years old, they reported on their externalizing behavior.
             Multigroup structural equation models revealed that across
             all eight countries, childhood family adversity had direct
             effects on externalizing behaviors 3 years later, and
             childhood family adversity had indirect effects on
             externalizing behavior through psychological mediators. The
             findings suggest ways in which family-level adversity poses
             risk for children's subsequent development of problems at
             psychological and behavioral levels, situated within diverse
             cultural contexts.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579417001328},
   Key = {fds330211}
}

@article{fds330210,
   Author = {Sorensen, LC and Cook, PJ and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {From Parents to Peers: Trajectories in Sources of Academic
             Influence Grades 4 to 8},
   Journal = {Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {697-711},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/0162373717708335},
   Doi = {10.3102/0162373717708335},
   Key = {fds330210}
}

@article{fds330822,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Godwin, J and Al-Hassan, SM and Bacchini, D and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Chen, BB and Deater-Deckard, K and Giunta, LD and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Steinberg, L and Tapanya, S and Peña
             Alampay, L and Uribe Tirado and LM and Zelli, A},
   Title = {Longitudinal Associations Between Parenting and Youth
             Adjustment in Twelve Cultural Groups: Cultural Normativeness
             of Parenting as a Moderator},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000416},
   Abstract = {© 2017 APA, all rights reserved). To examine whether the
             cultural normativeness of parents' beliefs and behaviors
             moderates the links between those beliefs and behaviors and
             youths' adjustment, mothers, fathers, and children (N =
             1,298 families) from 12 cultural groups in 9 countries
             (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden,
             Thailand, and the United States) were interviewed when
             children were, on average, 10 years old and again when
             children were 12 years old. Multilevel models examined 5
             aspects of parenting (expectations regarding family
             obligations, monitoring, psychological control, behavioral
             control, warmth/affection) in relation to 5 aspects of youth
             adjustment (social competence, prosocial behavior, academic
             achievement, externalizing behavior, internalizing
             behavior). Interactions between family level and
             culture-level predictors were tested to examine whether
             cultural normativeness of parenting behaviors moderated the
             link between those behaviors and children's adjustment. More
             evidence was found for within- than between-culture
             differences in parenting predictors of youth adjustment. In
             7 of the 8 instances in which cultural normativeness was
             found to moderate the link between parenting and youth
             adjustment, the link between a particular parenting behavior
             and youth adjustment was magnified in cultural contexts in
             which the parenting behavior was more normative. (PsycINFO
             Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/dev0000416},
   Key = {fds330822}
}

@article{fds330212,
   Author = {McQuillan, ME and Kultur, EC and Bates, JE and O'Reilly, LM and Dodge,
             KA and Lansford, JE and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Dysregulation in children: Origins and implications from age
             5 to age 28.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Pages = {1-19},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579417001572},
   Abstract = {Research shows that childhood dysregulation is associated
             with later psychiatric disorders. It does not yet resolve
             discrepancies in the operationalization of dysregulation. It
             is also far from settled on the origins and implications of
             individual differences in dysregulation. This study tested
             several operational definitions of dysregulation using
             Achenbach attention, anxious/depressed, and aggression
             subscales. Individual growth curves of dysregulation were
             computed, and predictors of growth differences were
             considered. The study also compared the predictive utility
             of the dysregulation indexes to standard externalizing and
             internalizing indexes. Dysregulation was indexed annually
             for 24 years in a community sample (n = 585). Hierarchical
             linear models considered changes in dysregulation in
             relation to possible influences from parenting, family
             stress, child temperament, language, and peer relations. In
             a test of the meaning of dysregulation, it was related to
             functional and psychiatric outcomes in adulthood.
             Dysregulation predictions were further compared to those of
             the more standard internalizing and externalizing indexes.
             Growth curve analyses showed strong stability of
             dysregulation. Initial levels of dysregulation were
             predicted by temperamental resistance to control, and change
             in dysregulation was predicted by poor language ability and
             peer relations. Dysregulation and externalizing problems
             were associated with negative adult outcomes to a similar
             extent.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579417001572},
   Key = {fds330212}
}

@article{fds330823,
   Author = {Petersen, IT and Lindhiem, O and LeBeau, B and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Development of Internalizing Problems From Adolescence to
             Emerging Adulthood: Accounting for Heterotypic Continuity
             With Vertical Scaling},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000449},
   Abstract = {© 2017 APA, all rights reserved). Manifestations of
             internalizing problems, such as specific symptoms of anxiety
             and depression, can change across development, even if
             individuals show strong continuity in rank-order levels of
             internalizing problems. This illustrates the concept of
             heterotypic continuity, and raises the question of whether
             common measures might be construct-valid for one age but not
             another. This study examines mean-level changes in
             internalizing problems across a long span of development at
             the same time as accounting for heterotypic continuity by
             using age-appropriate, changing measures. Internalizing
             problems from age 14-24 were studied longitudinally in a
             community sample (N = 585), using Achenbach's Youth
             Self-Report (YSR) and Young Adult Self-Report (YASR).
             Heterotypic continuity was evaluated with an item response
             theory (IRT) approach to vertical scaling, linking different
             measures over time to be on the same scale, as well as with
             a Thurstone scaling approach. With vertical scaling,
             internalizing problems peaked in mid-to-late adolescence and
             showed a group-level decrease from adolescence to early
             adulthood, a change that would not have been seen with the
             approach of using only age-common items. Individuals'
             trajectories were sometimes different than would have been
             seen with the common-items approach. Findings support the
             importance of considering heterotypic continuity when
             examining development and vertical scaling to account for
             heterotypic continuity with changing measures. (PsycINFO
             Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/dev0000449},
   Key = {fds330823}
}

@article{fds330213,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Peer Victimization during Middle Childhood as a Marker of
             Attenuated Risk for Adult Arrest.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-017-0354-x},
   Abstract = {This longitudinal investigation examined interactions
             between aggression and peer victimization during middle
             childhood in the prediction of arrest through the adult
             years for 388 (198 boys, 190 girls) study participants. As
             part of an ongoing multisite study (i.e., Child Development
             Project), peer victimization and aggression were assessed
             via a peer nomination inventory in middle childhood, and
             juvenile and adult arrest histories were assessed via a
             self-report questionnaire as well as review of court
             records. Early aggression was linked to later arrest but
             only for those youths who were rarely victimized by peers.
             Although past investigators have viewed youths who are both
             aggressive and victimized as a high-risk subgroup, our
             findings suggest that the psychological and behavioral
             attributes of these children may mitigate trajectories
             toward antisocial problems.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-017-0354-x},
   Key = {fds330213}
}

@article{fds330175,
   Author = {Cook, PJ and Dodge, KA and Gifford, EJ and Schulting,
             AB},
   Title = {A new program to prevent primary school absenteeism: Results
             of a pilot study in five schools},
   Journal = {Children and Youth Services Review},
   Volume = {82},
   Pages = {262-270},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.09.017},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.09.017},
   Key = {fds330175}
}

@article{fds329395,
   Author = {Duell, N and Steinberg, L and Icenogle, G and Chein, J and Chaudhary, N and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Fanti, KA and Lansford, JE and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya, S and Uribe
             Tirado, LM and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM and Takash, HMS and Bacchini, D and Chang, L},
   Title = {Age Patterns in Risk Taking Across the World.},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-017-0752-y},
   Abstract = {Epidemiological data indicate that risk behaviors are among
             the leading causes of adolescent morbidity and mortality
             worldwide. Consistent with this, laboratory-based studies of
             age differences in risk behavior allude to a peak in
             adolescence, suggesting that adolescents demonstrate a
             heightened propensity, or inherent inclination, to take
             risks. Unlike epidemiological reports, studies of risk
             taking propensity have been limited to Western samples,
             leaving questions about the extent to which heightened risk
             taking propensity is an inherent or culturally constructed
             aspect of adolescence. In the present study, age patterns in
             risk-taking propensity (using two laboratory tasks: the
             Stoplight and the BART) and real-world risk taking (using
             self-reports of health and antisocial risk taking) were
             examined in a sample of 5227 individuals (50.7% female) ages
             10-30 (M = 17.05 years, SD = 5.91) from 11 Western
             and non-Western countries (China, Colombia, Cyprus, India,
             Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and
             the US). Two hypotheses were tested: (1) risk taking follows
             an inverted-U pattern across age groups, peaking earlier on
             measures of risk taking propensity than on measures of
             real-world risk taking, and (2) age patterns in risk taking
             propensity are more consistent across countries than age
             patterns in real-world risk taking. Overall, risk taking
             followed the hypothesized inverted-U pattern across age
             groups, with health risk taking evincing the latest peak.
             Age patterns in risk taking propensity were more consistent
             across countries than age patterns in real-world risk
             taking. Results suggest that although the association
             between age and risk taking is sensitive to measurement and
             culture, around the world, risk taking is generally highest
             among late adolescents.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10964-017-0752-y},
   Key = {fds329395}
}

@article{fds327351,
   Author = {Goodnight, JA and Bates, JE and Holtzworth-Munroe, A and Pettit, GS and Ballard, RH and Iskander, JM and Swanson, A and Dodge, KA and Lansford,
             JE},
   Title = {Dispositional, demographic, and social predictors of
             trajectories of intimate partner aggression in early
             adulthood.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {85},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {950-965},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000226},
   Abstract = {From a developmental systems perspective, the origins of
             maladjusted behavior are multifaceted, interdependent, and
             may differ at different points in development. Personality
             traits influence developmental outcomes, as do socialization
             environments, but the influence of personality depends on
             the socialization environment, and the influence of the
             socialization environment varies according to personality.
             The present study takes a developmental systems approach to
             investigate pathways through which dispositional traits in
             childhood might act in concert with peer and parental
             socialization contexts to predict trajectories of intimate
             partner aggression (IPA) during emerging adulthood.The study
             included 466 participants (49% male, 81% European American,
             15% African American) from a longitudinal study of social
             development. Measures of demographics, temperament,
             personality, parent-child relations, romantic relationships,
             peer relationships, and IPA were administered between 5 and
             23 years of age. The study used latent growth curve analysis
             to predict variations in trajectories of IPA during early
             adulthood.Numerous variables predicted risk for the
             perpetration of IPA, but different factors were associated
             at the end of adolescence (e.g., psychopathic traits) than
             with changes across early adulthood (e.g., friend
             antisociality). Males and individuals with a history of
             resistance to control temperament showed enhanced
             susceptibility to social risk factors, such as exposure to
             antisocial peers and poor parent-adolescent
             relations.Consistent with a developmental systems
             perspective, multiple factors, including personality traits
             in early childhood and aspects of the social environment in
             adolescence, predict trajectories of IPA during early
             adulthood through additive, mediated, and moderated
             pathways. Knowledge of these risk factors and for whom they
             are most influential could help inform efforts to prevent
             the emergence and persistence of IPA. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/ccp0000226},
   Key = {fds327351}
}

@article{fds322250,
   Author = {Icenogle, G and Steinberg, L and Olino, TM and Shulman, EP and Chein, J and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM and Takash, HMS and Bacchini, D and Chang,
             L and Chaudhary, N and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Fanti, KA and Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner,
             AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya, S and Uribe Tirado,
             LM},
   Title = {Puberty Predicts Approach But Not Avoidance on the Iowa
             Gambling Task in a Multinational Sample.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1598-1614},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12655},
   Abstract = {According to the dual systems model of adolescent risk
             taking, sensation seeking and impulse control follow
             different developmental trajectories across adolescence and
             are governed by two different brain systems. The authors
             tested whether different underlying processes also drive age
             differences in reward approach and cost avoidance. Using a
             modified Iowa Gambling Task in a multinational,
             cross-sectional sample of 3,234 adolescents (ages 9-17;
             M = 12.87, SD = 2.36), pubertal maturation, but not age,
             predicted reward approach, mediated through higher sensation
             seeking. In contrast, age, but not pubertal maturation,
             predicted increased cost avoidance, mediated through greater
             impulse control. These findings add to evidence that
             adolescent behavior is best understood as the product of two
             interacting, but independently developing, brain
             systems.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.12655},
   Key = {fds322250}
}

@article{fds325210,
   Author = {Bornstein, MH and Putnick, DL and Lansford, JE and Al-Hassan, SM and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di
             Giunta, L and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Steinberg, L and Tapanya, S and Tirado,
             LMU and Zelli, A and Alampay, LP},
   Title = {'Mixed blessings': parental religiousness, parenting, and
             child adjustment in global perspective.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {58},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {880-892},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12705},
   Abstract = {Most studies of the effects of parental religiousness on
             parenting and child development focus on a particular
             religion or cultural group, which limits generalizations
             that can be made about the effects of parental religiousness
             on family life.We assessed the associations among parental
             religiousness, parenting, and children's adjustment in a
             3-year longitudinal investigation of 1,198 families from
             nine countries. We included four religions (Catholicism,
             Protestantism, Buddhism, and Islam) plus unaffiliated
             parents, two positive (efficacy and warmth) and two negative
             (control and rejection) parenting practices, and two
             positive (social competence and school performance) and two
             negative (internalizing and externalizing) child outcomes.
             Parents and children were informants.Greater parent
             religiousness had both positive and negative associations
             with parenting and child adjustment. Greater parent
             religiousness when children were age 8 was associated with
             higher parental efficacy at age 9 and, in turn, children's
             better social competence and school performance and fewer
             child internalizing and externalizing problems at age 10.
             However, greater parent religiousness at age 8 was also
             associated with more parental control at age 9, which in
             turn was associated with more child internalizing and
             externalizing problems at age 10. Parental warmth and
             rejection had inconsistent relations with parental
             religiousness and child outcomes depending on the informant.
             With a few exceptions, similar patterns of results held for
             all four religions and the unaffiliated, nine sites, mothers
             and fathers, girls and boys, and controlling for demographic
             covariates.Parents and children agree that parental
             religiousness is associated with more controlling parenting
             and, in turn, increased child problem behaviors. However,
             children see religiousness as related to parental rejection,
             whereas parents see religiousness as related to parental
             efficacy and warmth, which have different associations with
             child functioning. Studying both parent and child views of
             religiousness and parenting are important to understand the
             effects of parental religiousness on parents and
             children.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jcpp.12705},
   Key = {fds325210}
}

@article{fds327154,
   Author = {Alampay, LP and Godwin, J and Lansford, JE and Bombi, AS and Bornstein,
             MH and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring,
             E and Tapanya, S and Uribe Tirado and LM and Zelli, A and Al-Hassan, S and Bacchini, D},
   Title = {Severity and Justness Do Not Moderate the Relation Between
             Corporal Punishment and Negative Child Outcomes: A
             Multicultural and Longitudinal Study.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Development},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {491-502},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165025417697852},
   Abstract = {There is strong evidence of a positive association between
             corporal punishment and negative child outcomes, but
             previous studies have suggested that the manner in which
             parents implement corporal punishment moderates the effects
             of its use. This study investigated whether severity and
             justness in the use of corporal punishment moderate the
             associations between frequency of corporal punishment and
             child externalizing and internalizing behaviors. This
             question was examined using a multicultural sample from
             eight countries and two waves of data collected one year
             apart. Interviews were conducted with 998 children aged 7-10
             years, and their mothers and fathers, from China, Colombia,
             Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Thailand, and the United
             States. Mothers and fathers responded to questions on the
             frequency, severity, and justness of their use of corporal
             punishment; they also reported on the externalizing and
             internalizing behavior of their child. Children reported on
             their aggression. Multigroup path models revealed that
             across cultural groups, and as reported by mothers and
             fathers, there is a positive relation between the frequency
             of corporal punishment and externalizing child behaviors.
             Mother-reported severity and father-reported justness were
             associated with child-reported aggression. Neither severity
             nor justness moderated the relation between frequency of
             corporal punishment and child problem behavior. The null
             result suggests that more use of corporal punishment is
             harmful to children regardless of how it is implemented, but
             requires further substantiation as the study is unable to
             definitively conclude that there is no true interaction
             effect.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0165025417697852},
   Key = {fds327154}
}

@article{fds315899,
   Author = {Di Giunta and L and Iselin, A-MR and Eisenberg, N and Pastorelli, C and Gerbino, M and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Caprara, GV and Bacchini,
             D and Uribe Tirado and LM and Thartori, E},
   Title = {Measurement Invariance and Convergent Validity of Anger and
             Sadness Self-Regulation Among Youth From Six Cultural
             Groups.},
   Journal = {Assessment},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {484-502},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1073-1911},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1073191115615214},
   Abstract = {The present study examined measurement invariance and
             convergent validity of a novel vignette-based measure of
             emotion-specific self-regulation that simultaneously
             assesses attributional bias, emotion-regulation, and
             self-efficacy beliefs about emotion regulation. Participants
             included 541 youth-mother dyads from three countries (Italy,
             the United States, and Colombia) and six ethnic/cultural
             groups. Participants were 12.62 years old ( SD = 0.69). In
             response to vignettes involving ambiguous peer interactions,
             children reported their hostile/depressive attribution bias,
             self-efficacy beliefs about anger and sadness regulation,
             and anger/sadness regulation strategies (i.e., dysregulated
             expression and rumination). Across the six cultural groups,
             anger and sadness self-regulation subscales had full metric
             and partial scalar invariance for a one-factor model, with
             some exceptions. We found support for both a four- and
             three-factor oblique model (dysregulated expression and
             rumination loaded on a second-order factor) for both anger
             and sadness. Anger subscales were related to externalizing
             problems, while sadness subscales were related to
             internalizing symptoms.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1073191115615214},
   Key = {fds315899}
}

@article{fds326573,
   Author = {Wang, FL and Chassin, L and Bates, JE and Dick, D and Lansford, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Serotonin functioning and adolescents' alcohol use: A
             genetically informed study examining mechanisms of
             risk.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Pages = {1-21},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s095457941700058x},
   Abstract = {The current study used data from two longitudinal samples to
             test whether self-regulation, depressive symptoms, and
             aggression/antisociality were mediators in the relation
             between a polygenic score indexing serotonin (5-HT)
             functioning and alcohol use in adolescence. The results from
             an independent genome-wide association study of
             5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the cerebrospinal fluid were
             used to create 5-HT polygenic risk scores. Adolescents
             and/or parents reported on adolescents' self-regulation
             (Time 1), depressive symptoms (Time 2), aggression/antisociality
             (Time 2), and alcohol use (Time 3). The results showed that
             5-HT polygenic risk did not predict self-regulation.
             However, adolescents with higher levels of 5-HT polygenic
             risk showed greater depression and aggression/antisociality.
             Adolescents' aggression/antisociality mediated the relation
             between 5-HT polygenic risk and later alcohol use. Deficits
             in self-regulation also predicted depression and
             aggression/antisociality, and indirectly predicted alcohol
             use through aggression/antisociality. Pathways to alcohol
             use were especially salient for males from families with low
             parental education in one of the two samples. The results
             provide insights into the longitudinal mechanisms underlying
             the relation between 5-HT functioning and alcohol use (i.e.,
             earlier aggression/antisociality). There was no evidence
             that genetically based variation in 5-HT functioning
             predisposed individuals to deficits in self-regulation.
             Genetically based variation in 5-HT functioning and
             self-regulation might be separate, transdiagnostic risk
             factors for several types of psychopathology.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s095457941700058x},
   Key = {fds326573}
}

@article{fds320116,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Bai, Y and Ladd, HF and Muschkin, CG},
   Title = {Impact of North Carolina's Early Childhood Programs and
             Policies on Educational Outcomes in Elementary
             School.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {996-1014},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12645},
   Abstract = {North Carolina's Smart Start and More at Four (MAF) early
             childhood programs were evaluated through the end of
             elementary school (age 11) by estimating the impact of state
             funding allocations to programs in each of 100 counties
             across 13 consecutive years on outcomes for all children in
             each county-year group (n = 1,004,571; 49% female; 61%
             non-Latinx White, 30% African American, 4% Latinx, 5%
             other). Student-level regression models with county and year
             fixed effects indicated significant positive impacts of each
             program on reading and math test scores and reductions in
             special education and grade retention in each grade. Effect
             sizes grew or held steady across years. Positive effects
             held for both high- and low-poverty families, suggesting
             spillover of effects to nonparticipating
             peers.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.12645},
   Key = {fds320116}
}

@article{fds323764,
   Author = {Steinberg, L and Icenogle, G and Shulman, EP and Breiner, K and Chein,
             J and Bacchini, D and Chang, L and Chaudhary, N and Giunta, LD and Dodge,
             KA and Fanti, KA and Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya, S and Tirado,
             LMU and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM and Takash,
             HMS},
   Title = {Around the world, adolescence is a time of heightened
             sensation seeking and immature self-regulation.},
   Journal = {Developmental Science},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/desc.12532},
   Abstract = {The dual systems model of adolescent risk-taking portrays
             the period as one characterized by a combination of
             heightened sensation seeking and still-maturing
             self-regulation, but most tests of this model have been
             conducted in the United States or Western Europe. In the
             present study, these propositions are tested in an
             international sample of more than 5000 individuals between
             ages 10 and 30 years from 11 countries in Africa, Asia,
             Europe and the Americas, using a multi-method test battery
             that includes both self-report and performance-based
             measures of both constructs. Consistent with the dual
             systems model, sensation seeking increased between
             preadolescence and late adolescence, peaked at age 19, and
             declined thereafter, whereas self-regulation increased
             steadily from preadolescence into young adulthood, reaching
             a plateau between ages 23 and 26. Although there were some
             variations in the magnitude of the observed age trends, the
             developmental patterns were largely similar across
             countries.},
   Doi = {10.1111/desc.12532},
   Key = {fds323764}
}

@article{fds324191,
   Author = {Calvert, SL and Appelbaum, M and Dodge, KA and Graham, S and Nagayama
             Hall, GC and Hamby, S and Fasig-Caldwell, LG and Citkowicz, M and Galloway, DP and Hedges, LV},
   Title = {The American Psychological Association Task Force assessment
             of violent video games: Science in the service of public
             interest.},
   Journal = {American Psychologist},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {126-143},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0040413},
   Abstract = {A task force of experts was convened by the American
             Psychological Association (APA) to update the knowledge and
             policy about the impact of violent video game use on
             potential adverse outcomes. This APA Task Force on Media
             Violence examined the existing literature, including the
             meta-analyses in the field, since the last APA report on
             media violence in 2005. Because the most recent
             meta-analyses were published in 2010 and reflected work
             through 2009, the task force conducted a search of the
             published studies from 2009-2013. These recently published
             articles were scored and assessed by a systematic
             evidentiary review, followed by a meta-analysis of the high
             utility studies, as documented in the evidentiary review.
             Consistent with the literature that we reviewed, we found
             that violent video game exposure was associated with: an
             increased composite aggression score; increased aggressive
             behavior; increased aggressive cognitions; increased
             aggressive affect, increased desensitization, and decreased
             empathy; and increased physiological arousal. The size of
             the effects was similar to that in prior meta-analyses,
             suggesting a stable result. Our task force concluded that
             violent video game use is a risk factor for adverse
             outcomes, but found insufficient studies to examine any
             potential link between violent video game use and
             delinquency or criminal behavior. Our technical report is
             the basis of this article. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0040413},
   Key = {fds324191}
}


%% Egger, Helen L.   
@article{fds328293,
   Author = {Zucker, N and Mauro, C and Craske, M and Wagner, HR and Datta, N and Hopkins, H and Caldwell, K and Kiridly, A and Marsan, S and Maslow, G and Mayer, E and Egger, H},
   Title = {Acceptance-based interoceptive exposure for young children
             with functional abdominal pain.},
   Journal = {Behaviour Research and Therapy},
   Volume = {97},
   Pages = {200-212},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2017.07.009},
   Abstract = {Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is a common childhood
             somatic complaint that contributes to impairment in daily
             functioning (e.g., school absences) and increases risk for
             chronic pain and psychiatric illness. Cognitive behavioral
             treatments for FAP target primarily older children
             (9 + years) and employ strategies to reduce a focus on
             pain. The experience of pain may be an opportunity to teach
             viscerally hypersensitive children to interpret the function
             of a variety of bodily signals (including those of hunger,
             emotions) thereby reducing fear of bodily sensations and
             facilitating emotion awareness and self-regulation. We
             designed and tested an interoceptive exposure treatment for
             younger children (5-9 years) with FAP. Assessments included
             diagnostic interviews, 14 days of daily pain monitoring, and
             questionnaires. Treatment involved 10 weekly appointments.
             Using cartoon characters to represent bodily sensations
             (e.g., Gassy Gus), children were trained to be "FBI agents"
             - Feeling and Body Investigators - who investigated
             sensations through exercises that provoked somatic
             experience. 24 parent-child dyads are reported. Pain
             (experience, distress, and interference) and negative affect
             demonstrated clinically meaningful and statistically
             significant change with effect sizes ranging from 0.48 to 71
             for pain and from 0.38 to 0.61 for pain distress, total
             pain: X2 (1, n = 24) = 13.14, p < 0.0003. An
             intervention that helps children adopt a curious stance and
             focus on somatic symptoms reduces pain and may help lessen
             somatic fear generally.NCT02075437.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brat.2017.07.009},
   Key = {fds328293}
}

@article{fds323858,
   Author = {Campbell, K and Carpenter, KLH and Espinosa, S and Hashemi, J and Qiu,
             Q and Tepper, M and Calderbank, R and Sapiro, G and Egger, HL and Baker,
             JP and Dawson, G},
   Title = {Use of a Digital Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers -
             Revised with Follow-up to Improve Quality of Screening for
             Autism.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Pediatrics},
   Volume = {183},
   Pages = {133-139.e1},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.01.021},
   Abstract = {To assess changes in quality of care for children at risk
             for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) due to process
             improvement and implementation of a digital screening
             form.The process of screening for ASD was studied in an
             academic primary care pediatrics clinic before and after
             implementation of a digital version of the Modified
             Checklist for Autism in Toddlers - Revised with Follow-up
             with automated risk assessment. Quality metrics included
             accuracy of documentation of screening results and
             appropriate action for positive screens (secondary screening
             or referral). Participating physicians completed pre- and
             postintervention surveys to measure changes in attitudes
             toward feasibility and value of screening for ASD. Evidence
             of change was evaluated with statistical process control
             charts and χ2 tests.Accurate documentation in the
             electronic health record of screening results increased from
             54% to 92% (38% increase, 95% CI 14%-64%) and appropriate
             action for children screening positive increased from 25% to
             85% (60% increase, 95% CI 35%-85%). A total of 90% of
             participating physicians agreed that the transition to a
             digital screening form improved their clinical assessment of
             autism risk.Implementation of a tablet-based digital version
             of the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers - Revised
             with Follow-up led to improved quality of care for children
             at risk for ASD and increased acceptability of screening for
             ASD. Continued efforts towards improving the process of
             screening for ASD could facilitate rapid, early diagnosis of
             ASD and advance the accuracy of studies of the impact of
             screening.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.01.021},
   Key = {fds323858}
}


%% Egner, Tobias   
@article{fds328427,
   Author = {Kiyonaga, A and Dowd, EW and Egner, T},
   Title = {Neural Representation of Working Memory Content Is Modulated
             by Visual Attentional Demand.},
   Journal = {Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {2011-2024},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_01174},
   Abstract = {Recent theories assert that visual working memory (WM)
             relies on the same attentional resources and sensory
             substrates as visual attention to external stimuli.
             Behavioral studies have observed competitive tradeoffs
             between internal (i.e., WM) and external (i.e., visual)
             attentional demands, and neuroimaging studies have revealed
             representations of WM content as distributed patterns of
             activity within the same cortical regions engaged by
             perception of that content. Although a key function of WM is
             to protect memoranda from competing input, it remains
             unknown how neural representations of WM content are
             impacted by incoming sensory stimuli and concurrent
             attentional demands. Here, we investigated how neural
             evidence for WM information is affected when attention is
             occupied by visual search-at varying levels of
             difficulty-during the delay interval of a WM match-to-sample
             task. Behavioral and fMRI analyses suggested that WM
             maintenance was impacted by the difficulty of a concurrent
             visual task. Critically, multivariate classification
             analyses of category-specific ventral visual areas revealed
             a reduction in decodable WM-related information when
             attention was diverted to a visual search task, especially
             when the search was more difficult. This study suggests that
             the amount of available attention during WM maintenance
             influences the detection of sensory WM representations.},
   Doi = {10.1162/jocn_a_01174},
   Key = {fds328427}
}

@article{fds326206,
   Author = {Chiu, Y-C and Egner, T},
   Title = {Cueing cognitive flexibility: Item-specific learning of
             switch readiness.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and
             Performance},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1950-1960},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xhp0000420},
   Abstract = {The rich behavioral repertoire of the human species derives
             from our ability to flexibly reconfigure processing
             strategies (task sets) in response to changing requirements.
             This updating of task sets is effortful, as reflected by
             longer response times when switching a task than repeating
             it (switch costs). However, some recent data suggest that
             switch costs can be reduced by cueing switch readiness
             bottom-up, by associating particular stimuli with frequent
             switch requirements. This type of "stimulus-control (S-C)
             learning" would be highly adaptive, as it combines the speed
             of automatic (bottom-up) processing with the flexibility and
             generalizability of controlled (top-down) processing.
             However, it is unclear whether S-C learning of switch
             readiness is truly possible, and what the underlying
             mechanisms are. Here we address these questions by pairing
             specific stimuli with a need to update task-sets either
             frequently or rarely. In all 3 experiments, we observe
             robust item-specific switch probability (ISSP) effects as
             revealed by smaller switch costs for frequent switch items
             than for rare switch items. By including a neutral
             condition, we also show that the ISSP effect is primarily
             driven by S-C learning reducing switch costs in frequent
             switch items. Furthermore, by employing 3 tasks in
             Experiment 3, we establish that the ISSP effect reflects an
             enhancement of general switch readiness, rather than of the
             readiness to switch to a specific alternate task. These
             results firmly establish that switch readiness is malleable
             by item-specific S-C learning processes, documenting that a
             generalizable state of cognitive flexibility can be primed
             by a bottom-up stimulus. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/xhp0000420},
   Key = {fds326206}
}

@article{fds331138,
   Author = {Whitehead, PS and Egner, T},
   Title = {Cognitive Control Over Prospective Task-set
             Interference},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and
             Performance},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xhp0000493},
   Abstract = {© 2017 APA, all rights reserved). Recent studies have
             demonstrated that maintaining task-sets in working memory
             (WM) for prospective implementation can interfere with
             performance on an intervening task when the same stimulus
             requires incompatible responses in the ongoing versus the
             prospective task. This prospective task-set interference
             effect has previously been conceptualized as an obligatory
             process, resulting from instruction-based reflexivity (IBR).
             However, the extent to which strategic control can be
             exerted over interference in ongoing behavior from
             prospective task-sets held in WM has heretofore not been
             tested directly. To probe for strategic control over this
             effect, the authors conducted 3 experiments using a common
             inducer-diagnostic task design that manipulated the
             proportion compatibility of trials in the ongoing task. They
             hypothesized that if prospective task-set interference were
             malleable by control, participants would suppress the
             influence of the prospective set on ongoing processing when
             incompatible trials are frequent. Consistent with this
             prediction, the results show that prospective task-set
             interference is subject to modulation by strategic control
             such that the magnitude of interference is reduced,
             eliminated, or reversed in the presence of frequent
             incompatible trials. Thus, the influence on ongoing behavior
             of a prospective task-set held in WM is not obligatory, but
             subject to strategic control. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/xhp0000493},
   Key = {fds331138}
}

@article{fds329983,
   Author = {Qiao, L and Zhang, L and Chen, A and Egner, T},
   Title = {Dynamic Trial-by-Trial Recoding of Task-Set Representations
             in the Frontoparietal Cortex Mediates Behavioral
             Flexibility.},
   Journal = {The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the
             Society for Neuroscience},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {45},
   Pages = {11037-11050},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.0935-17.2017},
   Abstract = {Cognitive flexibility forms the core of the extraordinary
             ability of humans to adapt, but the precise neural
             mechanisms underlying our ability to nimbly shift between
             task sets remain poorly understood. Recent functional
             magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies employing
             multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) have shown that a
             currently relevant task set can be decoded from activity
             patterns in the frontoparietal cortex, but whether these
             regions support the dynamic transformation of task sets from
             trial to trial is not clear. Here, we combined a cued
             task-switching protocol with human (both sexes) fMRI, and
             harnessed representational similarity analysis (RSA) to
             facilitate a novel assessment of trial-by-trial changes in
             neural task-set representations. We first used MVPA to
             define task-sensitive frontoparietal and visual regions and
             found that neural task-set representations on switch trials
             are less stably encoded than on repeat trials. We then
             exploited RSA to show that the neural representational
             pattern dissimilarity across consecutive trials is greater
             for switch trials than for repeat trials, and that the
             degree of this pattern dissimilarity predicts behavior.
             Moreover, the overall neural pattern of representational
             dissimilarities followed from the assumption that repeating
             sets, compared with switching sets, results in stronger
             neural task representations. Finally, when moving from cue
             to target phase within a trial, pattern dissimilarities
             tracked the transformation from previous-trial task
             representations to the currently relevant set. These results
             provide neural evidence for the longstanding assumptions of
             an effortful task-set reconfiguration process hampered by
             task-set inertia, and they demonstrate that frontoparietal
             and stimulus processing regions support "dynamic adaptive
             coding," flexibly representing changing task sets in a
             trial-by-trial fashion.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Humans can
             fluently switch between different tasks, reflecting an
             ability to dynamically configure "task sets," rule
             representations that link stimuli to appropriate responses.
             Recent studies show that neural signals in frontal and
             parietal brain regions can tell us which of two tasks a
             person is currently performing. However, it is not known
             whether these regions are also involved in dynamically
             reconfiguring task-set representations when switching
             between tasks. Here we measured human brain activity during
             task switching and tracked the similarity of neural task-set
             representations from trial to trial. We show that frontal
             and parietal brain regions flexibly recode changing task
             sets in a trial-by-trial fashion, and that task-set
             similarity over consecutive trials predicts
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1523/jneurosci.0935-17.2017},
   Key = {fds329983}
}

@article{fds328321,
   Author = {Oh-Descher, H and Beck, JM and Ferrari, S and Sommer, MA and Egner,
             T},
   Title = {Probabilistic inference under time pressure leads to a
             cortical-to-subcortical shift in decision evidence
             integration.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {162},
   Pages = {138-150},
   Publisher = {Elsevier},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.08.069},
   Abstract = {Real-life decision-making often involves combining multiple
             probabilistic sources of information under finite time and
             cognitive resources. To mitigate these pressures, people
             "satisfice", foregoing a full evaluation of all available
             evidence to focus on a subset of cues that allow for fast
             and "good-enough" decisions. Although this form of
             decision-making likely mediates many of our everyday
             choices, very little is known about the way in which the
             neural encoding of cue information changes when we satisfice
             under time pressure. Here, we combined human functional
             magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a probabilistic
             classification task to characterize neural substrates of
             multi-cue decision-making under low (1500 ms) and high
             (500 ms) time pressure. Using variational Bayesian
             inference, we analyzed participants' choices to track and
             quantify cue usage under each experimental condition, which
             was then applied to model the fMRI data. Under low time
             pressure, participants performed near-optimally,
             appropriately integrating all available cues to guide
             choices. Both cortical (prefrontal and parietal cortex) and
             subcortical (hippocampal and striatal) regions encoded
             individual cue weights, and activity linearly tracked
             trial-by-trial variations in the amount of evidence and
             decision uncertainty. Under increased time pressure,
             participants adaptively shifted to using a satisficing
             strategy by discounting the least informative cue in their
             decision process. This strategic change in decision-making
             was associated with an increased involvement of the
             dopaminergic midbrain, striatum, thalamus, and cerebellum in
             representing and integrating cue values. We conclude that
             satisficing the probabilistic inference process under time
             pressure leads to a cortical-to-subcortical shift in the
             neural drivers of decisions.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.08.069},
   Key = {fds328321}
}

@article{fds328117,
   Author = {Korb, FM and Jiang, J and King, JA and Egner, T},
   Title = {Hierarchically Organized Medial Frontal Cortex-Basal Ganglia
             Loops Selectively Control Task- and Response-Selection.},
   Journal = {The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the
             Society for Neuroscience},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {33},
   Pages = {7893-7905},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.3289-16.2017},
   Abstract = {Adaptive behavior requires context-sensitive configuration
             of task-sets that specify time-varying stimulus-response
             mappings. Intriguingly, response time costs associated with
             changing task-sets and motor responses are known to be
             strongly interactive: switch costs at the task level are
             small in the presence of a response-switch but large when
             accompanied by a response-repetition, and vice versa for
             response-switch costs. The reasons behind this well known
             interdependence between task- and response-level control
             processes are currently not well understood. Here, we
             formalized and tested a model assuming a hierarchical
             organization of superordinate task-set and subordinate
             response-set selection processes to account for this effect.
             The model was found to successfully explain the full range
             of behavioral task- and response-switch costs across first
             and second order trial transitions. Using functional
             magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in healthy humans, we then
             characterized the neural circuitry mediating these effects.
             We found that presupplementary motor area (preSMA) activity
             tracked task-set control costs, SMA activity tracked
             response-set control costs, and basal ganglia (BG) activity
             mirrored the interaction between task- and response-set
             regulation processes that characterized participants'
             response times. A subsequent fMRI-guided transcranial
             magnetic stimulation experiment confirmed dissociable roles
             of the preSMA and SMA in determining response costs.
             Together, these data provide evidence for a hierarchical
             organization of posterior medial frontal cortex and its
             interaction with the BG, where a superordinate preSMA-BG
             loop establishes task-set selection, which imposes a
             (unidirectional) constraint on a subordinate SMA-BG loop
             that determines response-selection, resulting in the
             characteristic interdependence in task- and response-switch
             costs in behavior.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability to use
             context-sensitive task-sets to guide our responses is
             central to human adaptive behavior. Task and response
             selection are strongly interactive: it is more difficult to
             repeat a response in the context of a changing task-set, and
             vice versa. However, the neurocognitive architecture giving
             rise to this interdependence is currently not understood.
             Here we use modeling, neuroimaging, and noninvasive
             neurostimulation to show that this phenomenon derives from a
             hierarchical organization of posterior medial frontal cortex
             and its interaction with the basal ganglia, where a more
             anterior corticostriatal loop establishes task-set
             selection, which constrains a more posterior loop
             responsible for response-selection. These data provide a
             neural explanation for a key behavioral signature of human
             cognitive control.},
   Doi = {10.1523/jneurosci.3289-16.2017},
   Key = {fds328117}
}

@article{fds324879,
   Author = {Dowd, EW and Pearson, JM and Egner, T},
   Title = {Decoding working memory content from attentional
             biases.},
   Journal = {Psychonomic Bulletin and Review},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1252-1260},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13423-016-1204-5},
   Abstract = {What we are currently thinking influences where we attend.
             The finding that active maintenance of visual items in
             working memory (WM) biases attention toward memory-matching
             objects-even when WM content is irrelevant for attentional
             goals-suggests a tight link between WM and attention. To
             test whether this link is reliable enough to infer specific
             WM content from measures of attentional bias, we applied
             multivariate pattern classification techniques to response
             times from an unrelated visual search task during a WM
             delay. Single-trial WM content was successfully decoded from
             incidental attentional bias within an individual,
             highlighting the specificity and reliability of the
             WM-attention link. Furthermore, classifiers trained on a
             group of individuals predicted WM content in another,
             completely independent individual-implying a shared
             cognitive mechanism of memory-driven attentional bias. The
             existence of such classifiers demonstrates that memory-based
             attentional bias is both a robust and generalizable probe of
             WM.},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13423-016-1204-5},
   Key = {fds324879}
}

@book{fds328428,
   Author = {Egner, T},
   Title = {The Wiley Handbook of Cognitive Control},
   Pages = {656 pages},
   Publisher = {Wiley-Blackwell},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   ISBN = {1118920546},
   Abstract = {Covering basic theory, new research, and intersections with
             adjacent fields, this is the first comprehensive reference
             work on cognitive control – our ability to use internal
             goals to guide thought and behavior.},
   Key = {fds328428}
}

@article{fds318684,
   Author = {Braem, S and King, JA and Korb, FM and Krebs, RM and Notebaert, W and Egner, T},
   Title = {The Role of Anterior Cingulate Cortex in the Affective
             Evaluation of Conflict.},
   Journal = {Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {137-149},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_01023},
   Abstract = {An influential theory of ACC function argues that this brain
             region plays a crucial role in the affective evaluation of
             performance monitoring and control demands. Specifically,
             control-demanding processes such as response conflict are
             thought to be registered as aversive signals by ACC, which
             in turn triggers processing adjustments to support avoidance
             learning. In support of conflict being treated as an
             aversive event, recent behavioral studies demonstrated that
             incongruent (i.e., conflict inducing), relative to
             congruent, stimuli can speed up subsequent negative,
             relative to positive, affective picture processing. Here, we
             used fMRI to investigate directly whether ACC activity in
             response to negative versus positive pictures is modulated
             by preceding control demands, consisting of conflict and
             task-switching conditions. The results show that negative,
             relative to positive, pictures elicited higher ACC
             activation after congruent, relative to incongruent, trials,
             suggesting that ACC's response to negative (positive)
             pictures was indeed affectively primed by incongruent
             (congruent) trials. Interestingly, this pattern of results
             was observed on task repetitions but disappeared on task
             alternations. This study supports the proposal that conflict
             induces negative affect and is the first to show that this
             affective signal is reflected in ACC activation.},
   Doi = {10.1162/jocn_a_01023},
   Key = {fds318684}
}

@article{fds323840,
   Author = {Chiu, Y-C and Jiang, J and Egner, T},
   Title = {The Caudate Nucleus Mediates Learning of Stimulus-Control
             State Associations.},
   Journal = {The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the
             Society for Neuroscience},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1028-1038},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.0778-16.2016},
   Abstract = {A longstanding dichotomy in cognitive psychology and
             neuroscience pits controlled, top-down driven behavior
             against associative, bottom-up driven behavior, where
             cognitive control processes allow us to override
             well-learned stimulus-response (S-R) associations. By
             contrast, some previous studies have raised the intriguing
             possibility of an integration between associative and
             controlled processing in the form of stimulus-control state
             (S-C) associations, the learned linkage of specific stimuli
             to particular control states, such as high attentional
             selectivity. The neural machinery mediating S-C learning
             remains poorly understood, however. Here, we combined human
             functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a
             previously developed Stroop protocol that allowed us to
             dissociate reductions in Stroop interference based on S-R
             learning from those based on S-C learning. We modeled
             subjects' acquisition of S-C and S-R associations using an
             associative learning model and then used trial-by-trial S-C
             and S-R prediction error (PE) estimates in model-based
             behavioral and fMRI analyses. We found that PE estimates
             derived from S-C and S-R associations accounted for the
             reductions in behavioral Stroop interference effects in the
             S-C and S-R learning conditions, respectively. Moreover,
             model-based fMRI analyses identified the caudate nucleus as
             the key structure involved in selectively updating
             stimulus-control state associations. Complementary analyses
             also revealed a greater reliance on parietal cortex when
             using the learned S-R versus S-C associations to minimize
             Stroop interference. These results support the emerging view
             that generalizable control states can become associated with
             specific bottom-up cues, and they place the caudate nucleus
             of the dorsal striatum at the center of the neural
             stimulus-control learning machinery.Previous behavioral
             studies have demonstrated that control states, for instance,
             heightened attentional selectivity, can become directly
             associated with, and subsequently retrieved by, particular
             stimuli, thus breaking down the traditional dichotomy
             between top-down and bottom-up driven behavior. However, the
             neural mechanisms underlying this type of stimulus-control
             learning remain poorly understood. We therefore combined
             noninvasive human neuroimaging with a task that allowed us
             to dissociate the acquisition of stimulus-control
             associations from that of stimulus-response associations.
             The results revealed the caudate nucleus as the key brain
             structure involved in selectively driving stimulus-control
             learning. These data represent the first identification of
             the neural mechanisms of stimulus-specific control
             associations, and they significantly extend current
             conceptions of the type of learning processes mediated by
             the caudate.},
   Doi = {10.1523/jneurosci.0778-16.2016},
   Key = {fds323840}
}

@article{fds323485,
   Author = {Mansouri, FA and Egner, T and Buckley, MJ},
   Title = {Monitoring Demands for Executive Control: Shared Functions
             between Human and Nonhuman Primates.},
   Journal = {Trends in Neurosciences},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {15-27},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tins.2016.11.001},
   Abstract = {Fifteen years ago, an influential model proposed that the
             human dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) detects
             conflict and induces adaptive control of behavior. Over the
             years support for this model has been mixed, in particular
             due to divergent findings in human versus nonhuman primates.
             We here review recent findings that suggest greater
             commonalities across species. These include equivalent
             behavioral consequences of conflict and similar neuronal
             signals in the dACC, but also a common failure of dACC
             lesions to reliably abolish conflict-driven behavior. We
             conclude that conflict might be one among many drivers of
             adjustments in executive control and that the ACC might be
             just one component of overlapping distributed systems
             involved in context-dependent learning and behavioral
             control.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.tins.2016.11.001},
   Key = {fds323485}
}


%% Ehrensaft, Miriam K   
@article{fds329143,
   Author = {Ehrensaft, MK and Westfall, HK and Niolon, PH and Lopez, T and Kamboukos, D and Huang, K-Y and Brotman, LM},
   Title = {Can a Parenting Intervention to Prevent Early Conduct
             Problems Interrupt Girls' Risk for Intimate Partner Violence
             10 Years Later?},
   Journal = {Prevention Science},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-017-0831-z},
   Abstract = {This study tests whether a parenting intervention for
             families of preschoolers at risk for conduct problems can
             prevent later risk for intimate partner violence (IPV).
             Ninety-nine preschoolers at familial risk for conduct
             problems were randomly assigned to intervention or control
             conditions. Ten years later, 45 preschoolers and 43 of their
             siblings completed an assessment of their romantic
             relationships, including measures of physical and
             psychological IPV. The study focuses on the 54 females,
             including targets (n = 27) and siblings (n = 27) who
             participated in a 10-year follow-up (M age = 16.5,
             SD = 5.2, range = 10-28). Using an intent-to-treat (ITT)
             design, multivariate regressions suggest that females from
             families randomly assigned to intervention in early
             childhood scored lower than those in the control condition
             on perceptions of dating violence as normative, beliefs
             about IPV prevalence, exposure to IPV in their own peer
             group, and expected sanction behaviors for IPV perpetration
             and victimization. Findings suggest that early parenting
             intervention may reduce association of high-risk females
             with aggressive peers and partners in adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-017-0831-z},
   Key = {fds329143}
}

@article{fds319604,
   Author = {Ehrensaft, MK and Knous-Westfall, H and Cohen,
             P},
   Title = {Long-term influence of intimate partner violence and
             parenting practices on offspring trauma symptoms.},
   Journal = {Psychology of Violence},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {296-305},
   Year = {2017},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0040168},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0040168},
   Key = {fds319604}
}


%% Fairbank, John A.   
@article{fds326331,
   Author = {McMaster, HS and LeardMann, CA and Speigle, S and Dillman,
             DA},
   Title = {An experimental comparison of web-push vs. paper-only survey
             procedures for conducting an in-depth health survey of
             military spouses},
   Journal = {BMC Medical Research Methodology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-017-0337-1},
   Doi = {10.1186/s12874-017-0337-1},
   Key = {fds326331}
}

@article{fds331314,
   Author = {Martindale, SL and Farrell-Carnahan, LV and Ulmer, CS and Kimbrel,
             NA and McDonald, SD and Rowland, JA and VA Mid-Atlantic MIRECC
             Registry Workgroup},
   Title = {Sleep quality in returning veterans: The influence of mild
             traumatic brain injury.},
   Journal = {Rehabilitation Psychology},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {563-570},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/rep0000159},
   Abstract = {Sleep disturbance is a key behavioral health concern among
             Iraq and Afghanistan era veterans and is a frequent
             complaint among veterans with a history of mild traumatic
             brain injury (mTBI). Currently, it is unclear whether sleep
             disturbance is a core sequelae of mTBI or if it may be
             related to other behavioral health conditions that are
             commonly present in postdeployment veterans. The purpose of
             this study was to determine if history of mTBI is associated
             with poor sleep quality beyond combat exposure and
             behavioral health concerns, including posttraumatic stress
             disorder (PTSD), mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and
             substance use disorders.Participants included 527 veterans
             who deployed after September 11, 2001, in support of the
             wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Participants completed the
             Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders, Combat
             Exposure Scale, a structured clinical TBI interview, and the
             Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index.Deployment-related mTBI was
             associated with poor sleep quality independent of combat
             exposure, PTSD, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and
             substance use disorders (B = 1.84, p = .001) an average of 6
             years after the injury event. No interaction effects between
             deployment-related mTBI and combat exposure, PTSD, mood
             disorders, anxiety disorders, or substance use disorders on
             sleep quality were detected.Veterans with a history of mTBI
             sustained during deployment reported significantly poorer
             sleep quality than veterans without history of mTBI, even
             when considering combat exposure and behavioral health
             issues. Clinicians should consider mTBI as a potential
             contributor to sleep problems, even years after an injury
             event. (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/rep0000159},
   Key = {fds331314}
}

@article{fds331181,
   Author = {Naylor, JC and Ryan Wagner and H and Brancu, M and Shepherd-Banigan, M and Elbogen, E and Kelley, M and Fecteau, T and Goldstein, K and Kimbrel,
             NA and Marx, CE and VA Mid-Atlantic MIRECC Work Group, and VA
             Mid-Atlantic MIRECC Women Veterans Work Group, and Strauss,
             JL},
   Title = {Self-Reported Pain in Male and Female Iraq/Afghanistan-Era
             Veterans: Associations with Psychiatric Symptoms and
             Functioning.},
   Journal = {Pain Medicine},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1658-1667},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnw308},
   Abstract = {To examine pain symptoms and co-occurring psychiatric and
             functional indices in male and female Iraq/Afghanistan-era
             veterans.Self-reported data collection and interviews of
             Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans who participated in a
             multisite study of postdeployment mental health.Veterans
             were enrolled at one of four participating VA sites.Two
             thousand five hundred eighty-seven male and 662 female
             Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans.Nonparametric Wilcoxon rank
             tests examined differences in pain scores between male and
             female veterans. Chi-square tests assessed differences
             between male and female veterans in the proportion of
             respondents endorsing moderate to high levels of pain vs no
             pain. Multilevel regression analyses evaluated the effect of
             pain on a variety of psychiatric and functional
             measures.Compared with males, female veterans reported
             significantly higher mean levels of headache ( P
              < 0.0001), muscle soreness ( P  < 0.008), and total
             pain ( P  < 0.0001), and were more likely to report the
             highest levels of headache ( P  < 0.0001) and muscle
             soreness ( P  < 0.0039). The presence of pain symptoms
             in Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans was positively associated
             with psychiatric comorbidity and negatively associated with
             psychosocial functioning. There were no observed gender
             differences in psychiatric and functional indices when
             levels of pain were equated.Although female
             Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans reported higher levels of pain
             than male veterans overall, male and female veterans
             experienced similar levels of psychiatric and functional
             problems at equivalent levels of reported pain. These
             findings suggest that pain-associated psychological and
             functional impacts are comparable and consequential for both
             male and female veterans.},
   Doi = {10.1093/pm/pnw308},
   Key = {fds331181}
}

@article{fds327056,
   Author = {Brancu, M and Wagner, HR and Morey, RA and Beckham, JC and Calhoun, PS and Tupler, LA and Marx, CE and Taber, KH and Hurley, RA and Rowland, J and McDonald, SD and Hoerle, JM and Moore, SD and Kudler, HS and Weiner, RD and VA Mid-Atlantic MIRECC Workgroup, and Fairbank,
             JA},
   Title = {The Post-Deployment Mental Health (PDMH) study and
             repository: A multi-site study of US Afghanistan and Iraq
             era veterans.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric
             Research},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {3},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mpr.1570},
   Abstract = {The United States (US) Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)
             Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness Research, Education, and
             Clinical Center (MIRECC) Post-Deployment Mental Health
             (PDMH) multi-site study examines post-deployment mental
             health in US military Afghanistan/Iraq-era veterans. The
             study includes the comprehensive behavioral health
             characterization of over 3600 study participants and the
             genetic, metabolomic, neurocognitive, and neuroimaging data
             for many of the participants. The study design also
             incorporates an infrastructure for a data repository to
             re-contact participants for follow-up studies. The
             overwhelming majority (94%) of participants consented to be
             re-contacted for future studies, and our recently completed
             feasibility study indicates that 73-83% of these
             participants could be reached successfully for enrollment
             into longitudinal follow-up investigations. Longitudinal
             concurrent cohort follow-up studies will be conducted (5-10+
             years post-baseline) to examine predictors of illness
             chronicity, resilience, recovery, functional outcome, and
             other variables, and will include neuroimaging,
             genetic/epigenetic, serum biomarker, and neurocognitive
             studies, among others. To date, the PDMH study has generated
             more than 35 publications from the baseline data and the
             repository has been leveraged in over 20 publications from
             follow-up studies drawing from this cohort. Limitations that
             may affect data collection for a longitudinal follow-up
             study are also presented.},
   Doi = {10.1002/mpr.1570},
   Key = {fds327056}
}

@article{fds326857,
   Author = {Sege, RD and Amaya-Jackson, L and AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS
             Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect, Council on Foster
             Care and Adoption and Kinship Care and AMERICAN ACADEMY OF CHILD
             AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY Committee on Child Maltreatment and Violence and NATIONAL CENTER FOR CHILD TRAUMATIC
             STRESS},
   Title = {Clinical Considerations Related to the Behavioral
             Manifestations of Child Maltreatment.},
   Journal = {Pediatrics},
   Volume = {139},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {e20170100-e20170100},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-0100},
   Abstract = {Children who have suffered early abuse or neglect may later
             present with significant health and behavior problems that
             may persist long after the abusive or neglectful environment
             has been remediated. Neurobiological research suggests that
             early maltreatment may result in an altered psychological
             and physiologic response to stressful stimuli, a response
             that deleteriously affects the child's subsequent
             development. Pediatricians can assist caregivers by helping
             them recognize the abused or neglected child's emotional and
             behavioral responses associated with child maltreatment and
             guide them in the use of positive parenting strategies,
             referring the children and families to evidence-based
             therapeutic treatment and mobilizing available community
             resources.},
   Doi = {10.1542/peds.2017-0100},
   Key = {fds326857}
}


%% Fitzsimons, Gavan J.   
@article{fds329373,
   Author = {Wu, F and Samper, A and Morales, AC and Fitzsimons,
             GJ},
   Title = {It’s Too Pretty to Use! When and How Enhanced Product
             Aesthetics Discourage Usage and Lower Consumption
             Enjoyment},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Research},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {651-672},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucx057},
   Doi = {10.1093/jcr/ucx057},
   Key = {fds329373}
}

@article{fds324822,
   Author = {Zemack-Rugar, Y and Moore, SG and Fitzsimons, GJ},
   Title = {Just do it! Why committed consumers react negatively to
             assertive ads},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {287-301},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcps.2017.01.002},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jcps.2017.01.002},
   Key = {fds324822}
}

@article{fds322756,
   Author = {Brick, DJ and Fitzsimons, GJ},
   Title = {Oppositional brand choice: Using brands to respond to
             relationship frustration},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {257-263},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcps.2016.10.002},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jcps.2016.10.002},
   Key = {fds322756}
}


%% Fitzsimons, Gráinne M   
@article{fds330732,
   Author = {Green, PI and Finkel, EJ and Fitzsimons, GM and Gino,
             F},
   Title = {The energizing nature of work engagement: Toward a new
             need-based theory of work motivation},
   Journal = {Research in Organizational Behavior},
   Volume = {37},
   Pages = {1-18},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.riob.2017.10.007},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Elsevier Ltd We present theory suggesting that
             experiences at work that meet employees’ expectations of
             need fulfillment drive work engagement. Employees have needs
             (e.g., a desire to be authentic) and they also have
             expectations for how their job or their organization will
             fulfill them. We argue that experiences at work that confirm
             employees’ need fulfillment expectations yield a positive
             emotional state that is energizing, and that this energy is
             manifested in employees’ behaviors at work. Our theorizing
             draws on a review of the work engagement literature, in
             which we identify three core characteristics of work
             engagement: (a) a positive emotional state that (b) yields a
             feeling of energy and (c) leads to positive work-oriented
             behaviors. These key themes provide the foundation for
             further theorizing suggesting that interactions at work
             confirm or disconfirm employees’ need fulfillment
             expectations, leading to different levels of engagement. We
             extend our theorizing to argue that confirmation, or
             disconfirmation, of different need expectations will yield
             emotional experience of varying magnitudes, with
             confirmation of approach-oriented need expectations exerting
             stronger effects than the confirmation of avoidance-oriented
             need expectations. We close with a review suggesting that
             organizational contextual features influence the expression
             of these needs, sustaining or undermining the positive
             emotional experiences that fuel work engagement.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.riob.2017.10.007},
   Key = {fds330732}
}


%% Flanagan, Owen   
@article{fds329381,
   Author = {Gyal, P and Flanagan, O},
   Title = {The role of pain in buddhism: The conquest of
             suffering},
   Pages = {288-296},
   Booktitle = {The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Pain},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   ISBN = {9781315742205},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315742205},
   Doi = {10.4324/9781315742205},
   Key = {fds329381}
}

@article{fds327006,
   Author = {Flanagan, O},
   Title = {Addiction Doesn’t Exist, But it is Bad for
             You},
   Journal = {Neuroethics},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {91-98},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12152-016-9298-z},
   Doi = {10.1007/s12152-016-9298-z},
   Key = {fds327006}
}


%% Fuemmeler, Bernard F.   
@article{fds331494,
   Author = {Chawla, D and Fuemmeler, B and Benjamin-Neelon, SE and Hoyo, C and Murphy, S and Daniels, JL},
   Title = {Early prenatal vitamin D concentrations and social-emotional
             development in infants.},
   Journal = {Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
             (Informa)},
   Pages = {1-8},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2017.1408065},
   Abstract = {Many pregnant women in the United States have suboptimal
             vitamin D, but the impact on infant development is unclear.
             Moreover, no pregnancy-specific vitamin D recommendations
             have been widely accepted.Given the ubiquitous expression of
             vitamin D receptors in the brain, we investigated the
             association between early prenatal plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin
             D (25(OH)D) concentrations and children's social and
             emotional development in the Newborn Epigenetic Study, a
             prospective study of pregnancies from 2009 to 2011 in
             Durham, North Carolina.We measured 25(OH)D concentrations in
             first or second trimester plasma samples and categorized
             25(OH)D concentrations into quartiles. Covariates were
             derived from maternal questionnaires. Mothers completed the
             Infant Toddler Social-Emotional Development Assessment when
             children were 12-24 months of age. We used multivariable
             linear regression to evaluate associations between 25(OH)D
             and specific behavior scores, adjusted for season of blood
             draw, maternal age, education, parity, smoking, marital
             status, prepregnancy BMI, and infant gender. We investigated
             effect-measure modification by race/ethnicity.Of the 218
             mother-infant pairs with complete data, Black mothers had
             much lower 25(OH)D concentrations as compared to White and
             Hispanic mothers. After adjustment, lower prenatal 25(OH)D
             was associated with slightly higher (less favorable)
             Internalizing scores among White children, but lower (more
             favorable) Internalizing scores among Black and Hispanic
             children. Lower prenatal 25(OH)D also appears to be
             associated with higher (less favorable) dysregulation
             scores, though only among White and Hispanic children.Though
             imprecise, preliminary results warrant further investigation
             regarding a role for prenatal vitamin D on children's early
             social and emotional development.},
   Doi = {10.1080/14767058.2017.1408065},
   Key = {fds331494}
}

@article{fds330367,
   Author = {Sanchez, CE and Barry, C and Sabhlok, A and Russell, K and Majors, A and Kollins, SH and Fuemmeler, BF},
   Title = {Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and child neurodevelopmental
             outcomes: a meta-analysis.},
   Journal = {Obesity Reviews},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/obr.12643},
   Abstract = {This review examined evidence of the association between
             maternal pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity status and child
             neurodevelopmental outcomes. PubMed and PsycINFO databases
             were systematically searched for empirical studies published
             before April 2017 using keywords related to prenatal obesity
             and children's neurodevelopment. Of 1483 identified papers,
             41 were included in the systematic review, and 32 articles
             representing 36 cohorts were included in the meta-analysis.
             Findings indicated that compared with children of normal
             weight mothers, children whose mothers were overweight or
             obese prior to pregnancy were at increased risk for
             compromised neurodevelopmental outcomes (overweight:
             OR = 1.17, 95% CI [1.11, 1.24], I(2)  = 65.51; obese:
             OR = 1.51; 95% CI [1.35, 1.69], I(2)  = 79.63).
             Pre-pregnancy obesity increased the risk of attention
             deficit-hyperactivity disorder (OR = 1.62; 95% CI [1.23,
             2.14], I(2)  = 70.15), autism spectrum disorder
             (OR = 1.36; 95% CI [1.08, 1.70], I(2)  = 60.52),
             developmental delay (OR = 1.58; 95% CI [1.39, 1.79], I(2)
              = 75.77) and emotional/behavioural problems (OR = 1.42;
             95% CI [1.26, 1.59], I(2)  = 87.74). Given the current
             obesity prevalence among young adults and women of
             childbearing age, this association between maternal obesity
             during pregnancy and atypical child neurodevelopment
             represents a potentially high public health
             burden.},
   Doi = {10.1111/obr.12643},
   Key = {fds330367}
}

@article{fds329030,
   Author = {McCullough, LE and Miller, EE and Calderwood, LE and Shivappa, N and Steck, SE and Forman, MR and A Mendez and M and Maguire, R and Fuemmeler,
             BF and Kollins, SH and D Bilbo and S and Huang, Z and Murtha, AP and Murphy,
             SK and Hébert, JR and Hoyo, C},
   Title = {Maternal inflammatory diet and adverse pregnancy outcomes:
             Circulating cytokines and genomic imprinting as potential
             regulators?},
   Journal = {Epigenetics : official journal of the DNA Methylation
             Society},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {688-697},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15592294.2017.1347241},
   Abstract = {Excessive inflammation during pregnancy alters homeostatic
             mechanisms of the developing fetus and has been linked to
             adverse pregnancy outcomes. An anti-inflammatory diet could
             be a promising avenue to combat the pro-inflammatory state
             of pregnancy, particularly in obese women, but we lack
             mechanistic data linking this dietary pattern during
             pregnancy to inflammation and birth outcomes. In an
             ethnically diverse cohort of 1057 mother-child pairs, we
             estimated the relationships between dietary inflammatory
             potential [measured via the energy-adjusted dietary
             inflammatory index (E-DII™)] and birth outcomes overall,
             as well as by offspring sex and maternal pre-pregnancy body
             mass index (BMI). In a subset of women, we also explored
             associations between E-DII, circulating cytokines (n = 105),
             and offspring methylation (n = 338) as potential modulators
             of these relationships using linear regression. Adjusted
             regression models revealed that women with pro-inflammatory
             diets had elevated rates of preterm birth among female
             offspring [β = -0.22, standard error (SE) = 0.07, P<0.01],
             but not male offspring (β=0.09, SE = 0.06, P<0.12)
             (Pinteraction = 0.003). Similarly, we observed
             pro-inflammatory diets were associated with higher rates of
             caesarean delivery among obese women (β = 0.17, SE = 0.08,
             P = 0.03), but not among women with BMI <25 kg/m2
             (Pinteraction = 0.02). We observed consistent inverse
             associations between maternal inflammatory cytokine
             concentrations (IL-12, IL-17, IL-4, IL-6, and TNFα) and
             lower methylation at the MEG3 regulatory sequence (P<0.05);
             however, results did not support the link between maternal
             E-DII and circulating cytokines. We replicate work by others
             on the association between maternal inflammatory diet and
             adverse pregnancy outcomes and provide the first empirical
             evidence supporting the inverse association between
             circulating cytokine concentrations and offspring
             methylation.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15592294.2017.1347241},
   Key = {fds329030}
}

@article{fds326256,
   Author = {Fuemmeler, BF and Behrman, P and Taylor, M and Sokol, R and Rothman, E and Jacobson, LT and Wischenka, D and Tercyak, KP},
   Title = {Child and family health in the era of prevention: new
             opportunities and challenges.},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {159-174},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10865-016-9791-1},
   Abstract = {To maintain positive health outcomes over the life course,
             prevention efforts should begin early in childhood. Two
             research domains that significantly impact the trajectory of
             health over the life course are childhood obesity and early
             trauma and violence. Prevention strategies addressing
             multiple levels of influence are being adopted in these
             fields. Childhood obesity prevention efforts no longer focus
             solely on individuals, but embrace multiple ecological
             levels, such as family, school, and community. Similarly,
             research on early trauma and violence has broadened to
             consider risk and protective factors across domains of
             influence. Although we have improved our understanding and
             prevention of these two issues, gaps remain in research,
             practice, and policy. The purpose of this review is to relay
             relevant findings that could enhance prevention strategies.
             We describe early life and multilevel risk factors relevant
             to these areas of research. We also provide recommendations
             for future efforts to better ensure good health for
             generations to come.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10865-016-9791-1},
   Key = {fds326256}
}

@article{fds72465,
   Title = {Fuemmeler BF, Agurs-Collins T, McClernon FJ, Kollins SH,
             Kail ME, Bergen AW, Ashley-Koch AE.  Genes implicated in
             serotonergic and dopamine functioning interact with gender
             to predict BMI categories: Findings from a nationally
             representative sample of young adults.  Obesity (in
             press) },
   Key = {fds72465}
}

@article{fds72466,
   Title = {McClernon FJ, Fuemmeler BF, Kollins SH, Kail ME, Ashley-Koch
             AE. Interactions between genotype and retrospective ADHD
             symptoms predict lifetime smoking risk in a sample of young
             adults. Nicotine & Tobacco Research (in press)
               },
   Key = {fds72466}
}

@article{fds202522,
   Title = {Fuemmeler, B. F., Yang, C., Costanzo, P., Hoyle, R.H.,
             Siegler, I.C., Williams, R.B., Ostbye, T. (in press).
             Parenting styles and BMI trajectories from adolescence into
             adulthood: A longitudinal study of the Add Health cohort.
             Health Psychology},
   Key = {fds202522}
}

@article{fds202523,
   Title = {Ranby, K.W., Boynton, M.H., Kollins, S. H., McClernon, J.,
             Yang, C., & Fuemmeler, B.F. (in press). Understanding the
             phenotypic structure of ADHD in a US population-based
             sample. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.
              },
   Key = {fds202523}
}

@article{fds211227,
   Title = {Fuemmeler, B.F., Lovelady, C.A., Zucker, N.L., Ostbye, T.
             (in press). Parental obesity moderates relationship between
             childhood appetitive traits and weight. Obesity},
   Key = {fds211227}
}

@article{fds211230,
   Title = {Fuemmeler, B.F., Pendzich, M.K., Clark, K., Rossoff, P.,
             Blatt, J., Lovelady , C., Demark-Wahnefried, W. (in press).
             Changes in weight, body composition, diet, and physical
             activity during the first year of treatment for childhood
             acute leukemia and lymphoma. Journal of Pediatric Hematology
             and Oncology },
   Key = {fds211230}
}

@article{fds215514,
   Title = {Fuemmeler, B.F., Lovelady, C.A., Zucker, N.L., Ostbye, T.
             (in press). Parental obesity moderates relationship between
             childhood eating behaviors and weight. Obesity },
   Key = {fds215514}
}


%% Gaither, Sarah E.   
@article{fds330902,
   Author = {Dukes, KN and Gaither, SE},
   Title = {Black Racial Stereotypes and Victim Blaming: Implications
             for Media Coverage and Criminal Proceedings in Cases of
             Police Violence against Racial and Ethnic
             Minorities},
   Journal = {Journal of Social Issues},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {789-807},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josi.12248},
   Abstract = {© 2017 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social
             Issues Posthumous stereotypical media portrayals of Michael
             Brown and other racial and ethnic minority victims of police
             violence have sparked questions about the influence of
             racial stereotypes on public opinions about their deaths and
             criminal proceedings for their killers. However, few studies
             have empirically investigated how the specific type of
             information released about a victim impacts opinions
             surrounding such incidents. Participants (N = 453) read
             about an altercation that resulted in a shooting death where
             the race of the victim and shooter (Black vs. White) was
             randomly assigned. Participants learned either negative,
             Black male stereotypic or positive, Black male
             counterstereotypic information about the victim. Next,
             participants appraised levels of fault and blame, sympathy
             and empathy for the victim and shooter, and indictment
             recommendations for the shooter. Findings suggest that the
             type of information released about a victim can
             significantly sway attitudes toward the victim and the
             shooter. Implications for media portrayals of racial/ethnic
             minority victims of police violence and its impact on
             criminal sentencing are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1111/josi.12248},
   Key = {fds330902}
}

@article{fds330903,
   Author = {Gomez, EM and Young, DM and Preston, AG and Wilton, LS and Gaither, SE and Kaiser, CR},
   Title = {Loss and loyalty: Change in political and gender identity
             among Clinton supporters after the 2016 U.S. presidential
             election},
   Journal = {Self and Identity},
   Pages = {1-23},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15298868.2017.1391873},
   Doi = {10.1080/15298868.2017.1391873},
   Key = {fds330903}
}


%% Gassman-Pines, Anna   
@article{fds328959,
   Author = {Schenck-Fontaine, A and Gassman-Pines, A and Hill,
             Z},
   Title = {Use of Informal Safety Nets during the Supplemental
             Nutrition Assistance Program Benefit Cycle: How Poor
             Families Cope with Within-Month Economic
             Instability},
   Journal = {Social Service Review},
   Volume = {91},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {456-487},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/694091},
   Doi = {10.1086/694091},
   Key = {fds328959}
}

@article{fds326690,
   Author = {Ananat, EO and Gassman-Pines, A and Francis, DV and Gibson-Davis,
             CM},
   Title = {Linking job loss, inequality, mental health, and
             education.},
   Journal = {Science},
   Volume = {356},
   Number = {6343},
   Pages = {1127-1128},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aam5347},
   Doi = {10.1126/science.aam5347},
   Key = {fds326690}
}

@article{fds326510,
   Author = {Schenck-Fontaine, A and Gassman-Pines, A and Gibson-Davis, CM and Ananat, EO},
   Title = {Local Job Losses and Child Maltreatment: The Importance of
             Community Context},
   Journal = {Social Service Review},
   Volume = {91},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {233-263},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/692075},
   Abstract = {© 2017 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.A
             growing body of literature suggests that economic downturns
             predict an increase in child maltreatment. However, to
             inform policies and practices to prevent and intervene in
             child maltreatment, it is necessary to identify how, when,
             and under what conditions community-level economic
             conditions affect child maltreatment. In this study, we use
             North Carolina administrative data from 2006 to 2011 on
             child maltreatment reports and job losses to distinguish
             effects on maltreatment frequency from effects on severity,
             identify the timing of these effects, and test whether
             community characteristics moderate these effects. To isolate
             effects of unanticipated job losses and to control for
             potential confounding factors, we use a fixed effects
             regression approach. We find that, though job losses did not
             affect the frequency of reports, job losses increased the
             share of reports that were relatively severe. This effect
             endured for 9 months following job losses and was only
             evident in economically disadvantaged communities.},
   Doi = {10.1086/692075},
   Key = {fds326510}
}

@article{fds321769,
   Author = {Gassman-Pines, A and Gibson-Davis, CM and Vernot, C and Butler, M and Hall, N and Taylor, L and Eastwood, K and Zhang, X},
   Title = {They Should Say “I Don't”: Norms About Midpregnancy
             Marriage and Job Loss},
   Journal = {Journal of Marriage and Family},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {405-418},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jomf.12379},
   Doi = {10.1111/jomf.12379},
   Key = {fds321769}
}


%% Gibson-Davis, Christina M.   
@article{fds326123,
   Author = {Rackin, HM and Gibson-Davis, CM},
   Title = {Low-Income Childless Young Adults' Marriage and Fertility
             Frameworks},
   Journal = {Journal of Marriage and Family},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1096-1110},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jomf.12405},
   Abstract = {© National Council on Family Relations, 2017.The authors
             investigated how low-income young adults without children
             understand marriage and fertility. Data come from the
             Becoming Partners and Parents Study (N=69), a qualitative
             study of African American adults aged 18 to 22 in a mid-size
             southern city. This is the first study to analyze young,
             low-income, childless, and unmarried Black respondents'
             frameworks (i.e., internal understandings of the world) of
             marriage and fertility. In contrast to research conducted on
             parents, this research on childless adults indicated a
             narrative in which there were close connections between
             marriage and fertility and an economic bar adhered to both
             marriage and childbearing. Respondents also believed that
             childbearing was meaningful and provided purpose, but that
             it was morally questionable if the parent was not
             financially stable. The results suggest that prior findings
             related to meanings of family formation and childbearing for
             low-income parents may not extend to those without
             children.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jomf.12405},
   Key = {fds326123}
}

@article{fds326472,
   Author = {Schenck-Fontaine, A and Gassman-Pines, A and Gibson-Davis, CM and Ananat, EO},
   Title = {Local Job Losses and Child Maltreatment: The Importance of
             Community Context},
   Journal = {Social Service Review},
   Volume = {91},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {233-263},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/692075},
   Abstract = {© 2017 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.A
             growing body of literature suggests that economic downturns
             predict an increase in child maltreatment. However, to
             inform policies and practices to prevent and intervene in
             child maltreatment, it is necessary to identify how, when,
             and under what conditions community-level economic
             conditions affect child maltreatment. In this study, we use
             North Carolina administrative data from 2006 to 2011 on
             child maltreatment reports and job losses to distinguish
             effects on maltreatment frequency from effects on severity,
             identify the timing of these effects, and test whether
             community characteristics moderate these effects. To isolate
             effects of unanticipated job losses and to control for
             potential confounding factors, we use a fixed effects
             regression approach. We find that, though job losses did not
             affect the frequency of reports, job losses increased the
             share of reports that were relatively severe. This effect
             endured for 9 months following job losses and was only
             evident in economically disadvantaged communities.},
   Doi = {10.1086/692075},
   Key = {fds326472}
}

@article{fds326877,
   Author = {Ananat, EO and Gassman-Pines, A and Francis, DV and Gibson-Davis,
             CM},
   Title = {Linking job loss, inequality, mental health, and
             education.},
   Journal = {Science},
   Volume = {356},
   Number = {6343},
   Pages = {1127-1128},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aam5347},
   Doi = {10.1126/science.aam5347},
   Key = {fds326877}
}

@article{fds320823,
   Author = {Gassman-Pines, A and Gibson-Davis, CM and Vernot, C and Butler, M and Hall, N and Taylor, L and Eastwood, K and Zhang, X},
   Title = {They Should Say “I Don't”: Norms About Midpregnancy
             Marriage and Job Loss},
   Journal = {Journal of Marriage and Family},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {405-418},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jomf.12379},
   Doi = {10.1111/jomf.12379},
   Key = {fds320823}
}


%% Gold, Deborah T.   
@article{fds326232,
   Author = {Kerr, C and Bottomley, C and Shingler, S and Giangregorio, L and de
             Freitas, HM and Patel, C and Randall, S and Gold,
             DT},
   Title = {The importance of physical function to people with
             osteoporosis.},
   Journal = {Osteoporosis International},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1597-1607},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-017-3911-9},
   Abstract = {There is increasing need to understand patient outcomes in
             osteoporosis. This article discusses that fracture in
             osteoporosis can lead to a cycle of impairment, driven by
             complex psychosocial factors, having a profound impact on
             physical function/activity which accumulates over time. More
             information is required on how treatments impact physical
             function.There is increasing need to understand
             patient-centred outcomes in osteoporosis (OP) clinical
             research and management. This multi-method paper provides
             insight on the effect of OP on patients' physical function
             and everyday activity.Data were collected from three
             sources: (1) targeted literature review on OP and physical
             function, conducted in MEDLINE, Embase and PsycINFO; (2)
             secondary thematic analysis of transcripts from patient
             interviews, conducted to develop a patient-reported outcome
             instrument. Transcripts were re-coded to focus on OP impact
             on daily activities and physical function for those with and
             without fracture history; and (3) discussions of the
             literature review and secondary qualitative analysis results
             with three clinical experts to review and interpret the
             importance and implications of the findings.Results suggest
             that OP, particularly with fracture, can have profound
             impacts on physical function/activity. These impacts
             accumulate over time through a cycle of impairment, as
             fracture leads to longer term detriments in physical
             function, including loss of muscle, activity avoidance and
             reduced physical capacity, which in turn leads to greater
             risk of fracture and potential for further physical
             restrictions. The cycle of impairment is complex, as other
             physical, psychosocial and treatment-related factors, such
             as comorbidities, fears and beliefs about physical activity
             and fracture risk influence physical function and everyday
             activity.More information on how treatments impact physical
             function would benefit healthcare professionals and persons
             with OP in making treatment decisions and improving
             treatment compliance/persistence, as these impacts may be
             more salient to patients than fracture incidence.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00198-017-3911-9},
   Key = {fds326232}
}

@article{fds326233,
   Author = {Diez-Perez, A and Naylor, KE and Abrahamsen, B and Agnusdei, D and Brandi, ML and Cooper, C and Dennison, E and Eriksen, EF and Gold, DT and Guañabens, N and Hadji, P and Hiligsmann, M and Horne, R and Josse, R and Kanis, JA and Obermayer-Pietsch, B and Prieto-Alhambra, D and Reginster, J-Y and Rizzoli, R and Silverman, S and Zillikens, MC and Eastell, R and Adherence Working Group of the International
             Osteoporosis Foundation and the European Calcified Tissue
             Society},
   Title = {International Osteoporosis Foundation and European Calcified
             Tissue Society Working Group. Recommendations for the
             screening of adherence to oral bisphosphonates.},
   Journal = {Osteoporosis International},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {767-774},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-017-3906-6},
   Abstract = {Adherence to oral bisphosphonates is low. A screening
             strategy is proposed based on the response of biochemical
             markers of bone turnover after 3 months of therapy. If no
             change is observed, the clinician should reassess the
             adherence to the treatment and also other potential issues
             with the drug.Low adherence to oral bisphosphonates is a
             common problem that jeopardizes the efficacy of treatment of
             osteoporosis. No clear screening strategy for the assessment
             of compliance is widely accepted in these patients.The
             International Osteoporosis Foundation and the European
             Calcified Tissue Society have convened a working group to
             propose a screening strategy to detect a lack of adherence
             to these drugs. The question to answer was whether the bone
             turnover markers (BTMs) PINP and CTX can be used to identify
             low adherence in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis
             initiating oral bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. The
             findings of the TRIO study specifically address this
             question and were used as the basis for testing the
             hypothesis.Based on the findings of the TRIO study,
             specifically addressing this question, the working group
             recommends measuring PINP and CTX at baseline and 3 months
             after starting therapy to check for a decrease above the
             least significant change (decrease of more than 38% for PINP
             and 56% for CTX). Detection rate for the measurement of PINP
             is 84%, for CTX 87% and, if variation in at least one is
             considered when measuring both, the level of detection is
             94.5%.If a significant decrease is observed, the treatment
             can continue, but if no decrease occurs, the clinician
             should reassess to identify problems with the treatment,
             mainly low adherence.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00198-017-3906-6},
   Key = {fds326233}
}


%% Goldston, David B.   
@article{fds330045,
   Author = {Copeland, WE and Goldston, DB and Costello, EJ},
   Title = {Adult Associations of Childhood Suicidal Thoughts and
             Behaviors: A Prospective, Longitudinal Analysis.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {958-965.e4},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.08.015},
   Abstract = {Suicidal thoughts and behavior (STBs) have their peak period
             of onset in adolescence, but little is known about how such
             behavior is associated with later functioning. The aim of
             this study is to test whether childhood STBs are related to
             adult psychiatric, suicidal, and functional outcomes.This is
             a prospective, population-based community study of 1,420
             participants assessed with structured interviews up to 7
             times in childhood/adolescence (ages 9-16 years; 6,674
             observations) for STBs including passive and active
             ideation, plans, and attempts. Participants were then
             assessed 4 times in young adulthood (ages 19, 21, 24, and 30
             years; 4,556 observations of 1,273 participants) for
             psychiatric diagnoses, STBs, and functional outcomes.By age
             16 years, 7.0% of participants had reported some type of
             STBs, with 3.9% reporting an attempt. Both ideation only and
             suicide attempts were associated with higher levels of
             anxiety disorders and STBs in adulthood, as well as poor
             functioning across financial, health, risky/illegal, and
             social domains. These observed effects generally were
             attenuated after adjusting for other psychiatric and
             psychosocial factors that predict childhood STBs
             (particularly maltreatment, depression, and disruptive
             behavior disorders). The exception was adult suicidal
             behavior, which was predicted by both childhood ideation and
             attempts, even in the fully adjusted model. Children and
             adolescents with STBs were more likely to have had a
             disrupted transition to adulthood.Childhood STBs are a
             marker for a multitude of poor psychiatric and functional
             outcomes in adulthood, but these effects are largely
             accounted for by other factors. In contrast, childhood STBs
             are a robust risk factor for adult suicidal thoughts and
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2017.08.015},
   Key = {fds330045}
}

@article{fds322758,
   Author = {Daniel, SS and Goldston, DB and Erkanli, A and Heilbron, N and Franklin,
             JC},
   Title = {Prospective Study of Major Loss Life Events and Risk for
             Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors Among Adolescents and Young
             Adults.},
   Journal = {Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {436-449},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sltb.12305},
   Abstract = {This prospective, naturalistic study examined the
             association between major loss life experiences, other
             psychiatric risk factors (depression, hopelessness, and
             anxiety), and suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs) among
             adolescents followed through young adulthood for up to
             14 years. Major loss life events were related to subsequent
             increases in STBs. Major loss life events were primarily
             related to increases in suicide ideation in the presence of
             lower levels of other risk factors. There was a
             bidirectional relationship between major losses and other
             risk factors. Implications for the association between loss
             experiences, other risk factors, and future STBs are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1111/sltb.12305},
   Key = {fds322758}
}


%% Grimes, Christina   
@article{fds326698,
   Author = {Golonka, MM and Peairs, KF and Malone, PS and Grimes, CL and Costanzo,
             PR},
   Title = {Natural Peer Leaders as Substance Use Prevention Agents: the
             Teens' Life Choice Project.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {555-566},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-017-0790-4},
   Abstract = {In adolescent social groups, natural peer leaders have been
             found to engage in more frequent experimentation with
             substance use and to possess disproportionate power to
             affect the behavior and social choices of their associated
             peer followers. In the current exploratory study, we used
             sociometrics and social cognitive mapping to identify
             natural leaders of cliques in a seventh grade population and
             invited the leaders to develop anti-drug presentations for
             an audience of younger peers. The program employed
             social-psychological approaches directed at having leaders
             proceed from extrinsic inducements to intrinsic
             identification with their persuasive products in the context
             of the group intervention process. The goals of the
             intervention were to induce substance resistant
             self-persuasion in the leaders and to produce a spread of
             this resistance effect to their peer followers. To test the
             intervention, we compared the substance use behaviors of the
             selected leaders and their peers to a control cohort. The
             study found preliminary support that the intervention
             produced changes in the substance use behavior among the
             leaders who participated in the intervention, but did not
             detect a spread to non-leader peers in the short term. This
             descriptive study speaks to the plausibility of employing
             self-persuasion paradigms to bring about change in high-risk
             behaviors among highly central adolescents. In addition, it
             highlights the viability of applying social psychological
             principles to prevention work and calls for more research in
             this area.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-017-0790-4},
   Key = {fds326698}
}


%% Hariri, Ahmad   
@article{fds329769,
   Author = {Dotterer, HL and Waller, R and Neumann, CS and Shaw, DS and Forbes, EE and Hariri, AR and Hyde, LW},
   Title = {Examining the Factor Structure of the Self-Report of
             Psychopathy Short-Form Across Four Young Adult
             Samples},
   Journal = {Assessment},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1062-1079},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1073191116640355},
   Doi = {10.1177/1073191116640355},
   Key = {fds329769}
}

@article{fds329035,
   Author = {Kim, MJ and Avinun, R and Knodt, AR and Radtke, SR and Hariri,
             AR},
   Title = {Neurogenetic plasticity and sex influence the link between
             corticolimbic structural connectivity and trait
             anxiety},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-11497-2},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-11497-2},
   Key = {fds329035}
}

@article{fds330404,
   Author = {Schaefer, JD and Scult, MA and Caspi, A and Arseneault, L and Belsky,
             DW and Hariri, AR and Harrington, H and Houts, R and Ramrakha, S and Poulton, R and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Is low cognitive functioning a predictor or consequence of
             major depressive disorder? A test in two longitudinal birth
             cohorts.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Pages = {1-15},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s095457941700164x},
   Abstract = {Cognitive impairment has been identified as an important
             aspect of major depressive disorder (MDD). We tested two
             theories regarding the association between MDD and cognitive
             functioning using data from longitudinal cohort studies. One
             theory, the cognitive reserve hypothesis, suggests that
             higher cognitive ability in childhood decreases risk of
             later MDD. The second, the scarring hypothesis, instead
             suggests that MDD leads to persistent cognitive deficits
             following disorder onset. We tested both theories in the
             Dunedin Study, a population-representative cohort followed
             from birth to midlife and assessed repeatedly for both
             cognitive functioning and psychopathology. We also used data
             from the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study to test
             whether childhood cognitive functioning predicts future MDD
             risk independent of family-wide and genetic risk using a
             discordant twin design. Contrary to both hypotheses, we
             found that childhood cognitive functioning did not predict
             future risk of MDD, nor did study members with a past
             history of MDD show evidence of greater cognitive decline
             unless MDD was accompanied by other comorbid psychiatric
             conditions. Our results thus suggest that low cognitive
             functioning is related to comorbidity, but is neither an
             antecedent nor an enduring consequence of MDD. Future
             research may benefit from considering cognitive deficits
             that occur during depressive episodes from a transdiagnostic
             perspective.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s095457941700164x},
   Key = {fds330404}
}

@article{fds330405,
   Author = {Lam, M and Trampush, JW and Yu, J and Knowles, E and Davies, G and Liewald,
             DC and Starr, JM and Djurovic, S and Melle, I and Sundet, K and Christoforou, A and Reinvang, I and DeRosse, P and Lundervold, AJ and Steen, VM and Espeseth, T and Räikkönen, K and Widen, E and Palotie,
             A and Eriksson, JG and Giegling, I and Konte, B and Roussos, P and Giakoumaki, S and Burdick, KE and Payton, A and Ollier, W and Chiba-Falek, O and Attix, DK and Need, AC and Cirulli, ET and Voineskos,
             AN and Stefanis, NC and Avramopoulos, D and Hatzimanolis, A and Arking,
             DE and Smyrnis, N and Bilder, RM and Freimer, NA and Cannon, TD et
             al.},
   Title = {Large-Scale Cognitive GWAS Meta-Analysis Reveals
             Tissue-Specific Neural Expression and Potential Nootropic
             Drug Targets.},
   Journal = {Cell Reports},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {2597-2613},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2017.11.028},
   Abstract = {Here, we present a large (n = 107,207) genome-wide
             association study (GWAS) of general cognitive ability ("g"),
             further enhanced by combining results with a large-scale
             GWAS of educational attainment. We identified 70 independent
             genomic loci associated with general cognitive ability.
             Results showed significant enrichment for genes causing
             Mendelian disorders with an intellectual disability
             phenotype. Competitive pathway analysis implicated the
             biological processes of neurogenesis and synaptic
             regulation, as well as the gene targets of two pharmacologic
             agents: cinnarizine, a T-type calcium channel blocker, and
             LY97241, a potassium channel inhibitor. Transcriptome-wide
             and epigenome-wide analysis revealed that the implicated
             loci were enriched for genes expressed across all brain
             regions (most strongly in the cerebellum). Enrichment was
             exclusive to genes expressed in neurons but not
             oligodendrocytes or astrocytes. Finally, we report genetic
             correlations between cognitive ability and disparate
             phenotypes including psychiatric disorders, several
             autoimmune disorders, longevity, and maternal age at first
             birth.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.celrep.2017.11.028},
   Key = {fds330405}
}

@article{fds329468,
   Author = {Avinun, R and Nevo, A and Knodt, AR and Elliott, ML and Radtke, SR and Brigidi, BD and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {Reward-Related Ventral Striatum Activity Buffers against the
             Experience of Depressive Symptoms Associated with Sleep
             Disturbances.},
   Journal = {The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the
             Society for Neuroscience},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {40},
   Pages = {9724-9729},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.1734-17.2017},
   Abstract = {Sleep disturbances represent one risk factor for depression.
             Reward-related brain function, particularly the activity of
             the ventral striatum (VS), has been identified as a
             potential buffer against stress-related depression. We were
             therefore interested in testing whether reward-related VS
             activity would moderate the effect of sleep disturbances on
             depression in a large cohort of young adults. Data were
             available from 1129 university students (mean age 19.71 ±
             1.25 years; 637 women) who completed a reward-related
             functional MRI task to assay VS activity and provided
             self-reports of sleep using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality
             Index and symptoms of depression using a summation of the
             General Distress/Depression and Anhedonic Depression
             subscales of the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms
             Questionnaire-short form. Analyses revealed that as VS
             activity increased the association between sleep
             disturbances and depressive symptoms decreased. The
             interaction between sleep disturbances and VS activity was
             robust to the inclusion of sex, age, race/ethnicity, past or
             present clinical disorder, early and recent life stress, and
             anxiety symptoms, as well as the interactions between VS
             activity and early or recent life stress as covariates. We
             provide initial evidence that high reward-related VS
             activity may buffer against depressive symptoms associated
             with poor sleep. Our analyses help advance an emerging
             literature supporting the importance of individual
             differences in reward-related brain function as a potential
             biomarker of relative risk for depression.SIGNIFICANCE
             STATEMENT Sleep disturbances are a common risk factor for
             depression. An emerging literature suggests that
             reward-related activity of the ventral striatum (VS), a
             brain region critical for motivation and goal-directed
             behavior, may buffer against the effect of negative
             experiences on the development of depression. Using data
             from a large sample of 1129 university students we
             demonstrate that as reward-related VS activity increases,
             the link between sleep disturbances and depression
             decreases. This finding contributes to accumulating research
             demonstrating that reward-related brain function may be a
             useful biomarker of relative risk for depression in the
             context of negative experiences.},
   Doi = {10.1523/jneurosci.1734-17.2017},
   Key = {fds329468}
}

@article{fds325037,
   Author = {Bogdan, R and Salmeron, BJ and Carey, CE and Agrawal, A and Calhoun, VD and Garavan, H and Hariri, AR and Heinz, A and Hill, MN and Holmes, A and Kalin, NH and Goldman, D},
   Title = {Imaging Genetics and Genomics in Psychiatry: A Critical
             Review of Progress and Potential},
   Journal = {Biological Psychiatry},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {165-175},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2016.12.030},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.biopsych.2016.12.030},
   Key = {fds325037}
}

@article{fds315805,
   Author = {Scult, MA and Knodt, AR and Hanson, JL and Ryoo, M and Adcock, RA and Hariri, AR and Strauman, TJ},
   Title = {Individual differences in regulatory focus predict neural
             response to reward.},
   Journal = {Social Neuroscience},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {419-429},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1747-0919},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17470919.2016.1178170},
   Abstract = {Although goal pursuit is related to both functioning of the
             brain's reward circuits and psychological factors, the
             literatures surrounding these concepts have often been
             separate. Here, we use the psychological construct of
             regulatory focus to investigate individual differences in
             neural response to reward. Regulatory focus theory proposes
             two motivational orientations for personal goal pursuit: (1)
             promotion, associated with sensitivity to potential gain,
             and (2) prevention, associated with sensitivity to potential
             loss. The monetary incentive delay task was used to
             manipulate reward circuit function, along with instructional
             framing corresponding to promotion and prevention in a
             within-subject design. We observed that the more promotion
             oriented an individual was, the lower their ventral striatum
             response to gain cues. Follow-up analyses revealed that
             greater promotion orientation was associated with decreased
             ventral striatum response even to no-value cues, suggesting
             that promotion orientation may be associated with relatively
             hypoactive reward system function. The findings are also
             likely to represent an interaction between the cognitive and
             motivational characteristics of the promotion system with
             the task demands. Prevention orientation did not correlate
             with ventral striatum response to gain cues, supporting the
             discriminant validity of regulatory focus theory. The
             results highlight a dynamic association between individual
             differences in self-regulation and reward system
             function.},
   Doi = {10.1080/17470919.2016.1178170},
   Key = {fds315805}
}

@article{fds328846,
   Author = {Gard, AM and Waller, R and Shaw, DS and Forbes, EE and Hariri, AR and Hyde,
             LW},
   Title = {The Long Reach of Early Adversity: Parenting, Stress, and
             Neural Pathways to Antisocial Behavior in
             Adulthood},
   Journal = {Biological psychiatry : cognitive neuroscience and
             neuroimaging},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpsc.2017.06.005},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bpsc.2017.06.005},
   Key = {fds328846}
}

@article{fds325971,
   Author = {Di Iorio and CR and Carey, CE and Michalski, LJ and Corral-Frias, NS and Conley, ED and Hariri, AR and Bogdan, R},
   Title = {Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis genetic variation and
             early stress moderates amygdala function},
   Journal = {Psychoneuroendocrinology},
   Volume = {80},
   Pages = {170-178},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.03.016},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.03.016},
   Key = {fds325971}
}

@article{fds326208,
   Author = {Romer, AL and Knodt, AR and Houts, R and Brigidi, BD and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {Structural alterations within cerebellar circuitry are
             associated with general liability for common mental
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Abstract = {Accumulating mental-health research encourages a shift in
             focus toward transdiagnostic dimensional features that are
             shared across categorical disorders. In support of this
             shift, recent studies have identified a general liability
             factor for psychopathology-sometimes called the 'p factor'-
             that underlies shared risk for a wide range of mental
             disorders. Identifying neural correlates of this general
             liability would substantiate its importance in
             characterizing the shared origins of mental disorders and
             help us begin to understand the mechanisms through which the
             'p factor' contributes to risk. Here we believe we first
             replicate the 'p factor' using cross-sectional data from a
             volunteer sample of 1246 university students, and then using
             high-resolution multimodal structural neuroimaging, we
             demonstrate that individuals with higher 'p factor' scores
             show reduced structural integrity of white matter pathways,
             as indexed by lower fractional anisotropy values, uniquely
             within the pons. Whole-brain analyses further revealed that
             higher 'p factor' scores are associated with reduced gray
             matter volume in the occipital lobe and left cerebellar
             lobule VIIb, which is functionally connected with prefrontal
             regions supporting cognitive control. Consistent with the
             preponderance of cerebellar afferents within the pons, we
             observed a significant positive correlation between the
             white matter integrity of the pons and cerebellar gray
             matter volume associated with higher 'p factor' scores. The
             results of our analyses provide initial evidence that
             structural alterations in corticocerebellar circuitry
             supporting core functions related to the basic integration,
             coordination and monitoring of information may contribute to
             a general liability for common mental disorders.Molecular
             Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 April 2017;
             doi:10.1038/mp.2017.57.},
   Doi = {10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Key = {fds326208}
}

@article{fds325036,
   Author = {Dotterer, HL and Hyde, LW and Swartz, JR and Hariri, AR and Williamson,
             DE},
   Title = {Amygdala reactivity predicts adolescent antisocial behavior
             but not callous-unemotional traits},
   Journal = {Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience},
   Volume = {24},
   Pages = {84-92},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2017.02.008},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.dcn.2017.02.008},
   Key = {fds325036}
}

@article{fds325035,
   Author = {Swartz, JR and Prather, AA and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {Threat-related amygdala activity is associated with
             peripheral CRP concentrations in men but not
             women.},
   Journal = {Psychoneuroendocrinology},
   Volume = {78},
   Pages = {93-96},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.01.024},
   Abstract = {Increased levels of peripheral inflammatory markers,
             including C-Reactive Protein (CRP), are associated with
             increased risk for depression, anxiety, and suicidality. The
             brain mechanisms that may underlie the association between
             peripheral inflammation and internalizing problems remain to
             be determined. The present study examines associations
             between peripheral CRP concentrations and threat-related
             amygdala activity, a neural biomarker of depression and
             anxiety risk, in a sample of 172 young adult undergraduate
             students. Participants underwent functional MRI scanning
             while performing an emotional face matching task to obtain a
             measure of threat-related amygdala activity to angry and
             fearful faces; CRP concentrations were assayed from dried
             blood spots. Results indicated a significant interaction
             between CRP and sex: in men, but not women, higher CRP was
             associated with higher threat-related amygdala activity.
             These results add to the literature finding associations
             between systemic levels of inflammation and brain function
             and suggest that threat-related amygdala activity may serve
             as a potential pathway through which heightened chronic
             inflammation may increase risk for mood and anxiety
             problems.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.01.024},
   Key = {fds325035}
}

@article{fds323253,
   Author = {Carey, CE and Knodt, AR and Conley, ED and Hariri, AR and Bogdan,
             R},
   Title = {Reward-Related Ventral Striatum Activity Links Polygenic
             Risk for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder to
             Problematic Alcohol Use in Young Adulthood},
   Journal = {Biological psychiatry : cognitive neuroscience and
             neuroimaging},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {180-187},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpsc.2016.10.003},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bpsc.2016.10.003},
   Key = {fds323253}
}

@article{fds323689,
   Author = {Trampush, JW and Yang, MLZ and Yu, J and Knowles, E and Davies, G and Liewald, DC and Starr, JM and Djurovic, S and Melle, I and Sundet, K and Christoforou, A and Reinvang, I and DeRosse, P and Lundervold, AJ and Steen, VM and Espeseth, T and Räikkönen, K and Widen, E and Palotie,
             A and Eriksson, JG and Giegling, I and Konte, B and Roussos, P and Giakoumaki, S and Burdick, KE and Payton, A and Ollier, W and Horan, M and Chiba-Falek, O and Attix, DK and Need, AC and Cirulli, ET and Voineskos,
             AN and Stefanis, NC and Avramopoulos, D and Hatzimanolis, A and Arking,
             DE and Smyrnis, N and Bilder, RM et al.},
   Title = {GWAS meta-analysis reveals novel loci and genetic correlates
             for general cognitive function: a report from the COGENT
             consortium.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {336-345},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2016.244},
   Abstract = {The complex nature of human cognition has resulted in
             cognitive genomics lagging behind many other fields in terms
             of gene discovery using genome-wide association study (GWAS)
             methods. In an attempt to overcome these barriers, the
             current study utilized GWAS meta-analysis to examine the
             association of common genetic variation (~8M
             single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with minor allele
             frequency ⩾1%) to general cognitive function in a sample
             of 35 298 healthy individuals of European ancestry across
             24 cohorts in the Cognitive Genomics Consortium (COGENT). In
             addition, we utilized individual SNP lookups and polygenic
             score analyses to identify genetic overlap with other
             relevant neurobehavioral phenotypes. Our primary GWAS
             meta-analysis identified two novel SNP loci (top SNPs:
             rs76114856 in the CENPO gene on chromosome 2 and rs6669072
             near LOC105378853 on chromosome 1) associated with cognitive
             performance at the genome-wide significance level (P<5 ×
             10-8). Gene-based analysis identified an additional three
             Bonferroni-corrected significant loci at chromosomes
             17q21.31, 17p13.1 and 1p13.3. Altogether, common variation
             across the genome resulted in a conservatively estimated SNP
             heritability of 21.5% (s.e.=0.01%) for general cognitive
             function. Integration with prior GWAS of cognitive
             performance and educational attainment yielded several
             additional significant loci. Finally, we found robust
             polygenic correlations between cognitive performance and
             educational attainment, several psychiatric disorders, birth
             length/weight and smoking behavior, as well as a novel
             genetic association to the personality trait of openness.
             These data provide new insight into the genetics of
             neurocognitive function with relevance to understanding the
             pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illness.},
   Doi = {10.1038/mp.2016.244},
   Key = {fds323689}
}

@article{fds330406,
   Author = {Swartz, JR and Waller, R and Bogdan, R and Knodt, AR and Sabhlok, A and Hyde, LW and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {A Common Polymorphism in a Williams Syndrome Gene Predicts
             Amygdala Reactivity and Extraversion in Healthy
             Adults.},
   Journal = {Biological Psychiatry},
   Volume = {81},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {203-210},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2015.12.007},
   Abstract = {Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic disorder resulting from
             hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7q11.23, has emerged
             as a model for identifying the genetic architecture of
             socioemotional behavior. Common polymorphisms in GTF2I,
             which is found within the WS microdeletion, have been
             associated with reduced social anxiety in the general
             population. Identifying neural phenotypes affected by these
             polymorphisms would help advance our understanding not only
             of this specific genetic association but also of the broader
             neurogenetic mechanisms of variability in socioemotional
             behavior.Through an ongoing parent protocol, the Duke
             Neurogenetics Study, we measured threat-related amygdala
             reactivity to fearful and angry facial expressions using
             functional magnetic resonance imaging, assessed trait
             personality using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, and
             imputed GTF2I rs13227433 from saliva-derived DNA using
             custom Illumina arrays. Participants included 808
             non-Hispanic Caucasian, African American, and Asian
             university students.The GTF2I rs13227433 AA genotype,
             previously associated with lower social anxiety, predicted
             decreased threat-related amygdala reactivity. An indirect
             effect of GTF2I genotype on the warmth facet of extraversion
             was mediated by decreased threat-related amygdala reactivity
             in women but not men.A common polymorphism in the WS gene
             GTF2I associated with reduced social anxiety predicts
             decreased threat-related amygdala reactivity, which mediates
             an association between genotype and increased warmth in
             women. These results are consistent with reduced
             threat-related amygdala reactivity in WS and suggest that
             common variation in GTF2I contributes to broader variability
             in socioemotional brain function and behavior, with
             implications for understanding the neurogenetic bases of WS
             as well as social anxiety.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.biopsych.2015.12.007},
   Key = {fds330406}
}

@article{fds322497,
   Author = {Swartz, JR and Knodt, AR and Radtke, SR and Hariri,
             AR},
   Title = {Peering into the brain to predict behavior: Peer-reported,
             but not self-reported, conscientiousness links
             threat-related amygdala activity to future problem
             drinking.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {146},
   Pages = {894-903},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.10.003},
   Abstract = {Personality traits such as conscientiousness as
             self-reported by individuals can help predict a range of
             outcomes, from job performance to longevity. Asking others
             to rate the personality of their acquaintances often
             provides even better predictive power than using
             self-report. Here, we examine whether peer-reported
             personality can provide a better link between brain
             function, namely threat-related amygdala activity, and
             future health-related behavior, namely problem drinking,
             than self-reported personality. Using data from a sample of
             377 young adult university students who were rated on five
             personality traits by peers, we find that higher
             threat-related amygdala activity to fearful facial
             expressions is associated with higher peer-reported, but not
             self-reported, conscientiousness. Moreover, higher
             peer-reported, but not self-reported, conscientiousness
             predicts lower future problem drinking more than one year
             later, an effect specific to men. Remarkably, relatively
             higher amygdala activity has an indirect effect on future
             drinking behavior in men, linked by peer-reported
             conscientiousness to lower future problem drinking. Our
             results provide initial evidence that the perceived
             conscientiousness of an individual by their peers uniquely
             reflects variability in a core neural mechanism supporting
             threat responsiveness. These novel patterns further suggest
             that incorporating peer-reported measures of personality
             into individual differences research can reveal novel
             predictive pathways of risk and protection for problem
             behaviors.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.10.003},
   Key = {fds322497}
}

@article{fds316880,
   Author = {Swartz, JR and Hariri, AR and Williamson, DE},
   Title = {An epigenetic mechanism links socioeconomic status to
             changes in depression-related brain function in high-risk
             adolescents.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {209-214},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1359-4184},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2016.82},
   Abstract = {Identifying biological mechanisms through which the
             experience of adversity emerges as individual risk for
             mental illness is an important step toward developing
             strategies for personalized treatment and, ultimately,
             prevention. Preclinical studies have identified epigenetic
             modification of gene expression as one such mechanism.
             Recent clinical studies have suggested that epigenetic
             modification, particularly methylation of gene regulatory
             regions, also acts to shape human brain function associated
             with risk for mental illness. However, it is not yet clear
             whether differential gene methylation as a function of
             adversity contributes to the emergence of individual risk
             for mental illness. Using prospective longitudinal
             epigenetic, neuroimaging and behavioral data from 132
             adolescents, we demonstrate that changes in gene methylation
             associated with lower socioeconomic status (SES) predict
             changes in risk-related brain function. Specifically, we
             find that lower SES during adolescence is associated with an
             increase in methylation of the proximal promoter of the
             serotonin transporter gene, which predicts greater increases
             in threat-related amygdala reactivity. We subsequently
             demonstrate that greater increases in amygdala reactivity
             moderate the association between a positive family history
             for depression and the later manifestation of depressive
             symptoms. These initial results suggest a specific
             biological mechanism through which adversity contributes to
             altered brain function, which in turn moderates the
             emergence of general liability as individual risk for mental
             illness. If replicated, this prospective pathway may
             represent a novel target biomarker for intervention and
             prevention among high-risk individuals.},
   Doi = {10.1038/mp.2016.82},
   Key = {fds316880}
}

@article{fds318715,
   Author = {Swartz, JR and Prather, AA and Di Iorio and CR and Bogdan, R and Hariri,
             AR},
   Title = {A Functional Interleukin-18 Haplotype Predicts Depression
             and Anxiety through Increased Threat-Related Amygdala
             Reactivity in Women but Not Men.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {419-426},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2016.129},
   Abstract = {Common functional polymorphisms in the gene encoding
             interleukin-18 (IL18), a cytokine belonging to the IL-1
             superfamily that can induce synthesis of several other
             cytokines, have been associated with major depressive
             episodes following the experience of stressful life events.
             The neural mechanisms underlying these associations remain
             unexamined. Here we use an imaging genetics strategy to
             examine the effects of risk-related IL18 haplotypes
             comprising rs187238 and rs1946518 on threat-related amygdala
             reactivity and, through an indirect effect, stress-related
             symptoms of depression and anxiety in 448 non-Hispanic
             Caucasian university students. Analyses indicated that women
             but not men possessing an IL18 haplotype comprising both
             risk-related alleles evidenced increased threat-related left
             centromedial amygdala reactivity relative to other haplotype
             groups. Moreover, in women only, increased threat-related
             left centromedial amygdala reactivity predicted increased
             symptoms of depression and anxiety in individuals also
             reporting higher levels of life stress. Path analyses
             revealed a significant indirect effect of IL18 risk
             haplotype on symptoms of depression and anxiety through
             increased threat-related amygdala reactivity. These results
             suggest that a common functional IL18 haplotype associated
             with heightened proinflammatory responses confers
             susceptibility to stress-related depression and anxiety
             through effects on threat-related amygdala function, a risk
             pathway specific to women. If replicated, these patterns can
             inform the search for personalized interventions targeting
             neurobiological pathways of risk associated with
             inflammation.},
   Doi = {10.1038/npp.2016.129},
   Key = {fds318715}
}

@article{fds323776,
   Author = {Scult, MA and Knodt, AR and Swartz, JR and Brigidi, BD and Hariri,
             AR},
   Title = {Thinking and Feeling: Individual Differences in Habitual
             Emotion Regulation and Stress-Related Mood are Associated
             with Prefrontal Executive Control.},
   Journal = {Clinical Psychological Science},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {150-157},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2167702616654688},
   Abstract = {Calculating math problems from memory may seem unrelated to
             everyday processing of emotions, but they have more in
             common than one might think. Prior research highlights the
             importance of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in
             executive control, intentional emotion regulation, and
             experience of dysfunctional mood and anxiety. While it has
             been hypothesized that emotion regulation may be related to
             'cold' (ie. not emotion-related) executive control, this
             assertion has not been tested. We address this gap by
             providing evidence that greater dlPFC activity during 'cold'
             executive control is associated with increased use of
             cognitive reappraisal to regulate emotions in everyday life.
             We then demonstrate that in the presence of increased life
             stress, increased dlPFC activity is associated with lower
             mood and anxiety symptoms and clinical diagnoses.
             Collectively, our results encourage ongoing efforts to
             understand prefrontal executive control as a possible
             intervention target for improving emotion regulation in mood
             and anxiety disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1177/2167702616654688},
   Key = {fds323776}
}

@article{fds318712,
   Author = {Scult, MA and Paulli, AR and Mazure, ES and Moffitt, TE and Hariri, AR and Strauman, TJ},
   Title = {The association between cognitive function and subsequent
             depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.},
   Journal = {Psychological Medicine},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-17},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0033291716002075},
   Abstract = {Despite a growing interest in understanding the cognitive
             deficits associated with major depressive disorder (MDD), it
             is largely unknown whether such deficits exist before
             disorder onset or how they might influence the severity of
             subsequent illness. The purpose of the present study was to
             conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of
             longitudinal datasets to determine whether cognitive
             function acts as a predictor of later MDD diagnosis or
             change in depression symptoms. Eligible studies included
             longitudinal designs with baseline measures of cognitive
             functioning, and later unipolar MDD diagnosis or symptom
             assessment. The systematic review identified 29
             publications, representing 34 unique samples, and 121 749
             participants, that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria.
             Quantitative meta-analysis demonstrated that higher
             cognitive function was associated with decreased levels of
             subsequent depression (r = -0.088, 95% confidence interval.
             -0.121 to -0.054, p < 0.001). However, sensitivity analyses
             revealed that this association is likely driven by
             concurrent depression symptoms at the time of cognitive
             assessment. Our review and meta-analysis indicate that the
             association between lower cognitive function and later
             depression is confounded by the presence of contemporaneous
             depression symptoms at the time of cognitive assessment.
             Thus, cognitive deficits predicting MDD likely represent
             deleterious effects of subclinical depression symptoms on
             performance rather than premorbid risk factors for
             disorder.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0033291716002075},
   Key = {fds318712}
}


%% Hoyle, Rick   
@article{fds327866,
   Author = {Piontak, JR and Russell, MA and Danese, A and Copeland, WE and Hoyle,
             RH and Odgers, CL},
   Title = {Violence exposure and adolescents' same-day obesogenic
             behaviors: New findings and a replication.},
   Journal = {Social Science & Medicine},
   Volume = {189},
   Pages = {145-151},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.07.004},
   Abstract = {To test whether exposure to violence is associated with
             same-day increases in obesogenic behaviors among young
             adolescents, including unhealthy food and beverage
             consumption, poor quality sleep, and lack of physical
             activity.Young at-risk adolescents between 12 and 15 years
             of age were recruited via telephone screening from
             low-income neighborhoods. Adolescents and their parents
             completed in-person assessments, followed by Ecological
             Momentary Assessment (EMA) delivered to 151 adolescents'
             mobile phones three times a day for 30 days (4329 person
             days). Three obesogenic behaviors - unhealthy food
             consumption, poor sleep quality, and lack of physical
             activity - and violence exposure were assessed daily.
             Adolescents' body mass index (BMI) was assessed prior to the
             EMA and 18 months later. A replication was performed among
             395 adolescents from a population-representative sample
             (with 5276 EMA person days).On days that at-risk adolescents
             were exposed versus not exposed to violence, they were more
             likely to consume unhealthy foods and beverages (b = 0.12,
             p = 0.01), report feeling tired the next morning
             (OR = 1.58, p < 0.01), and to be active (OR = 1.61,
             p < 0.01). At-risk adolescents who reported higher
             consumption of soda and caffeinated beverages during the
             30-day EMA were more likely to experience increases in BMI
             in later adolescence. Findings related to sleep and activity
             were supported in the population-based replication sample;
             however, no significant same-day associations were found
             between violence exposure and unhealthy dietary
             consumption.This study provides evidence that exposure to
             violence is associated with same-day unhealthy dietary
             consumption among at-risk adolescents and next-day tiredness
             related to sleep quality among adolescents from both at-risk
             and normative populations. Findings also point to unhealthy
             soda consumption during early adolescence as an important
             predictor of weight gain among at-risk adolescents.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.07.004},
   Key = {fds327866}
}

@article{fds326828,
   Author = {Leary, MR and Diebels, KJ and Davisson, EK and Jongman-Sereno, KP and Isherwood, JC and Raimi, KT and Deffler, SA and Hoyle,
             RH},
   Title = {Cognitive and Interpersonal Features of Intellectual
             Humility.},
   Journal = {Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {793-813},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167217697695},
   Abstract = {Four studies examined intellectual humility-the degree to
             which people recognize that their beliefs might be wrong.
             Using a new Intellectual Humility (IH) Scale, Study 1 showed
             that intellectual humility was associated with variables
             related to openness, curiosity, tolerance of ambiguity, and
             low dogmatism. Study 2 revealed that participants high in
             intellectual humility were less certain that their beliefs
             about religion were correct and judged people less on the
             basis of their religious opinions. In Study 3, participants
             high in intellectual humility were less inclined to think
             that politicians who changed their attitudes were
             "flip-flopping," and Study 4 showed that people high in
             intellectual humility were more attuned to the strength of
             persuasive arguments than those who were low. In addition to
             extending our understanding of intellectual humility, this
             research demonstrates that the IH Scale is a valid measure
             of the degree to which people recognize that their beliefs
             are fallible.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0146167217697695},
   Key = {fds326828}
}


%% Huettel, Scott   
@article{fds330849,
   Author = {Kwak, Y and Huettel, S},
   Title = {The order of information processing alters economic
             gain-loss framing effects.},
   Journal = {Acta Psychologica},
   Volume = {182},
   Pages = {46-54},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2017.11.013},
   Abstract = {Adaptive decision making requires analysis of available
             information during the process of choice. In many decisions
             that information is presented visually - which means that
             variations in visual properties (e.g., salience, complexity)
             can potentially influence the process of choice. In the
             current study, we demonstrate that variation in the
             left-right positioning of risky and safe decision options
             can influence the canonical gain-loss framing effect. Two
             experiments were conducted using an economic framing task in
             which participants chose between gambles and certain
             outcomes. The first experiment demonstrated that the
             magnitude of the gain-loss framing effect was greater when
             the certain option signaling the current frame was presented
             on the left side of the visual display. Eye-tracking data
             during task performance showed a left-gaze bias for initial
             fixations, suggesting that the option presented on the left
             side was processed first. Combination of eye-tracking and
             choice data revealed that there was a significant effect of
             direction of first gaze (i.e. left vs. right) as well as an
             interaction between gaze direction and identity of the first
             fixated information (i.e. certain vs. gamble) regardless of
             frame. A second experiment presented the gamble and certain
             options in a random order, with a temporal delay between
             their presentations. We found that the magnitude of
             gain-loss framing was larger when the certain option was
             presented first, regardless of left and right positioning,
             only in individuals with lower risk-taking tendencies. The
             effect of presentation order on framing was not present in
             high risk-takers. These results suggest that the sequence of
             visual information processing as well as their left-right
             positioning can bias choices by changing the impact of the
             presented information during risky decision
             making.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.actpsy.2017.11.013},
   Key = {fds330849}
}

@article{fds329283,
   Author = {Stanton, SJ and Sinnott-Armstrong, W and Huettel,
             SA},
   Title = {Neuromarketing: Ethical Implications of its Use and
             Potential Misuse},
   Journal = {Journal of Business Ethics},
   Volume = {144},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {799-811},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10551-016-3059-0},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10551-016-3059-0},
   Key = {fds329283}
}

@article{fds327383,
   Author = {Meade, CS and Hobkirk, AL and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Bell, RP and Huettel, SA},
   Title = {Cocaine dependence modulates the effect of HIV infection on
             brain activation during intertemporal decision
             making.},
   Journal = {Drug and Alcohol Dependence},
   Volume = {178},
   Pages = {443-451},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.05.043},
   Abstract = {Both HIV infection and chronic cocaine use alter the neural
             circuitry of decision making, but the interactive effects of
             these commonly comorbid conditions have not been adequately
             examined. This study tested how cocaine moderates
             HIV-related neural activation during an intertemporal
             decision-making task.The sample included 73 participants who
             differed on cocaine and HIV status (18 COC+/HIV+, 19
             COC+/HIV-, 19 COC-/HIV+, 17 COC-/HIV-). Participants made
             choices between smaller, sooner and larger, delayed rewards
             while undergoing functional MRI. Choices varied in
             difficulty based on subjective value: hard (equivalently
             valued), easy (disparately valued), and control choices. A
             mixed-effects model controlling for education and smoking
             identified main and interactive effects of HIV and COC
             during hard relative to easy choices (difficulty
             contrast).COC+ status was associated with lower activation
             in bilateral frontal gyri and right insular and posterior
             parietal cortices. HIV+ status was associated with higher
             activation in the visual cortex, but lower activation in
             bilateral prefrontal cortices and cerebellum and left
             posterior parietal cortex. COC moderated the effects of HIV
             in several clusters centered in the bilateral prefrontal
             cortices and cerebellum. In post-hoc analyses, there were
             significant effects of HIV status on activation for COC+,
             but not COC-, participants; interaction effects remained
             after controlling for polysubstance use.Cocaine use may
             diminish the compensatory neural activation often seen among
             HIV+ samples during decision making. Our results highlight
             the importance of examining the neuropsychiatric effects of
             comorbid medical conditions to identify potential neural
             targets for cognitive remediation interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.05.043},
   Key = {fds327383}
}

@article{fds327384,
   Author = {Meade, CS and Addicott, M and Hobkirk, AL and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Sridharan, S and Huettel, SA},
   Title = {Cocaine and HIV are independently associated with neural
             activation in response to gain and loss valuation during
             economic risky choice.},
   Journal = {Addiction Biology},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adb.12529},
   Abstract = {Stimulant abuse is disproportionately common in HIV-positive
             persons. Both HIV and stimulants are independently
             associated with deficits in reward-based decision making,
             but their interactive and/or additive effects are poorly
             understood despite their prevalent co-morbidity. Here, we
             examined the effects of cocaine dependence and HIV infection
             in 69 adults who underwent functional magnetic resonance
             imaging while completing an economic loss aversion task. We
             identified two neural networks that correlated with the
             evaluation of the favorable characteristics of the gamble
             (i.e. higher gains/lower losses: ventromedial prefrontal
             cortex, anterior cingulate, anterior and posterior precuneus
             and visual cortex) versus unfavorable characteristics of the
             gamble (i.e. lower gains/higher losses: dorsal prefrontal,
             lateral orbitofrontal, posterior parietal cortex, anterior
             insula and dorsal caudate). Behaviorally, cocaine and HIV
             had additive effects on loss aversion scores, with
             HIV-positive cocaine users being the least loss averse.
             Cocaine users had greater activation in brain regions that
             tracked the favorability of gamble characteristics (i.e.
             increased activation to gains, but decreased activation to
             losses). In contrast, HIV infection was independently
             associated with lesser activation in regions that tracked
             the unfavorability of gamble characteristics. These results
             suggest that cocaine is associated with an overactive
             reward-seeking system, while HIV is associated with an
             underactive cognitive control system. Together, these
             alterations may leave HIV-positive cocaine users
             particularly vulnerable to making unfavorable decisions when
             outcomes are uncertain.},
   Doi = {10.1111/adb.12529},
   Key = {fds327384}
}

@article{fds330179,
   Author = {Kelly, M and Ngo, L and Chituc, V and Huettel, S and Sinnott-Armstrong,
             W},
   Title = {Moral conformity in online interactions: rational
             justifications increase influence of peer opinions on moral
             judgments},
   Journal = {Social Influence},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {2-3},
   Pages = {57-68},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15534510.2017.1323007},
   Doi = {10.1080/15534510.2017.1323007},
   Key = {fds330179}
}

@article{fds325992,
   Author = {Li, R and Roberts, RC and Huettel, SA and Brannon,
             EM},
   Title = {Five-year-olds do not show ambiguity aversion in a risk and
             ambiguity task with physical objects.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Child Psychology},
   Volume = {159},
   Pages = {319-326},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2017.02.013},
   Abstract = {Ambiguity aversion arises when a decision maker prefers
             risky gambles with known probabilities over equivalent
             ambiguous gambles with unknown probabilities. This
             phenomenon has been consistently observed in adults across a
             large body of empirical work. Evaluating ambiguity aversion
             in young children, however, has posed methodological
             challenges because probabilistic representations appropriate
             for adults might not be understood by young children. Here,
             we established a novel method for representing risk and
             ambiguity with physical objects that overcomes previous
             methodological limitations and allows us to measure
             ambiguity aversion in young children. We found that
             individual 5-year-olds exhibited consistent choice
             preferences and, as a group, exhibited no ambiguity aversion
             in a task that evokes ambiguity aversion in adults. Across
             individuals, 5-year-olds exhibited greater variance in
             ambiguity preferences compared with adults tested under
             similar conditions. This suggests that ambiguity aversion is
             absent during early childhood and emerges over the course of
             development.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jecp.2017.02.013},
   Key = {fds325992}
}

@article{fds324858,
   Author = {Cordero, DM and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Robertson, KR and Madden, DJ and Huettel, SA and Meade, CS},
   Title = {Cocaine dependence does not contribute substantially to
             white matter abnormalities in HIV infection.},
   Journal = {Journal of NeuroVirology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {441-450},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13365-017-0512-5},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the association of HIV infection and
             cocaine dependence with cerebral white matter integrity
             using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). One hundred
             thirty-five participants stratified by HIV and cocaine
             status (26 HIV+/COC+, 37 HIV+/COC-, 37 HIV-/COC+, and 35
             HIV-/COC-) completed a comprehensive substance abuse
             assessment, neuropsychological testing, and MRI with DTI.
             Among HIV+ participants, all were receiving HIV care and 46%
             had an AIDS diagnosis. All COC+ participants were current
             users and met criteria for cocaine use disorder. We used
             tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to assess the relation
             of HIV and cocaine to fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean
             diffusivity (MD). In whole-brain analyses, HIV+ participants
             had significantly reduced FA and increased MD compared to
             HIV- participants. The relation of HIV and FA was widespread
             throughout the brain, whereas the HIV-related MD effects
             were restricted to the corpus callosum and thalamus. There
             were no significant cocaine or HIV-by-cocaine effects. These
             DTI metrics correlated significantly with duration of HIV
             disease, nadir CD4+ cell count, and AIDS diagnosis, as well
             as some measures of neuropsychological functioning. These
             results suggest that HIV is related to white matter
             integrity throughout the brain, and that HIV-related effects
             are more pronounced with increasing duration of infection
             and greater immune compromise. We found no evidence for
             independent effects of cocaine dependence on white matter
             integrity, and cocaine dependence did not appear to
             exacerbate the effects of HIV.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13365-017-0512-5},
   Key = {fds324858}
}

@article{fds325991,
   Author = {Li, R and Smith, DV and Clithero, JA and Venkatraman, V and Carter, RM and Huettel, SA},
   Title = {Reason's Enemy Is Not Emotion: Engagement of Cognitive
             Control Networks Explains Biases in Gain/Loss
             Framing.},
   Journal = {The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the
             Society for Neuroscience},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {13},
   Pages = {3588-3598},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.3486-16.2017},
   Abstract = {In the classic gain/loss framing effect, describing a gamble
             as a potential gain or loss biases people to make
             risk-averse or risk-seeking decisions, respectively. The
             canonical explanation for this effect is that frames
             differentially modulate emotional processes, which in turn
             leads to irrational choice behavior. Here, we evaluate the
             source of framing biases by integrating functional magnetic
             resonance imaging data from 143 human participants
             performing a gain/loss framing task with meta-analytic data
             from >8000 neuroimaging studies. We found that activation
             during choices consistent with the framing effect were most
             correlated with activation associated with the resting or
             default brain, while activation during choices inconsistent
             with the framing effect was most correlated with the
             task-engaged brain. Our findings argue against the common
             interpretation of gain/loss framing as a competition between
             emotion and control. Instead, our study indicates that this
             effect results from differential cognitive engagement across
             decision frames.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The biases frequently
             exhibited by human decision makers have often been
             attributed to the presence of emotion. Using a large fMRI
             sample and analysis of whole-brain networks defined with the
             meta-analytic tool Neurosynth, we find that neural activity
             during frame-biased decisions was more significantly
             associated with default behaviors (and the absence of
             executive control) than with emotion. These findings point
             to a role for neuroscience in shaping long-standing
             psychological theories in decision science.},
   Doi = {10.1523/jneurosci.3486-16.2017},
   Key = {fds325991}
}

@misc{fds330540,
   Author = {Jack, J and Appelbaum, LG and Beam, E and Moody, J and Huettel,
             SA},
   Title = {Mapping rhetorical topologies in cognitive
             neuroscience},
   Pages = {125-150},
   Booktitle = {Topologies as Techniques for a Post-Critical
             Rhetoric},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9783319512686},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51268-6_7},
   Abstract = {© The Author(s) 2017. Many tools that neuroscientists use
             to trace the complex topography of the human brain draw on
             the neuroscience literature to yield “metanalyses” or
             “syntheses of data.” These approaches conflate
             rhetorical connections in the literature with physical
             connections in the brain. By contrast, the model presented
             in this chapter seeks not a topography of the brain but a
             topology of neuroscience. A social network analysis of
             titles and abstracts for cognitive neuroscience articles
             yields a topology of brain regions and functions. This map
             can help researchers identify underresearched areas (e.g.,
             the thalamus) or areas that are oversaturated (e.g., the
             amygdala). The map also helps researchers identify
             subdisciplines, such as “neuroeconomics,” that have not
             yet integrated with the broader field–“islands” where
             rhetorical work could yield benefits.},
   Doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-51268-6_7},
   Key = {fds330540}
}

@article{fds329566,
   Author = {Utevsky, AV and Smith, DV and Young, JS and Huettel,
             SA},
   Title = {Large-Scale Network Coupling with the Fusiform Cortex
             Facilitates Future Social Motivation},
   Journal = {eNeuro},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {ENEURO.0084-17.2017-ENEURO.0084-17.2017},
   Year = {2017},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/ENEURO.0084-17.2017},
   Doi = {10.1523/ENEURO.0084-17.2017},
   Key = {fds329566}
}


%% Kay, Aaron C.   
@article{fds329823,
   Author = {Khenfer, J and Laurin, K and Tafani, E and Roux, E and Kay,
             AC},
   Title = {Interventionist external agents make specific advice less
             demotivating},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {73},
   Pages = {189-196},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2017.07.003},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2017.07.003},
   Key = {fds329823}
}

@article{fds323320,
   Author = {Shepherd, S and Eibach, RP and Kay, AC},
   Title = {“One Nation Under God”: The System-Justifying Function
             of Symbolically Aligning God and Government},
   Journal = {Political Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {703-720},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pops.12353},
   Abstract = {© 2016 International Society of Political Psychology. Do
             references to God in political discourse increase confidence
             in the U.S. sociopolitical system? Using a system
             justification framework (Jost & Banaji, ), five studies
             provide evidence that, (1) increasingly governments
             symbolically associate the nation with God when public
             confidence in the social system may be threatened and (2)
             associating the nation with God serves a system-justifying
             function by increasing public confidence in the system. In
             an analysis of U.S. presidential speeches, presidents were
             more likely to symbolically associate the nation with God
             during threatening times (Study 1). Among religious
             individuals, referencing God in political rhetoric increased
             the perceived trustworthiness of politicians, compared to
             patriotic secular rhetoric (Study 2) or simply priming the
             concept of God (Study 3). These effects were also unique to
             politicians from one's own sociopolitical system (Study 4).
             Finally, believing God has a plan for the United States
             attenuates the deleterious effect that perceptions of
             national decline have on system confidence (Study 5).
             Implications for the system-justifying function of religion
             are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1111/pops.12353},
   Key = {fds323320}
}

@article{fds328086,
   Author = {Ma, A and Landau, MJ and Narayanan, J and Kay, AC},
   Title = {Thought-control difficulty motivates structure
             seeking.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology: General},
   Volume = {146},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1067-1072},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xge0000282},
   Abstract = {Struggling to control one's mind can change how the world
             appears. In prior studies testing the compensatory control
             theory, reduced control over the external environment
             motivated the search for perceptual patterns and other forms
             of structured knowledge, even in remote domains. Going
             further, the current studies test whether difficulty
             controlling thoughts similarly predicts structure seeking.
             As hypothesized, thought-control difficulty positively
             predicted perceptions of causal connections between remote
             events (Study 1a) and nonexistent objects in visual noise
             (Study 1b). This effect was mediated by aversive arousal
             (Study 2) and caused specifically by thought-control
             difficulty as distinct from general difficulty (Study 3).
             Study 4 replicated the effect with a sample of meditators
             learning to control their thoughts, showing that
             thought-control difficulty was a powerful predictor of
             structure seeking. These findings reveal a novel form of
             motivated perception. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/xge0000282},
   Key = {fds328086}
}

@article{fds326633,
   Author = {Ma, A and Kay, AC},
   Title = {Compensatory control and ambiguity intolerance},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {140},
   Pages = {46-61},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2017.04.001},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.obhdp.2017.04.001},
   Key = {fds326633}
}

@article{fds327057,
   Author = {Leander, NP and Kay, AC and Chartrand, TL and Payne,
             BK},
   Title = {An Affect Misattribution Pathway to Perceptions of Intrinsic
             Reward},
   Journal = {Social Cognition},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {163-180},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1521/soco.2017.35.2.163},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Guilford Publications, Inc. Intrinsic rewards are
             typically thought to stem from an activity's inherent
             properties and not from separable rewards one receives from
             it. Yet, people may not consciously notice or remember all
             the subtle external rewards that correspond with an activity
             and may misattribute some directly to the activity itself.
             We propose that perceptions of intrinsic reward can often be
             byproducts of misattributed causal inference, and present
             some initial evidence that perceptions of intrinsic reward
             can in fact increase when words pertaining to an activity
             are subtly paired with pleasant context cues. Importantly,
             these effects follow classic boundary conditions of both
             misattribution and intrinsic motivation, insofar as they
             were extinguished when participants could make a proper
             source attribution and/or when the activity became
             associated with a blatant external reward. We further
             propose a distinction can be made between authentically
             "intrinsic" rewards and the illusion of intrinsic rewards
             caused by misattributed positive affect.},
   Doi = {10.1521/soco.2017.35.2.163},
   Key = {fds327057}
}

@article{fds326064,
   Author = {Laurin, K and Kay, AC},
   Title = {The Motivational Underpinnings of Belief in
             God},
   Journal = {Advances in experimental social psychology},
   Volume = {56},
   Pages = {201-257},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.aesp.2017.02.004},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Beliefs in powerful Gods are prevalent
             across time and across societies. In this chapter, we
             explore the motivated underpinnings of this phenomenon.
             After describing two popular theories that help account for
             some of this prevalence—one focused on byproducts of
             normal human cognition and the other focused on the cultural
             benefit conferred by shared belief in powerful Gods—we
             propose that a third perspective may be needed to fully
             explain why so many people believe: that believing in God is
             one mechanism through which people fulfill their need to
             perceive the world as structured, orderly, and nonrandom. We
             then describe a model that outlines the causes and
             consequences of perceptions of structure, and leverage this
             model to organize the evidence connecting belief in God to
             people's need for structure. We then note the ways in which
             belief in a powerful God, though not the only form of belief
             that can satisfy the need for structure, may hold an
             advantage over most alternatives. Finally, we conclude by
             discussing the implications of this perspective for
             understanding the ongoing evolution of religious
             belief.},
   Doi = {10.1016/bs.aesp.2017.02.004},
   Key = {fds326064}
}


%% Keefe, Francis J.   
@article{fds331439,
   Author = {Porter, LS and Keefe, FJ},
   Title = {Couple-based communication interventions for cancer: moving
             beyond a 'one size fits all' approach.},
   Journal = {Acta Oncologica (Informa)},
   Pages = {1-2},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0284186x.2017.1400687},
   Doi = {10.1080/0284186x.2017.1400687},
   Key = {fds331439}
}

@article{fds330575,
   Author = {O'Sullivan, ML and Shelby, RA and Dorfman, CS and Kelleher, SA and Fisher, HM and Rowe Nichols and KA and Keefe, FJ and Sung, AD and Somers,
             TJ},
   Title = {The effect of pre-transplant pain and chronic disease
             self-efficacy on quality of life domains in the year
             following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.},
   Journal = {Supportive Care in Cancer},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-017-3947-6},
   Abstract = {Pain is common for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT)
             patients and may be experienced pre-transplant, acutely
             post-transplant, and for months or years following
             transplant. HSCT patients with persistent pain may be at
             risk for poor quality of life following transplant; however,
             the impact of pre-transplant pain on quality of life
             post-transplant is not well understood. Self-efficacy for
             chronic disease management is associated with quality of
             life among cancer patients and may impact quality of life
             for HSCT patients. The primary aim was to examine the effect
             of pre-transplant pain and self-efficacy on quality of life
             domains in the year following transplant.One hundred
             sixty-six HSCT patients completed questionnaires providing
             information on pain, self-efficacy, and quality of life
             prior to transplant, at discharge, and 3-, 6-, and 12-months
             post-transplant as part of a longitudinal, observational
             study. Linear mixed modeling examined the trajectories of
             these variables and the effect of pre-transplant pain and
             self-efficacy on post-transplant quality of life.Pain and
             social and emotional quality of life remained stable in the
             year following transplant while self-efficacy and physical
             and functional quality of life improved. Pre-transplant pain
             was significantly related to lower physical well-being
             post-transplant. Lower pre-transplant self-efficacy was
             related to lower quality of life across all domains
             post-transplant.Above and beyond the effect of
             pre-transplant pain, self-efficacy for managing chronic
             disease is important in understanding quality of life
             following transplant. Identifying patients with pain and/or
             low self-efficacy pre-transplant may allow for early
             intervention with self-management strategies.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00520-017-3947-6},
   Key = {fds330575}
}

@article{fds330576,
   Author = {Lefebvre, JC and Jensen, MP and Waters, SJ and Molton, IR and Keefe, FJ and Caldwell, DS},
   Title = {The development and assessment of the Worry About Pain
             Questionnaire.},
   Journal = {European Journal of Pain},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {1154-1164},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejp.1015},
   Abstract = {Worry can be conceptualized as a cognitive-affective
             automatic process initiated in order to address uncertainty
             and potential personal inadequacies that could result in
             negative outcomes. The purpose of the current study was to
             develop a measure of pain-specific worry - the Worry About
             Pain Questionnaire (WAPQ).In study 1, responses of 335
             pain-free participants were used to complete an item
             analysis and exploratory factors analysis to develop and
             assess the internal structure of the WAPQ. Study 2 included
             224 pain-free participants who completed the WAPQ in order
             to confirm its factor structure, and to examine its relation
             to the experience of acute experimental pain. In study 3,
             137 individuals with persistent pain were asked to complete
             the WAPQ as well as measures of pain and depressive
             symptoms.The resulting 15-item measure assesses
             uncertainties and potential negative outcomes related to the
             experience of pain. The results of the exploratory and
             confirmatory factor analyses showed a two-factor structure.
             Across all studies, the WAPQ was found to be related to
             measures of pain in clinical and non-clinical samples, acute
             experimental pain stimuli, as well as pain anxiety, pain
             catastrophizing, fear of pain, rumination and depressive
             symptomatology.The results suggest that the WAPQ is a
             reliable and valid measure for the assessment of worry about
             pain that can be used to understand how pain-specific
             worries are related to the experience and impact of pain
             across different populations.Worry has been assessed in pain
             populations using measures that assess worry in general. The
             current study shows a relationship between pain-specific
             worry and the experience of pain. Further, worry about pain
             is related to but not synonymous with pain
             catastrophizing.},
   Doi = {10.1002/ejp.1015},
   Key = {fds330576}
}

@article{fds319635,
   Author = {Porter, LS and Keefe, FJ and Baucom, DH and Olsen, M and Zafar, SY and Uronis, H},
   Title = {A randomized pilot trial of a videoconference couples
             communication intervention for advanced GI
             cancer.},
   Journal = {Psycho-Oncology},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {1027-1035},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pon.4121},
   Abstract = {This study aims to test the feasibility and preliminary
             efficacy of a couple-based communication intervention for
             advanced GI cancer delivered via videoconference.Thirty-two
             couples were randomly assigned to either couples
             communication skills training (CCST) or an education
             comparison intervention, both delivered via videoconference.
             Participation was limited to couples who reported
             communication difficulties at screening. Patients and
             partners completed measures of relationship functioning and
             individual functioning at baseline and post-intervention.Eighty-eight
             percent of randomized dyads completed all six sessions and
             reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention.
             Between-group effect sizes suggested that the CCST
             intervention led to improvements in relationship
             satisfaction for patients and partners and to improvements
             in intimacy and communication for patients.A couples-based
             communication intervention delivered via videoconference is
             feasible and acceptable in the context of advanced cancer.
             Preliminary findings suggest that the intervention shows
             promise in contributing to enhanced relationship
             functioning. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons,
             Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/pon.4121},
   Key = {fds319635}
}

@article{fds330867,
   Author = {Parmelee, PA and Cox, BS and DeCaro, JA and Keefe, FJ and Smith,
             DM},
   Title = {Racial/ethnic differences in sleep quality among older
             adults with osteoarthritis.},
   Journal = {Sleep health},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {163-169},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2017.03.010},
   Abstract = {To examine racial/ethnic differences in sleep quality and
             the pain-sleep association among older adults with
             osteoarthritis of the knee.Baseline interview followed by a
             7-day microlongitudinal study using accelerometry and
             self-reports.Participants were community residents in
             western Alabama and Long Island, NY.Ninety-six African
             Americans (AAs) and 128 non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) with
             physician-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis, recruited from a
             variety of clinical and community settings.Self-reports
             yielded demographics, body mass index, physical health
             problems, and depressive symptoms. Sleep quality was
             measured for 3 to 7 nights using wrist-worn accelerometers;
             pain was self-reported daily over the same period.With
             demographics and health controlled, AAs displayed poorer
             sleep efficiency, greater time awake after sleep onset and
             sleep fragmentation, and marginally more awakenings during
             the night, but no differences in total sleep time. AAs also
             showed greater night-to-night variability in number of
             awakenings and sleep fragmentation, and marginally greater
             variability in total sleep time and sleep efficiency. Sleep
             quality was not associated with pain either the day before
             sleep or the day after. Average daily pain interacted with
             race, whereas AAs displayed no effect of pain on sleep
             efficiency, NHWs exhibited better sleep efficiency at higher
             levels of average pain.These data corroborate previous
             studies documenting poorer sleep among AAs vs NHWs. The
             findings of greater night-to-night variability in sleep
             among AAs, as well as a negative association of pain with
             sleep quality among NHWs, are unique. Further study is
             needed to elucidate these findings.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.sleh.2017.03.010},
   Key = {fds330867}
}

@article{fds330577,
   Author = {Gerhart, JI and Burns, JW and Post, KM and Smith, DA and Porter, LS and Burgess, HJ and Schuster, E and Buvanendran, A and Fras, AM and Keefe,
             FJ},
   Title = {Relationships Between Sleep Quality and Pain-Related Factors
             for People with Chronic Low Back Pain: Tests of Reciprocal
             and Time of Day Effects.},
   Journal = {Annals of Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {365-375},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12160-016-9860-2},
   Abstract = {Poor sleep quality among people with chronic low back pain
             appears to be related to worse pain, affect, poor physical
             function, and pain catastrophizing. The causal direction
             between poor sleep and pain remains an open question,
             however, as does whether sleep quality exerts effects on low
             back pain differently across the course of the day.This
             daily diary study examined lagged temporal associations
             between prior night sleep quality and subsequent day pain,
             affect, physical function and pain catastrophizing, the
             reverse lagged temporal associations between prior day
             pain-related factors and subsequent night sleep quality, and
             whether the time of day during which an assessment was made
             moderated these temporal associations.Chronic low back pain
             patients (n = 105) completed structured electronic diary
             assessments five times per day for 14 days. Items included
             patient ratings of their pain, affect, physical function,
             and pain catastrophizing.Collapsed across all observations,
             poorer sleep quality was significantly related to higher
             pain ratings, higher negative affect, lower positive affect,
             poorer physical function, and higher pain catastrophizing.
             Lagged analyses averaged across the day revealed that poorer
             prior night sleep quality significantly predicted greater
             next day patient ratings of pain, and poorer physical
             function and higher pain catastrophizing. Prior poorer night
             sleep quality significantly predicted greater reports of
             pain, and poorer physical function, and higher pain
             catastrophizing, especially during the early part of the
             day. Sleep quality × time of day interactions showed that
             poor sleepers reported high pain, and negative mood and low
             function uniformly across the day, whereas good sleepers
             reported relatively good mornings, but showed pain, affect
             and function levels comparable to poor sleepers by the end
             of the day. Analyses of the reverse causal pathway were
             mostly nonsignificant.Sleep quality appears related not only
             to pain intensity but also to a wide range of patient mood
             and function factors. A good night's sleep also appears to
             offer only temporary respite, suggesting that comprehensive
             interventions for chronic low back pain not only should
             include attention to sleep problems but also focus on
             problems with pain appraisals and coping.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s12160-016-9860-2},
   Key = {fds330577}
}

@article{fds331440,
   Title = {Internet-Delivered Exercise and Pain-Coping Skills Training
             for Chronic Knee Pain},
   Journal = {Annals of internal medicine},
   Volume = {166},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {I-13-I-13},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.7326/P17-9031},
   Doi = {10.7326/P17-9031},
   Key = {fds331440}
}

@article{fds330868,
   Author = {Rini, C and Vu, MB and Lerner, H and Bloom, C and Carda-Auten, J and Wood,
             WA and Basch, EM and Voorhees, PM and Reeder-Hayes, KE and Keefe,
             FJ},
   Title = {A qualitative study of patient and provider perspectives on
             using web-based pain coping skills training to treat
             persistent cancer pain.},
   Journal = {Palliative & Supportive Care},
   Pages = {1-15},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s1478951517000086},
   Abstract = {Persistent pain is common and inadequately treated in cancer
             patients. Behavioral pain interventions are a recommended
             part of multimodal pain treatments, but they are underused
             in clinical care due to barriers such as a lack of the
             resources needed to deliver them in person and difficulties
             coordinating their use with clinical care. Pain coping
             skills training (PCST) is an evidence-based behavioral pain
             intervention traditionally delivered in person. Delivering
             this training via the web would increase access to it by
             addressing barriers that currently limit its use. We
             conducted a patient pilot study of an 8-week web-based PCST
             program to determine the acceptability of this approach to
             patients and the program features needed to meet their
             needs. Focus groups with healthcare providers identified
             strategies for coordinating the use of web-based PCST in
             clinical care.Participants included 7 adults with bone pain
             due to multiple myeloma or metastasized breast or prostate
             cancer and 12 healthcare providers (4 physicians and 8
             advanced practice providers) who treat cancer-related bone
             pain. Patients completed web-based PCST at home and then
             took part in an in-depth qualitative interview. Providers
             attended focus groups led by a trained moderator.
             Qualitative analyses identified themes in the patient and
             provider data.Patients reported strongly favorable responses
             to web-based PCST and described emotional and physical
             benefits. They offered suggestions for adapting the approach
             to better fit their needs and to overcome barriers to
             completion. Focus groups indicated a need to familiarize
             healthcare providers with PCST and to address concerns about
             overburdening patients. Providers would recommend the
             program to patients they felt could benefit. They suggested
             applying a broad definition of cancer pain and having
             various types of providers help coordinate program its use
             with clinical care.Web-based PCST was acceptable to patients
             and providers. Our findings suggest that patients could
             benefit from this approach, especially if patient and
             provider barriers are addressed.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s1478951517000086},
   Key = {fds330868}
}

@article{fds330906,
   Author = {Edmond, SN and Shelby, RA and Keefe, FJ and Fisher, HM and Schmidt, JE and Soo, MS and Skinner, CS and Ahrendt, GM and Manculich, J and Sumkin, JH and Zuley, ML and Bovbjerg, DH},
   Title = {Persistent Breast Pain Among Women With Histories of
             Breast-conserving Surgery for Breast Cancer Compared With
             Women Without Histories of Breast Surgery or
             Cancer.},
   Journal = {Clinical Journal of Pain},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {51-56},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ajp.0000000000000377},
   Abstract = {This study compared persistent breast pain among women who
             received breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer and
             women without a history of breast cancer.Breast cancer
             survivors (n=200) were recruited at their first postsurgical
             surveillance mammogram (6 to 15 mo postsurgery). Women
             without a breast cancer history (n=150) were recruited at
             the time of a routine screening mammogram. All women
             completed measures of breast pain, pain interference with
             daily activities and intimacy, worry about breast pain,
             anxiety symptoms, and depression symptoms. Demographic and
             medical information were also collected.Persistent breast
             pain (duration ≥6 mo) was reported by 46.5% of breast
             cancer survivors and 12.7% of women without a breast cancer
             history (P<0.05). Breast cancer survivors also had
             significantly higher rates of clinically significant
             persistent breast pain (pain intensity score ≥3/10), as
             well as higher average breast pain intensity and
             unpleasantness scores. Breast cancer survivors with
             persistent breast pain had significantly higher levels of
             depressive symptoms, as well as pain worry and interference,
             compared with survivors without persistent breast pain or
             women without a breast cancer history. Anxiety symptoms were
             significantly higher in breast cancer survivors with
             persistent breast pain compared with women without a breast
             cancer history.Results indicate that persistent breast pain
             negatively impacts women with a history of breast-conserving
             cancer surgery compared with women without that history.
             Strategies to ameliorate persistent breast pain and to
             improve adjustment among women with persistent breast pain
             should be explored for incorporation into standard care for
             breast cancer survivors.},
   Doi = {10.1097/ajp.0000000000000377},
   Key = {fds330906}
}


%% Keefe, Richard S.   
@article{fds326113,
   Author = {Eum, S and Hill, SK and Rubin, LH and Carnahan, RM and Reilly, JL and Ivleva, EI and Keedy, SK and Tamminga, CA and Pearlson, GD and Clementz,
             BA and Gershon, ES and Keshavan, MS and Keefe, RSE and Sweeney, JA and Bishop, JR},
   Title = {Cognitive burden of anticholinergic medications in psychotic
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Volume = {190},
   Pages = {129-135},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.03.034},
   Abstract = {Patients with psychotic disorders are often treated with
             numerous medications, many of which have anticholinergic
             activity. We assessed cognition in relation to the
             cumulative anticholinergic burden of multiple drugs included
             in treatment regimens of participants from the
             Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes
             (B-SNIP) study.Clinically stable participants with
             schizophrenia (n=206), schizoaffective disorder (n=131), and
             psychotic bipolar disorder (n=146) were examined.
             Anticholinergic properties of all scheduled drugs were
             quantified using the Anticholinergic Drug Scale (ADS). ADS
             scores were summed across individual drugs to create a total
             ADS burden score for each participant and examined in
             relation to the Brief Assessment of Cognition in
             Schizophrenia (BACS).Anticholinergic burden aggregated
             across all medications was inversely related to cognitive
             performance starting at ADS scores of 4 in participants with
             schizophrenia. Those with ADS scores ≥4 had lower
             composite BACS scores compared to those with ADS<4
             (p=0.004). Among BACS subtests, Verbal Memory was the most
             adversely affected by high anticholinergic burden. Despite
             similar anticholinergic burden scores across groups, a
             significant threshold effect of anticholinergic burden was
             not detected in schizoaffective or psychotic bipolar
             disorder.We identified an adverse effect threshold of
             anticholinergic burden on cognition in clinically stable
             participants with schizophrenia. This relationship was not
             identified in affective psychoses. Examination of other
             medications, doses, and clinical measures did not account
             for these findings. Patients with schizophrenia may have
             increased cognitive susceptibility to anticholinergic
             medications and the aggregate effects of one's medication
             regimen may be important to consider in clinical
             practice.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2017.03.034},
   Key = {fds326113}
}

@article{fds330046,
   Author = {Ang, MS and Abdul Rashid and NA and Lam, M and Rapisarda, A and Kraus, M and Keefe, RSE and Lee, J},
   Title = {The Impact of Medication Anticholinergic Burden on Cognitive
             Performance in People With Schizophrenia.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {651-656},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/jcp.0000000000000790},
   Abstract = {Cognitive deficits are prevalent in people with
             schizophrenia and associated with functional impairments. In
             addition to antipsychotics, pharmacotherapy in schizophrenia
             often includes other psychotropics, and some of these agents
             possess anticholinergic properties, which may impair
             cognition. The objective of this study was to explore the
             association between medication anticholinergic burden and
             cognition in schizophrenia.Seven hundred five individuals
             with schizophrenia completed a neuropsychological battery
             comprising Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Wechsler
             Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence Matrix Reasoning,
             Continuous Performance Test-Identical Pairs Version, and the
             Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia. Cognitive g
             and 3 cognitive factor scores that include executive
             function, memory/fluency, and speed of processing/vigilance,
             which were derived from a previously published analysis,
             were entered as cognitive variables. Anticholinergic burden
             was computed using 2 anticholinergic scales: Anticholinergic
             Burden Scale and Anticholinergic Drug Scale. Duration and
             severity of illness, antipsychotic dose, smoking status,
             age, and sex were included as covariates.Anticholinergic
             burden was associated with poorer cognitive performance in
             cognitive g, all 3 cognitive domains and most cognitive
             tasks in multivariate analyses. The associations were
             statistically significant, but the effect sizes were small
             (for Anticholinergic Burden Scale, Cohen f = 0.008; for
             Anticholinergic Drug Scale, Cohen f = 0.017).Although our
             results showed a statistically significant association
             between medications with anticholinergic properties and
             cognition in people with schizophrenia, the impact is of
             doubtful or minimal clinical significance.},
   Doi = {10.1097/jcp.0000000000000790},
   Key = {fds330046}
}

@article{fds327060,
   Author = {Georgiades, A and Davis, VG and Atkins, AS and Khan, A and Walker, TW and Loebel, A and Haig, G and Hilt, DC and Dunayevich, E and Umbricht, D and Sand, M and Keefe, RSE},
   Title = {Psychometric characteristics of the MATRICS Consensus
             Cognitive Battery in a large pooled cohort of stable
             schizophrenia patients.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Volume = {190},
   Pages = {172-179},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.03.040},
   Abstract = {The MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) was developed
             to assess cognitive treatment effects in schizophrenia
             clinical trials, and is considered the FDA gold standard
             outcome measure for that purpose. The aim of the present
             study was to establish pre-treatment psychometric
             characteristics of the MCCB in a large pooled sample. The
             dataset included 2616 stable schizophrenia patients enrolled
             in 15 different clinical trials between 2007 and 2016 within
             the United States (94%) and Canada (6%). The MCCB was
             administered twice prior to the initiation of treatment in
             1908 patients. Test-retest reliability and practice effects
             of the cognitive composite score, the neurocognitive
             composite score, which excludes the domain Social Cognition,
             and the subtests/domains were examined using Intra-Class
             Correlations (ICC) and Cohen's d. Simulated regression
             models explored which domains explained the greatest portion
             of variance in composite scores. Test-retest reliability was
             high (ICC=0.88) for both composite scores. Practice effects
             were small for the cognitive (d=0.15) and neurocognitive
             (d=0.17) composites. Simulated bootstrap regression analyses
             revealed that 3 of the 7 domains explained 86% of the
             variance for both composite scores. The domains that entered
             most frequently in the top 3 positions of the regression
             models were Speed of Processing, Working Memory, and Visual
             Learning. Findings provide definitive psychometric
             characteristics and a benchmark comparison for clinical
             trials using the MCCB. The test-retest reliability of the
             MCCB composite scores is considered excellent and the
             learning effects are small, fulfilling two of the key
             criteria for outcome measures in cognition clinical
             trials.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2017.03.040},
   Key = {fds327060}
}

@article{fds329482,
   Author = {Xavier, RM and Vorderstrasse, A and Keefe, RSE and Dungan,
             JR},
   Title = {Genetic correlates of insight in schizophrenia.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.10.021},
   Abstract = {Insight in schizophrenia is clinically important as it is
             associated with several adverse outcomes. Genetic
             contributions to insight are unknown. We examined genetic
             contributions to insight by investigating if polygenic risk
             scores (PRS) and candidate regions were associated with
             insight.Schizophrenia case-only analysis of the Clinical
             Antipsychotics Trials of Intervention Effectiveness trial.
             Schizophrenia PRS was constructed using Psychiatric Genomics
             Consortium (PGC) leave-one out GWAS as discovery data set.
             For candidate regions, we selected 105 schizophrenia-associated
             autosomal loci and 11 schizophrenia-related oligodendrocyte
             genes. We used regressions to examine PRS associations and
             set-based testing for candidate analysis.We examined data
             from 730 subjects. Best-fit PRS at p-threshold of 1e-07 was
             associated with total insight (R(2)=0.005, P=0.05, empirical
             P=0.054) and treatment insight (R(2)=0.005, P=0.048,
             empirical P=0.048). For models that controlled for
             neurocognition, PRS significantly predicted treatment
             insight but at higher p-thresholds (0.1 to 0.5) but did not
             survive correction. Patients with highest polygenic burden
             had 5.9 times increased risk for poor insight compared to
             patients with lowest burden. PRS explained 3.2% (P=0.002,
             empirical P=0.011) of variance in poor insight. Set-based
             analyses identified two variants associated with poor
             insight- rs320703, an intergenic variant (within-set
             P=6e-04, FDR P=0.046) and rs1479165 in SOX2-OT (within-set
             P=9e-04, FDR P=0.046).To the best of our knowledge, this is
             the first study examining genetic basis of insight. We
             provide evidence for genetic contributions to impaired
             insight. Relevance of findings and necessity for replication
             are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2017.10.021},
   Key = {fds329482}
}

@article{fds329375,
   Author = {Blokland, GAM and Del Re and EC and Mesholam-Gately, RI and Jovicich, J and Trampush, JW and Keshavan, MS and DeLisi, LE and Walters, JTR and Turner, JA and Malhotra, AK and Lencz, T and Shenton, ME and Voineskos,
             AN and Rujescu, D and Giegling, I and Kahn, RS and Roffman, JL and Holt,
             DJ and Ehrlich, S and Kikinis, Z and Dazzan, P and Murray, RM and Di Forti,
             M and Lee, J and Sim, K and Lam, M and Wolthusen, RPF and de Zwarte, SMC and Walton, E and Cosgrove, D and Kelly, S and Maleki, N and Osiecki, L and Picchioni, MM and Bramon, E and Russo, M and David, AS and Mondelli, V and Reinders, AATS and Falcone, MA et al.},
   Title = {The Genetics of Endophenotypes of Neurofunction to
             Understand Schizophrenia (GENUS) consortium: A collaborative
             cognitive and neuroimaging genetics project.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.09.024},
   Abstract = {Schizophrenia has a large genetic component, and the
             pathways from genes to illness manifestation are beginning
             to be identified. The Genetics of Endophenotypes of
             Neurofunction to Understand Schizophrenia (GENUS) Consortium
             aims to clarify the role of genetic variation in brain
             abnormalities underlying schizophrenia. This article
             describes the GENUS Consortium sample collection.We
             identified existing samples collected for schizophrenia
             studies consisting of patients, controls, and/or individuals
             at familial high-risk (FHR) for schizophrenia. Samples had
             single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data or genomic
             DNA, clinical and demographic data, and neuropsychological
             and/or brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Data
             were subjected to quality control procedures at a central
             site.Sixteen research groups contributed data from 5199
             psychosis patients, 4877 controls, and 725 FHR individuals.
             All participants have relevant demographic data and all
             patients have relevant clinical data. The sex ratio is 56.5%
             male and 43.5% female. Significant differences exist between
             diagnostic groups for premorbid and current IQ (both
             p<1×10-10). Data from a diversity of neuropsychological
             tests are available for 92% of participants, and 30% have
             structural MRI scans (half also have diffusion-weighted MRI
             scans). SNP data are available for 76% of participants. The
             ancestry composition is 70% European, 20% East Asian, 7%
             African, and 3% other.The Consortium is investigating the
             genetic contribution to brain phenotypes in a schizophrenia
             sample collection of >10,000 participants. The breadth of
             data across clinical, genetic, neuropsychological, and MRI
             modalities provides an important opportunity for elucidating
             the genetic basis of neural processes underlying
             schizophrenia.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2017.09.024},
   Key = {fds329375}
}

@article{fds326635,
   Author = {Lam, M and Wang, M and Huang, W and Eng, GK and Rapisarda, A and Kraus, M and Kang, S and Keefe, RSE and Lee, J},
   Title = {Establishing the Brief Assessment of Cognition - Short
             form.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychiatric Research},
   Volume = {93},
   Pages = {1-11},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.05.006},
   Abstract = {The study aims to identify and validate a parsimonious
             subset of tests in the commonly used Brief Assessment of
             Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) that allows the evaluation
             of global cognitive ability. Several permutations of
             subtests from the BACS were examined to identify the best
             subset of tests to compose the short form measure. The Brief
             Assessment of Cognition-Short Form (BAC-SF) was evaluated
             for convergent validity in healthy and psychiatric samples
             (N = 3718). Verbal Memory, Digit Sequencing, and Symbol
             Coding subtests were found to best summarize the variance of
             composite scores in both Asian and US Norming samples
             (r = 0.91) indicating that BAC-SF is an appropriate
             approximation of cognitive deficits. Test re-test
             reliability of the BAC-SF was adequate (Intraclass
             Correlation Coefficient (ICC) = 0.73) and showed
             sufficient separation between healthy controls and
             schizophrenia (Average Predictive Accuracy = 79.9%;
             replication = 76.5%). Findings indicate that the BAC-SF an
             could be used as a cognitive screener for large-scale
             clinical and epidemiological studies. The short form does
             not replace the need for comprehensive neuropsychological
             batteries purposed for detailed neuropsychological and
             clinical investigation of cognitive function. Further
             replication of the construct might be necessary in other
             clinical populations.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.05.006},
   Key = {fds326635}
}

@article{fds330047,
   Author = {Cella, M and Stahl, D and Morris, S and Keefe, RSE and Bell, MD and Wykes,
             T},
   Title = {Effects of cognitive remediation on negative symptoms
             dimensions: exploring the role of working
             memory.},
   Journal = {Psychological Medicine},
   Pages = {1-9},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0033291717000757},
   Abstract = {Recent theories suggest that poor working memory (WM) may be
             the cognitive underpinning of negative symptoms in people
             with schizophrenia. In this study, we first explore the
             effect of cognitive remediation (CR) on two clusters of
             negative symptoms (i.e. expressive and social amotivation),
             and then assess the relevance of WM gains as a possible
             mediator of symptom improvement.Data were accessed for 309
             people with schizophrenia from the NIMH Database of
             Cognitive Training and Remediation Studies and a separate
             study. Approximately half the participants received CR and
             the rest were allocated to a control condition. All
             participants were assessed before and after therapy and at
             follow-up. Expressive negative symptoms and social
             amotivation symptoms scores were calculated from the
             Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. WM was assessed with
             digit span and letter-number span tests.Participants who
             received CR had a significant improvement in WM scores (d =
             0.27) compared with those in the control condition.
             Improvements in social amotivation levels approached
             statistical significance (d = -0.19), but change in
             expressive negative symptoms did not differ between groups.
             WM change did not mediate the effect of CR on social
             amotivation.The results suggest that a course of CR may
             benefit behavioural negative symptoms. Despite hypotheses
             linking memory problems with negative symptoms, the current
             findings do not support the role of this cognitive domain as
             a significant mediator. The results indicate that WM
             improves independently from negative symptoms
             reduction.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0033291717000757},
   Key = {fds330047}
}

@article{fds327058,
   Author = {Keefe, RSE and Davis, VG and Harvey, PD and Atkins, AS and Haig, GM and Hagino, O and Marder, S and Hilt, DC and Umbricht,
             D},
   Title = {Placebo Response and Practice Effects in Schizophrenia
             Cognition Trials.},
   Journal = {JAMA Psychiatry},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {807-814},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.1574},
   Abstract = {Patients' previous experience with performance-based
             cognitive tests in clinical trials for cognitive impairment
             associated with schizophrenia can create practice-related
             improvements. Placebo-controlled trials for cognitive
             impairment associated with schizophrenia are at risk for
             these practice effects, which can be difficult to
             distinguish from placebo effects.To conduct a systematic
             evaluation of the magnitude of practice effects on the
             Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in
             Schizophrenia Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) in
             cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia and to
             examine which demographic, clinical, and cognitive
             characteristics were associated with improvement in placebo
             conditions.A blinded review was conducted of data from 813
             patients with schizophrenia who were treated with placebo in
             12 randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials conducted
             mostly in outpatient clinics in North America, Europe, Asia,
             and Latin America from February 22, 2007, to March 1, 2014.
             A total of 779 patients provided data for the primary
             outcome measure at baseline and at least 1 follow-up. Seven
             trials had prebaseline assessments wherein the patients knew
             that they were not receiving treatment, allowing a
             comparison of practice and placebo effects in the same
             patients.Placebo compared with various experimental drug
             treatments.Composite score on the MCCB.Of the 813 patients
             in the study (260 women and 553 men; mean [SD] age, 41.2
             [11.5] years), the mean MCCB composite score at baseline was
             22.8 points below the normative mean, and the mean (SEM)
             total change in the MCCB during receipt of placebo was 1.8
             (0.2) T-score points (95% CI, 1.40-2.18), equivalent to a
             change of 0.18 SD. Practice effects in the 7 studies in
             which there was a prebaseline assessment were essentially
             identical to the postbaseline placebo changes. Baseline
             factors associated with greater improvements in the MCCB
             during receipt of placebo included more depression/anxiety
             (F1,438 = 5.41; P = .02), more motivation
             (F1,272 = 4.63; P = .03), and less improvement from
             screening to baseline (F1,421 = 59.32;
             P < .001).Placebo effects were minimal and associated
             with the number of postbaseline assessments and several
             patient characteristics. Given that the patients performed
             2.28 SDs below normative standards on average at baseline, a
             mean placebo-associated improvement of less than 0.2 SD
             provides evidence that ceiling effects do not occur in these
             trials. These minimal changes in the MCCB could not be
             responsible for effective active treatments failing to
             separate from placebo.},
   Doi = {10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.1574},
   Key = {fds327058}
}

@article{fds327210,
   Author = {Xavier, RM and Pan, W and Dungan, JR and Keefe, RSE and Vorderstrasse,
             A},
   Title = {Unraveling interrelationships among psychopathology
             symptoms, cognitive domains and insight dimensions in
             chronic schizophrenia.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.07.002},
   Abstract = {Insight in schizophrenia is long known to have a complex
             relationship with psychopathology symptoms and cognition.
             However, very few studies have examined models that explain
             these interrelationships.In a large sample derived from the
             NIMH Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention
             Effectiveness (CATIE) schizophrenia trial (N=1391), we
             interrogated these interrelationships for potential causal
             pathways using structural equation modeling. Using the NIMH
             consensus model, latent variables were constructed for
             psychopathology symptom dimensions, including positive,
             negative, disorganized, excited and depressed from the
             Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) items.
             Neurocognitive variables were created from five predefined
             domains of working memory, verbal memory, reasoning,
             vigilance and processing speed. Illness insight and
             treatment insight were tested using latent variables
             constructed from the Illness and Treatment Attitude
             Questionnaire (ITAQ).Disorganized symptoms had the strongest
             effect on insight. Illness insight mediated the relationship
             of positive, depressed, and disorganized symptoms with
             treatment insight. Neurocognition mediated the relationship
             between disorganized and treatment insight and depressed
             symptoms and treatment insight. There was no effect of
             negative symptoms on either illness insight or treatment
             insight. Taken together, our results indicate overlapping
             and unique relational paths for illness and treatment
             insight dimensions, which could suggest differences in
             causal mechanisms and potential interventions to improve
             insight.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2017.07.002},
   Key = {fds327210}
}

@article{fds324823,
   Author = {Mazhari, S and Ghafaree-Nejad, AR and Soleymani-Zade, S and Keefe,
             RSE},
   Title = {Validation of the Persian version of the Schizophrenia
             Cognition Rating Scale (SCoRS) in patients with
             schizophrenia.},
   Journal = {Asian Journal of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {27},
   Pages = {12-15},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajp.2017.02.007},
   Abstract = {The Schizophrenia Cognition Rating Scale (SCoRS) is an
             interview-based assessment of cognition that involves
             interviews with patients and informants. The SCoRS has shown
             good reliability, validity, and sensitivity to cognitive
             impairment in schizophrenia, with the advantage of brief
             administration and scoring time. The present study aimed to
             test the concurrent validity of the Persian version of the
             SCoRS. A group of 35 patients with schizophrenia and a group
             of 35 healthy controls received the Persian-SCoRS in the
             first session, and a standardized performance-based
             cognitive battery, the Brief Assessment of Cognition in
             Schizophrenia (BACS), in the second session.Our results
             indicated that the Persian version of the SCoRS was
             sensitive to cognitive impairment in the patients. The
             Persian SCoRS global rating was significantly associated
             with the composite score generated from the Persian version
             of the BACS and predicted functional outcomes as measured by
             Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) and World Health
             Organization Quality of Life (WHO QOL). A Persian version of
             the SCoRS, an interview based measure of cognition that
             included informants, is related to cognitive performance and
             global functioning.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ajp.2017.02.007},
   Key = {fds324823}
}

@article{fds326634,
   Author = {Hochberger, WC and Combs, T and Reilly, JL and Bishop, JR and Keefe,
             RSE and Clementz, BA and Keshavan, MS and Pearlson, GD and Tamminga, CA and Hill, SK and Sweeney, JA},
   Title = {Deviation from expected cognitive ability across psychotic
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.05.019},
   Abstract = {Patients with schizophrenia show a deficit in cognitive
             ability compared to estimated premorbid and familial
             intellectual abilities. However, the degree to which this
             pattern holds across psychotic disorders and is familial is
             unclear. The present study examined deviation from expected
             cognitive level in schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder,
             and psychotic bipolar disorder probands and their
             first-degree relatives. Using a norm-based regression
             approach, parental education and WRAT-IV Reading scores
             (both significant predictors of cognitive level in the
             healthy control group) were used to predict global
             neuropsychological function as measured by the composite
             score from the Brief Assessment of Cognition in
             Schizophrenia (BACS) test in probands and relatives. When
             compared to healthy control group, psychotic probands showed
             a significant gap between observed and predicted BACS
             composite scores and a greater likelihood of robust
             cognitive decline. This effect was not seen in unaffected
             relatives. While BACS and WRAT-IV Reading scores were
             themselves highly familial, the decline in cognitive
             function from expectation had lower estimates of
             familiality. Thus, illness-related factors such as
             epigenetic, treatment, or pathophysiological factors may be
             important causes of illness related decline in cognitive
             abilities across psychotic disorders. This is consistent
             with the markedly greater level of cognitive impairment seen
             in affected individuals compared to their unaffected family
             members.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2017.05.019},
   Key = {fds326634}
}

@article{fds327059,
   Author = {Keefe, RSE and Kahn, RS},
   Title = {Cognitive Decline and Disrupted Cognitive Trajectory in
             Schizophrenia.},
   Journal = {JAMA Psychiatry},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {535-536},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.0312},
   Doi = {10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.0312},
   Key = {fds327059}
}

@article{fds327061,
   Author = {Kendler, KS and Ohlsson, H and Keefe, RSE and Sundquist, K and Sundquist, J},
   Title = {The joint impact of cognitive performance in adolescence and
             familial cognitive aptitude on risk for major psychiatric
             disorders: a delineation of four potential pathways to
             illness.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.78},
   Abstract = {How do joint measures of premorbid cognitive ability and
             familial cognitive aptitude (FCA) reflect risk for a
             diversity of psychiatric and substance use disorders? To
             address this question, we examined, using Cox models, the
             predictive effects of school achievement (SA) measured at
             age 16 and FCA-assessed from SA in siblings and cousins, and
             educational attainment in parents-on risk for 12 major
             psychiatric syndromes in 1 140 608 Swedes born
             1972-1990. Four developmental patterns emerged. In the
             first, risk was predicted jointly by low levels of SA and
             high levels of FCA-that is a level of SA lower than would be
             predicted from the FCA. This pattern was strongest in autism
             spectrum disorders and schizophrenia, and weakest in bipolar
             illness. In these disorders, a pathologic process seems to
             have caused cognitive functioning to fall substantially
             short of familial potential. In the second pattern, seen in
             the internalizing conditions of major depression and anxiety
             disorders, risk was associated with low SA but was unrelated
             to FCA. Externalizing disorders-drug abuse and alcohol use
             disorders-demonstrated the third pattern, in which risk was
             predicted jointly by low SA and low FCA. The fourth pattern,
             seen in eating disorders, was directly opposite of that
             observed in externalizing disorders with risk associated
             with high SA and high FCA. When measured together,
             adolescent cognitive ability and FCA identified four
             developmental patterns leading to diverse psychiatric
             disorders. The value of cognitive assessments in psychiatric
             research can be substantially increased by also evaluating
             familial cognitive potential.Molecular Psychiatry advance
             online publication, 18 April 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.78.},
   Doi = {10.1038/mp.2017.78},
   Key = {fds327061}
}

@article{fds323546,
   Author = {Atkins, AS and Tseng, T and Vaughan, A and Twamley, EW and Harvey, P and Patterson, T and Narasimhan, M and Keefe, RSE},
   Title = {Validation of the tablet-administered Brief Assessment of
             Cognition (BAC App).},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Volume = {181},
   Pages = {100-106},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2016.10.010},
   Abstract = {Computerized tests benefit from automated scoring procedures
             and standardized administration instructions. These methods
             can reduce the potential for rater error. However,
             especially in patients with severe mental illnesses, the
             equivalency of traditional and tablet-based tests cannot be
             assumed. The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia
             (BACS) is a pen-and-paper cognitive assessment tool that has
             been used in hundreds of research studies and clinical
             trials, and has normative data available for generating age-
             and gender-corrected standardized scores. A tablet-based
             version of the BACS called the BAC App has been developed.
             This study compared performance on the BACS and the BAC App
             in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Test
             equivalency was assessed, and the applicability of
             paper-based normative data was evaluated. Results
             demonstrated the distributions of standardized composite
             scores for the tablet-based BAC App and the pen-and-paper
             BACS were indistinguishable, and the between-methods mean
             differences were not statistically significant. The
             discrimination between patients and controls was similarly
             robust. The between-methods correlations for individual
             measures in patients were r>0.70 for most subtests. When
             data from the Token Motor Test was omitted, the
             between-methods correlation of composite scores was r=0.88
             (df=48; p<0.001) in healthy controls and r=0.89 (df=46;
             p<0.001) in patients, consistent with the test-retest
             reliability of each measure. Taken together, results
             indicate that the tablet-based BAC App generates results
             consistent with the traditional pen-and-paper BACS, and
             support the notion that the BAC App is appropriate for use
             in clinical trials and clinical practice.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2016.10.010},
   Key = {fds323546}
}

@article{fds327062,
   Author = {Reilly, JL and Hill, SK and Gold, JM and Keefe, RSE and Clementz, BA and Gershon, E and Keshavan, MS and Pearlson, G and Tamminga, CA and Sweeney, JA},
   Title = {Impaired Context Processing is Attributable to Global
             Neuropsychological Impairment in Schizophrenia and Psychotic
             Bipolar Disorder.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {397-406},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbw081},
   Abstract = {Context processing may reflect a specific cognitive
             impairment in schizophrenia. Whether impaired context
             processing is observed across psychotic disorders or among
             relatives of affected individuals, and whether it is a
             deficit that is independent from the generalized
             neuropsychological deficits seen in psychotic disorders, are
             less established.Schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and
             psychotic bipolar probands (n = 660), their first-degree
             relatives (n = 741), and healthy individuals (n = 308)
             studied by the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate
             Phenotypes consortium performed an expectancy task requiring
             use of contextual information to overcome a pre-potent
             response. Sensitivity for target detection and false alarm
             rates on trials requiring inhibition or goal maintenance
             were measured.Proband groups and relatives with psychosis
             spectrum personality traits demonstrated reduced target
             sensitivity and elevated false alarm rates. False alarm rate
             was higher under inhibition vs goal maintenance conditions
             although this difference was attenuated in schizophrenia and
             schizoaffective proband groups. After accounting for global
             neuropsychological impairment, as reflected by the composite
             score from the Brief Assessment of Cognition in
             Schizophrenia neuropsychological battery, deficits in
             schizophrenia and bipolar proband groups were no longer
             significant. Performance measures were moderately
             familial.Reduced target detection, but not a specific
             deficit in context processing, is observed across psychotic
             disorders. Impairments in both goal maintenance and response
             inhibition appear to contribute comparably to deficits in
             schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, whereas greater
             difficulty with response inhibition underlies deficits in
             bipolar disorder. Yet, these deficits are not independent
             from the generalized neurocognitive impairment observed in
             schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder.},
   Doi = {10.1093/schbul/sbw081},
   Key = {fds327062}
}

@article{fds325352,
   Author = {Addington, J and Liu, L and Perkins, DO and Carrion, RE and Keefe, RSE and Woods, SW},
   Title = {The Role of Cognition and Social Functioning as Predictors
             in the Transition to Psychosis for Youth With Attenuated
             Psychotic Symptoms.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {57-63},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbw152},
   Abstract = {In the literature, there have been several attempts to
             develop prediction models for youth who are at clinical high
             risk (CHR) of developing psychosis. Although there are no
             specific clinical or demographic variables that seem to
             consistently predict the later transition to psychosis in
             those CHR youth, in addition to attenuated psychotic
             symptoms, the most commonly occuring predictors tend to be
             poor social functioning and certain cognitive tasks.
             Unfortunately, there has been little attempt to replicate
             alogorithms. A recently published article by Cornblatt et al
             suggested that, for individuals with attentuated psychotic
             symptoms (APS), disorganized communication, suspiciousness,
             verbal memory, and a decline in social functioning were the
             best predictors of later transition to psychosis (the RAP
             model). The purpose of this article was to first test the
             prediction model of Cornblatt et al with a new sample of
             individuals with APS from the PREDICT study. The RAP model
             was not the best fit for the PREDICT data. However, using
             other variables from PREDICT, it was demonstrated that
             unusual thought content, disorganized communication,
             baseline social functioning, verbal fluency, and memory,
             processing speed and age were predictors of later transition
             to psychosis in the PREDICT sample. Although the predictors
             were different in these 2 models, both supported that
             disorganized communication, poor social functioning, and
             verbal memory, were good candidates as predictors for later
             conversion to psychosis.},
   Doi = {10.1093/schbul/sbw152},
   Key = {fds325352}
}


%% Kollins, Scott H.   
@article{fds330274,
   Author = {Sanchez, CE and Barry, C and Sabhlok, A and Russell, K and Majors, A and Kollins, SH and Fuemmeler, BF},
   Title = {Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and child neurodevelopmental
             outcomes: a meta-analysis.},
   Journal = {Obesity Reviews},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/obr.12643},
   Abstract = {This review examined evidence of the association between
             maternal pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity status and child
             neurodevelopmental outcomes. PubMed and PsycINFO databases
             were systematically searched for empirical studies published
             before April 2017 using keywords related to prenatal obesity
             and children's neurodevelopment. Of 1483 identified papers,
             41 were included in the systematic review, and 32 articles
             representing 36 cohorts were included in the meta-analysis.
             Findings indicated that compared with children of normal
             weight mothers, children whose mothers were overweight or
             obese prior to pregnancy were at increased risk for
             compromised neurodevelopmental outcomes (overweight:
             OR = 1.17, 95% CI [1.11, 1.24], I(2)  = 65.51; obese:
             OR = 1.51; 95% CI [1.35, 1.69], I(2)  = 79.63).
             Pre-pregnancy obesity increased the risk of attention
             deficit-hyperactivity disorder (OR = 1.62; 95% CI [1.23,
             2.14], I(2)  = 70.15), autism spectrum disorder
             (OR = 1.36; 95% CI [1.08, 1.70], I(2)  = 60.52),
             developmental delay (OR = 1.58; 95% CI [1.39, 1.79], I(2)
              = 75.77) and emotional/behavioural problems (OR = 1.42;
             95% CI [1.26, 1.59], I(2)  = 87.74). Given the current
             obesity prevalence among young adults and women of
             childbearing age, this association between maternal obesity
             during pregnancy and atypical child neurodevelopment
             represents a potentially high public health
             burden.},
   Doi = {10.1111/obr.12643},
   Key = {fds330274}
}

@article{fds311593,
   Author = {Mitchell, JT and McIntyre, EM and English, JS and Dennis, MF and Beckham, JC and Kollins, SH},
   Title = {A Pilot Trial of Mindfulness Meditation Training for ADHD in
             Adulthood: Impact on Core Symptoms, Executive Functioning,
             and Emotion Dysregulation.},
   Journal = {Journal of Attention Disorders},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {13},
   Pages = {1105-1120},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24305060},
   Abstract = {Mindfulness meditation training is garnering increasing
             empirical interest as an intervention for ADHD in adulthood,
             although no studies of mindfulness as a standalone treatment
             have included a sample composed entirely of adults with ADHD
             or a comparison group. The aim of this study was to assess
             the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of
             mindfulness meditation for ADHD, executive functioning (EF),
             and emotion dysregulation symptoms in an adult ADHD
             sample.Adults with ADHD were stratified by ADHD medication
             status and otherwise randomized into an 8-week group-based
             mindfulness treatment ( n = 11) or waitlist group ( n =
             9).Treatment feasibility and acceptability were positive. In
             addition, self-reported ADHD and EF symptoms (assessed in
             the laboratory and ecological momentary assessment),
             clinician ratings of ADHD and EF symptoms, and self-reported
             emotion dysregulation improved for the treatment group
             relative to the waitlist group over time with large effect
             sizes. Improvement was not observed for EF tasks.Findings
             support preliminary treatment efficacy, though require
             larger trials.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1087054713513328},
   Key = {fds311593}
}

@article{fds329548,
   Author = {Sweitzer, MM and Kollins, SH and Kozink, RV and Hallyburton, M and English, J and Addicott, MA and Oliver, JA and McClernon,
             FJ},
   Title = {ADHD, Smoking Withdrawal, and Inhibitory Control: Results of
             a Neuroimaging Study with Methylphenidate
             Challenge.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology (Nature)},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2017.248},
   Abstract = {Smoking withdrawal negatively impacts inhibitory control,
             and these effects are greater for smokers with preexisting
             attention problems, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity
             disorder (ADHD). The current study preliminarily evaluated
             changes in inhibitory control-related behavior and brain
             activation during smoking withdrawal among smokers with
             ADHD. Moreover, we investigated the role of catecholamine
             transmission in these changes by examining the effects of
             40 mg methylphenidate (MPH) administration. Adult daily
             smokers with (n=17) and without (n=20) ADHD completed fMRI
             scanning under each of three conditions: (a) smoking as
             usual+placebo; (b) 24 h smoking abstinence+placebo and (c)
             24 h smoking abstinence+MPH. Scan order was randomized and
             counterbalanced. Participants completed a modified Go/No-Go
             task to assess both sustained and transient inhibitory
             control. Voxelwise analysis of task-related BOLD signal
             revealed a significant group-by-abstinence interaction in
             occipital/parietal cortex during sustained inhibition, with
             greater abstinence-induced decreases in activation observed
             among ADHD smokers compared with non-ADHD smokers. Changes
             in behavioral performance during abstinence were associated
             with changes in activation in regions of occipital and
             parietal cortex and bilateral insula during sustained
             inhibition in both groups. MPH administration improved
             behavioral performance and increased sustained inhibitory
             control-related activation for both groups. During transient
             inhibition, MPH increased prefrontal activation for both
             groups and increased striatal activation only among ADHD
             smokers. These preliminary findings suggest that
             abstinence-induced changes in catecholamine transmission in
             visual attention areas (eg, occipital and superior parietal
             cortex) may be associated with inhibitory control deficits
             and contribute to smoking vulnerability among individuals
             with ADHD.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online
             publication, 15 November 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.248.},
   Doi = {10.1038/npp.2017.248},
   Key = {fds329548}
}

@misc{fds329393,
   Author = {Murphy, SK and Schrott, R and Visco, Z and Huang, Z and Grenier, C and Mitchell, J and Schechter, J and Lucas, J and Levin, ED and Price, T and Kollins, SH},
   Title = {Environment and Gametic Epigenetic Reprogramming.},
   Journal = {Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis},
   Volume = {58},
   Pages = {S28-S28},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds329393}
}

@article{fds327694,
   Author = {McCullough, LE and Miller, EE and Calderwood, LE and Shivappa, N and Steck, SE and Forman, MR and A Mendez and M and Maguire, R and Fuemmeler,
             BF and Kollins, SH and D Bilbo and S and Huang, Z and Murtha, AP and Murphy,
             SK and Hébert, JR and Hoyo, C},
   Title = {Maternal inflammatory diet and adverse pregnancy outcomes:
             Circulating cytokines and genomic imprinting as potential
             regulators?},
   Journal = {Epigenetics : official journal of the DNA Methylation
             Society},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {688-697},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15592294.2017.1347241},
   Abstract = {Excessive inflammation during pregnancy alters homeostatic
             mechanisms of the developing fetus and has been linked to
             adverse pregnancy outcomes. An anti-inflammatory diet could
             be a promising avenue to combat the pro-inflammatory state
             of pregnancy, particularly in obese women, but we lack
             mechanistic data linking this dietary pattern during
             pregnancy to inflammation and birth outcomes. In an
             ethnically diverse cohort of 1057 mother-child pairs, we
             estimated the relationships between dietary inflammatory
             potential [measured via the energy-adjusted dietary
             inflammatory index (E-DII™)] and birth outcomes overall,
             as well as by offspring sex and maternal pre-pregnancy body
             mass index (BMI). In a subset of women, we also explored
             associations between E-DII, circulating cytokines (n = 105),
             and offspring methylation (n = 338) as potential modulators
             of these relationships using linear regression. Adjusted
             regression models revealed that women with pro-inflammatory
             diets had elevated rates of preterm birth among female
             offspring [β = -0.22, standard error (SE) = 0.07, P<0.01],
             but not male offspring (β=0.09, SE = 0.06, P<0.12)
             (Pinteraction = 0.003). Similarly, we observed
             pro-inflammatory diets were associated with higher rates of
             caesarean delivery among obese women (β = 0.17, SE = 0.08,
             P = 0.03), but not among women with BMI <25 kg/m2
             (Pinteraction = 0.02). We observed consistent inverse
             associations between maternal inflammatory cytokine
             concentrations (IL-12, IL-17, IL-4, IL-6, and TNFα) and
             lower methylation at the MEG3 regulatory sequence (P<0.05);
             however, results did not support the link between maternal
             E-DII and circulating cytokines. We replicate work by others
             on the association between maternal inflammatory diet and
             adverse pregnancy outcomes and provide the first empirical
             evidence supporting the inverse association between
             circulating cytokine concentrations and offspring
             methylation.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15592294.2017.1347241},
   Key = {fds327694}
}

@article{fds329549,
   Author = {Lee, C-T and McClernon, FJ and Kollins, SH and Fuemmeler,
             BF},
   Title = {Childhood ADHD Symptoms and Future Illicit Drug Use: The
             Role of Adolescent Cigarette Use.},
   Journal = {Journal of Pediatric Psychology},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsx098},
   Abstract = {The aim of this study is to understand how early cigarette
             use might predict subsequent illicit drug use, especially
             among individuals with attention-deficit hyperactivity
             disorder (ADHD) symptoms during childhood. Data were drawn
             from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
             (Waves I-IV). The analysis sample involves participants who
             had not used illicit drugs at Wave I, with no missing
             responses for studied predictors ( N  = 7,332). Smoking
             status at Wave I (ever regular vs. never regular) and
             childhood ADHD symptoms predicted subsequent illicit drug
             use at Waves II to IV. No interaction effect of smoking
             status at Wave I and childhood ADHD symptoms was found.
             However, an indirect effect from childhood ADHD symptoms on
             illicit drug use was identified, through smoking status at
             Wave I. Similar results were observed for predicting illicit
             drug dependence. The findings support the notion that
             smoking status during early adolescence may mediate the
             association between childhood ADHD symptoms and risk of
             later adult drug use. Interventions to prevent smoking among
             adolescents may be particularly effective at decreasing
             subsequent drug use, especially among children with ADHD
             symptoms.},
   Doi = {10.1093/jpepsy/jsx098},
   Key = {fds329549}
}

@article{fds324863,
   Author = {Schechter, JC and Kollins, SH},
   Title = {Prenatal Smoke Exposure and ADHD: Advancing the
             Field.},
   Journal = {Pediatrics},
   Volume = {139},
   Number = {2},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-3481},
   Doi = {10.1542/peds.2016-3481},
   Key = {fds324863}
}

@article{fds319636,
   Author = {Childress, AC and Kollins, SH and Cutler, AJ and Marraffino, A and Sikes, CR},
   Title = {Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of an Extended-Release
             Orally Disintegrating Methylphenidate Tablet in Children
             6-12 Years of Age with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity
             Disorder in the Laboratory Classroom Setting.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {66-74},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cap.2016.0002},
   Abstract = {Methylphenidate extended-release orally disintegrating
             tablets (MPH XR-ODTs) represent a new technology for MPH
             delivery. ODTs disintegrate in the mouth without water and
             provide a pharmacokinetic profile that is consistent with
             once-daily dosing. This study sought to determine the
             efficacy, safety, and tolerability of this novel MPH XR-ODT
             formulation in school-age children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity
             disorder (ADHD) in a laboratory classroom setting.Children
             aged 6-12 years with ADHD (n = 87) were enrolled in this
             randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled,
             parallel, laboratory classroom study. The MPH XR-ODT dose
             was titrated to an optimized dose during a 4-week open-label
             period and maintained on that dose for 1 week. Participants
             (n = 85) were then randomized to receive their optimized
             dose of MPH XR-ODT or placebo once daily for 1 week (double
             blind), culminating in a laboratory classroom testing day.
             Efficacy was evaluated using the Swanson, Kotkin, Agler,
             M-Flynn, and Pelham (SKAMP) Attention, Deportment, and
             Combined scores along with Permanent Product Measure of
             Performance (PERMP; Attempted and Correct) assessments.
             Onset and duration of drug action were also evaluated as key
             secondary endpoints. Safety assessments included adverse
             events (AEs), physical examinations, electrocardiograms
             (ECGs), and the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale
             (C-SSRS).The average SKAMP-Combined score on the classroom
             study day was significantly better for the MPH XR-ODT group
             (n = 43) than for the placebo group (n = 39;
             p < 0.0001). The effect was evident at 1 hour and lasted
             through 12 hours postdose. The average SKAMP-Attention,
             SKAMP-Deportment, PERMP-A, and PERMP-C scores were
             indicative of significantly greater ADHD symptom control for
             the MPH XR-ODT group. The most common AEs reported were
             decreased appetite, upper abdominal pain, headache,
             insomnia, upper respiratory tract infection, affect
             lability, irritability, cough, and vomiting.MPH XR-ODT was
             effective and well tolerated for the treatment of children
             with ADHD in a laboratory classroom setting. Clinical Trial
             Registry: NCT01835548 ( ClinicalTrials.gov
             ).},
   Doi = {10.1089/cap.2016.0002},
   Key = {fds319636}
}

@article{fds327695,
   Author = {Mitchell, JT and Weisner, TS and Jensen, PS and Murray, DW and Molina,
             BSG and Arnold, EL and Hechtman, L and Swanson, JM and Hinshaw, SP and Victor, EC and Kollins, SH and Wells, KC and Belendiuk, KA and Blonde,
             A and Nguyen, C and Ambriz, L and Nguyen, JL},
   Title = {How Substance Users With ADHD Perceive the Relationship
             Between Substance Use and Emotional Functioning.},
   Journal = {Journal of Attention Disorders},
   Pages = {1087054716685842},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1087054716685842},
   Abstract = {Although substance use (SU) is elevated in ADHD and both are
             associated with disrupted emotional functioning, little is
             known about how emotions and SU interact in ADHD. We used a
             mixed qualitative-quantitative approach to explore this
             relationship.Narrative comments were coded for 67 persistent
             (50 ADHD, 17 local normative comparison group [LNCG]) and 25
             desistent (20 ADHD, 5 LNCG) substance users from the
             Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (MTA) adult
             follow-up (21.7-26.7 years-old).SU persisters perceived SU
             positively affects emotional states and positive emotional
             effects outweigh negative effects. No ADHD group effects
             emerged. Qualitative analysis identified perceptions that
             cannabis enhanced positive mood for ADHD and LNCG SU
             persisters, and improved negative mood and ADHD for ADHD SU
             persisters.Perceptions about SU broadly and mood do not
             differentiate ADHD and non-ADHD SU persisters. However,
             perceptions that cannabis is therapeutic may inform
             ADHD-related risk for cannabis use.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1087054716685842},
   Key = {fds327695}
}


%% LaBar, Kevin S   
@article{fds330541,
   Author = {LaBar, KS},
   Title = {Advances in neuroscience.},
   Journal = {Science Advances},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {eaar2953},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aar2953},
   Doi = {10.1126/sciadv.aar2953},
   Key = {fds330541}
}

@article{fds327386,
   Author = {Zucker, NL and Kragel, PA and Wagner, HR and Keeling, L and Mayer, E and Wang, J and Kang, MS and Merwin, R and Simmons, WK and LaBar,
             KS},
   Title = {The Clinical Significance of Posterior Insular Volume in
             Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.},
   Journal = {Psychosomatic Medicine},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1025-1035},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/psy.0000000000000510},
   Abstract = {The diagnostic criterion disturbance in the experience of
             the body remains a poorly understood and persistent feature
             of anorexia nervosa (AN). Increased sophistication in
             understanding the structure of the insular cortex-a neural
             structure that receives and integrates visceral sensations
             with action and meaning-may elucidate the nature of this
             disturbance. We explored age, weight status, illness
             severity, and self-reported body dissatisfaction
             associations with insular cortex volume.Structural magnetic
             resonance imaging data were collected from 21 adolescents
             with a history of AN and 20 age-, sex-, and body mass
             index-matched controls. Insular cortical volumes (bilateral
             anterior and posterior regions) were identified using manual
             tracing.Volumes of the right posterior insula demonstrated
             the following: (a) a significant age by clinical status
             interaction (β = -0.018 [0.008]; t = 2.32, p = .02) and (b)
             larger volumes were associated with longer duration of
             illness (r = 0.48, p < .04). In contrast, smaller volumes of
             the right anterior insula were associated with longer
             duration of illness (r = -0.50, p < .03). The associations
             of insular volume with body dissatisfaction were of moderate
             effect size and also of opposite direction, but a
             statistical trend in right posterior (r = 0.40, p < .10 in
             right posterior; r = -0.49, p < .04 in right anterior).In
             this exploratory study, findings of atypical structure of
             the right posterior insular cortex point to the importance
             of future work investigating the role of visceral afferent
             signaling in understanding disturbance in body experience in
             AN.},
   Doi = {10.1097/psy.0000000000000510},
   Key = {fds327386}
}

@article{fds318723,
   Author = {Li, D and Zucker, NL and Kragel, PA and Covington, VE and LaBar,
             KS},
   Title = {Adolescent development of insula-dependent interoceptive
             regulation.},
   Journal = {Developmental Science},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {5},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/desc.12438},
   Abstract = {Adolescence is hypothesized to be a critical period for the
             maturation of self-regulatory capacities, including those
             that depend on interoceptive sensitivity, but the neural
             basis of interoceptive regulation in adolescence is unknown.
             We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and
             psychophysiology to study interoceptive regulation in
             healthy adolescent females. Participants regulated their gut
             activities in response to a virtual roller coaster by deep
             breathing aided by visually monitoring their online
             electrogastrogram (EGG) activity through a virtual
             thermometer (i.e. gut biofeedback), or without biofeedback.
             Analyses focused on the insula, given its putative role in
             interoception. The bilateral posterior insula showed
             increased activation in the no-biofeedback compared to
             biofeedback condition, suggesting that the participants
             relied more on interoceptive input when exteroceptive
             feedback was unavailable. The bilateral dorsal anterior
             insula showed activation linearly associated with age during
             both induction and regulation, and its activation during
             regulation correlated positively with change of EGG in the
             tachygastria frequency band from induction to regulation.
             Induction-related activation in the bilateral ventral
             anterior insula was nonlinearly associated with age and
             peaked at mid-adolescence. These results implicate different
             developmental trajectories of distinct sub-regions of the
             insula in interoceptive processes, with implications for
             competing neurobiological theories of female adolescent
             development.},
   Doi = {10.1111/desc.12438},
   Key = {fds318723}
}


%% Larrick, Richard P.   
@article{fds330876,
   Author = {Kay, MB and Proudfoot, D and Larrick, RP},
   Title = {There's No Team in I: How Observers Perceive Individual
             Creativity in a Team Setting},
   Journal = {Journal of Applied Psychology},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/apl0000270},
   Abstract = {© 2017 APA, all rights reserved). Creativity is highly
             valued in organizations as an important source of
             innovation. As most creative projects require the efforts of
             groups of individuals working together, it is important to
             understand how creativity is perceived for team products,
             including how observers attribute creative ability to focal
             actors who worked as part of a creative team. Evidence from
             three experiments suggests that observers commit the
             fundamental attribution error-systematically discounting the
             contribution of the group when assessing the creative
             ability of a single group representative, particularly when
             the group itself is not visually salient. In a pilot study,
             we found that, in the context of the design team at Apple, a
             target group member visually depicted alone is perceived to
             have greater personal creative ability than when he is
             visually depicted with his team. In Study 1, using a sample
             of managers, we conceptually replicated this finding and
             further observed that, when shown alone, a target member of
             a group that produced a creative product is perceived to be
             as creative as an individual described as working alone on
             the same output. In Study 2, we replicated the findings of
             Study 1 and also observed that a target group member
             depicted alone, rather than with his team, is also
             attributed less creative ability for uncreative group
             output. Findings are discussed in light of how
             overattribution of individual creative ability can harm
             organizations in the long run.(PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/apl0000270},
   Key = {fds330876}
}

@article{fds328721,
   Author = {Rader, CA and Larrick, RP and Soll, JB},
   Title = {Advice as a form of social influence: Informational motives
             and the consequences for accuracy},
   Journal = {Social and Personality Psychology Compass},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {e12329-e12329},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/spc3.12329},
   Doi = {10.1111/spc3.12329},
   Key = {fds328721}
}

@article{fds327421,
   Author = {de Langhe, B and Puntoni, S and Larrick, R},
   Title = {Linear thinking in a nonlinear world: The obvious choice is
             often wrong},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {2017},
   Number = {July-August},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {fds327421}
}

@article{fds325129,
   Author = {Tang, S and Morewedge, CM and Larrick, RP and Klein,
             JG},
   Title = {Disloyalty aversion: Greater reluctance to bet against close
             others than the self},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {140},
   Pages = {1-13},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2017.02.001},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.obhdp.2017.02.001},
   Key = {fds325129}
}

@article{fds327118,
   Author = {Aribarg, A and Burson, KA and Larrick, RP},
   Title = {Tipping the Scale: The Role of Discriminability in Conjoint
             Analysis},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {279-292},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1509/jmr.14.0659},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmr.14.0659},
   Key = {fds327118}
}

@article{fds331495,
   Author = {Tong, J and Feiler, D and Larrick, R},
   Title = {A Behavioral Remedy for the Censorship Bias},
   Journal = {Production and Operations Management},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/poms.12823},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Production and Operations Management Society.
             Existing evidence suggests that managers exhibit a
             censorship bias: demand beliefs tend to be biased low when
             lost sales from stockouts are unobservable (censored demand)
             compared to when they are observable (uncensored demand). We
             develop a non-constraining, easily implementable behavioral
             debias technique to help mitigate this tendency in demand
             forecasting and inventory decision-making settings. The
             debiasing technique has individuals record estimates of
             demand outcomes (REDO): participants explicitly record a
             self-generated estimate of every demand realization,
             allowing them to record a different value than the number of
             sales in periods with stockouts. In doing so, they construct
             a more representative sample of demand realizations (that
             differs from the sales sample). In three laboratory
             experiments with MBA and undergraduate students, this remedy
             significantly reduces downward bias in demand beliefs under
             censorship and leads to higher inventory order
             decisions.},
   Doi = {10.1111/poms.12823},
   Key = {fds331495}
}

@article{fds326636,
   Author = {De Langhe and B and Puntoni, S and Larrick, R},
   Title = {LINEAR THINKING IN A NONLINEAR WORLD},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {130-139},
   Year = {2017},
   Key = {fds326636}
}


%% Leary, Mark R.   
@article{fds331404,
   Author = {Shumway, M and Mangurian, C and Carraher, N and Momenzadeh, A and Leary,
             M and Lee, E and Dilley, JW},
   Title = {Increasing HIV Testing in Inpatient Psychiatry},
   Journal = {Psychosomatics},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2017.10.007},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psym.2017.10.007},
   Key = {fds331404}
}

@article{fds326829,
   Author = {Leary, MR and Diebels, KJ and Davisson, EK and Jongman-Sereno, KP and Isherwood, JC and Raimi, KT and Deffler, SA and Hoyle,
             RH},
   Title = {Cognitive and Interpersonal Features of Intellectual
             Humility.},
   Journal = {Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {793-813},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167217697695},
   Abstract = {Four studies examined intellectual humility-the degree to
             which people recognize that their beliefs might be wrong.
             Using a new Intellectual Humility (IH) Scale, Study 1 showed
             that intellectual humility was associated with variables
             related to openness, curiosity, tolerance of ambiguity, and
             low dogmatism. Study 2 revealed that participants high in
             intellectual humility were less certain that their beliefs
             about religion were correct and judged people less on the
             basis of their religious opinions. In Study 3, participants
             high in intellectual humility were less inclined to think
             that politicians who changed their attitudes were
             "flip-flopping," and Study 4 showed that people high in
             intellectual humility were more attuned to the strength of
             persuasive arguments than those who were low. In addition to
             extending our understanding of intellectual humility, this
             research demonstrates that the IH Scale is a valid measure
             of the degree to which people recognize that their beliefs
             are fallible.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0146167217697695},
   Key = {fds326829}
}


%% Levin, Edward D.   
@article{fds330580,
   Author = {Lacagnina, MJ and Kopec, AM and Cox, SS and Hanamsagar, R and Wells, C and Slade, S and Grace, PM and Watkins, LR and Levin, ED and Bilbo,
             SD},
   Title = {Opioid Self-Administration is Attenuated by Early-Life
             Experience and Gene Therapy for Anti-Inflammatory IL-10 in
             the Nucleus Accumbens of Male Rats.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology (Nature)},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {2128-2140},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2017.82},
   Abstract = {Early-life conditions can contribute to the propensity for
             developing neuropsychiatric disease, including substance
             abuse disorders. However, the long-lasting mechanisms that
             shape risk or resilience for drug addiction remain unclear.
             Previous work has shown that a neonatal handling procedure
             in rats (which promotes enriched maternal care) attenuates
             morphine conditioning, reduces morphine-induced glial
             activation, and increases microglial expression of the
             anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). We thus
             hypothesized that anti-inflammatory signaling may underlie
             the effects of early-life experience on later-life opioid
             drug-taking. Here we demonstrate that neonatal handling
             attenuates intravenous self-administration of the opioid
             remifentanil in a drug-concentration-dependent manner.
             Transcriptional profiling of the nucleus accumbens (NAc)
             from handled rats following repeated exposure to
             remifentanil reveals a suppression of pro-inflammatory
             cytokine and chemokine gene expression, consistent with an
             anti-inflammatory phenotype. To determine if
             anti-inflammatory signaling alters drug-taking behavior, we
             administered intracranial injections of plasmid DNA encoding
             IL-10 (pDNA-IL-10) into the NAc of non-handled rats. We
             discovered that pDNA-IL-10 treatment reduces remifentanil
             self-administration in a drug-concentration-dependent
             manner, similar to the effect of handling. In contrast,
             neither handling nor pDNA-IL-10 treatment alters
             self-administration of food or sucrose rewards. These
             collective observations suggest that neuroimmune signaling
             mechanisms in the NAc are shaped by early-life experience
             and may modify motivated behaviors for opioid drugs.
             Moreover, manipulation of the IL-10 signaling pathway
             represents a novel approach for influencing opioid
             reinforcement.},
   Doi = {10.1038/npp.2017.82},
   Key = {fds330580}
}

@article{fds329144,
   Author = {Glazer, L and Wells, CN and Drastal, M and Odamah, K-A and Galat, RE and Behl, M and Levin, ED},
   Title = {Developmental exposure to low concentrations of two
             brominated flame retardants, BDE-47 and BDE-99, causes
             life-long behavioral alterations in zebrafish.},
   Journal = {NeuroToxicology},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2017.09.007},
   Abstract = {Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were widely used as
             flame retardants until the early 2000s, mainly in home
             furnishings and electronics. The persistence of PBDEs in the
             environment leads to continued ubiquitous exposure to low
             levels, with infants and children experiencing higher
             exposures than adults. Accumulating evidence suggest that
             low-level exposures during early life stages can affect
             brain development and lead to long-term behavioral
             impairments. We investigated the effects of zebrafish
             exposure to low doses of the two prominent PBDEs;
             2,2',4,4',5,-Pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99) and
             2,2',4,4',-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), during
             embryo-development on short- and long-term behavioral
             endpoints. We included the organophosphate pesticide
             chlorpyrifos (CPF) due to its well documented neurotoxicity
             across species from zebrafish to humans.Zebrafish embryos
             were exposed to the following individual treatments; 0.1%
             DMSO (vehicle control); 0.3μM CPF; 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3μM
             BDE-47; 0.003, 0.03, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 20μM BDE-99 from 5
             until 120h post fertilization (hpf). Low exposure levels
             were determined as those not causing immediate overt
             toxicity, and behavior assays were conducted in the
             low-level range. At 144 hpf the larvae were tested for
             locomotor activity. At approximately 6 months of age adult
             zebrafish were tested in a behavioral battery including
             assays for anxiety-related behavior, sensorimotor response
             and habituation, social interaction, and predator
             avoidance.In the short-term, larval locomotor activity was
             reduced in larvae treated with 0.3μM CPF and 0.1μM BDE-47.
             BDE-99 treatment caused non-monotonic dose effects, with
             0.3μM causing hyperactivity and 1μM or higher causing
             hypoactivity. In the long-term, adult anxiety-related
             behavior was reduced in all treatments as measured in both
             the novel tank dive test and tap test.We show that exposure
             of zebrafish embryos to low concentrations of the brominated
             flame retardants BDE-47 and BDE-99, and the organophosphate
             pesticide CPF, caused both short- and long-term behavioral
             impairments. Interestingly, we also found that at very low
             exposure concentrations, where there were no visible effects
             on larval activity, adult behavior was still strongly
             affected.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuro.2017.09.007},
   Key = {fds329144}
}

@article{fds327308,
   Author = {Rezvani, AH and Slade, S and Wells, C and Yenugonda, VM and Liu, Y and Brown, ML and Xiao, Y and Kellar, KJ and Levin, ED},
   Title = {Differential efficacies of the nicotinic α4β2
             desensitizing agents in reducing nicotine
             self-administration in female rats.},
   Journal = {Psychopharmacology},
   Volume = {234},
   Number = {17},
   Pages = {2517-2523},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-017-4641-6},
   Abstract = {Desensitization of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine
             receptors holds promise as an effective treatment of tobacco
             addiction. Previously, we found that sazetidine-A (Saz-A),
             which selectively desensitizes α4β2 nicotinic receptors,
             significantly decreased intravenous (IV) nicotine
             self-administration (SA) in rats with an effective dose of
             3 mg/kg in acute and repeated injection studies. We also
             found that chronic infusions of Saz-A at doses of 2 and
             6 mg/kg/day significantly reduced nicotine SA in rats. In
             continuing studies, we have characterized other Saz-A
             analogs, YL-2-203 and VMY-2-95, to determine their
             efficacies in reducing nicotine SA in rats.Young adult
             female Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with IV catheters and
             were trained for nicotine SA (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) on a
             fixed ratio 1 schedule for ten sessions. The same rats were
             also implanted subcutaneously with osmotic minipumps to
             continually deliver 2 or 6 mg/kg body weight YL-2-203,
             VMY-2-95, or saline for four consecutive weeks.Chronic
             administration of VMY-2-95 at doses of 2 and 6 mg/kg/day
             caused significant (p < 0.01) decreases in nicotine SA
             over the 2 weeks of continued nicotine SA and for the
             1-week period of resumed access after a week of enforced
             abstinence, whereas chronic administration of YL-2-203 at
             the same doses was not found to be effective.These studies,
             together with our previous studies of Saz-A, revealed a
             spectrum of efficacies for these α4β2 nicotinic receptor
             desensitizing agents and provide a path forward for the most
             effective compounds to be further developed as possible aids
             to smoking cessation.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00213-017-4641-6},
   Key = {fds327308}
}

@article{fds330581,
   Author = {Massarsky, A and Abdel, A and Glazer, L and Levin, ED and Di Giulio,
             RT},
   Title = {Exposure to 1,2-Propanediol Impacts Early Development of
             Zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Induces Hyperactivity.},
   Journal = {Zebrafish},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {216-222},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/zeb.2016.1400},
   Abstract = {The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is
             increasing as an alternative to tobacco burning cigarettes;
             however, their safety remains to be fully determined. The
             long-term effects of e-cigarettes are unknown, including the
             effects of maternal e-cigarette use on pre- and postnatal
             development. Additional research on the safety of
             e-cigarettes is needed. Especially useful would be
             information from high- and moderate-throughput economic
             model systems. This study investigates the effects of
             1,2-propanediol, which was identified as the main component
             of e-cigarette liquid, on early development of zebrafish (an
             in vivo high-throughput model system that was recently
             proposed for the study of tobacco cigarette and e-cigarette
             toxicity). Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 1.25% or 2.5%
             1,2-propanediol from 6 to 72 h post-fertilization (hpf).
             We show that exposure to 1,2-propanediol did not
             significantly affect mortality. Hatching success was
             significantly lower in 2.5% 1,2-propanediol-exposed embryos
             at 48 hpf, but at 72 hpf no significant differences were
             noted. Moreover, exposure to 1,2-propanediol reduced growth
             and increased the incidence of string heart, pericardial
             edema, and yolk sac edema. Most importantly, developmental
             exposure to 1.25% 1,2-propanediol caused hyperactive
             swimming behavior in larvae. This study demonstrates that
             1,2-propanediol has adverse impacts on early development in
             zebrafish.},
   Doi = {10.1089/zeb.2016.1400},
   Key = {fds330581}
}

@article{fds324065,
   Author = {Hall, BJ and Abreu-Villaça, Y and Cauley, M and Junaid, S and White, H and Kiany, A and Levin, ED},
   Title = {The ventral hippocampal muscarinic cholinergic system plays
             a key role in sexual dimorphisms of spatial working memory
             in rats.},
   Journal = {Neuropharmacology},
   Volume = {117},
   Pages = {106-113},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.01.019},
   Abstract = {Sex differences in cognitive processing and function have
             been documented in human and animal studies. Females have
             been found to perform better than males on non-spatial
             memory tasks, while males tend to outperform females on
             spatial memory tasks. The neural mechanisms underlying these
             sexual dimorphisms are unclear. However, it is known that
             the cholinergic system is critically involved in memory
             processes, and there are notable differences between males
             and females in cholinergic system function and receptor
             expression. In particular, there are sex differences in the
             processing of information in the frontal cortex and
             hippocampus. In this study, we examined the roles of
             muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the
             medial frontal cortex (MfC) and ventral hippocampus (VH) on
             spatial working memory in male and female rats. Local
             infusions of scopolamine (SCOP) and mecamylamine (MEC) (10,
             20, 50 μg/side) were used to antagonize these receptors in
             each respective brain region during performance in the
             16-arm radial arm maze. Infusions of SCOP into the VH caused
             a significant increase in memory errors in female rats, but
             had no significant effect on males, while infusions of MEC
             into the VH had no effect on either sex. Infusions of both
             SCOP (50 μg/side) and MEC (20 μg/side) into the MfC caused
             working memory impairments in both sexes. These results show
             that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the VH are
             differentially vulnerable to spatial memory impairments in
             females. Ventral hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine
             receptors may play a key role in male-female differences in
             spatial memory.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.01.019},
   Key = {fds324065}
}

@article{fds330582,
   Author = {van Thriel, C and Levin, E and Lein, P and Costa, LG and Westerink,
             RHS},
   Title = {Neural mechanisms of functional impairment across the
             lifespan: The 15th Biennial Meeting of the International
             Neurotoxicology Association and 39th Annual Meeting of the
             Neurobehavioral Teratology Society.},
   Journal = {NeuroToxicology},
   Volume = {59},
   Pages = {131-132},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2017.03.003},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuro.2017.03.003},
   Key = {fds330582}
}

@article{fds324066,
   Author = {Abreu-Villaça, Y and Levin, ED},
   Title = {Developmental neurotoxicity of succeeding generations of
             insecticides.},
   Journal = {Environment International},
   Volume = {99},
   Pages = {55-77},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2016.11.019},
   Abstract = {Insecticides are by design toxic. They must be toxic to
             effectively kill target species of insects. Unfortunately,
             they also have off-target toxic effects that can harm other
             species, including humans. Developmental neurotoxicity is
             one of the most prominent off-target toxic risks of
             insecticides. Over the past seven decades several classes of
             insecticides have been developed, each with their own
             mechanisms of effect and toxic side effects. This review
             covers the developmental neurotoxicity of the succeeding
             generations of insecticides including organochlorines,
             organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates and
             neonicotinoids. The goal of new insecticide development is
             to more effectively kill target species with fewer toxic
             side effects on non-target species. From the experience with
             the developmental neurotoxicity caused by the generations of
             insecticides developed in the past advice is offered how to
             proceed with future insecticide development to decrease
             neurotoxic risk.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.envint.2016.11.019},
   Key = {fds324066}
}

@article{fds330184,
   Author = {Macaulay, LJ and Chernick, M and Chen, A and Hinton, DE and Bailey, JM and Kullman, SW and Levin, ED and Stapleton, HM},
   Title = {Exposure to a PBDE/OH-BDE mixture alters juvenile zebrafish
             (Danio rerio) development.},
   Journal = {Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {36-48},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/etc.3535},
   Abstract = {Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their metabolites
             (e.g., hydroxylated BDEs [OH-BDEs]) are contaminants
             frequently detected together in human tissues and are
             structurally similar to thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones
             partially mediate metamorphic transitions between life
             stages in zebrafish, making this a critical developmental
             window that may be vulnerable to chemicals disrupting
             thyroid signaling. In the present study, zebrafish were
             exposed to 6-OH-BDE-47 (30 nM; 15 μg/L) alone, or to a
             low-dose (30 μg/L) or high-dose (600 μg/L) mixture of
             PentaBDEs, 6-OH-BDE-47 (0.5-6 μg/L), and
             2,4,6-tribromophenol (5-100 μg/L) during juvenile
             development (9-23 d postfertilization) and evaluated for
             developmental endpoints mediated by thyroid hormone
             signaling. Fish were sampled at 3 time points and examined
             for developmental and skeletal morphology, apical thyroid
             and skeletal gene markers, and modifications in swimming
             behavior (as adults). Exposure to the high-dose mixture
             resulted in >85% mortality within 1 wk of exposure,
             despite being below reported acute toxicity thresholds for
             individual congeners. The low-dose mixture and 6-OH-BDE-47
             groups exhibited reductions in body length and delayed
             maturation, specifically relating to swim bladder, fin, and
             pigmentation development. Reduced skeletal ossification was
             also observed in 6-OH-BDE-47-treated fish. Assessment of
             thyroid and osteochondral gene regulatory networks
             demonstrated significantly increased expression of genes
             that regulate skeletal development and thyroid hormones.
             Overall, these results indicate that exposures to
             PBDE/OH-BDE mixtures adversely impact zebrafish maturation
             during metamorphosis. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:36-48. ©
             2016 SETAC.},
   Doi = {10.1002/etc.3535},
   Key = {fds330184}
}

@article{fds330275,
   Author = {Slotkin, TA and Stadler, A and Skavicus, S and Card, J and Ruff, J and Levin, ED and Seidler, FJ},
   Title = {Is There a Critical Period for the Developmental
             Neurotoxicity of Low-Level Tobacco Smoke
             Exposure?},
   Journal = {Toxicological Sciences (Elsevier)},
   Volume = {155},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {75-84},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfw180},
   Abstract = {Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure in pregnancy increases the
             risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. We evaluated in rats
             whether there is a critical period during which tobacco
             smoke extract (TSE) affects the development of acetylcholine
             and serotonin systems, prominent targets for adverse effects
             of nicotine and tobacco smoke. We simulated secondhand smoke
             exposure by administering TSE so as to produce nicotine
             concentrations one-tenth those in active smoking, with 3
             distinct, 10-day windows: premating, early gestation or late
             gestation. We conducted longitudinal evaluations in multiple
             brain regions, starting in early adolescence (postnatal day
             30) and continued to full adulthood (day 150). TSE exposure
             in any of the 3 windows impaired presynaptic cholinergic
             activity, exacerbated by a decrement in nicotinic
             cholinergic receptor concentrations. Although the adverse
             effects were seen for all 3 treatment windows, there was a
             distinct progression, with lowest sensitivity for premating
             exposure and higher sensitivity for gestational exposures.
             Serotonin receptors were also reduced by TSE exposure with
             the same profile: little effect with premating exposure,
             intermediate effect with early gestational exposure and
             large effect with late gestational exposure. As serotonergic
             circuits can offset the neurobehavioral impact of
             cholinergic deficits, these receptor changes were
             maladaptive. Thus, there is no single 'critical period' for
             effects of low-level tobacco smoke but there is differential
             sensitivity dependent upon the developmental stage at the
             time of exposure. Our findings reinforce the need to avoid
             secondhand smoke exposure not only during pregnancy, but
             also in the period prior to conception, or generally for
             women of childbearing age.},
   Doi = {10.1093/toxsci/kfw180},
   Key = {fds330275}
}

@article{fds330161,
   Author = {Rezvani, AH and Levin, ED and Cauley, M and Getachew, B and Tizabi,
             Y},
   Title = {Ketamine Differentially Attenuates Alcohol Intake in Male
             Versus Female Alcohol Preferring (P) Rats},
   Journal = {Journal of drug and alcohol research},
   Volume = {6},
   Pages = {1-6},
   Year = {2017},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4303/jdar/236030},
   Doi = {10.4303/jdar/236030},
   Key = {fds330161}
}


%% Lisanby, Sarah H.   
@article{fds330049,
   Author = {Loo, CK and Husain, MM and McDonald, WM and Aaronson, S and O'Reardon,
             JP and Alonzo, A and Weickert, CS and Martin, DM and McClintock, SM and Mohan, A and Lisanby, SH and International Consortium of Research
             in tDCS (ICRT)},
   Title = {International randomized-controlled trial of transcranial
             Direct Current Stimulation in depression.},
   Journal = {Brain Stimulation},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {125-133},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2017.10.011},
   Abstract = {Evidence suggests that transcranial Direct Current
             Stimulation (tDCS) has antidepressant effects in unipolar
             depression, but there is limited information for patients
             with bipolar depression. Additionally, prior research
             suggests that brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)
             Val66Met genotype may moderate response to tDCS.To examine
             tDCS efficacy in unipolar and bipolar depression and assess
             if BDNF genotype is associated with antidepressant response
             to tDCS.130 participants diagnosed with a major depressive
             episode were randomized to receive active (2.5 milliamps
             (mA), 30 min) or sham (0.034 mA and two 60-second current
             ramps up to 1 and 0.5 mA) tDCS to the left prefrontal
             cortex, administered in 20 sessions over 4 weeks, in a
             double-blinded, international multisite study. Mixed effects
             repeated measures analyses assessed change in mood and
             neuropsychological scores in participants with at least one
             post-baseline rating in the unipolar (N = 84) and bipolar
             (N = 36) samples.Mood improved significantly over the
             4-week treatment period in both unipolar (p = 0.001) and
             bipolar groups (p < 0.001). Among participants with
             unipolar depression, there were more remitters in the sham
             treatment group (p = 0.03). There was no difference
             between active and sham stimulation in the bipolar sample.
             BDNF genotype was unrelated to antidepressant
             outcome.Overall, this study found no antidepressant
             difference between active and sham stimulation for unipolar
             or bipolar depression. However, the possibility that the low
             current delivered in the sham tDCS condition was
             biologically active cannot be discounted. Moreover, BDNF
             genotype did not moderate antidepressant
             outcome.www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01562184.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brs.2017.10.011},
   Key = {fds330049}
}

@article{fds329063,
   Author = {Davis, SW and Luber, B and Murphy, DLK and Lisanby, SH and Cabeza,
             R},
   Title = {Frequency-specific neuromodulation of local and distant
             connectivity in aging and episodic memory
             function.},
   Journal = {Human Brain Mapping},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {5987-6004},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23803},
   Abstract = {A growing literature has focused on the brain's ability to
             augment processing in local regions by recruiting distant
             communities of neurons in response to neural decline or
             insult. In particular, both younger and older adult
             populations recruit bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) as a
             means of compensating for increasing neural effort to
             maintain successful cognitive function. However, it remains
             unclear how local changes in neural activity affect the
             recruitment of this adaptive mechanism. To address this
             problem, we combined graph theoretical measures from
             functional MRI with diffusion weighted imaging and
             repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to
             resolve a central hypothesis: how do aged brains flexibly
             adapt to local changes in cortical activity? Specifically,
             we applied neuromodulation to increase or decrease local
             activity in a cortical region supporting successful memory
             encoding (left dorsolateral PFC or DLPFC) using 5 or 1 Hz
             rTMS, respectively. We then assessed a region's local
             within-module degree, or the distributed between-module
             degree (BMD) between distant cortical communities. We
             predicted that (1) local stimulation-related deficits may be
             counteracted by boosting BMD between bilateral PFC, and that
             this effect should be (2) positively correlated with
             structural connectivity. Both predictions were confirmed; 5
             Hz rTMS increased local success-related activity and local
             increases in PFC connectivity, while 1 Hz rTMS decreases
             local activity and triggered a more distributed pattern of
             bilateral PFC connectivity to compensate for this local
             inhibitory effect. These results provide an integrated,
             causal explanation for the network interactions associated
             with successful memory encoding in older adults. Hum Brain
             Mapp 38:5987-6004, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals,
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hbm.23803},
   Key = {fds329063}
}

@article{fds330881,
   Author = {McCall, WV and Lisanby, SH and Rosenquist, PB and Dooley, M and Husain,
             MM and Knapp, RG and Petrides, G and Rudorfer, MV and Young, RC and McClintock, SM and Mueller, M and Prudic, J and Greenberg, RM and Weiner, RD and Bailine, SH and Youssef, NA and McCloud, L and Kellner,
             CH and CORE/PRIDE Work Group},
   Title = {Effects of continuation electroconvulsive therapy on quality
             of life in elderly depressed patients: A randomized clinical
             trial.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychiatric Research},
   Volume = {97},
   Pages = {65-69},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.11.001},
   Abstract = {We examined whether electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) plus
             medications ("STABLE + PHARM" group) had superior HRQOL
             compared with medications alone ("PHARM" group) as
             continuation strategy after successful acute right
             unilateral ECT for major depressive disorder (MDD). We
             hypothesized that scores from the Medical Outcomes Study
             Short Form-36 (SF-36) would be higher during continuation
             treatment in the "STABLE + PHARM" group versus the "PHARM"
             group. The overall study design was called "Prolonging
             Remission in Depressed Elderly" (PRIDE). Remitters to the
             acute course of ECT were re-consented to enter a 6 month RCT
             of "STABLE + PHARM" versus "PHARM". Measures of depressive
             symptoms and cognitive function were completed by blind
             raters; SF-36 measurements were patient self-report every 4
             weeks. Participants were 120 patients >60 years old.
             Patients with dementia, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or
             substance abuse were excluded. The "PHARM" group received
             venlafaxine and lithium. The "STABLE + PHARM" received the
             same medications, plus 4 weekly outpatient ECT sessions,
             with additional ECT session as needed. Participants were
             mostly female (61.7%) with a mean age of 70.5 ± 7.2
             years. "STABLE + PHARM" patients received 4.5 ± 2.5 ECT
             sessions during Phase 2. "STABLE + PHARM" group had 7
             point advantage (3.5-10.4, 95% CI) for Physical Component
             Score of SF-36 (P < 0.0001), and 8.2 point advantage
             (4.2-12.2, 95% CI) for Mental Component Score
             (P < 0.0001). Additional ECT resulted in overall net
             health benefit. Consideration should be given to
             administration of additional ECT to prevent relapse during
             the continuation phase of treatment of MDD. CLINICAL
             TRIALS.GOV: NCT01028508.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.11.001},
   Key = {fds330881}
}

@article{fds330048,
   Author = {Holtzheimer, PE and Husain, MM and Lisanby, SH and Taylor, SF and Whitworth, LA and McClintock, S and Slavin, KV and Berman, J and McKhann, GM and Patil, PG and Rittberg, BR and Abosch, A and Pandurangi,
             AK and Holloway, KL and Lam, RW and Honey, CR and Neimat, JS and Henderson,
             JM and DeBattista, C and Rothschild, AJ and Pilitsis, JG and Espinoza,
             RT and Petrides, G and Mogilner, AY and Matthews, K and Peichel, D and Gross, RE and Hamani, C and Lozano, AM and Mayberg,
             HS},
   Title = {Subcallosal cingulate deep brain stimulation for
             treatment-resistant depression: a multisite, randomised,
             sham-controlled trial.},
   Journal = {The Lancet. Psychiatry},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {839-849},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s2215-0366(17)30371-1},
   Abstract = {Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subcallosal cingulate
             white matter has shown promise as an intervention for
             patients with chronic, unremitting depression. To test the
             safety and efficacy of DBS for treatment-resistant
             depression, a prospective, randomised, sham-controlled trial
             was conducted.Participants with treatment-resistant
             depression were implanted with a DBS system targeting
             bilateral subcallosal cingulate white matter and randomised
             to 6 months of active or sham DBS, followed by 6 months of
             open-label subcallosal cingulate DBS. Randomisation was
             computer generated with a block size of three at each site
             before the site started the study. The primary outcome was
             frequency of response (defined as a 40% or greater reduction
             in depression severity from baseline) averaged over months
             4-6 of the double-blind phase. A futility analysis was
             performed when approximately half of the proposed sample
             received DBS implantation and completed the double-blind
             phase. At the conclusion of the 12-month study, a subset of
             patients were followed up for up to 24 months. The study is
             registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00617162.Before
             the futility analysis, 90 participants were randomly
             assigned to active (n=60) or sham (n=30) stimulation between
             April 10, 2008, and Nov 21, 2012. Both groups showed
             improvement, but there was no statistically significant
             difference in response during the double-blind,
             sham-controlled phase (12 [20%] patients in the stimulation
             group vs five [17%] patients in the control group). 28
             patients experienced 40 serious adverse events; eight of
             these (in seven patients) were deemed to be related to the
             study device or surgery.This study confirmed the safety and
             feasibility of subcallosal cingulate DBS as a treatment for
             treatment-resistant depression but did not show
             statistically significant antidepressant efficacy in a
             6-month double-blind, sham-controlled trial. Future studies
             are needed to investigate factors such as clinical features
             or electrode placement that might improve efficacy.Abbott
             (previously St Jude Medical).},
   Doi = {10.1016/s2215-0366(17)30371-1},
   Key = {fds330048}
}

@article{fds324470,
   Author = {McCall, WV and Lisanby, SH and Rosenquist, PB and Dooley, M and Husain,
             MM and Knapp, RG and Petrides, G and Rudorfer, MV and Young, RC and McClintock, SM and Mueller, M and Prudic, J and Greenberg, RM and Weiner, RD and Bailine, SH and Riley, MA and McCloud, L and Kellner, CH and CORE/PRIDE Work Group},
   Title = {Effects of a Course of Right Unilateral Ultrabrief Pulse
             Electroconvulsive Therapy Combined With Venlafaxine on
             Insomnia Symptoms in Elderly Depressed Patients.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Psychiatry},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {219-220},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/jcp.16m11089},
   Abstract = {Antidepressant medications have a variety of effects on
             sleep, apart from their antidepressant effects. It is
             unknown whether electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has effects
             on perceived sleep in depressed patients. This secondary
             analysis examines the effects of ECT on perceived sleep,
             separate from its antidepressant effects.Elderly patients
             with major depressive disorder, as defined by DSM-IV,
             received open-label high-dose, right unilateral ultrabrief
             pulse ECT, combined with venlafaxine, as part of
             participating in phase 1 of the National Institute of Mental
             Health-supported study Prolonging Remission in Depressed
             Elderly (PRIDE). Phase 1 of PRIDE participant enrollment
             period extended from February 2009 to August 2014.
             Depression severity was measured with the Hamilton
             Depression Rating Scale-24 item (HDRS₂₄), and measures
             of insomnia severity were extracted from the HDRS₂₄.
             Participants were characterized at baseline as either
             "high-insomnia" or "low-insomnia" subtypes, based upon the
             sum of the 3 HDRS₂₄ sleep items as either 4-6 or 0-3,
             respectively. Insomnia scores were followed during ECT and
             were adjusted for the sum of all the HDRS₂₄ non-sleep
             items. Generalized linear models were used for longitudinal
             analysis of insomnia scores.Two hundred forty patients
             participated, with 48.3% in the high-insomnia and 51.7% in
             the low-insomnia group. Although there was a reduction in
             the insomnia scores in the high-insomnia group, only 12.4%
             of them experienced remission of insomnia after a course of
             ECT, despite an increase in utilization of sleep aids across
             the course of ECT, from 8.6% to 23.2%. The degree of
             improvement in insomnia symptoms paralleled the degree of
             improvement in non-insomnia symptoms. A "low" amount of
             improvement on the sum of the HDRS non-insomnia items
             (HDRS-sleep) was accompanied by a "low" amount of
             improvement in insomnia scores (change of -1.6 ± 1.2, P <
             .0001), while a "high" amount of improvement on the sum of
             the HDRS non-insomnia items was accompanied by a "higher"
             amount of improvement in insomnia scores (change of -3.1 ±
             1.6, P < .0001). After adjustment for non-insomnia symptoms,
             there was no change in insomnia in the low-insomnia group.We
             found that ECT, combined with venlafaxine, has a modest
             anti-insomnia effect that is linked to its antidepressant
             effect. Most patients will have some degree of residual
             insomnia after ECT, and will require some consideration of
             whether additional, targeted assessment and treatment of
             insomnia is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
             NCT01028508.},
   Doi = {10.4088/jcp.16m11089},
   Key = {fds324470}
}

@article{fds330050,
   Author = {Zhi-De Deng, and Lisanby, SH},
   Title = {Electric field characteristics of low-field synchronized
             transcranial magnetic stimulation (sTMS).},
   Journal = {Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in
             Medicine and Biology - Proceedings},
   Volume = {2017},
   Pages = {1445-1448},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/embc.2017.8037106},
   Abstract = {Low-field synchronized trancranial magnetic stimulation
             (sTMS) was hypothesized to have significant therapeutic
             effects in patients with major depressive disorder by
             entrainment of neural oscillations. The sTMS device is
             comprised of neodymium magnets mounted over multiple brain
             regions and set to rotate at the patients alpha frequency.
             We characterized the electric field strength and
             distribution of sTMS using the finite element method. We
             found that the maximum induced electric field strength on
             the surfaces of the head and cortex are approximately
             0.06Vm-1 and 0.02Vm-1, respectively. These field strengths
             are an order of magnitude lower than that delivered by
             transcranial current stimulation.},
   Doi = {10.1109/embc.2017.8037106},
   Key = {fds330050}
}

@article{fds328089,
   Author = {Lisanby, SH},
   Title = {Noninvasive Brain Stimulation for Depression - The Devil Is
             in the Dosing.},
   Journal = {The New England journal of medicine},
   Volume = {376},
   Number = {26},
   Pages = {2593-2594},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/nejme1702492},
   Doi = {10.1056/nejme1702492},
   Key = {fds328089}
}

@article{fds323757,
   Author = {Lee, WH and Lisanby, SH and Laine, AF and Peterchev,
             AV},
   Title = {Minimum Electric Field Exposure for Seizure Induction with
             Electroconvulsive Therapy and Magnetic Seizure
             Therapy.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology (Nature)},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1192-1200},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2016.276},
   Abstract = {Lowering and individualizing the current amplitude in
             electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been proposed as a means
             to produce stimulation closer to the neural activation
             threshold and more focal seizure induction, which could
             potentially reduce cognitive side effects. However, the
             effect of current amplitude on the electric field (E-field)
             in the brain has not been previously linked to the current
             amplitude threshold for seizure induction. We coupled
             MRI-based E-field models with amplitude titrations of motor
             threshold (MT) and seizure threshold (ST) in four nonhuman
             primates (NHPs) to determine the strength, distribution, and
             focality of stimulation in the brain for four ECT electrode
             configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right-unilateral, and
             frontomedial) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) with cap
             coil on vertex. At the amplitude-titrated ST, the stimulated
             brain subvolume (23-63%) was significantly less than for
             conventional ECT with high, fixed current (94-99%). The
             focality of amplitude-titrated right-unilateral ECT (25%)
             was comparable to cap coil MST (23%), demonstrating that ECT
             with a low current amplitude and focal electrode placement
             can induce seizures with E-field as focal as MST, although
             these electrode and coil configurations affect differently
             specific brain regions. Individualizing the current
             amplitude reduced interindividual variation in the
             stimulation focality by 40-53% for ECT and 26% for MST,
             supporting amplitude individualization as a means of dosing
             especially for ECT. There was an overall significant
             correlation between the measured amplitude-titrated ST and
             the prediction of the E-field models, supporting a potential
             role of these models in dosing of ECT and MST. These
             findings may guide the development of seizure therapy dosing
             paradigms with improved risk/benefit ratio.},
   Doi = {10.1038/npp.2016.276},
   Key = {fds323757}
}

@article{fds326503,
   Author = {Radman, T and Lisanby, SH},
   Title = {New directions in the rational design of electrical and
             magnetic seizure therapies: individualized Low Amplitude
             Seizure Therapy (iLAST) and Magnetic Seizure Therapy
             (MST).},
   Journal = {International Review of Psychiatry (Informa)},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {63-78},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09540261.2017.1304898},
   Abstract = {Electroconvulsive therapy remains a key treatment option for
             severe cases of depression, but undesirable side-effects
             continue to limit its use. Innovations in the design of
             novel seizure therapies seek to improve its risk benefit
             ratio through enhanced control of the focality of
             stimulation. The design of seizure therapies with increased
             spatial precision is motivated by avoiding stimulation of
             deep brain structures implicated in memory retention,
             including the hippocampus. The development of two
             innovations in seizure therapy-individualized low-amplitude
             seizure therapy (iLAST) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST),
             are detailed. iLAST is a method of seizure titration
             involving reducing current spread in the brain by titrating
             current amplitude from the traditional fixed amplitudes.
             MST, which can be used in conjunction with iLAST dosing
             methods, involves the use of magnetic stimulation to reduce
             shunting and spreading of current by the scalp occurring
             during electrical stimulation. Evidence is presented on the
             rationale for increasing the focality of ECT in hopes of
             preserving its effectiveness, while reducing cognitive
             side-effects. Finally, the value of electric field and
             neural modelling is illustrated to explain observed clinical
             effects of modifications to ECT technique, and their utility
             in the rational design of the next generation of seizure
             therapies.},
   Doi = {10.1080/09540261.2017.1304898},
   Key = {fds326503}
}

@article{fds326065,
   Author = {Kellner, CH and Knapp, RG and Petrides, G and McCall, WV and Young, RC and Husain, MM and Lisanby, SH and CORE/PRIDE Work
             Group},
   Title = {A Step Toward Optimizing Treatment Schedules for
             Continuation ECT: Response to Rasmussen.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {174},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {397-398},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.16111322r},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.16111322r},
   Key = {fds326065}
}

@article{fds323725,
   Author = {Luber, BM and Davis, S and Bernhardt, E and Neacsiu, A and Kwapil, L and Lisanby, SH and Strauman, TJ},
   Title = {Using neuroimaging to individualize TMS treatment for
             depression: Toward a new paradigm for imaging-guided
             intervention.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {148},
   Pages = {1-7},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.12.083},
   Abstract = {The standard clinical technique for using repetitive
             transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for major
             depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with limited
             efficacy to date. Such limited efficacy may be due to
             reliance on scalp-based targeting rather than
             state-of-the-science methods which incorporate fMRI-guided
             neuronavigation based on a specific model of neurocircuit
             dysfunction. In this review, we examine such a specific
             model drawn from regulatory focus theory, which postulates
             two brain/behavior systems, the promotion and prevention
             systems, underlying goal pursuit. Individual differences in
             these systems have been shown to predict vulnerability to
             MDD as well as to comorbid generalized anxiety disorder
             (GAD). Activation of an individual's promotion or prevention
             goals via priming leads to motivational and affective
             responses modulated by the individual's appraisal of their
             progress in attaining the goal. In addition, priming
             promotion vs. prevention goals induces discriminable
             patterns of brain activation that are sensitive to the
             effects of depression and anxiety: MDD is associated with
             promotion system failure, anhedonic/dysphoric symptoms, and
             hypoactivation in specific regions in left prefrontal
             cortex, whereas GAD is associated with prevention system
             failure, hypervigilant/agitated symptoms, and
             hyperactivation in right prefrontal cortex (PFC). These left
             and right PFC locations can be directly targeted in an
             individualized manner for TMS. Additionally, this
             individually targeted rTMS can be integrated with cognitive
             interventions designed to activate the neural circuitry
             associated with promotion vs. prevention, thus allowing the
             neuroplasticity induced by the rTMS to benefit the systems
             likely to be involved in remediating depression. Targeted
             engagement of cortical systems involved in emotion
             regulation using individualized fMRI guidance may help
             increase the efficacy of rTMS in depression.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.12.083},
   Key = {fds323725}
}

@article{fds325353,
   Author = {Thome, A and Marrone, DF and Ellmore, TM and Chawla, MK and Lipa, P and Ramirez-Amaya, V and Lisanby, SH and McNaughton, BL and Barnes,
             CA},
   Title = {Evidence for an Evolutionarily Conserved Memory Coding
             Scheme in the Mammalian Hippocampus.},
   Journal = {The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the
             Society for Neuroscience},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {2795-2801},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.3057-16.2017},
   Abstract = {Decades of research identify the hippocampal formation as
             central to memory storage and recall. Events are stored via
             distributed population codes, the parameters of which (e.g.,
             sparsity and overlap) determine both storage capacity and
             fidelity. However, it remains unclear whether the parameters
             governing information storage are similar between species.
             Because episodic memories are rooted in the space in which
             they are experienced, the hippocampal response to navigation
             is often used as a proxy to study memory. Critically, recent
             studies in rodents that mimic the conditions typical of
             navigation studies in humans and nonhuman primates (i.e.,
             virtual reality) show that reduced sensory input alters
             hippocampal representations of space. The goal of this study
             was to quantify this effect and determine whether there are
             commonalities in information storage across species. Using
             functional molecular imaging, we observe that navigation in
             virtual environments elicits activity in fewer CA1 neurons
             relative to real-world conditions. Conversely, comparable
             neuronal activity is observed in hippocampus region CA3 and
             the dentate gyrus under both conditions. Surprisingly, we
             also find evidence that the absolute number of neurons used
             to represent an experience is relatively stable between
             nonhuman primates and rodents. We propose that this
             convergence reflects an optimal ensemble size for episodic
             memories.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT One primary factor
             constraining memory capacity is the sparsity of the engram,
             the proportion of neurons that encode a single experience.
             Investigating sparsity in humans is hampered by the lack of
             single-cell resolution and differences in behavioral
             protocols. Sparsity can be quantified in freely moving
             rodents, but extrapolating these data to humans assumes that
             information storage is comparable across species and is
             robust to restraint-induced reduction in sensory input.
             Here, we test these assumptions and show that species
             differences in brain size build memory capacity without
             altering the structure of the data being stored.
             Furthermore, sparsity in most of the hippocampus is
             resilient to reduced sensory information. This information
             is vital to integrating animal data with human imaging
             navigation studies.},
   Doi = {10.1523/jneurosci.3057-16.2017},
   Key = {fds325353}
}

@article{fds320774,
   Author = {Vaughn McCall and W and Lisanby, SH and Rosenquist, PB and Dooley, M and Husain, MM and Knapp, RG and Petrides, G and Rudorfer, MV and Young, RC and McClintock, SM and Mueller, M and Prudic, J and Greenberg, RM and Weiner, RD and Bailine, SH and Riley, MA and McCloud, L and Kellner, CH and CORE/PRIDE Work Group},
   Title = {Effects of a right unilateral ultrabrief pulse
             electroconvulsive therapy course on health related quality
             of life in elderly depressed patients.},
   Journal = {Journal of Affective Disorders},
   Volume = {209},
   Pages = {39-45},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2016.11.003},
   Abstract = {Patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) referred for
             electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) have poorer Health Related
             Quality of Life (HRQOL), compared with other patients with
             MDD, but ECT is associated with significant and durable
             improvement in HRQOL. However, no prior research has focused
             exclusively on elderly patients with MDD receiving ECT.HRQOL
             data from 240 depressed patients over the age of 60 was
             measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36
             (SF-36). The SF-36 was measured before and after a course of
             acute ECT. Predictors of change in HRQOL scores were
             identified by generalized linear modeling.At baseline,
             participants showed very poor HRQOL. After treatment with
             ECT, the full sample showed marked and significant
             improvement across all SF-36 measures, with the largest
             gains seen in dimensions of mental health. Across all
             participants, the Physical Component Summary (PCS) score
             improved by 2.1 standardized points (95% CI, 0.61,3.56),
             while the Mental Component Summary (MCS) score improved by
             12.5 points (95% CI, 7.2,10.8) Compared with non-remitters,
             remitters showed a trend toward greater improvement in the
             PCS summary score of 2.7 points (95%CI, -0.45, 5.9), while
             the improvement in the MCS summary score was significantly
             greater (8.5 points, 95% CI, 4.6,12.3) in the remitters than
             non-remitters. Post-ECT SF-36 measurements were consistently
             and positively related to baseline scores and
             remitter/non-remitter status or change in depression
             severity from baseline. Objective measures of cognitive
             function had no significant relationships to changes in
             SF-36 scores.This study's limitations include that it was an
             open label study with no comparison group, and
             generalizability is limited to elderly patients.ECT
             providers and elderly patients with MDD treated with ECT can
             be confident that ECT will result in improved HRQOL in the
             short-term. Attaining remission is a key factor in the
             improvement of HRQOL. Acute changes in select cognitive
             functions were outweighed by improvement in depressive
             symptoms in determining the short term HRQOL of the
             participants treated with ECT.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2016.11.003},
   Key = {fds320774}
}

@article{fds322765,
   Author = {Peterchev, AV and Luber, B and Westin, GG and Lisanby,
             SH},
   Title = {Pulse Width Affects Scalp Sensation of Transcranial Magnetic
             Stimulation.},
   Journal = {Brain Stimulation},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {99-105},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2016.09.007},
   Abstract = {Scalp sensation and pain comprise the most common side
             effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which can
             reduce tolerability and complicate experimental blinding.We
             explored whether changing the width of single TMS pulses
             affects the quality and tolerability of the resultant
             somatic sensation.Using a controllable pulse parameter TMS
             device with a figure-8 coil, single monophasic magnetic
             pulses inducing electric field with initial phase width of
             30, 60, and 120 µs were delivered in 23 healthy
             volunteers. Resting motor threshold of the right first
             dorsal interosseus was determined for each pulse width, as
             reported previously. Subsequently, pulses were delivered
             over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex at each of the
             three pulse widths at two amplitudes (100% and 120% of the
             pulse-width-specific motor threshold), with 20 repetitions
             per condition delivered in random order. After each pulse,
             subjects rated 0-to-10 visual analog scales for Discomfort,
             Sharpness, and Strength of the sensation.Briefer TMS pulses
             with amplitude normalized to the motor threshold were
             perceived as slightly more uncomfortable than longer pulses
             (with an average 0.89 point increase on the Discomfort scale
             for pulse width of 30 µs compared to 120 µs). The
             sensation of the briefer pulses was felt to be substantially
             sharper (2.95 points increase for 30 µs compared to
             120 µs pulse width), but not stronger than longer pulses.
             As expected, higher amplitude pulses increased the perceived
             discomfort and strength, and, to a lesser degree the
             perceived sharpness.Our findings contradict a previously
             published hypothesis that briefer TMS pulses are more
             tolerable. We discovered that the opposite is true, which
             merits further study as a means of enhancing tolerability in
             the context of repetitive TMS.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brs.2016.09.007},
   Key = {fds322765}
}

@article{fds320196,
   Author = {Taylor, SF and Bhati, MT and Dubin, MJ and Hawkins, JM and Lisanby, SH and Morales, O and Reti, IM and Sampson, S and Short, EB and Spino, C and Watcharotone, K and Wright, J},
   Title = {A naturalistic, multi-site study of repetitive transcranial
             magnetic stimulation therapy for depression.},
   Journal = {Journal of Affective Disorders},
   Volume = {208},
   Pages = {284-290},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2016.08.049},
   Abstract = {Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was
             approved in 2008 in the United States, and there are
             relatively few studies describing its use in regular
             clinical practice since approval.From April 2011 to October
             2014, ten sites within the National Network of Depression
             Centers (NNDC) provided data on 62 evaluable patients with a
             depressive episode. Treatment was determined
             naturalistically. Response was assessed by the Quick
             Inventory of Depressive Symptoms, Self-Report (QIDS-SR) as
             the primary outcome, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9
             (PHQ-9) and the clinician-rated Clinical Global Impression
             (CGI) as secondary depression measures.Enrolled patients
             exhibited significant treatment resistance, with 70.2%
             reporting more than 4 prior depressive episodes. Most
             patients received treatment with standard parameters (10Hz
             over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex), although
             22.6% of the patients received 1 or 5Hz stimulation at some
             point. Over 6 weeks of treatment, response and remission
             rates were 29.4% and 5.9%, respectively, for the QIDS-SR;
             39.2% and 15.7%, respectively, for the PHQ-9; and 50.9% and
             17.9%, respectively, for the CGI. Moderator analyses
             revealed no effect of prior depressive episodes, history of
             ECT or gender, although early life stress predicted a better
             response to rTMS therapy.The study was an open-label,
             registry trial, with relatively coarse clinical data,
             reflecting practice only in academic, depression-specialty
             centers. Because of the relatively small size and
             heterogeneity of the sample, type 2 errors are possible and
             positive findings are in need of replication.rTMS
             demonstrates effectiveness in clinical practice within the
             NNDC, although remission rates appear slightly lower in
             comparison with other recent naturalistic
             studies.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2016.08.049},
   Key = {fds320196}
}

@article{fds319643,
   Author = {Kuo, H-C and Ferre, CL and Carmel, JB and Gowatsky, JL and Stanford, AD and Rowny, SB and Lisanby, SH and Gordon, AM and Friel,
             KM},
   Title = {Using diffusion tensor imaging to identify corticospinal
             tract projection patterns in children with unilateral
             spastic cerebral palsy.},
   Journal = {Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {65-71},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.13192},
   Abstract = {To determine whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can be
             an independent assessment for identifying the corticospinal
             tract (CST) projecting from the more-affected motor cortex
             in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy
             (CP).Twenty children with unilateral spastic CP participated
             in this study (16 males, four females; mean age 9y 2mo
             [standard deviation (SD) 3y 2mo], Manual Ability
             Classification System [MACS] level I-III). We used DTI
             tractography to reconstruct the CST projecting from the
             more-affected motor cortex. We mapped the motor
             representation of the more-affected hand by stimulating the
             more- and the less-affected motor cortex measured with
             single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We
             then verified the presence or absence of the contralateral
             CST by comparing the TMS map and DTI tractography. Fisher's
             exact test was used to determine the association between
             findings of TMS and DTI.DTI tractography successfully
             identified the CST controlling the more-affected hand
             (sensitivity=82%, specificity=78%).Contralateral CST
             projecting from the lesioned motor cortex assessed by DTI is
             consistent with findings of TMS mapping. Since CST
             connectivity may be predictive of response to certain upper
             extremity treatments, DTI-identified CST connectivity may
             potentially be valuable for determining such connectivity
             where TMS is unavailable or inadvisable for children with
             seizures.},
   Doi = {10.1111/dmcn.13192},
   Key = {fds319643}
}


%% Madden, David J.   
@article{fds331315,
   Author = {Zhuang, J and Madden, DJ and Duong-Fernandez, X and Chen, N-K and Cousins, SW and Potter, GG and Diaz, MT and Whitson,
             HE},
   Title = {Language processing in age-related macular degeneration
             associated with unique functional connectivity signatures in
             the right hemisphere.},
   Journal = {Neurobiology of Aging},
   Volume = {63},
   Pages = {65-74},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.11.003},
   Abstract = {Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease
             associated with significant vision loss among older adults.
             Previous large-scale behavioral studies indicate that people
             with AMD are at increased risk of cognitive deficits in
             language processing, particularly in verbal fluency tasks.
             The neural underpinnings of any relationship between AMD and
             higher cognitive functions, such as language processing,
             remain unclear. This study aims to address this issue using
             independent component analysis of spontaneous brain activity
             at rest. In 2 components associated with visual processing,
             we observed weaker functional connectivity in the primary
             visual cortex and lateral occipital cortex in AMD patients
             compared with healthy controls, indicating that AMD might
             lead to differences in the neural representation of vision.
             In a component related to language processing, we found that
             increasing connectivity within the right inferior frontal
             gyrus was associated with better verbal fluency performance
             across all older adults, and the verbal fluency effect was
             greater in AMD patients than controls in both right inferior
             frontal gyrus and right posterior temporal regions. As the
             behavioral performance of our patients is as good as that of
             controls, these findings suggest that preservation of verbal
             fluency performance in AMD patients might be achieved
             through higher contribution from right hemisphere regions in
             bilateral language networks. If that is the case, there may
             be an opportunity to promote cognitive resilience among
             seniors with AMD or other forms of late-life vision
             loss.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.11.003},
   Key = {fds331315}
}

@article{fds326350,
   Author = {Monge, ZA and Geib, BR and Siciliano, RE and Packard, LE and Tallman,
             CW and Madden, DJ},
   Title = {Functional modular architecture underlying attentional
             control in aging.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {155},
   Pages = {257-270},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.05.002},
   Abstract = {Previous research suggests that age-related differences in
             attention reflect the interaction of top-down and bottom-up
             processes, but the cognitive and neural mechanisms
             underlying this interaction remain an active area of
             research. Here, within a sample of community-dwelling adults
             19-78 years of age, we used diffusion reaction time (RT)
             modeling and multivariate functional connectivity to
             investigate the behavioral components and whole-brain
             functional networks, respectively, underlying bottom-up and
             top-down attentional processes during conjunction visual
             search. During functional MRI scanning, participants
             completed a conjunction visual search task in which each
             display contained one item that was larger than the other
             items (i.e., a size singleton) but was not informative
             regarding target identity. This design allowed us to examine
             in the RT components and functional network measures the
             influence of (a) additional bottom-up guidance when the
             target served as the size singleton, relative to when the
             distractor served as the size singleton (i.e., size
             singleton effect) and (b) top-down processes during target
             detection (i.e., target detection effect; target present vs.
             absent trials). We found that the size singleton effect
             (i.e., increased bottom-up guidance) was associated with RT
             components related to decision and nondecision processes,
             but these effects did not vary with age. Also, a modularity
             analysis revealed that frontoparietal module connectivity
             was important for both the size singleton and target
             detection effects, but this module became central to the
             networks through different mechanisms for each effect.
             Lastly, participants 42 years of age and older, in service
             of the target detection effect, relied more on
             between-frontoparietal module connections. Our results
             further elucidate mechanisms through which frontoparietal
             regions support attentional control and how these mechanisms
             vary in relation to adult age.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.05.002},
   Key = {fds326350}
}

@article{fds325978,
   Author = {Madden, DJ and Parks, EL and Tallman, CW and Boylan, MA and Hoagey, DA and Cocjin, SB and Packard, LE and Johnson, MA and Chou, Y-H and Potter, GG and Chen, N-K and Siciliano, RE and Monge, ZA and Honig, JA and Diaz,
             MT},
   Title = {Sources of disconnection in neurocognitive aging: cerebral
             white-matter integrity, resting-state functional
             connectivity, and white-matter hyperintensity
             volume.},
   Journal = {Neurobiology of Aging},
   Volume = {54},
   Pages = {199-213},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.01.027},
   Abstract = {Age-related decline in fluid cognition can be characterized
             as a disconnection among specific brain structures, leading
             to a decline in functional efficiency. The potential sources
             of disconnection, however, are unclear. We investigated
             imaging measures of cerebral white-matter integrity,
             resting-state functional connectivity, and white-matter
             hyperintensity volume as mediators of the relation between
             age and fluid cognition, in 145 healthy, community-dwelling
             adults 19-79 years of age. At a general level of analysis,
             with a single composite measure of fluid cognition and
             single measures of each of the 3 imaging modalities, age
             exhibited an independent influence on the cognitive and
             imaging measures, and the imaging variables did not mediate
             the age-cognition relation. At a more specific level of
             analysis, resting-state functional connectivity of
             sensorimotor networks was a significant mediator of the
             age-related decline in executive function. These findings
             suggest that different levels of analysis lead to different
             models of neurocognitive disconnection, and that
             resting-state functional connectivity, in particular, may
             contribute to age-related decline in executive
             function.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.01.027},
   Key = {fds325978}
}

@article{fds325365,
   Author = {Cordero, DM and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Robertson, KR and Madden, DJ and Huettel, SA and Meade, CS},
   Title = {Cocaine dependence does not contribute substantially to
             white matter abnormalities in HIV infection.},
   Journal = {Journal of NeuroVirology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {441-450},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13365-017-0512-5},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the association of HIV infection and
             cocaine dependence with cerebral white matter integrity
             using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). One hundred
             thirty-five participants stratified by HIV and cocaine
             status (26 HIV+/COC+, 37 HIV+/COC-, 37 HIV-/COC+, and 35
             HIV-/COC-) completed a comprehensive substance abuse
             assessment, neuropsychological testing, and MRI with DTI.
             Among HIV+ participants, all were receiving HIV care and 46%
             had an AIDS diagnosis. All COC+ participants were current
             users and met criteria for cocaine use disorder. We used
             tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to assess the relation
             of HIV and cocaine to fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean
             diffusivity (MD). In whole-brain analyses, HIV+ participants
             had significantly reduced FA and increased MD compared to
             HIV- participants. The relation of HIV and FA was widespread
             throughout the brain, whereas the HIV-related MD effects
             were restricted to the corpus callosum and thalamus. There
             were no significant cocaine or HIV-by-cocaine effects. These
             DTI metrics correlated significantly with duration of HIV
             disease, nadir CD4+ cell count, and AIDS diagnosis, as well
             as some measures of neuropsychological functioning. These
             results suggest that HIV is related to white matter
             integrity throughout the brain, and that HIV-related effects
             are more pronounced with increasing duration of infection
             and greater immune compromise. We found no evidence for
             independent effects of cocaine dependence on white matter
             integrity, and cocaine dependence did not appear to
             exacerbate the effects of HIV.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13365-017-0512-5},
   Key = {fds325365}
}

@article{fds325785,
   Author = {Siciliano, RE and Madden, DJ and Tallman, CW and Boylan, MA and Kirste,
             I and Monge, ZA and Packard, LE and Potter, GG and Wang,
             L},
   Title = {Task difficulty modulates brain activation in the emotional
             oddball task.},
   Journal = {Brain Research},
   Volume = {1664},
   Pages = {74-86},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2017.03.028},
   Abstract = {Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
             studies have reported that task-irrelevant, emotionally
             salient events can disrupt target discrimination,
             particularly when attentional demands are low, while others
             demonstrate alterations in the distracting effects of
             emotion in behavior and neural activation in the context of
             attention-demanding tasks. We used fMRI, in conjunction with
             an emotional oddball task, at different levels of target
             discrimination difficulty, to investigate the effects of
             emotional distractors on the detection of subsequent
             targets. In addition, we distinguished different behavioral
             components of target detection representing decisional,
             nondecisional, and response criterion processes. Results
             indicated that increasing target discrimination difficulty
             led to increased time required for both the decisional and
             nondecisional components of the detection response, as well
             as to increased target-related neural activation in
             frontoparietal regions. The emotional distractors were
             associated with activation in ventral occipital and frontal
             regions and dorsal frontal regions, but this activation was
             attenuated with increased difficulty. Emotional distraction
             did not alter the behavioral measures of target detection,
             but did lead to increased target-related frontoparietal
             activation for targets following emotional images as
             compared to those following neutral images. This latter
             effect varied with target discrimination difficulty, with an
             increased influence of the emotional distractors on
             subsequent target-related frontoparietal activation in the
             more difficult discrimination condition. This influence of
             emotional distraction was in addition associated
             specifically with the decisional component of target
             detection. These findings indicate that emotion-cognition
             interactions, in the emotional oddball task, vary depending
             on the difficulty of the target discrimination and the
             associated limitations on processing resources.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brainres.2017.03.028},
   Key = {fds325785}
}

@article{fds323600,
   Author = {Madden, DJ and Parks, EL and Tallman, CW and Boylan, MA and Hoagey, DA and Cocjin, SB and Johnson, MA and Chou, Y-H and Potter, GG and Chen, N-K and Packard, LE and Siciliano, RE and Monge, ZA and Diaz,
             MT},
   Title = {Frontoparietal activation during visual conjunction search:
             Effects of bottom-up guidance and adult age.},
   Journal = {Human Brain Mapping},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {2128-2149},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23509},
   Abstract = {We conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
             with a visual search paradigm to test the hypothesis that
             aging is associated with increased frontoparietal
             involvement in both target detection and bottom-up
             attentional guidance (featural salience). Participants were
             68 healthy adults, distributed continuously across 19 to 78
             years of age. Frontoparietal regions of interest (ROIs) were
             defined from resting-state scans obtained prior to
             task-related fMRI. The search target was defined by a
             conjunction of color and orientation. Each display contained
             one item that was larger than the others (i.e., a size
             singleton) but was not informative regarding target
             identity. Analyses of search reaction time (RT) indicated
             that bottom-up attentional guidance from the size singleton
             (when coincident with the target) was relatively constant as
             a function of age. Frontoparietal fMRI activation related to
             target detection was constant as a function of age, as was
             the reduction in activation associated with salient targets.
             However, for individuals 35 years of age and older,
             engagement of the left frontal eye field (FEF) in bottom-up
             guidance was more prominent than for younger individuals.
             Further, the age-related differences in left FEF activation
             were a consequence of decreasing resting-state functional
             connectivity in visual sensory regions. These findings
             indicate that age-related compensatory effects may be
             expressed in the relation between activation and behavior,
             rather than in the magnitude of activation, and that
             relevant changes in the activation-RT relation may begin at
             a relatively early point in adulthood. Hum Brain Mapp
             38:2128-2149, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals,
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hbm.23509},
   Key = {fds323600}
}

@article{fds323599,
   Author = {Chou, Y-H and Sundman, M and Whitson, HE and Gaur, P and Chu, M-L and Weingarten, CP and Madden, DJ and Wang, L and Kirste, I and Joliot, M and Diaz, MT and Li, Y-J and Song, AW and Chen, N-K},
   Title = {Maintenance and Representation of Mind Wandering during
             Resting-State fMRI.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {7},
   Pages = {40722},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep40722},
   Abstract = {Major advances in resting-state functional magnetic
             resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques in the last two decades
             have provided a tool to better understand the functional
             organization of the brain both in health and illness.
             Despite such developments, characterizing regulation and
             cerebral representation of mind wandering, which occurs
             unavoidably during resting-state fMRI scans and may induce
             variability of the acquired data, remains a work in
             progress. Here, we demonstrate that a decrease or decoupling
             in functional connectivity involving the caudate nucleus,
             insula, medial prefrontal cortex and other domain-specific
             regions was associated with more sustained mind wandering in
             particular thought domains during resting-state fMRI.
             Importantly, our findings suggest that temporal and
             between-subject variations in functional connectivity of
             above-mentioned regions might be linked with the continuity
             of mind wandering. Our study not only provides a preliminary
             framework for characterizing the maintenance and cerebral
             representation of different types of mind wandering, but
             also highlights the importance of taking mind wandering into
             consideration when studying brain organization with
             resting-state fMRI in the future.},
   Doi = {10.1038/srep40722},
   Key = {fds323599}
}


%% March, John S.   
@article{fds138619,
   Title = {March, J., Parker, J., Sullivan, K., Stallings, P., Conners,
             C. (in press), The Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for
             Children (MASC): Factor structure, reliability and validity.
             J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry},
   Key = {fds138619}
}

@article{fds138635,
   Title = {March, J., Amaya-Jackson, L., Costanzo, P., Terry, R. (in
             press), Post-traumatic stress in children and adolescents
             after an industrial fire. Journal of the American Academy of
             Child and Adolescent Psychiatry},
   Key = {fds138635}
}


%% Marsh, Elizabeth J.   
@article{fds331410,
   Author = {Marsh, EJ and Yang, BW},
   Title = {A Call to Think Broadly about Information
             Literacy},
   Journal = {Journal of Applied Research in Memory and
             Cognition},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {401-404},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jarmac.2017.09.012},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jarmac.2017.09.012},
   Key = {fds331410}
}

@article{fds326719,
   Author = {Brashier, NM and Umanath, S and Cabeza, R and Marsh,
             EJ},
   Title = {Competing cues: Older adults rely on knowledge in the face
             of fluency.},
   Journal = {Psychology and Aging},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {331-337},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pag0000156},
   Abstract = {Consumers regularly encounter repeated false claims in
             political and marketing campaigns, but very little empirical
             work addresses their impact among older adults. Repeated
             statements feel easier to process, and thus more truthful,
             than new ones (i.e., illusory truth). When judging truth,
             older adults' accumulated general knowledge may offset this
             perception of fluency. In two experiments, participants read
             statements that contradicted information stored in memory; a
             post-experimental knowledge check confirmed what individual
             participants knew. Unlike young adults, older adults
             exhibited illusory truth only when they lacked knowledge
             about claims. This interaction between knowledge and fluency
             extends dual-process theories of aging. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/pag0000156},
   Key = {fds326719}
}

@article{fds326720,
   Author = {Arnold, KM and Umanath, S and Thio, K and Reilly, WB and McDaniel, MA and Marsh, EJ},
   Title = {Understanding the cognitive processes involved in writing to
             learn.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {115-127},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xap0000119},
   Abstract = {Writing is often used as a tool for learning. However,
             empirical support for the benefits of writing-to-learn is
             mixed, likely because the literature conflates diverse
             activities (e.g., summaries, term papers) under the single
             umbrella of writing-to-learn. Following recent trends in the
             writing-to-learn literature, the authors focus on the
             underlying cognitive processes. They draw on the largely
             independent writing-to-learn and cognitive psychology
             learning literatures to identify important cognitive
             processes. The current experiment examines learning from 3
             writing tasks (and 1 nonwriting control), with an emphasis
             on whether or not the tasks engaged retrieval. Tasks that
             engaged retrieval (essay writing and free recall) led to
             better final test performance than those that did not (note
             taking and highlighting). Individual differences in
             structure building (the ability to construct mental
             representations of narratives; Gernsbacher, Varner, & Faust,
             1990) modified this effect; skilled structure builders
             benefited more from essay writing and free recall than did
             less skilled structure builders. Further, more essay-like
             responses led to better performance, implicating the
             importance of additional cognitive processes such as
             reorganization and elaboration. The results highlight how
             both task instructions and individual differences affect the
             cognitive processes involved when writing-to-learn, with
             consequences for the effectiveness of the learning strategy.
             (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/xap0000119},
   Key = {fds326720}
}

@article{fds322500,
   Author = {Cantor, AD and Marsh, EJ},
   Title = {Expertise effects in the Moses illusion: detecting
             contradictions with stored knowledge.},
   Journal = {Memory},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {220-230},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2016.1152377},
   Abstract = {People frequently miss contradictions with stored knowledge;
             for example, readers often fail to notice any problem with a
             reference to the Atlantic as the largest ocean. Critically,
             such effects occur even though participants later
             demonstrate knowing the Pacific is the largest ocean (the
             Moses Illusion) [Erickson, T. D., & Mattson,
             M. E. (1981). From words to meaning: A semantic illusion.
             Journal of Verbal Learning & Verbal Behavior, 20, 540-551].
             We investigated whether such oversights disappear when
             erroneous references contradict information in one's expert
             domain, material which likely has been encountered many
             times and is particularly well-known. Biology and history
             graduate students monitored for errors while answering
             biology and history questions containing erroneous
             presuppositions ("In what US state were the forty-niners
             searching for oil?"). Expertise helped: participants were
             less susceptible to the illusion and less likely to later
             reproduce errors in their expert domain. However, expertise
             did not eliminate the illusion, even when errors were bolded
             and underlined, meaning that it was unlikely that people
             simply skipped over errors. The results support claims that
             people often use heuristics to judge truth, as opposed to
             directly retrieving information from memory, likely because
             such heuristics are adaptive and often lead to the correct
             answer. Even experts sometimes use such shortcuts,
             suggesting that overlearned and accessible knowledge does
             not guarantee retrieval of that information.},
   Doi = {10.1080/09658211.2016.1152377},
   Key = {fds322500}
}


%% Mauro, Christian F.   
@article{fds328294,
   Author = {Zucker, N and Mauro, C and Craske, M and Wagner, HR and Datta, N and Hopkins, H and Caldwell, K and Kiridly, A and Marsan, S and Maslow, G and Mayer, E and Egger, H},
   Title = {Acceptance-based interoceptive exposure for young children
             with functional abdominal pain.},
   Journal = {Behaviour Research and Therapy},
   Volume = {97},
   Pages = {200-212},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2017.07.009},
   Abstract = {Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is a common childhood
             somatic complaint that contributes to impairment in daily
             functioning (e.g., school absences) and increases risk for
             chronic pain and psychiatric illness. Cognitive behavioral
             treatments for FAP target primarily older children
             (9 + years) and employ strategies to reduce a focus on
             pain. The experience of pain may be an opportunity to teach
             viscerally hypersensitive children to interpret the function
             of a variety of bodily signals (including those of hunger,
             emotions) thereby reducing fear of bodily sensations and
             facilitating emotion awareness and self-regulation. We
             designed and tested an interoceptive exposure treatment for
             younger children (5-9 years) with FAP. Assessments included
             diagnostic interviews, 14 days of daily pain monitoring, and
             questionnaires. Treatment involved 10 weekly appointments.
             Using cartoon characters to represent bodily sensations
             (e.g., Gassy Gus), children were trained to be "FBI agents"
             - Feeling and Body Investigators - who investigated
             sensations through exercises that provoked somatic
             experience. 24 parent-child dyads are reported. Pain
             (experience, distress, and interference) and negative affect
             demonstrated clinically meaningful and statistically
             significant change with effect sizes ranging from 0.48 to 71
             for pain and from 0.38 to 0.61 for pain distress, total
             pain: X2 (1, n = 24) = 13.14, p < 0.0003. An
             intervention that helps children adopt a curious stance and
             focus on somatic symptoms reduces pain and may help lessen
             somatic fear generally.NCT02075437.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brat.2017.07.009},
   Key = {fds328294}
}


%% Mazuka, Reiko   
@article{fds329036,
   Author = {Akimoto, Y and Takahashi, H and Gunji, A and Kaneko, Y and Asano, M and Matsuo, J and Ota, M and Kunugi, H and Hanakawa, T and Mazuka, R and Kamio,
             Y},
   Title = {Alpha band event-related desynchronization underlying social
             situational context processing during irony comprehension: A
             magnetoencephalography source localization
             study.},
   Journal = {Brain and Language},
   Volume = {175},
   Pages = {42-46},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2017.09.002},
   Abstract = {Irony comprehension requires integration of social
             contextual information. Previous studies have investigated
             temporal aspects of irony processing and its neural
             substrates using psychological/electroencephalogram or
             functional magnetic resonance imaging methods, but have not
             clarified the temporospatial neural mechanisms of irony
             comprehension. Therefore, we used magnetoencephalography to
             investigate the neural generators of alpha-band (8-13Hz)
             event-related desynchronization (ERD) occurring from 600 to
             900ms following the onset of a critical sentence at which
             social situational contexts activated ironic representation.
             We found that the right anterior temporal lobe, which is
             involved in processing social knowledge and evaluating
             others' intentions, exhibited stronger alpha ERD following
             an ironic statement than following a literal statement. We
             also found that alpha power in the left anterior temporal
             lobe correlated with the participants' communication
             abilities. These results elucidate the temporospatial neural
             mechanisms of language comprehension in social contexts,
             including non-literal processing.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bandl.2017.09.002},
   Key = {fds329036}
}

@article{fds325710,
   Author = {Hirose, Y and Mazuka, R},
   Title = {Exploiting Pitch Accent Information in Compound Processing:
             A Comparison between Adults and 6- to 7-Year-Old
             Children},
   Journal = {Language Learning and Development},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {375-394},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15475441.2017.1292141},
   Doi = {10.1080/15475441.2017.1292141},
   Key = {fds325710}
}

@article{fds326609,
   Author = {Miyazawa, K and Shinya, T and Martin, A and Kikuchi, H and Mazuka,
             R},
   Title = {Vowels in infant-directed speech: More breathy and more
             variable, but not clearer.},
   Journal = {Cognition},
   Volume = {166},
   Pages = {84-93},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2017.05.003},
   Abstract = {Infant-directed speech (IDS) is known to differ from
             adult-directed speech (ADS) in a number of ways, and it has
             often been argued that some of these IDS properties
             facilitate infants' acquisition of language. An influential
             study in support of this view is Kuhl et al. (1997), which
             found that vowels in IDS are produced with expanded first
             and second formants (F1/F2) on average, indicating that the
             vowels are acoustically further apart in IDS than in ADS.
             These results have been interpreted to mean that the way
             vowels are produced in IDS makes infants' task of learning
             vowel categories easier. The present paper revisits this
             interpretation by means of a thorough analysis of IDS vowels
             using a large-scale corpus of Japanese natural utterances.
             We will show that the expansion of F1/F2 values does occur
             in spontaneous IDS even when the vowels' prosodic position,
             lexical pitch accent, and lexical bias are accounted for.
             When IDS vowels are compared to carefully read speech (CS)
             by the same mothers, however, larger variability among IDS
             vowel tokens means that the acoustic distances among vowels
             are farther apart only in CS, but not in IDS when compared
             to ADS. Finally, we will show that IDS vowels are
             significantly more breathy than ADS or CS vowels. Taken
             together, our results demonstrate that even though expansion
             of formant values occurs in spontaneous IDS, this expansion
             cannot be interpreted as an indication that the acoustic
             distances among vowels are farther apart, as is the case in
             CS. Instead, we found that IDS vowels are characterized by
             breathy voice, which has been associated with the
             communication of emotional affect.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cognition.2017.05.003},
   Key = {fds326609}
}

@article{fds321661,
   Author = {Hayashi, A and Mazuka, R},
   Title = {Emergence of Japanese infants' prosodic preferences in
             infant-directed vocabulary.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {28-37},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000259},
   Abstract = {The article examines the role of infant-directed vocabulary
             (IDV) in infants language acquisition, specifically
             addressing the question of whether IDV forms that are not
             prominent in adult language may nonetheless be useful to the
             process of acquisition. Japanese IDV offers a good test
             case, as IDV characteristically takes a bisyllabic
             H(eavy)-L(ight) form that is rare in adult speech. In 5
             experiments using the Headturn Preference Procedure (HPP),
             8- to 10-month-old Japanese infants, but not 4- to
             6-month-olds, were found to show a preference for bisyllabic
             H-L words over other types of words. These results
             demonstrate (a) that infants may develop a preference for a
             dominant prosodic form based on infant-directed speech, even
             when it is not a prominent characteristic of adult language;
             and perhaps more importantly, and (b) that infant-directed
             speech may provide a boost for a feature that could be
             useful for infants' acquisition of language even when it not
             prominent in adult language. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/dev0000259},
   Key = {fds321661}
}


%% Meade, Christina S.   
@article{fds328929,
   Author = {Skalski, LM and Towe, SL and Sikkema, KJ and Meade,
             CS},
   Title = {Memory Impairment in HIV-Infected Individuals with Early and
             Late Initiation of Regular Marijuana Use.},
   Journal = {AIDS and Behavior},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10461-017-1898-z},
   Abstract = {Marijuana use is disproportionately prevalent among
             HIV-infected individuals. The strongest neurocognitive
             effect of marijuana use is impairment in the domain of
             memory. Memory impairment is also high among HIV-infected
             persons. The present study examined 69 HIV-infected
             individuals who were stratified by age of regular marijuana
             initiation to investigate how marijuana use impacts
             neurocognitive functioning. A comprehensive battery assessed
             substance use and neurocognitive functioning. Findings
             indicated early onset marijuana users (regular use prior to
             age 18), compared to non-marijuana users and late onset
             marijuana users (regular use at age 18 or later), were over
             8 times more likely to have learning impairment and nearly 4
             times more likely to have memory impairment. A similar
             pattern of early onset marijuana users performing worse in
             learning emerged when examining domain deficit scores. The
             potential for early onset of regular marijuana use to
             exacerbate already high levels of memory impairment among
             HIV-infected persons has important clinical implications,
             including increased potential for medication non-adherence
             and difficulty with independent living.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10461-017-1898-z},
   Key = {fds328929}
}

@article{fds327327,
   Author = {Meade, CS and Hobkirk, AL and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Bell, RP and Huettel, SA},
   Title = {Cocaine dependence modulates the effect of HIV infection on
             brain activation during intertemporal decision
             making.},
   Journal = {Drug and Alcohol Dependence},
   Volume = {178},
   Pages = {443-451},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.05.043},
   Abstract = {Both HIV infection and chronic cocaine use alter the neural
             circuitry of decision making, but the interactive effects of
             these commonly comorbid conditions have not been adequately
             examined. This study tested how cocaine moderates
             HIV-related neural activation during an intertemporal
             decision-making task.The sample included 73 participants who
             differed on cocaine and HIV status (18 COC+/HIV+, 19
             COC+/HIV-, 19 COC-/HIV+, 17 COC-/HIV-). Participants made
             choices between smaller, sooner and larger, delayed rewards
             while undergoing functional MRI. Choices varied in
             difficulty based on subjective value: hard (equivalently
             valued), easy (disparately valued), and control choices. A
             mixed-effects model controlling for education and smoking
             identified main and interactive effects of HIV and COC
             during hard relative to easy choices (difficulty
             contrast).COC+ status was associated with lower activation
             in bilateral frontal gyri and right insular and posterior
             parietal cortices. HIV+ status was associated with higher
             activation in the visual cortex, but lower activation in
             bilateral prefrontal cortices and cerebellum and left
             posterior parietal cortex. COC moderated the effects of HIV
             in several clusters centered in the bilateral prefrontal
             cortices and cerebellum. In post-hoc analyses, there were
             significant effects of HIV status on activation for COC+,
             but not COC-, participants; interaction effects remained
             after controlling for polysubstance use.Cocaine use may
             diminish the compensatory neural activation often seen among
             HIV+ samples during decision making. Our results highlight
             the importance of examining the neuropsychiatric effects of
             comorbid medical conditions to identify potential neural
             targets for cognitive remediation interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.05.043},
   Key = {fds327327}
}

@article{fds327328,
   Author = {Meade, CS and Addicott, M and Hobkirk, AL and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Sridharan, S and Huettel, SA},
   Title = {Cocaine and HIV are independently associated with neural
             activation in response to gain and loss valuation during
             economic risky choice.},
   Journal = {Addiction Biology},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adb.12529},
   Abstract = {Stimulant abuse is disproportionately common in HIV-positive
             persons. Both HIV and stimulants are independently
             associated with deficits in reward-based decision making,
             but their interactive and/or additive effects are poorly
             understood despite their prevalent co-morbidity. Here, we
             examined the effects of cocaine dependence and HIV infection
             in 69 adults who underwent functional magnetic resonance
             imaging while completing an economic loss aversion task. We
             identified two neural networks that correlated with the
             evaluation of the favorable characteristics of the gamble
             (i.e. higher gains/lower losses: ventromedial prefrontal
             cortex, anterior cingulate, anterior and posterior precuneus
             and visual cortex) versus unfavorable characteristics of the
             gamble (i.e. lower gains/higher losses: dorsal prefrontal,
             lateral orbitofrontal, posterior parietal cortex, anterior
             insula and dorsal caudate). Behaviorally, cocaine and HIV
             had additive effects on loss aversion scores, with
             HIV-positive cocaine users being the least loss averse.
             Cocaine users had greater activation in brain regions that
             tracked the favorability of gamble characteristics (i.e.
             increased activation to gains, but decreased activation to
             losses). In contrast, HIV infection was independently
             associated with lesser activation in regions that tracked
             the unfavorability of gamble characteristics. These results
             suggest that cocaine is associated with an overactive
             reward-seeking system, while HIV is associated with an
             underactive cognitive control system. Together, these
             alterations may leave HIV-positive cocaine users
             particularly vulnerable to making unfavorable decisions when
             outcomes are uncertain.},
   Doi = {10.1111/adb.12529},
   Key = {fds327328}
}

@article{fds322766,
   Author = {Berg, MK and Hobkirk, AL and Joska, JA and Meade,
             CS},
   Title = {The role of substance use coping in the relation between
             childhood sexual abuse and depression among methamphetamine
             users in South Africa.},
   Journal = {Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and
             Policy},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {493-499},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/tra0000207},
   Abstract = {Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a critical global health
             issue associated with poor psychosocial outcomes.
             Individuals with CSA histories are at risk for drug use,
             which is a growing problem in the Western Cape of South
             Africa. The present study of methamphetamine users in this
             region examined whether substance use coping, a contextually
             relevant type of avoidance-based coping, mediates the
             relation between CSA and depressive symptoms.Participants
             included 161 men and 108 women seeking treatment for
             methamphetamine use. Participants completed a
             computer-assisted survey and a face-to-face interview with
             clinic staff to evaluate history of CSA, current substance
             use severity and coping, and current depressive
             symptoms.Nearly a third of participants reported a history
             of CSA, and the average methamphetamine use severity score
             exceeded the threshold of high risk. A history of CSA was
             significantly associated with higher substance use coping
             and more depression symptoms. Substance use coping was a
             significant mediator of the association between CSA and
             depression symptoms.In this study of high-risk
             methamphetamine users, substance use coping emerged as a
             common means of managing stress, especially for those with a
             history of CSA, which was further linked to depressive
             symptoms. These findings underscore the potential benefit of
             integrating coping interventions and mental health treatment
             into substance abuse treatment programs, particularly for
             those with a history of childhood abuse and violence.
             (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/tra0000207},
   Key = {fds322766}
}

@article{fds327119,
   Author = {Towe, SL and Patel, P and Meade, CS},
   Title = {The Acceptability and Potential Utility of Cognitive
             Training to Improve Working Memory in Persons Living With
             HIV: A Preliminary Randomized Trial.},
   Journal = {Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS
             Care},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {633-643},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jana.2017.03.007},
   Abstract = {HIV-associated neurocognitive impairments that impact daily
             function persist in the era of effective antiretroviral
             therapy. Cognitive training, a promising low-cost
             intervention, has been shown to improve neurocognitive
             functioning in some clinical populations. We tested the
             feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effects of
             computerized cognitive training to improve working memory in
             persons living with HIV infection (PLWH) and working memory
             impairment. In this randomized clinical trial, we assigned
             21 adult PLWH to either an experimental cognitive training
             intervention or an attention-matched control training
             intervention. Participants completed 12 training sessions
             across 10 weeks with assessments at baseline and
             post-training. Session attendance was excellent and
             participants rated the program positively. Participants in
             the experimental arm demonstrated improved working memory
             function over time; participants in the control arm showed
             no change. Our results suggest that cognitive training may
             be a promising intervention for working memory impairment in
             PLWH and should be evaluated further.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jana.2017.03.007},
   Key = {fds327119}
}

@article{fds324504,
   Author = {Cordero, DM and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Robertson, KR and Madden, DJ and Huettel, SA and Meade, CS},
   Title = {Cocaine dependence does not contribute substantially to
             white matter abnormalities in HIV infection.},
   Journal = {Journal of NeuroVirology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {441-450},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13365-017-0512-5},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the association of HIV infection and
             cocaine dependence with cerebral white matter integrity
             using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). One hundred
             thirty-five participants stratified by HIV and cocaine
             status (26 HIV+/COC+, 37 HIV+/COC-, 37 HIV-/COC+, and 35
             HIV-/COC-) completed a comprehensive substance abuse
             assessment, neuropsychological testing, and MRI with DTI.
             Among HIV+ participants, all were receiving HIV care and 46%
             had an AIDS diagnosis. All COC+ participants were current
             users and met criteria for cocaine use disorder. We used
             tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to assess the relation
             of HIV and cocaine to fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean
             diffusivity (MD). In whole-brain analyses, HIV+ participants
             had significantly reduced FA and increased MD compared to
             HIV- participants. The relation of HIV and FA was widespread
             throughout the brain, whereas the HIV-related MD effects
             were restricted to the corpus callosum and thalamus. There
             were no significant cocaine or HIV-by-cocaine effects. These
             DTI metrics correlated significantly with duration of HIV
             disease, nadir CD4+ cell count, and AIDS diagnosis, as well
             as some measures of neuropsychological functioning. These
             results suggest that HIV is related to white matter
             integrity throughout the brain, and that HIV-related effects
             are more pronounced with increasing duration of infection
             and greater immune compromise. We found no evidence for
             independent effects of cocaine dependence on white matter
             integrity, and cocaine dependence did not appear to
             exacerbate the effects of HIV.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13365-017-0512-5},
   Key = {fds324504}
}

@article{fds324505,
   Author = {Lion, RR and Watt, MH and Wechsberg, WM and Meade,
             CS},
   Title = {Gender and Sex Trading Among Active Methamphetamine Users in
             Cape Town, South Africa.},
   Journal = {Substance Use & Misuse (Informa)},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {773-784},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2016.1264964},
   Abstract = {South Africa has experienced a tremendous rise in
             methamphetamine use since the year 2000. Sex trading is a
             global phenomenon that has been observed in active drug
             users and has been associated with risks for HIV infection
             and violence.This paper describes and examines the
             correlates of sex trading among active methamphetamine users
             in Cape Town, South Africa.Through peer referral, 360 (201
             male; 159 female) active methamphetamine users were
             recruited in a peri-urban township. Demographics, sex
             trading, drug use, trauma, and mental health were assessed
             by a structured clinical interview and computer survey.
             Logistic regression models were used to examine predictors
             of sex trading for men and women.In the past 3 months, 40%
             of men and 33% of women endorsed trading sex for
             methamphetamine or money. Among these, they reported trading
             with same sex partners (33%), high rates of inconsistent
             condom use (73%), and incidences of physical (23%) and
             sexual (27%) assault when sex trading. Increased drug use
             severity was correlated with sex trading. Women with
             experiences of violence and trauma were also more likely to
             trade sex. Conclusions/importance: The results stress a need
             for linkage to drug treatment, as addiction may be fueling
             sex trading. Targeted interventions geared towards safe sex
             practices may reduce risky sexual behaviors. Women need
             interventions that are attuned to their specific
             vulnerabilities. More research is needed to explore the
             experiences of men who have sex with men given their
             particularly high rates of sex trading behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1080/10826084.2016.1264964},
   Key = {fds324505}
}

@article{fds322767,
   Author = {Hobkirk, AL and Towe, SL and Patel, P and Meade, CS},
   Title = {Food Insecurity Is Associated with Cognitive Deficits Among
             HIV-Positive, But Not HIV-Negative, Individuals in a United
             States Sample.},
   Journal = {AIDS and Behavior},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {783-791},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10461-016-1514-7},
   Abstract = {People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in the United States
             (US) have disproportionately high rates of food insecurity
             (FI). In the general population, FI has been associated with
             cognitive impairment among older adults and may exacerbate
             HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. The current study
             assessed the effects of FI and HIV infection on the
             neuropsychological performance of 61 HIV-positive and 36
             HIV-negative adults in the US. While the main effects were
             minimal, the interactive effects revealed that FI was
             related to deficits in speed of information processing,
             learning, memory, motor function, and overall cognitive
             impairment for the HIV-positive group, but not the
             HIV-negative group. The interactive effects remained after
             controlling for relevant sociodemographic characteristics.
             Although bidirectional associations cannot be ruled out in a
             cross-sectional study, the results suggest that FI may
             contribute to cognitive impairment among HIV-positive adults
             in the US. Given the high rates of socioeconomic
             disadvantage among PLWHA in the US, addressing FI as part of
             routine clinical care may be warranted.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10461-016-1514-7},
   Key = {fds322767}
}

@article{fds319647,
   Author = {Watt, MH and Guidera, KE and Hobkirk, AL and Skinner, D and Meade,
             CS},
   Title = {Intimate partner violence among men and women who use
             methamphetamine: A mixed-methods study in South
             Africa.},
   Journal = {Drug and Alcohol Review},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {97-106},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dar.12420},
   Abstract = {The prevalence of methamphetamine use has risen dramatically
             in parts of South Africa. Globally, methamphetamine has been
             linked to intimate partner violence (IPV) and other forms of
             aggression. The aim of this mixed-methods study was to
             examine the experiences of physical IPV and its contextual
             factors among methamphetamine users in an urban community in
             Cape Town, South Africa.Active methamphetamine users were
             recruited using respondent driven sampling. All participants
             (n = 360) completed structured surveys, and a subset
             (n = 30) completed in-depth interviews with discussions
             of personal IPV experiences. Quantitative data were examined
             separately by gender, and regression models were used to
             identify factors that were associated with physical IPV
             victimisation and perpetration. Qualitative data were
             analysed to provide contextual understanding.In the past
             3 months, 47% of women and 31% of men reported being a
             victim of IPV, and 30% of women and 28% men reported being a
             perpetrator of IPV. Victimisation and perpetration were
             highly correlated, and both were significantly associated
             with histories of other traumas. Although the survey data
             suggests gender equivalence in IPV, the qualitative data
             provides a more nuanced context, with female victimisation
             by male partners being particularly frequent and intense. In
             narratives, IPV was a product of male aggression while using
             methamphetamine, norms around sex trading and gender-based
             attitudes endorsing violence against women.Addiction to
             methamphetamine creates heightened risks of IPV, especially
             among those with previous traumas. The findings emphasise
             the importance of identifying and addressing IPV among
             methamphetamine users in South Africa. [Watt MH, Guidera KE,
             Hobkirk AL, Skinner D, Meade CS. Intimate partner violence
             among men and women who use methamphetamine: A mixed-methods
             study in South Africa. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:97-106].},
   Doi = {10.1111/dar.12420},
   Key = {fds319647}
}

@article{fds319649,
   Author = {Skalski, LM and Towe, SL and Sikkema, KJ and Meade,
             CS},
   Title = {The Impact of Marijuana Use on Memory in HIV-Infected
             Patients: A Comprehensive Review of the HIV and Marijuana
             Literatures.},
   Journal = {Current Drug Abuse Reviews},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {126-141},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874473709666160502124503},
   Abstract = {The most robust neurocognitive effect of marijuana use is
             memory impairment. Memory deficits are also high among
             persons living with HIV/AIDS, and marijuana is the most
             commonly used drug in this population. Yet research
             examining neurocognitive outcomes resulting from
             co-occurring marijuana and HIV is limited.The primary
             objectives of this comprehensive review are to: (1) examine
             the literature on memory functioning in HIV-infected
             individuals; (2) examine the literature on memory
             functioning in marijuana users; (3) synthesize findings and
             propose a theoretical framework to guide future
             research.PubMed was searched for English publications
             2000-2013. Twenty-two studies met inclusion criteria in the
             HIV literature, and 23 studies in the marijuana
             literature.Among HIV-infected individuals, memory deficits
             with medium to large effect sizes were observed. Marijuana
             users also demonstrated memory problems, but results were
             less consistent due to the diversity of samples.A
             compensatory hypothesis, based on the cognitive aging
             literature, is proposed to provide a framework to explore
             the interaction between marijuana and HIV. There is some
             evidence that individuals infected with HIV recruit
             additional brain regions during memory tasks to compensate
             for HIV-related declines in neurocognitive functioning.
             Marijuana is associated with disturbance in similar brain
             systems, and thus it is hypothesized that the added neural
             strain of marijuana can exhaust neural resources, resulting
             in pronounced memory impairment. It will be important to
             test this hypothesis empirically, and future research
             priorities are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.2174/1874473709666160502124503},
   Key = {fds319649}
}

@article{fds312880,
   Author = {Hatch-Maillette, MA and Beadnell, B and Campbell, ANC and Meade, CS and Tross, S and Calsyn, DA},
   Title = {Heterosexual Anal Sex Among Men and Women in Substance Abuse
             Treatment: Secondary Analysis of Two Gender-Specific
             HIV-Prevention Trials.},
   Journal = {Journal of Sex Research},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {33-41},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-4499},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00224499.2015.1118426},
   Abstract = {Receptive anal sex has high human immunodeficiency virus
             (HIV) transmission risk, and heterosexual substance-abusing
             individuals report higher anal sex rates compared to their
             counterparts in the general population. This secondary
             analysis evaluated the effectiveness of two gender-specific,
             evidence-based HIV-prevention interventions (Real Men Are
             Safe, or REMAS, for men; Safer Sex Skill Building, or SSSB,
             for women) against an HIV education (HIV-Ed) control
             condition on decreasing unprotected heterosexual anal sex
             (HAS) among substance abuse treatment-seeking men
             (n = 171) and women (n = 105). Two variables, engagement
             in any HAS and engagement in unprotected HAS, were assessed
             at baseline and three months postintervention. Compared to
             the control group, women in the gender-specific intervention
             did not differ on rates of any HAS at follow-up but
             significantly decreased their rates of unprotected HAS. Men
             in both the gender-specific and the control interventions
             reported less HAS and unprotected HAS at three-month
             follow-up compared to baseline, with no treatment condition
             effect. The mechanism of action for SSSB compared to REMAS
             in decreasing unprotected HAS is unclear. More attention to
             HAS in HIV-prevention interventions for heterosexual men and
             women in substance abuse treatment is warranted.},
   Doi = {10.1080/00224499.2015.1118426},
   Key = {fds312880}
}


%% Meck, Warren H.   
@article{fds330542,
   Author = {Toda, K and Lusk, NA and Watson, GDR and Kim, N and Lu, D and Li, HE and Meck,
             WH and Yin, HH},
   Title = {Nigrotectal Stimulation Stops Interval Timing in
             Mice.},
   Journal = {Current Biology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {24},
   Pages = {3763-3770.e3},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2017.11.003},
   Abstract = {Considerable evidence implicates the basal ganglia in
             interval timing, yet the underlying mechanisms remain poorly
             understood. Using a novel behavioral task, we demonstrate
             that head-fixed mice can be trained to show the key features
             of timing behavior within a few sessions. Single-trial
             analysis of licking behavior reveals stepping dynamics with
             variable onset times, which is responsible for the canonical
             Gaussian distribution of timing behavior. Moreover, the
             duration of licking bouts decreased as mice became sated,
             showing a strong motivational modulation of licking bout
             initiation and termination. Using optogenetics, we examined
             the role of the basal ganglia output in interval timing. We
             stimulated a pathway important for licking behavior, the
             GABAergic output projections from the substantia nigra pars
             reticulata to the deep layers of the superior colliculus. We
             found that stimulation of this pathway not only cancelled
             licking but also delayed the initiation of anticipatory
             licking for the next interval in a frequency-dependent
             manner. By combining quantitative behavioral analysis with
             optogenetics in the head-fixed setup, we established a new
             approach for studying the neural basis of interval
             timing.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cub.2017.11.003},
   Key = {fds330542}
}

@article{fds329170,
   Author = {Teki, S and Gu, B-M and Meck, WH},
   Title = {The persistence of memory: how the brain encodes time in
             memory},
   Journal = {Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences},
   Volume = {17},
   Pages = {178-185},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cobeha.2017.09.003},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Time and memory are inextricably
             linked, but it is far from clear how event durations and
             temporal sequences are encoded in memory. In this review, we
             focus on resource allocation models of working memory which
             suggest that memory resources can be flexibly distributed
             amongst several items such that the precision of working
             memory decreases with the number of items to be encoded.
             This type of model is consistent with human performance in
             working memory tasks based on visual, auditory as well as
             temporal stimulus patterns. At the neural-network level, we
             focus on excitatory–inhibitory oscillatory processes that
             are able to encode both interval timing and working memory
             in a coupled excitatory–inhibitory network. This
             modification of the striatal beat-frequency model of
             interval timing shows how memories for multiple time
             intervals are represented by neural oscillations and can
             also be used to explain the mechanisms of resource
             allocation in working memory.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cobeha.2017.09.003},
   Key = {fds329170}
}


%% Mitroff, Stephen   
@article{fds329322,
   Author = {Mitroff, SR and Sharpe, B},
   Title = {Using big data to solve real problems through academic and
             industry partnerships},
   Journal = {Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences},
   Volume = {18},
   Pages = {91-96},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cobeha.2017.09.013},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Big data has revolutionized a number of
             industries as it provides a powerful tool for asking and
             answering questions in novel ways. Academic researchers can
             join this trend and use immense and complex datasets to
             explore previously intractable questions. Yet, accessing and
             analyzing big data can be difficult. The goal of this
             chapter is to outline various benefits and challenges of
             using big data for academic purposes, and to provide
             thoughts on how to succeed. The primary suggestion is for
             academics to collaborate with appropriate industry partners
             to simultaneously achieve both theoretical and practical
             advances.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cobeha.2017.09.013},
   Key = {fds329322}
}

@article{fds327186,
   Author = {Biggs, AT and Clark, K and Mitroff, SR},
   Title = {Who should be searching? Differences in personality can
             affect visual search accuracy},
   Journal = {Personality and Individual Differences},
   Volume = {116},
   Pages = {353-358},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2017.04.045},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.paid.2017.04.045},
   Key = {fds327186}
}

@article{fds331411,
   Author = {Ericson, JM and Kravitz, DJ and Mitroff, SR},
   Title = {Visual Search: You Are Who You Are (+ A Learning
             Curve)},
   Journal = {Perception},
   Pages = {030100661772109-030100661772109},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0301006617721091},
   Doi = {10.1177/0301006617721091},
   Key = {fds331411}
}

@article{fds323691,
   Author = {Chang, BP and Cain, D and Mitroff, SR},
   Title = {Emergency department crowding associated with differences in
             CXR interpretations between emergency physicians and
             radiologists.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Emergency Medicine},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {793-794},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2016.12.067},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ajem.2016.12.067},
   Key = {fds323691}
}


%% Moffitt, Terrie E.   
@article{fds329770,
   Author = {Newbury, JB and Arseneault, L and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Danese,
             A and Baldwin, JR and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {Measuring childhood maltreatment to predict early-adult
             psychopathology: Comparison of prospective informant-reports
             and retrospective self-reports.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychiatric Research},
   Volume = {96},
   Pages = {57-64},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.09.020},
   Abstract = {Both prospective informant-reports and retrospective
             self-reports may be used to measure childhood maltreatment,
             though both methods entail potential limitations such as
             underestimation and memory biases. The validity and utility
             of standard measures of childhood maltreatment requires
             clarification in order to inform the design of future
             studies investigating the mental health consequences of
             maltreatment. The present study assessed agreement between
             prospective informant-reports and retrospective self-reports
             of childhood maltreatment, as well as the comparative
             utility of both reports for predicting a range of
             psychiatric problems at age 18. Data were obtained from the
             Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a
             nationally-representative birth cohort of 2232 children
             followed to 18 years of age (with 93% retention). Childhood
             maltreatment was assessed in two ways: (i) prospective
             informant-reports from caregivers, researchers, and
             clinicians when children were aged 5, 7, 10 and 12; and (ii)
             retrospective self-reports of maltreatment experiences
             occurring up to age 12, obtained at age 18 using the
             Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Participants were privately
             interviewed at age 18 concerning several psychiatric
             problems including depression, anxiety, self-injury,
             alcohol/cannabis dependence, and conduct disorder. There was
             only slight to fair agreement between prospective and
             retrospective reports of childhood maltreatment (all
             Kappa's ≤ 0.31). Both prospective and retrospective
             reports of maltreatment were associated with age-18
             psychiatric problems, though the strongest associations were
             found when maltreatment was retrospectively self-reported.
             These findings indicate that prospective and retrospective
             reports of childhood maltreatment capture largely
             non-overlapping groups of individuals. Young adults who
             recall being maltreated have a particularly elevated risk
             for psychopathology.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.09.020},
   Key = {fds329770}
}

@article{fds329192,
   Author = {Baldwin, JR and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Fisher, HL and Moffitt,
             TE and Odgers, CL and Pariante, C and Ambler, A and Dove, R and Kepa, A and Matthews, T and Menard, A and Sugden, K and Williams, B and Danese,
             A},
   Title = {Childhood victimization and inflammation in young adulthood:
             A genetically sensitive cohort study.},
   Journal = {Brain, Behavior, and Immunity},
   Volume = {67},
   Pages = {211-217},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2017.08.025},
   Abstract = {Childhood victimization is an important risk factor for
             later immune-related disorders. Previous evidence has
             demonstrated that childhood victimization is associated with
             elevated levels of inflammation biomarkers measured decades
             after exposure. However, it is unclear whether this
             association is (1) already detectable in young people, (2)
             different in males and females, and (3) confounded by
             genetic liability to inflammation. Here we sought to address
             these questions.Participants were 2232 children followed
             from birth to age 18years as part of the Environmental Risk
             (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study. Childhood victimization
             was measured prospectively from birth to age 12years.
             Inflammation was measured through C-reactive protein (CRP)
             levels in dried blood spots at age 18years. Latent genetic
             liability for high inflammation levels was assessed through
             a twin-based method.Greater exposure to childhood
             victimization was associated with higher CRP levels at age
             18 (serum-equivalent means were 0.65 in non-victimized Study
             members, 0.74 in those exposed to one victimization type,
             and 0.81 in those exposed to poly-victimization; p=0.018).
             However, this association was driven by a significant
             association in females (serum-equivalent means were 0.75 in
             non-victimized females, 0.87 in those exposed to one type of
             victimization, and 1.19 in those exposed to
             poly-victimization; p=0.010), while no significant
             association was observed in males (p=0.19). Victimized
             females showed elevated CRP levels independent of latent
             genetic influence, as well as childhood socioeconomic
             status, and waist-hip ratio and body temperature at the time
             of CRP assessment.Childhood victimization is associated with
             elevated CRP levels in young women, independent of latent
             genetic influences and other key risk factors. These results
             strengthen causal inference about the effects of childhood
             victimization on inflammation levels in females by
             accounting for potential genetic confounding.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bbi.2017.08.025},
   Key = {fds329192}
}

@article{fds331412,
   Author = {Rivenbark, JG and Odgers, CL and Caspi, A and Harrington, H and Hogan,
             S and Houts, RM and Poulton, R and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {The high societal costs of childhood conduct problems:
             evidence from administrative records up to age 38 in a
             longitudinal birth cohort.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12850},
   Abstract = {Children with conduct problems that persist into adulthood
             are at increased risk for future behavioral, health, and
             social problems. However, the longer term public service
             usage among these children has not been fully documented. To
             aid public health and intervention planning, adult service
             usage across criminal justice, health care, and social
             welfare domains is compared among all individuals from a
             representative cohort who followed different conduct problem
             trajectories from childhood into adulthood.Participants are
             from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development
             Study, a prospective, representative cohort of consecutive
             births (N = 1,037) from April 1972 to March 1973 in
             Dunedin, New Zealand. Regression analyses were used to
             compare levels of public service usage up to age 38,
             gathered via administrative and electronic medical records,
             between participants who displayed distinct subtypes of
             childhood conduct problems (low, childhood-limited,
             adolescent-onset, and life-course persistent).Children
             exhibiting life-course persistent conduct problems used
             significantly more services as adults than those with low
             levels of childhood conduct problems. Although this group
             comprised only 9.0% of the population, they accounted for
             53.3% of all convictions, 15.7% of emergency department
             visits, 20.5% of prescription fills, 13.1% of injury claims,
             and 24.7% of welfare benefit months. Half of this group
             (50.0%) also accrued high service use across all three
             domains of criminal justice, health, and social welfare
             services, as compared to only 11.3% of those with low
             conduct problems (OR = 7.27, 95% CI = 4.42-12.0).Conduct
             problems in childhood signal high future costs in terms of
             service utilization across multiple sectors. Future
             evaluations of interventions aimed at conduct problems
             should also track potential reductions in health burden and
             service usage that stretch into midlife.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jcpp.12850},
   Key = {fds331412}
}

@article{fds330410,
   Author = {Newbury, JB and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Odgers,
             CL and Baldwin, JR and Zavos, HMS and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {In the eye of the beholder: Perceptions of neighborhood
             adversity and psychotic experiences in adolescence.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1823-1837},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579417001420},
   Abstract = {Adolescent psychotic experiences increase risk for
             schizophrenia and other severe psychopathology in adulthood.
             Converging evidence implicates urban and adverse
             neighborhood conditions in the etiology of adolescent
             psychotic experiences, but the role of young people's
             personal perceptions of disorder (i.e., physical and social
             signs of threat) in their neighborhood is unknown. This was
             examined using data from the Environmental Risk Longitudinal
             Twin Study, a nationally representative birth cohort of
             2,232 British twins. Participants were interviewed at age 18
             about psychotic phenomena and perceptions of disorder in the
             neighborhood. Multilevel, longitudinal, and genetically
             sensitive analyses investigated the association between
             perceptions of neighborhood disorder and adolescent
             psychotic experiences. Adolescents who perceived higher
             levels of neighborhood disorder were significantly more
             likely to have psychotic experiences, even after accounting
             for objectively/independently measured levels of crime and
             disorder, neighborhood- and family-level socioeconomic
             status, family psychiatric history, adolescent substance and
             mood problems, and childhood psychotic symptoms: odds ratio
             = 1.62, 95% confidence interval [1.27, 2.05], p < .001. The
             phenotypic overlap between adolescent psychotic experiences
             and perceptions of neighborhood disorder was explained by
             overlapping common environmental influences, rC = .88, 95%
             confidence interval [0.26, 1.00]. Findings suggest that
             early psychological interventions to prevent adolescent
             psychotic experiences should explore the role of young
             people's (potentially modifiable) perceptions of threatening
             neighborhood conditions.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579417001420},
   Key = {fds330410}
}

@article{fds330411,
   Author = {Schaefer, JD and Scult, MA and Caspi, A and Arseneault, L and Belsky,
             DW and Hariri, AR and Harrington, H and Houts, R and Ramrakha, S and Poulton, R and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Is low cognitive functioning a predictor or consequence of
             major depressive disorder? A test in two longitudinal birth
             cohorts.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Pages = {1-15},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s095457941700164x},
   Abstract = {Cognitive impairment has been identified as an important
             aspect of major depressive disorder (MDD). We tested two
             theories regarding the association between MDD and cognitive
             functioning using data from longitudinal cohort studies. One
             theory, the cognitive reserve hypothesis, suggests that
             higher cognitive ability in childhood decreases risk of
             later MDD. The second, the scarring hypothesis, instead
             suggests that MDD leads to persistent cognitive deficits
             following disorder onset. We tested both theories in the
             Dunedin Study, a population-representative cohort followed
             from birth to midlife and assessed repeatedly for both
             cognitive functioning and psychopathology. We also used data
             from the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study to test
             whether childhood cognitive functioning predicts future MDD
             risk independent of family-wide and genetic risk using a
             discordant twin design. Contrary to both hypotheses, we
             found that childhood cognitive functioning did not predict
             future risk of MDD, nor did study members with a past
             history of MDD show evidence of greater cognitive decline
             unless MDD was accompanied by other comorbid psychiatric
             conditions. Our results thus suggest that low cognitive
             functioning is related to comorbidity, but is neither an
             antecedent nor an enduring consequence of MDD. Future
             research may benefit from considering cognitive deficits
             that occur during depressive episodes from a transdiagnostic
             perspective.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s095457941700164x},
   Key = {fds330411}
}

@article{fds328626,
   Author = {Matthews, T and Danese, A and Gregory, AM and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Arseneault, L},
   Title = {Sleeping with one eye open: loneliness and sleep quality in
             young adults},
   Journal = {Psychological Medicine},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {2177-2186},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291717000629},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0033291717000629},
   Key = {fds328626}
}

@article{fds328905,
   Author = {Williams, MJA and Milne, BJ and Ambler, A and Theodore, R and Ramrakha,
             S and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Poulton, R},
   Title = {Childhood body mass index and endothelial dysfunction
             evaluated by peripheral arterial tonometry in early
             midlife.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Obesity},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1355-1360},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2017.108},
   Abstract = {Endothelial dysfunction predicts mortality but it is unknown
             whether childhood obesity predicts adult endothelial
             dysfunction. The aim of this study was to determine whether
             anthropometric indices of body fat in childhood, adolescence
             and early midlife are associated with endothelial
             dysfunction in early midlife.Participants belonged to a
             representative birth cohort of 1037 individuals born in
             Dunedin, New Zealand in 1972 and 1973 and followed to age 38
             years, with 95% retention (the Dunedin Multidisciplinary
             Health and Development Study). We assessed anthropometric
             indices of obesity at ages 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 18, 21,
             26, 32 and 38 years. We tested associations between
             endothelial function assessed by peripheral arterial
             tonometry (PAT) at age 38 and; age 38 cardiovascular risk
             factors; age 3 body mass index (BMI); and four BMI
             trajectory groups from childhood to early midlife.Early
             midlife endothelial dysfunction was associated with BMI,
             large waist circumference, low high-density lipoprotein
             cholesterol, low cardiorespiratory fitness and increased
             high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. After adjustment for
             sex and childhood socioeconomic status, 3-year-olds with BMI
             1 s.d. above the mean had Framingham-reactive hyperemia
             index (F-RHI) ratios that were 0.10 below those with normal
             BMI (β=-0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.17 to -0.03,
             P=0.007) at age 38. Cohort members in the 'overweight',
             'obese' and 'morbidly obese' trajectories had F-RHI ratios
             that were 0.08 (β=-0.08, 95% CI -0.14 to -0.03, P=0.003),
             0.13 (β=-0.13, 95% CI -0.21 to -0.06, P<0.001) and 0.17
             (β=-0.17, 95% CI -0.33 to -0.01, P=0.033), respectively,
             below age-peers in the 'normal' trajectory.Childhood BMI and
             the trajectories of BMI from childhood to early midlife
             predict endothelial dysfunction evaluated by PAT in early
             midlife.},
   Doi = {10.1038/ijo.2017.108},
   Key = {fds328905}
}

@article{fds327018,
   Author = {Suppli, NP and Bukh, JD and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Johansen, C and Tjønneland, A and Kessing, LV and Dalton, SO},
   Title = {Genetic variants in 5-HTTLPR, BDNF, HTR1A, COMT, and FKBP5
             and risk for treated depression after cancer
             diagnosis.},
   Journal = {Depression and Anxiety},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {845-855},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/da.22660},
   Abstract = {The role of gene-environment interactions in the
             pathogenesis of depression is unclear. Previous studies
             addressed vulnerability for depression after childhood
             adversity and stressful life events among carriers of
             numerous specific genetic variants; however, the importance
             of individual genetic variants, the environmental exposures
             with which they interact, and the magnitude of the risk
             conveyed by these interactions remain elusive.We included
             7,320 people with a first primary cancer identified in the
             prospective Diet, Cancer and Health study in an exposed-only
             cohort study. The mean age of the individuals was 68 years
             (5th, 95th percentiles: 58, 78) at cancer diagnosis. Using
             Cox regression models and cumulative incidence plots, we
             analyzed the associations between genetic variants in
             5-HTTLPR, BDNF, HTR1A, COMT, and FKBP5 and use of
             antidepressants as well as hospital contact for depression
             after diagnosis of cancer.Overall, we observed no
             statistically significant associations, with nonsignificant
             hazard ratio estimates for use of antidepressants of
             0.95-1.07.This study of elderly people indicates that it is
             unlikely that the investigated genetic variants are
             clinically relevantly associated with depression after
             diagnosis of cancer. The mechanisms for gene-environment
             interactions in younger individuals are probably different,
             and we advise caution in extrapolating our results to early
             life stress. However, conclusion from the present study
             might be generalizable to elderly persons exposed to other
             stressful life events.},
   Doi = {10.1002/da.22660},
   Key = {fds327018}
}

@article{fds321669,
   Author = {Erskine, HE and Baxter, AJ and Patton, G and Moffitt, TE and Patel, V and Whiteford, HA and Scott, JG},
   Title = {The global coverage of prevalence data for mental disorders
             in children and adolescents.},
   Journal = {Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {395-402},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s2045796015001158},
   Abstract = {Children and adolescents make up almost a quarter of the
             world's population with 85% living in low- and middle-income
             countries (LMICs). Globally, mental (and substance use)
             disorders are the leading cause of disability in young
             people; however, the representativeness or 'coverage' of the
             prevalence data is unknown. Coverage refers to the
             proportion of the target population (ages 5-17 years)
             represented by the available data.Prevalence data for
             conduct disorder (CD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity
             disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), eating
             disorders (EDs), depression, and anxiety disorders were
             sourced from systematic reviews conducted for the Global
             Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010) and 2013 (GBD 2013).
             For each study, the location proportion was multiplied by
             the age proportion to give study coverage. Location
             proportion was calculated by dividing the total study
             location population by the total study location population.
             Age proportion was calculated by dividing the population of
             the country aged within the age range of the study sample by
             the population of the country aged within the age range of
             the study sample. If a study only sampled one sex, study
             coverage was halved. Coverage across studies was then summed
             for each country to give coverage by country. This method
             was repeated at the region and global level, and separately
             for GBD 2013 and GBD 2010.Mean global coverage of prevalence
             data for mental disorders in ages 5-17 years was 6.7% (CD:
             5.0%, ADHD: 5.5%, ASDs: 16.1%, EDs: 4.4%, depression: 6.2%,
             anxiety: 3.2%). Of 187 countries, 124 had no data for any
             disorder. Many LMICs were poorly represented in the
             available prevalence data, for example, no region in
             sub-Saharan Africa had more than 2% coverage for any
             disorder. While coverage increased between GBD 2010 and GBD
             2013, this differed greatly between disorders and few new
             countries provided data.The global coverage of prevalence
             data for mental disorders in children and adolescents is
             limited. Practical methodology must be developed and
             epidemiological surveys funded to provide representative
             prevalence estimates so as to inform appropriate resource
             allocation and support policies that address mental health
             needs of children and adolescents.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s2045796015001158},
   Key = {fds321669}
}

@article{fds326210,
   Author = {Belsky, DW and Caspi, A and Cohen, HJ and Kraus, WE and Ramrakha, S and Poulton, R and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Impact of early personal-history characteristics on the Pace
             of Aging: implications for clinical trials of therapies to
             slow aging and extend healthspan.},
   Journal = {Aging Cell},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {644-651},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acel.12591},
   Abstract = {Therapies to extend healthspan are poised to move from
             laboratory animal models to human clinical trials.
             Translation from mouse to human will entail challenges,
             among them the multifactorial heterogeneity of human aging.
             To inform clinical trials about this heterogeneity, we
             report how humans' pace of biological aging relates to
             personal-history characteristics. Because geroprotective
             therapies must be delivered by midlife to prevent
             age-related disease onset, we studied young-adult members of
             the Dunedin Study 1972-73 birth cohort (n = 954). Cohort
             members' Pace of Aging was measured as coordinated decline
             in the integrity of multiple organ systems, by quantifying
             rate of decline across repeated measurements of 18
             biomarkers assayed when cohort members were ages 26, 32, and
             38 years. The childhood personal-history characteristics
             studied were known predictors of age-related disease and
             mortality, and were measured prospectively during childhood.
             Personal-history characteristics of familial longevity,
             childhood social class, adverse childhood experiences, and
             childhood health, intelligence, and self-control all
             predicted differences in cohort members' adulthood Pace of
             Aging. Accumulation of more personal-history risks predicted
             faster Pace of Aging. Because trials of anti-aging therapies
             will need to ascertain personal histories retrospectively,
             we replicated results using cohort members' retrospective
             personal-history reports made in adulthood. Because many
             trials recruit participants from clinical settings, we
             replicated results in the cohort subset who had recent
             health system contact according to electronic medical
             records. Quick, inexpensive measures of trial participants'
             early personal histories can enable clinical trials to study
             who volunteers for trials, who adheres to treatment, and who
             responds to anti-aging therapies.},
   Doi = {10.1111/acel.12591},
   Key = {fds326210}
}

@article{fds328906,
   Author = {Meier, MH and Caspi, A and Danese, A and Fisher, HL and Houts, R and Arseneault, L and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Associations between adolescent cannabis use and
             neuropsychological decline: a longitudinal co-twin control
             study.},
   Journal = {Addiction},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/add.13946},
   Abstract = {This study tested whether adolescents who used cannabis or
             met criteria for cannabis dependence showed
             neuropsychological impairment prior to cannabis initiation
             and neuropsychological decline from before to after cannabis
             initiation.A longitudinal co-twin control study.Participants
             were 1989 twins from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk)
             Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally representative birth
             cohort of twins born in England and Wales from 1994 to
             1995.Frequency of cannabis use and cannabis dependence were
             assessed at age 18. Intelligence quotient (IQ) was obtained
             at ages 5, 12 and 18. Executive functions were assessed at
             age 18.Compared with adolescents who did not use cannabis,
             adolescents who used cannabis had lower IQ in childhood
             prior to cannabis initiation and lower IQ at age 18, but
             there was little evidence that cannabis use was associated
             with IQ decline from ages 12-18. For example, adolescents
             with cannabis dependence had age 12 and age 18 IQ scores
             that were 5.61 (t = -3.11, P = 0.002) and 7.34 IQ points
             (t = -5.27, P < 0.001) lower than adolescents without
             cannabis dependence, but adolescents with cannabis
             dependence did not show greater IQ decline from age 12-18
             (t = -1.27, P = 0.20). Moreover, adolescents who used
             cannabis had poorer executive functions at age 18 than
             adolescents who did not use cannabis, but these associations
             were generally not apparent within twin pairs. For example,
             twins who used cannabis more frequently than their co-twin
             performed similarly to their co-twin on five of six
             executive function tests (Ps > 0.10). The one exception
             was that twins who used cannabis more frequently than their
             co-twin performed worse on one working memory test (Spatial
             Span reversed; β = -0.07, P = 0.036).Short-term
             cannabis use in adolescence does not appear to cause IQ
             decline or impair executive functions, even when cannabis
             use reaches the level of dependence. Family background
             factors explain why adolescent cannabis users perform worse
             on IQ and executive function tests.},
   Doi = {10.1111/add.13946},
   Key = {fds328906}
}

@article{fds329193,
   Author = {Newbury, J and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Odgers,
             CL and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {Cumulative Effects of Neighborhood Social Adversity and
             Personal Crime Victimization on Adolescent Psychotic
             Experiences.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbx060},
   Abstract = {Little is known about the impact of urbanicity, adverse
             neighborhood conditions and violent crime victimization on
             the emergence of adolescent psychotic experiences.Participants
             were from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin
             Study, a nationally-representative cohort of 2232 British
             twins who were interviewed about adolescent psychotic
             experiences at age 18. Urbanicity, neighborhood
             characteristics, and personal victimization by violent crime
             were measured during childhood and adolescence via geocoded
             census data, surveys of over 5000 immediate neighbors of the
             E-Risk participants, and interviews with participants
             themselves.Adolescents raised in urban vs rural
             neighborhoods were significantly more likely to have
             psychotic experiences (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.21-2.30, P =
             .002). This association remained significant after
             considering potential confounders including family
             socioeconomic status, family psychiatric history, and
             adolescent substance problems (OR = 1.43, 95% CI =
             1.01-2.03, P = .042), but became nonsignificant after
             considering adverse social conditions in urban neighborhoods
             such as low social cohesion and high neighborhood disorder
             (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.94-1.92, P = .102). The combined
             association of adverse neighborhood social conditions and
             personal crime victimization with adolescent psychotic
             experiences (adjusted OR = 4.86, 95% CI = 3.28-7.20, P <
             .001) was substantially greater than for either exposure
             alone, highlighting a potential interaction between
             neighborhood conditions and crime victimization (interaction
             contrast ratio = 1.81, 95% CI = -0.03 to 3.65) that was
             significant at the P = .054 level.Cumulative effects of
             adverse neighborhood social conditions and personal
             victimization by violent crime during upbringing partly
             explain why adolescents in urban settings are more likely to
             report psychotic experiences. Early intervention efforts for
             psychosis could be targeted towards victimized youth living
             in urban and socially adverse neighborhoods.},
   Doi = {10.1093/schbul/sbx060},
   Key = {fds329193}
}

@article{fds325850,
   Author = {Kotov, R and Krueger, RF and Watson, D and Achenbach, TM and Althoff,
             RR and Bagby, RM and Brown, TA and Carpenter, WT and Caspi, A and Clark,
             LA and Eaton, NR and Forbes, MK and Forbush, KT and Goldberg, D and Hasin,
             D and Hyman, SE and Ivanova, MY and Lynam, DR and Markon, K and Miller, JD and Moffitt, TE and Morey, LC and Mullins-Sweatt, SN and Ormel, J and Patrick, CJ and Regier, DA and Rescorla, L and Ruggero, CJ and Samuel,
             DB and Sellbom, M and Simms, LJ and Skodol, AE and Slade, T and South, SC and Tackett, JL and Waldman, ID and Waszczuk, MA and Widiger, TA and Wright,
             AGC and Zimmerman, M},
   Title = {The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP): A
             dimensional alternative to traditional nosologies.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {126},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {454-477},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/abn0000258},
   Abstract = {The reliability and validity of traditional taxonomies are
             limited by arbitrary boundaries between psychopathology and
             normality, often unclear boundaries between disorders,
             frequent disorder co-occurrence, heterogeneity within
             disorders, and diagnostic instability. These taxonomies went
             beyond evidence available on the structure of
             psychopathology and were shaped by a variety of other
             considerations, which may explain the aforementioned
             shortcomings. The Hierarchical Taxonomy Of Psychopathology
             (HiTOP) model has emerged as a research effort to address
             these problems. It constructs psychopathological syndromes
             and their components/subtypes based on the observed
             covariation of symptoms, grouping related symptoms together
             and thus reducing heterogeneity. It also combines
             co-occurring syndromes into spectra, thereby mapping out
             comorbidity. Moreover, it characterizes these phenomena
             dimensionally, which addresses boundary problems and
             diagnostic instability. Here, we review the development of
             the HiTOP and the relevant evidence. The new classification
             already covers most forms of psychopathology. Dimensional
             measures have been developed to assess many of the
             identified components, syndromes, and spectra. Several
             domains of this model are ready for clinical and research
             applications. The HiTOP promises to improve research and
             clinical practice by addressing the aforementioned
             shortcomings of traditional nosologies. It also provides an
             effective way to summarize and convey information on risk
             factors, etiology, pathophysiology, phenomenology, illness
             course, and treatment response. This can greatly improve the
             utility of the diagnosis of mental disorders. The new
             classification remains a work in progress. However, it is
             developing rapidly and is poised to advance mental health
             research and care significantly as the relevant science
             matures. (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/abn0000258},
   Key = {fds325850}
}

@article{fds326211,
   Author = {Romer, AL and Knodt, AR and Houts, R and Brigidi, BD and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {Structural alterations within cerebellar circuitry are
             associated with general liability for common mental
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Abstract = {Accumulating mental-health research encourages a shift in
             focus toward transdiagnostic dimensional features that are
             shared across categorical disorders. In support of this
             shift, recent studies have identified a general liability
             factor for psychopathology-sometimes called the 'p factor'-
             that underlies shared risk for a wide range of mental
             disorders. Identifying neural correlates of this general
             liability would substantiate its importance in
             characterizing the shared origins of mental disorders and
             help us begin to understand the mechanisms through which the
             'p factor' contributes to risk. Here we believe we first
             replicate the 'p factor' using cross-sectional data from a
             volunteer sample of 1246 university students, and then using
             high-resolution multimodal structural neuroimaging, we
             demonstrate that individuals with higher 'p factor' scores
             show reduced structural integrity of white matter pathways,
             as indexed by lower fractional anisotropy values, uniquely
             within the pons. Whole-brain analyses further revealed that
             higher 'p factor' scores are associated with reduced gray
             matter volume in the occipital lobe and left cerebellar
             lobule VIIb, which is functionally connected with prefrontal
             regions supporting cognitive control. Consistent with the
             preponderance of cerebellar afferents within the pons, we
             observed a significant positive correlation between the
             white matter integrity of the pons and cerebellar gray
             matter volume associated with higher 'p factor' scores. The
             results of our analyses provide initial evidence that
             structural alterations in corticocerebellar circuitry
             supporting core functions related to the basic integration,
             coordination and monitoring of information may contribute to
             a general liability for common mental disorders.Molecular
             Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 April 2017;
             doi:10.1038/mp.2017.57.},
   Doi = {10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Key = {fds326211}
}

@article{fds325487,
   Author = {Arseneault, L and Agnew-Blais, J and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Child vs Adult Onset of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity
             Disorder-Reply.},
   Journal = {JAMA Psychiatry},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {422-423},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.2781},
   Doi = {10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.2781},
   Key = {fds325487}
}

@article{fds324440,
   Author = {Danese, A and Moffitt, TE and Arseneault, L and Bleiberg, BA and Dinardo, PB and Gandelman, SB and Houts, R and Ambler, A and Fisher, HL and Poulton, R and Caspi, A},
   Title = {The Origins of Cognitive Deficits in Victimized Children:
             Implications for Neuroscientists and Clinicians.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {174},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {349-361},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.16030333},
   Abstract = {Individuals reporting a history of childhood violence
             victimization have impaired brain function. However, the
             clinical significance, reproducibility, and causality of
             these findings are disputed. The authors used data from two
             large cohort studies to address these research questions
             directly.The authors tested the association between
             prospectively collected measures of childhood violence
             victimization and cognitive functions in childhood,
             adolescence, and adulthood among 2,232 members of the U.K.
             E-Risk Study and 1,037 members of the New Zealand Dunedin
             Study who were followed up from birth until ages 18 and 38
             years, respectively. Multiple measures of victimization and
             cognition were used, and comparisons were made of cognitive
             scores for twins discordant for victimization.Individuals
             exposed to childhood victimization had pervasive impairments
             in clinically relevant cognitive functions, including
             general intelligence, executive function, processing speed,
             memory, perceptual reasoning, and verbal comprehension in
             adolescence and adulthood. However, the observed cognitive
             deficits in victimized individuals were largely explained by
             cognitive deficits that predated childhood victimization and
             by confounding genetic and environmental risks.Findings from
             two population-representative birth cohorts totaling more
             than 3,000 individuals and born 20 years and 20,000 km apart
             suggest that the association between childhood violence
             victimization and later cognition is largely noncausal, in
             contrast to conventional interpretations. These findings
             support the adoption of a more circumspect approach to
             causal inference in the neuroscience of stress. Clinically,
             cognitive deficits should be conceptualized as individual
             risk factors for victimization as well as potential
             complicating features during treatment.},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.16030333},
   Key = {fds324440}
}

@article{fds325849,
   Author = {Reuben, A and Caspi, A and Belsky, DW and Broadbent, J and Harrington,
             H and Sugden, K and Houts, RM and Ramrakha, S and Poulton, R and Moffitt,
             TE},
   Title = {Association of Childhood Blood Lead Levels With Cognitive
             Function and Socioeconomic Status at Age 38 Years and With
             IQ Change and Socioeconomic Mobility Between Childhood and
             Adulthood.},
   Journal = {JAMA : the journal of the American Medical
             Association},
   Volume = {317},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1244-1251},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2017.1712},
   Abstract = {Many children in the United States and around the world are
             exposed to lead, a developmental neurotoxin. The long-term
             cognitive and socioeconomic consequences of lead exposure
             are uncertain.To test the hypothesis that childhood lead
             exposure is associated with cognitive function and
             socioeconomic status in adulthood and with changes in IQ and
             socioeconomic mobility between childhood and midlife.A
             prospective cohort study based on a population-representative
             1972-1973 birth cohort from New Zealand; the Dunedin
             Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study observed
             participants to age 38 years (until December 2012).Childhood
             lead exposure ascertained as blood lead levels measured at
             age 11 years. High blood lead levels were observed among
             children from all socioeconomic status levels in this
             cohort.The IQ (primary outcome) and indexes of Verbal
             Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Working Memory, and
             Processing Speed (secondary outcomes) were assessed at age
             38 years using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV
             (WAIS-IV; IQ range, 40-160). Socioeconomic status (primary
             outcome) was assessed at age 38 years using the New Zealand
             Socioeconomic Index-2006 (NZSEI-06; range, 10 [lowest]-90
             [highest]).Of 1037 original participants, 1007 were alive at
             age 38 years, of whom 565 (56%) had been lead tested at age
             11 years (54% male; 93% white). Mean (SD) blood lead level
             at age 11 years was 10.99 (4.63) µg/dL. Among blood-tested
             participants included at age 38 years, mean WAIS-IV score
             was 101.16 (14.82) and mean NZSEI-06 score was 49.75
             (17.12). After adjusting for maternal IQ, childhood IQ, and
             childhood socioeconomic status, each 5-µg/dL higher level
             of blood lead in childhood was associated with a 1.61-point
             lower score (95% CI, -2.48 to -0.74) in adult IQ, a
             2.07-point lower score (95% CI, -3.14 to -1.01) in
             perceptual reasoning, and a 1.26-point lower score (95% CI,
             -2.38 to -0.14) in working memory. Associations of childhood
             blood lead level with deficits in verbal comprehension and
             processing speed were not statistically significant. After
             adjusting for confounders, each 5-µg/dL higher level of
             blood lead in childhood was associated with a 1.79-unit
             lower score (95% CI, -3.17 to -0.40) in socioeconomic
             status. An association between greater blood lead levels and
             a decline in IQ and socioeconomic status from childhood to
             adulthood was observed with 40% of the association with
             downward mobility mediated by cognitive decline from
             childhood.In this cohort born in New Zealand in 1972-1973,
             childhood lead exposure was associated with lower cognitive
             function and socioeconomic status at age 38 years and with
             declines in IQ and with downward social mobility. Childhood
             lead exposure may have long-term ramifications.},
   Doi = {10.1001/jama.2017.1712},
   Key = {fds325849}
}

@article{fds321664,
   Author = {Gregory, AM and Agnew-Blais, JC and Matthews, T and Moffitt, TE and Arseneault, L},
   Title = {ADHD and Sleep Quality: Longitudinal Analyses From Childhood
             to Early Adulthood in a Twin Cohort.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {284-294},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2016.1183499},
   Abstract = {Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is
             associated with poor sleep quality, but there is more to
             learn about the longitudinal association and aetiology of
             this association. We investigated the following: (a) Is
             there an association between childhood ADHD and poor sleep
             quality in young adulthood? (b) Is this driven by the
             long-term effects of childhood ADHD or concurrent
             associations with ADHD in young adulthood? (c) To what
             extent do genetic and environmental influences explain the
             overlap between symptoms of ADHD and poor sleep quality?
             Participants were from the Environmental Risk Longitudinal
             Twin Study of 2,232 twin children born in the United Kingdom
             in 1994-1995. We ascertained ADHD diagnoses at ages 5, 7,
             10, 12, and 18. We assessed sleep quality using the
             Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index at age 18. We used regression
             models to examine longitudinal associations and bivariate
             twin modelling to test genetic and environmental influences.
             Children with ADHD had poorer sleep quality in young
             adulthood, but only if their ADHD persisted. Adults with
             ADHD had more sleep problems than those without ADHD, over
             and above psychiatric comorbidity and maternal insomnia.
             ADHD and sleep problems in young adulthood were associated
             because of genetic (55%) and nonshared environmental
             influences (45%). Should ADHD remit, children with ADHD do
             not appear to have an increased risk of later sleep
             problems. Good quality sleep is important for multiple areas
             of functioning, and a better understanding of why adults
             with ADHD have poorer sleep quality will further the goal of
             improving treatments.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374416.2016.1183499},
   Key = {fds321664}
}

@article{fds324773,
   Author = {Moffitt, TE and Belsky, DW and Danese, A and Poulton, R and Caspi,
             A},
   Title = {The Longitudinal Study of Aging in Human Young Adults:
             Knowledge Gaps and Research Agenda.},
   Journal = {Journals of Gerontology: Series A},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {210-215},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glw191},
   Abstract = {To prevent onset of age-related diseases and physical and
             cognitive decline, interventions to slow human aging and
             extend health span must eventually be applied to people
             while they are still young and healthy. Yet most human aging
             research examines older adults, many with chronic disease,
             and little is known about aging in healthy young humans.This
             article explains how this knowledge gap is a barrier to
             extending health span and puts forward the case that
             geroscience should invest in researching the pace of aging
             in young adults. As one illustrative example, we describe an
             initial effort to study the pace of aging in a young-adult
             birth cohort by using repeated waves of biomarkers collected
             across the third and fourth decades to quantify the pace of
             coordinated physiological deterioration across multiple
             organ systems (eg, pulmonary, periodontal, cardiovascular,
             renal, hepatic, metabolic, and immune function).Findings
             provided proof of principle that it is possible to quantify
             individual variation in the pace of aging in young adults
             still free of age-related diseases.This article articulates
             research needs to improve longitudinal measurement of the
             pace of aging in young people, to pinpoint factors that slow
             or speed the pace of aging, to compare pace of aging against
             genomic clocks, to explain slow-aging young adults, and to
             apply pace of aging in preventive clinical trials of
             antiaging therapies. This article puts forward a research
             agenda to fill the knowledge gap concerning lifelong causes
             of aging.},
   Doi = {10.1093/gerona/glw191},
   Key = {fds324773}
}

@article{fds321672,
   Author = {Schaefer, JD and Caspi, A and Belsky, DW and Harrington, H and Houts, R and Horwood, LJ and Hussong, A and Ramrakha, S and Poulton, R and Moffitt,
             TE},
   Title = {Enduring mental health: Prevalence and prediction.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {126},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {212-224},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/abn0000232},
   Abstract = {We review epidemiological evidence indicating that most
             people will develop a diagnosable mental disorder,
             suggesting that only a minority experience enduring mental
             health. This minority has received little empirical study,
             leaving the prevalence and predictors of enduring mental
             health unknown. We turn to the population-representative
             Dunedin cohort, followed from birth to midlife, to compare
             people never-diagnosed with mental disorder (N = 171; 17%
             prevalence) to those diagnosed at 1-2 study waves, the
             cohort mode (N = 409). Surprisingly, compared to this modal
             group, never-diagnosed Study members were not born into
             unusually well-to-do families, nor did their enduring mental
             health follow markedly sound physical health, or unusually
             high intelligence. Instead, they tended to have an
             advantageous temperament/personality style, and negligible
             family history of mental disorder. As adults, they report
             superior educational and occupational attainment, greater
             life satisfaction, and higher-quality relationships. Our
             findings draw attention to "enduring mental health" as a
             revealing psychological phenotype and suggest it deserves
             further study. (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/abn0000232},
   Key = {fds321672}
}

@article{fds320829,
   Author = {Scult, MA and Paulli, AR and Mazure, ES and Moffitt, TE and Hariri, AR and Strauman, TJ},
   Title = {The association between cognitive function and subsequent
             depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.},
   Journal = {Psychological Medicine},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-17},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0033291716002075},
   Abstract = {Despite a growing interest in understanding the cognitive
             deficits associated with major depressive disorder (MDD), it
             is largely unknown whether such deficits exist before
             disorder onset or how they might influence the severity of
             subsequent illness. The purpose of the present study was to
             conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of
             longitudinal datasets to determine whether cognitive
             function acts as a predictor of later MDD diagnosis or
             change in depression symptoms. Eligible studies included
             longitudinal designs with baseline measures of cognitive
             functioning, and later unipolar MDD diagnosis or symptom
             assessment. The systematic review identified 29
             publications, representing 34 unique samples, and 121 749
             participants, that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria.
             Quantitative meta-analysis demonstrated that higher
             cognitive function was associated with decreased levels of
             subsequent depression (r = -0.088, 95% confidence interval.
             -0.121 to -0.054, p < 0.001). However, sensitivity analyses
             revealed that this association is likely driven by
             concurrent depression symptoms at the time of cognitive
             assessment. Our review and meta-analysis indicate that the
             association between lower cognitive function and later
             depression is confounded by the presence of contemporaneous
             depression symptoms at the time of cognitive assessment.
             Thus, cognitive deficits predicting MDD likely represent
             deleterious effects of subclinical depression symptoms on
             performance rather than premorbid risk factors for
             disorder.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0033291716002075},
   Key = {fds320829}
}


%% Nicolelis, Miguel A.   
@article{fds326638,
   Author = {Yadav, AP and Nicolelis, MAL},
   Title = {Electrical stimulation of the dorsal columns of the spinal
             cord for Parkinson's disease.},
   Journal = {Movement Disorders},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {820-832},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.27033},
   Abstract = {Spinal cord stimulation has been used for the treatment of
             chronic pain for decades. In 2009, our laboratory proposed,
             based on studies in rodents, that electrical stimulation of
             the dorsal columns of the spinal cord could become an
             effective treatment for motor symptoms associated with
             Parkinson's disease (PD). Since our initial report in
             rodents and a more recent study in primates, several
             clinical studies have now described beneficial effects of
             dorsal column stimulation in parkinsonian patients. In
             primates, we have shown that dorsal column stimulation
             activates multiple structures along the somatosensory
             pathway and desynchronizes the pathological cortico-striatal
             oscillations responsible for the manifestation of PD
             symptoms. Based on recent evidence, we argue that
             neurological disorders such as PD can be broadly classified
             as diseases emerging from abnormal neuronal timing, leading
             to pathological brain states, and that the spinal cord could
             be used as a "channel" to transmit therapeutic electrical
             signals to disrupt these abnormalities. © 2017
             International Parkinson and Movement Disorder
             Society.},
   Doi = {10.1002/mds.27033},
   Key = {fds326638}
}

@article{fds326639,
   Author = {Ramakrishnan, A and Byun, YW and Rand, K and Pedersen, CE and Lebedev,
             MA and Nicolelis, MAL},
   Title = {Cortical neurons multiplex reward-related signals along with
             sensory and motor information.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {114},
   Number = {24},
   Pages = {E4841-E4850},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1703668114},
   Abstract = {Rewards are known to influence neural activity associated
             with both motor preparation and execution. This influence
             can be exerted directly upon the primary motor (M1) and
             somatosensory (S1) cortical areas via the projections from
             reward-sensitive dopaminergic neurons of the midbrain
             ventral tegmental areas. However, the neurophysiological
             manifestation of reward-related signals in M1 and S1 are not
             well understood. Particularly, it is unclear how the neurons
             in these cortical areas multiplex their traditional
             functions related to the control of spatial and temporal
             characteristics of movements with the representation of
             rewards. To clarify this issue, we trained rhesus monkeys to
             perform a center-out task in which arm movement direction,
             reward timing, and magnitude were manipulated independently.
             Activity of several hundred cortical neurons was
             simultaneously recorded using chronically implanted
             microelectrode arrays. Many neurons (9-27%) in both M1 and
             S1 exhibited activity related to reward anticipation.
             Additionally, neurons in these areas responded to a mismatch
             between the reward amount given to the monkeys and the
             amount they expected: A lower-than-expected reward caused a
             transient increase in firing rate in 60-80% of the total
             neuronal sample, whereas a larger-than-expected reward
             resulted in a decreased firing rate in 20-35% of the
             neurons. Moreover, responses of M1 and S1 neurons to reward
             omission depended on the direction of movements that led to
             those rewards. These observations suggest that sensorimotor
             cortical neurons corepresent rewards and movement-related
             activity, presumably to enable reward-based
             learning.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.1703668114},
   Key = {fds326639}
}

@article{fds325514,
   Author = {Lebedev, MA and Nicolelis, MAL},
   Title = {Brain-Machine Interfaces: From Basic Science to
             Neuroprostheses and Neurorehabilitation.},
   Journal = {Physiological reviews},
   Volume = {97},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {767-837},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/physrev.00027.2016},
   Abstract = {Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) combine methods, approaches,
             and concepts derived from neurophysiology, computer science,
             and engineering in an effort to establish real-time
             bidirectional links between living brains and artificial
             actuators. Although theoretical propositions and some proof
             of concept experiments on directly linking the brains with
             machines date back to the early 1960s, BMI research only
             took off in earnest at the end of the 1990s, when this
             approach became intimately linked to new neurophysiological
             methods for sampling large-scale brain activity. The classic
             goals of BMIs are 1) to unveil and utilize principles of
             operation and plastic properties of the distributed and
             dynamic circuits of the brain and 2) to create new therapies
             to restore mobility and sensations to severely disabled
             patients. Over the past decade, a wide range of BMI
             applications have emerged, which considerably expanded these
             original goals. BMI studies have shown neural control over
             the movements of robotic and virtual actuators that enact
             both upper and lower limb functions. Furthermore, BMIs have
             also incorporated ways to deliver sensory feedback,
             generated from external actuators, back to the brain. BMI
             research has been at the forefront of many
             neurophysiological discoveries, including the demonstration
             that, through continuous use, artificial tools can be
             assimilated by the primate brain's body schema. Work on BMIs
             has also led to the introduction of novel
             neurorehabilitation strategies. As a result of these
             efforts, long-term continuous BMI use has been recently
             implicated with the induction of partial neurological
             recovery in spinal cord injury patients.},
   Doi = {10.1152/physrev.00027.2016},
   Key = {fds325514}
}

@article{fds325874,
   Author = {Vouga, T and Zhuang, KZ and Olivier, J and Lebedev, MA and Nicolelis,
             MAL and Bouri, M and Bleuler, H},
   Title = {EXiO-A Brain-Controlled Lower Limb Exoskeleton for Rhesus
             Macaques.},
   Journal = {IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation
             Engineering},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {131-141},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/tnsre.2017.2659654},
   Abstract = {Recent advances in the field of brain-machine interfaces
             (BMIs) have demonstrated enormous potential to shape the
             future of rehabilitation and prosthetic devices. Here, a
             lower-limb exoskeleton controlled by the intracortical
             activity of an awake behaving rhesus macaque is presented as
             a proof-of-concept for a locomotorBMI. A detailed
             description of the mechanical device, including its
             innovative features and first experimental results, is
             provided. During operation, BMI-decoded position and
             velocity are directly mapped onto the bipedal exoskeleton's
             motions, which then move the monkey's legs as the monkey
             remains physicallypassive. To meet the unique requirements
             of such an application, the exoskeleton's features include:
             high output torque with backdrivable actuation, size
             adjustability, and safe user-robot interface. In addition, a
             novel rope transmission is introduced and implemented. To
             test the performance of the exoskeleton, a mechanical
             assessment was conducted, which yielded quantifiable results
             for transparency, efficiency, stiffness, and tracking
             performance. Usage under both brain control and automated
             actuation demonstrates the device's capability to fulfill
             the demanding needs of this application. These results lay
             the groundwork for further advancement in BMI-controlled
             devices for primates including humans.},
   Doi = {10.1109/tnsre.2017.2659654},
   Key = {fds325874}
}

@article{fds330459,
   Author = {Nicolelis, MAL},
   Title = {Are we at risk of becoming biological digital
             machines?},
   Journal = {Nature Human Behaviour},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {0008-0008},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41562-016-0008},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41562-016-0008},
   Key = {fds330459}
}

@article{7951637,
   Author = {Wiest, M.C. and Nicolelis, M.A.L.},
   Title = {Behavioral detection of tactile stimuli during 7-12 Hz
             cortical oscillations in awake rats},
   Journal = {Nat. Neurosci. (USA)},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {913 - 14},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn1107},
   Keywords = {bioelectric potentials;biological techniques;brain;microelectrodes;neurophysiology;touch
             (physiological);},
   Abstract = {Prominent 7-12 Hz oscillations in the primary somatosensory
             cortex (S1) of awake but immobile rats might represent a
             seizure-like state1 in which neuronal burst firing renders
             animals unresponsive to incoming tactile stimuli; others
             have proposed that these oscillations are analogous to human
             &mu; rhythm. To test whether rats can respond to tactile
             stimuli during 7-12 Hz oscillatory activity, we trained
             head-immobilized awake animals to indicate whether they
             could detect the occurrence of transient whisker deflections
             while we recorded local field potentials (LFPs) from
             microelectrode arrays implanted bilaterally in the S1
             whisker representation area. They responded rapidly and
             reliably, suggesting that this brain rhythm represents
             normal physiological activity that does not preclude
             perception},
   Key = {7951637}
}


%% Nowicki, Stephen   
@article{fds324221,
   Author = {Anderson, RC and Searcy, WA and Peters, S and Hughes, M and DuBois, AL and Nowicki, S},
   Title = {Song learning and cognitive ability are not consistently
             related in a songbird.},
   Journal = {Animal Cognition},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {309-320},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-016-1053-7},
   Abstract = {Learned aspects of song have been hypothesized to signal
             cognitive ability in songbirds. We tested this hypothesis in
             hand-reared song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) that were
             tutored with playback of adult songs during the critical
             period for song learning. The songs developed by the 19 male
             subjects were compared to the model songs to produce two
             measures of song learning: the proportion of notes copied
             from models and the average spectrogram cross-correlation
             between copied notes and model notes. Song repertoire size,
             which reflects song complexity, was also measured. At
             1 year of age, subjects were given a battery of five
             cognitive tests that measured speed of learning in the
             context of a novel foraging task, color association, color
             reversal, detour-reaching, and spatial learning. Bivariate
             correlations between the three song measures and the five
             cognitive measures revealed no significant associations. As
             in other studies of avian cognition, different cognitive
             measures were for the most part not correlated with each
             other, and this result remained true when 22 hand-reared
             female song sparrows were added to the analysis. General
             linear mixed models controlling for effects of neophobia and
             nest of origin indicated that all three song measures were
             associated with better performance on color reversal and
             spatial learning but were associated with worse performance
             on novel foraging and detour-reaching. Overall, the results
             do not support the hypothesis that learned aspects of song
             signal cognitive ability.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10071-016-1053-7},
   Key = {fds324221}
}

@article{fds326813,
   Author = {Anderson, R and Niederhauser, J and Dubois, A and Nowicki, S and Searcy,
             W},
   Title = {Are Song Sparrow 'Soft Songs' Adapted for Short-range
             Communication?},
   Journal = {Integrative and Comparative Biology (BioOne)},
   Volume = {57},
   Pages = {E192-E192},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {fds326813}
}

@article{fds324222,
   Author = {Peters, S and Nowicki, S},
   Title = {Overproduction and attrition: the fates of songs memorized
             during song learning in songbirds},
   Journal = {Animal Behaviour},
   Volume = {124},
   Pages = {255-261},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.09.019},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.09.019},
   Key = {fds324222}
}


%% Odgers, Candice L.   
@article{fds329537,
   Author = {Baldwin, JR and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Fisher, HL and Moffitt,
             TE and Odgers, CL and Pariante, C and Ambler, A and Dove, R and Kepa, A and Matthews, T and Menard, A and Sugden, K and Williams, B and Danese,
             A},
   Title = {Childhood victimization and inflammation in young adulthood:
             A genetically sensitive cohort study.},
   Journal = {Brain, Behavior, and Immunity},
   Volume = {67},
   Pages = {211-217},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2017.08.025},
   Abstract = {Childhood victimization is an important risk factor for
             later immune-related disorders. Previous evidence has
             demonstrated that childhood victimization is associated with
             elevated levels of inflammation biomarkers measured decades
             after exposure. However, it is unclear whether this
             association is (1) already detectable in young people, (2)
             different in males and females, and (3) confounded by
             genetic liability to inflammation. Here we sought to address
             these questions.Participants were 2232 children followed
             from birth to age 18years as part of the Environmental Risk
             (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study. Childhood victimization
             was measured prospectively from birth to age 12years.
             Inflammation was measured through C-reactive protein (CRP)
             levels in dried blood spots at age 18years. Latent genetic
             liability for high inflammation levels was assessed through
             a twin-based method.Greater exposure to childhood
             victimization was associated with higher CRP levels at age
             18 (serum-equivalent means were 0.65 in non-victimized Study
             members, 0.74 in those exposed to one victimization type,
             and 0.81 in those exposed to poly-victimization; p=0.018).
             However, this association was driven by a significant
             association in females (serum-equivalent means were 0.75 in
             non-victimized females, 0.87 in those exposed to one type of
             victimization, and 1.19 in those exposed to
             poly-victimization; p=0.010), while no significant
             association was observed in males (p=0.19). Victimized
             females showed elevated CRP levels independent of latent
             genetic influence, as well as childhood socioeconomic
             status, and waist-hip ratio and body temperature at the time
             of CRP assessment.Childhood victimization is associated with
             elevated CRP levels in young women, independent of latent
             genetic influences and other key risk factors. These results
             strengthen causal inference about the effects of childhood
             victimization on inflammation levels in females by
             accounting for potential genetic confounding.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bbi.2017.08.025},
   Key = {fds329537}
}

@article{fds331328,
   Author = {Rivenbark, JG and Odgers, CL and Caspi, A and Harrington, H and Hogan,
             S and Houts, RM and Poulton, R and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {The high societal costs of childhood conduct problems:
             evidence from administrative records up to age 38 in a
             longitudinal birth cohort.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12850},
   Abstract = {Children with conduct problems that persist into adulthood
             are at increased risk for future behavioral, health, and
             social problems. However, the longer term public service
             usage among these children has not been fully documented. To
             aid public health and intervention planning, adult service
             usage across criminal justice, health care, and social
             welfare domains is compared among all individuals from a
             representative cohort who followed different conduct problem
             trajectories from childhood into adulthood.Participants are
             from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development
             Study, a prospective, representative cohort of consecutive
             births (N = 1,037) from April 1972 to March 1973 in
             Dunedin, New Zealand. Regression analyses were used to
             compare levels of public service usage up to age 38,
             gathered via administrative and electronic medical records,
             between participants who displayed distinct subtypes of
             childhood conduct problems (low, childhood-limited,
             adolescent-onset, and life-course persistent).Children
             exhibiting life-course persistent conduct problems used
             significantly more services as adults than those with low
             levels of childhood conduct problems. Although this group
             comprised only 9.0% of the population, they accounted for
             53.3% of all convictions, 15.7% of emergency department
             visits, 20.5% of prescription fills, 13.1% of injury claims,
             and 24.7% of welfare benefit months. Half of this group
             (50.0%) also accrued high service use across all three
             domains of criminal justice, health, and social welfare
             services, as compared to only 11.3% of those with low
             conduct problems (OR = 7.27, 95% CI = 4.42-12.0).Conduct
             problems in childhood signal high future costs in terms of
             service utilization across multiple sectors. Future
             evaluations of interventions aimed at conduct problems
             should also track potential reductions in health burden and
             service usage that stretch into midlife.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jcpp.12850},
   Key = {fds331328}
}

@article{fds331329,
   Author = {Odgers, CL and Russell, MA},
   Title = {Violence exposure is associated with adolescents' same- and
             next-day mental health symptoms.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {58},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1310-1318},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12763},
   Abstract = {Young people exposed to violence are at increased risk for
             mental health and behavioral problems. However, very little
             is known about the immediate, or same-day, associations
             between violence exposure and adolescents' mental health
             symptoms or whether daily symptom or behavioral reactivity
             marks future problems.Young adolescents were assessed three
             times a day for 30 consecutive days using mobile-phone-based
             Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) (N = 151
             adolescents). Over 12,500 assessments and 4,329 person days
             were obtained via the EMA. Adolescents were recruited from
             low-income neighborhoods based on parent-reported risk for
             externalizing symptoms. Mental health symptoms were assessed
             via parent and child report at baseline, multiple times per
             day via EMA assessments of the adolescents, and again
             18 months later when 93% of the adolescents were
             reinterviewed.Results from multilevel models illustrated
             that young adolescents were more likely to experience
             symptoms of anger (OR = 1.74, CI: 1.31-2.30), depression
             (OR = 1.66, CI: 1.26-2.19), and conduct problems
             (OR = 2.63, CI: 1.71-4.04) on days that they were exposed
             versus not exposed to violence. Increases in depressive
             symptoms were also observed on days following violence
             exposure (OR = 1.46, CI: 1.09-1.97). Adolescents with the
             highest levels of violence exposure across the 30-day EMA
             were less behaviorally reactive to violence exposures in
             daily life, and heightened behavioral reactivity predicted
             increased risk for substance use across early
             adolescence.Findings support the need to focus on both the
             immediate and long-term associations between violence
             exposure and adolescents' mental health and behavior.
             Results also suggest that heightened behavioral reactivity
             during early adolescence may signal emerging substance use
             problems.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jcpp.12763},
   Key = {fds331329}
}

@article{fds327711,
   Author = {Piontak, JR and Russell, MA and Danese, A and Copeland, WE and Hoyle,
             RH and Odgers, CL},
   Title = {Violence exposure and adolescents' same-day obesogenic
             behaviors: New findings and a replication.},
   Journal = {Social Science & Medicine},
   Volume = {189},
   Pages = {145-151},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.07.004},
   Abstract = {To test whether exposure to violence is associated with
             same-day increases in obesogenic behaviors among young
             adolescents, including unhealthy food and beverage
             consumption, poor quality sleep, and lack of physical
             activity.Young at-risk adolescents between 12 and 15 years
             of age were recruited via telephone screening from
             low-income neighborhoods. Adolescents and their parents
             completed in-person assessments, followed by Ecological
             Momentary Assessment (EMA) delivered to 151 adolescents'
             mobile phones three times a day for 30 days (4329 person
             days). Three obesogenic behaviors - unhealthy food
             consumption, poor sleep quality, and lack of physical
             activity - and violence exposure were assessed daily.
             Adolescents' body mass index (BMI) was assessed prior to the
             EMA and 18 months later. A replication was performed among
             395 adolescents from a population-representative sample
             (with 5276 EMA person days).On days that at-risk adolescents
             were exposed versus not exposed to violence, they were more
             likely to consume unhealthy foods and beverages (b = 0.12,
             p = 0.01), report feeling tired the next morning
             (OR = 1.58, p < 0.01), and to be active (OR = 1.61,
             p < 0.01). At-risk adolescents who reported higher
             consumption of soda and caffeinated beverages during the
             30-day EMA were more likely to experience increases in BMI
             in later adolescence. Findings related to sleep and activity
             were supported in the population-based replication sample;
             however, no significant same-day associations were found
             between violence exposure and unhealthy dietary
             consumption.This study provides evidence that exposure to
             violence is associated with same-day unhealthy dietary
             consumption among at-risk adolescents and next-day tiredness
             related to sleep quality among adolescents from both at-risk
             and normative populations. Findings also point to unhealthy
             soda consumption during early adolescence as an important
             predictor of weight gain among at-risk adolescents.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.07.004},
   Key = {fds327711}
}

@article{fds326125,
   Author = {George, MJ and Russell, MA and Piontak, JR and Odgers,
             CL},
   Title = {Concurrent and Subsequent Associations Between Daily Digital
             Technology Use and High-Risk Adolescents' Mental Health
             Symptoms.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12819},
   Abstract = {Adolescents are spending an unprecedented amount of time
             using digital technologies (especially mobile technologies),
             and there are concerns that adolescents' constant
             connectivity is associated with poor mental health,
             particularly among at-risk adolescents. Participants
             included 151 adolescents at risk for mental health problems
             (Mage  = 13.1) who completed a baseline assessment, 30-day
             ecological momentary assessment, and 18 month follow-up
             assessment. Results from multilevel regression models showed
             that daily reports of both time spent using digital
             technologies and the number of text messages sent were
             associated with increased same-day attention deficit
             hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD)
             symptoms. Adolescents' reported digital technology usage and
             text messaging across the ecological momentary assessment
             (EMA) period was also associated with poorer self-regulation
             and increases in conduct problem symptoms between the
             baseline and follow-up assessments.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.12819},
   Key = {fds326125}
}

@article{fds322282,
   Author = {Bailey, D and Duncan, GJ and Odgers, CL and Yu, W},
   Title = {Persistence and Fadeout in the Impacts of Child and
             Adolescent Interventions},
   Journal = {Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {7-39},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19345747.2016.1232459},
   Doi = {10.1080/19345747.2016.1232459},
   Key = {fds322282}
}

@article{fds331330,
   Author = {Odgers, CL and Adler, NE},
   Title = {Challenges for Low-Income Children in an Era of Increasing
             Income Inequality},
   Journal = {Child Development Perspectives},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12273},
   Abstract = {© 2017 The Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.
             Children growing up in poverty are at heightened risk for
             poor health. Researchers have identified some mechanisms
             responsible for this association but we know less about how
             children are affected by growing up in communities, schools,
             and countries with varying levels of income inequality. In
             this article, we summarize what is known about the
             association between children's well-being and income
             inequality, and outline three challenges that increasing
             levels of income inequality may pose to children from
             low-income families. We also discuss implications for
             research and policy.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdep.12273},
   Key = {fds331330}
}


%% Payne, John W.   
@article{fds327673,
   Author = {Atlas, SA and Johnson, EJ and Payne, JW},
   Title = {Time Preferences and Mortgage Choice},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {415-429},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1509/jmr.14.0481},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmr.14.0481},
   Key = {fds327673}
}


%% Pearson, John M.   
@article{fds329405,
   Author = {Addicott, MA and Pearson, JM and Sweitzer, MM and Barack, DL and Platt,
             ML},
   Title = {A Primer on Foraging and the Explore/Exploit Trade-Off for
             Psychiatry Research.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology (Nature)},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1931-1939},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2017.108},
   Abstract = {Foraging is a fundamental behavior, and many types of
             animals appear to have solved foraging problems using a
             shared set of mechanisms. Perhaps the most common foraging
             problem is the choice between exploiting a familiar option
             for a known reward and exploring unfamiliar options for
             unknown rewards-the so-called explore/exploit trade-off.
             This trade-off has been studied extensively in behavioral
             ecology and computational neuroscience, but is relatively
             new to the field of psychiatry. Explore/exploit paradigms
             can offer psychiatry research a new approach to studying
             motivation, outcome valuation, and effort-related processes,
             which are disrupted in many mental and emotional disorders.
             In addition, the explore/exploit trade-off encompasses
             elements of risk-taking and impulsivity-common behaviors in
             psychiatric disorders-and provides a novel framework for
             understanding these behaviors within an ecological context.
             Here we explain relevant concepts and some common paradigms
             used to measure explore/exploit decisions in the laboratory,
             review clinically relevant research on the neurobiology and
             neuroanatomy of explore/exploit decision making, and discuss
             how computational psychiatry can benefit from foraging
             theory.},
   Doi = {10.1038/npp.2017.108},
   Key = {fds329405}
}

@article{fds329406,
   Author = {Chen, X and Beck, JM and Pearson, JM},
   Title = {Neuron's eye view: Inferring features of complex stimuli
             from neural responses.},
   Journal = {PLoS computational biology},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {e1005645},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005645},
   Abstract = {Experiments that study neural encoding of stimuli at the
             level of individual neurons typically choose a small set of
             features present in the world-contrast and luminance for
             vision, pitch and intensity for sound-and assemble a
             stimulus set that systematically varies along these
             dimensions. Subsequent analysis of neural responses to these
             stimuli typically focuses on regression models, with
             experimenter-controlled features as predictors and spike
             counts or firing rates as responses. Unfortunately, this
             approach requires knowledge in advance about the relevant
             features coded by a given population of neurons. For domains
             as complex as social interaction or natural movement,
             however, the relevant feature space is poorly understood,
             and an arbitrary a priori choice of features may give rise
             to confirmation bias. Here, we present a Bayesian model for
             exploratory data analysis that is capable of automatically
             identifying the features present in unstructured stimuli
             based solely on neuronal responses. Our approach is unique
             within the class of latent state space models of neural
             activity in that it assumes that firing rates of neurons are
             sensitive to multiple discrete time-varying features tied to
             the stimulus, each of which has Markov (or semi-Markov)
             dynamics. That is, we are modeling neural activity as driven
             by multiple simultaneous stimulus features rather than
             intrinsic neural dynamics. We derive a fast variational
             Bayesian inference algorithm and show that it correctly
             recovers hidden features in synthetic data, as well as
             ground-truth stimulus features in a prototypical neural
             dataset. To demonstrate the utility of the algorithm, we
             also apply it to cluster neural responses and demonstrate
             successful recovery of features corresponding to monkeys and
             faces in the image set.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005645},
   Key = {fds329406}
}

@article{fds331202,
   Author = {Dowd, EW and Pearson, JM and Egner, T},
   Title = {Decoding working memory content from attentional
             biases.},
   Journal = {Psychonomic Bulletin and Review},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1252-1260},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13423-016-1204-5},
   Abstract = {What we are currently thinking influences where we attend.
             The finding that active maintenance of visual items in
             working memory (WM) biases attention toward memory-matching
             objects-even when WM content is irrelevant for attentional
             goals-suggests a tight link between WM and attention. To
             test whether this link is reliable enough to infer specific
             WM content from measures of attentional bias, we applied
             multivariate pattern classification techniques to response
             times from an unrelated visual search task during a WM
             delay. Single-trial WM content was successfully decoded from
             incidental attentional bias within an individual,
             highlighting the specificity and reliability of the
             WM-attention link. Furthermore, classifiers trained on a
             group of individuals predicted WM content in another,
             completely independent individual-implying a shared
             cognitive mechanism of memory-driven attentional bias. The
             existence of such classifiers demonstrates that memory-based
             attentional bias is both a robust and generalizable probe of
             WM.},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13423-016-1204-5},
   Key = {fds331202}
}

@article{fds330584,
   Author = {Pearson, JM and Hickey, PT and Lad, SP and Platt, ML and Turner,
             DA},
   Title = {Local Fields in Human Subthalamic Nucleus Track the Lead-up
             to Impulsive Choices.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Neuroscience},
   Volume = {11},
   Pages = {646},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2017.00646},
   Abstract = {The ability to adaptively minimize not only motor but
             cognitive symptoms of neurological diseases, such as
             Parkinson's Disease (PD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder
             (OCD), is a primary goal of next-generation deep brain
             stimulation (DBS) devices. On the basis of studies
             demonstrating a link between beta-band synchronization and
             severity of motor symptoms in PD, the minimization of beta
             band activity has been proposed as a potential training
             target for closed-loop DBS. At present, no comparable signal
             is known for the impulsive side effects of PD, though
             multiple studies have implicated theta band activity within
             the subthalamic nucleus (STN), the site of DBS treatment, in
             processes of conflict monitoring and countermanding. Here,
             we address this challenge by recording from multiple
             independent channels within the STN in a self-paced decision
             task to test whether these signals carry information
             sufficient to predict stopping behavior on a trial-by-trial
             basis. As in previous studies, we found that local field
             potentials (LFPs) exhibited modulations preceding
             self-initiated movements, with power ramping across multiple
             frequencies during the deliberation period. In addition,
             signals showed phasic changes in power around the time of
             decision. However, a prospective model that attempted to use
             these signals to predict decision times showed effects of
             risk level did not improve with the addition of LFPs as
             regressors. These findings suggest information tracking the
             lead-up to impulsive choices is distributed across multiple
             frequency scales in STN, though current techniques may not
             possess sufficient signal-to-noise ratios to predict-and
             thus curb-impulsive behavior on a moment-to-moment
             basis.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fnins.2017.00646},
   Key = {fds330584}
}


%% Puffer, Eve S.   
@article{fds331413,
   Author = {Goodman, ML and Puffer, ES and Keiser, PH and Gitari,
             S},
   Title = {Suicide clusters among young Kenyan men.},
   Journal = {Journal of Health Psychology},
   Pages = {1359105317743803},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1359105317743803},
   Abstract = {Suicide is a leading cause of global mortality. Suicide
             clusters have recently been identified among peer networks
             in high-income countries. This study investigates dynamics
             of suicide clustering within social networks of young Kenya
             men ( n = 532; 18-34 years). We found a strong,
             statistically significant association between reported
             number of friends who previously attempted suicide and
             present suicide ideation (odds ratio = 1.9; 95%
             confidence interval (1.42, 2.54); p < 0.001). This
             association was mediated by lower collective self-esteem
             (23% of total effect). Meaning in life further mediated the
             association between collective self-esteem and suicide
             ideation. Survivors of peer suicide should be evaluated for
             suicide risk.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1359105317743803},
   Key = {fds331413}
}

@article{fds322201,
   Author = {Annan, J and Sim, A and Puffer, ES and Salhi, C and Betancourt,
             TS},
   Title = {Improving Mental Health Outcomes of Burmese Migrant and
             Displaced Children in Thailand: a Community-Based Randomized
             Controlled Trial of a Parenting and Family Skills
             Intervention.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {793-803},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-016-0728-2},
   Abstract = {The negative effects of displacement and poverty on child
             mental health are well-known, yet research on prevention
             interventions in low- and middle-income countries,
             especially fragile states, remains limited. We examined the
             effectiveness of a parenting skills intervention on mental
             health outcomes among Burmese migrant and displaced children
             living in 20 communities in Thailand. Participants were
             primary caregivers and children aged 7 to 15 years
             (n = 479 families). Families were randomly assigned to
             receive an adapted version of the Strengthening Families
             Program (n = 240) or a wait-list control condition
             (n = 239). Assessments were conducted at baseline and
             1-month post-intervention for both conditions and at
             6 months for treatment group only. One month after the
             program, children in the treatment condition showed
             significant reductions in externalizing problems (caregiver
             effect size (ES) -0.22, p = 0.02; child report ES -0.11,
             p = 0.02) and child attention problems compared with
             controls (caregiver report ES -0.23, p = 0.03). There
             was no significant treatment effect on children's
             internalizing problems (ES -0.06; p = 0.31). Children
             reported a significant increase in prosocial protective
             factors relative to controls (ES 0.20, p < 0.01).
             Results suggest that an evidence-based parenting skills
             intervention adapted for a displaced and migrant Burmese
             population facing high levels of adversity can have positive
             effects on children's externalizing symptoms and protective
             psychosocial factors.Clinicaltrials.gov:
             https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01829815.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-016-0728-2},
   Key = {fds322201}
}

@article{fds326142,
   Author = {Giusto, AM and Green, EP and Puffer, ES},
   Title = {Associations Between Fathers' and Sons' Sexual Risk in Rural
             Kenya: The Potential for Intergenerational
             Transmission.},
   Journal = {Journal of Adolescent Health},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {219-225},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.02.007},
   Abstract = {Despite high rates of HIV in areas of Sub-Saharan Africa and
             men's role in driving the epidemic, little is known about
             whether or how sexual risk-both behaviors and beliefs-may be
             passed down through generations of males. This study
             examined associations between sexual risk behaviors and
             sex-related beliefs of adolescent males and those of their
             male caregivers in Kenya, as well as the potential
             moderating effects of parenting characteristics and
             father-son relationship quality.Cross-sectional linear
             regression analysis was applied to baseline data from a
             trial of a family- and church-based intervention for
             families in rural Kenya that followed a stepped-wedge
             cluster randomized design. Our subsample consisted of 79
             male caregiver and son (aged 10-16 years) dyads.Results
             demonstrated a direct relationship between fathers' and
             sons' sex-related beliefs that was not moderated by
             parenting or quality of father-son relationship.
             Parenting/relationship characteristics did moderate the
             relationship between fathers' and sons' sexual behavior; if
             fathers did not engage in high-risk sex and exhibited more
             positive parenting/higher relationship quality, their sons
             were less likely to be sexually active. Among fathers having
             high-risk sex, parenting was unrelated to sons' behavior
             except at very high levels of positive parenting/relationship
             quality; at these levels, sons were actually more likely to
             have had sex.Findings support recommendations to include
             male caregivers in youth HIV prevention efforts, potentially
             by targeting fathers' parenting strategies and their
             individual risk.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.02.007},
   Key = {fds326142}
}

@article{fds326143,
   Author = {Puffer, ES and Annan, J and Sim, AL and Salhi, C and Betancourt,
             TS},
   Title = {The impact of a family skills training intervention among
             Burmese migrant families in Thailand: A randomized
             controlled trial.},
   Journal = {PloS one},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {e0172611},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0172611},
   Abstract = {To conduct a randomized controlled trial assessing the
             impact of a family-based intervention delivered to Burmese
             migrant families displaced in Thailand on parenting and
             family functioning.Participants included 479 Burmese migrant
             families from 20 communities in Thailand. Families,
             including 513 caregivers and 479 children aged 7 to 15
             years, were randomized to treatment and waitlist control
             groups. The treatment group received a 12-session
             family-based intervention delivered to groups of families by
             lay facilitators. Adapted standardized and locally derived
             measures were administered before and after the intervention
             to assess parent-child relationship quality, discipline
             practices, and family functioning.Compared with controls,
             intervention families demonstrated improved quality of
             parent-child interactions on scales of parental warmth and
             affection (Effect size (ES) = 0.25 caregivers; 0.26
             children, both p < 0.05) and negative relationship quality
             (ES = -0.37, p < 0.001 caregivers; -0.22 children, p <
             0.05). Both children and caregivers also reported an effect
             on relationship quality based on a locally derived measure
             (ES = 0.40 caregivers, p < .001; 0.43 children, p < .05).
             Family functioning was improved, including family cohesion
             (ES = 0.46 caregivers; 0.36 children; both p < 0.001) and
             decreased negative interactions (ES = -0.30 caregivers, p <
             0.01; -0.24 children, p < 0.05). Family communication also
             improved according to children only (ES = 0.29, p < 0.01).
             Caregivers, but not children, reported decreased harsh
             discipline (ES = -0.39, p < 0.001), and no effects were
             observed on use of positive discipline strategies. Treatment
             attendance was high, with participants attending a mean of
             9.7 out of 12 sessions.The intervention increased protective
             aspects of family well-being for migrant children and
             caregivers in a middle-income country. The strongest effects
             were on parent-child relationship quality and family
             functioning, while results were mixed on changes in
             discipline practices. Results suggest that a behavioral
             family-based approach implemented by lay providers in
             community settings is a promising intervention approach for
             strengthening families in highly stressed
             contexts.Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01668992.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0172611},
   Key = {fds326143}
}


%% Purves, Dale   
@article{fds331493,
   Author = {Bowling, DL and Purves, D and Gill, KZ},
   Title = {Vocal similarity predicts the relative attraction of musical
             chords.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {115},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {216-221},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1713206115},
   Abstract = {Musical chords are combinations of two or more tones played
             together. While many different chords are used in music,
             some are heard as more attractive (consonant) than others.
             We have previously suggested that, for reasons of biological
             advantage, human tonal preferences can be understood in
             terms of the spectral similarity of tone combinations to
             harmonic human vocalizations. Using the chromatic scale, we
             tested this theory further by assessing the perceived
             consonance of all possible dyads, triads, and tetrads within
             a single octave. Our results show that the consonance of
             chords is predicted by their relative similarity to voiced
             speech sounds. These observations support the hypothesis
             that the relative attraction of musical tone combinations is
             due, at least in part, to the biological advantages that
             accrue from recognizing and responding to conspecific vocal
             stimuli.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.1713206115},
   Key = {fds331493}
}


%% Putallaz, Martha   
@article{fds323842,
   Author = {Zabaneh, D and Krapohl, E and Simpson, MA and Miller, MB and Iacono, WG and McGue, M and Putallaz, M and Lubinski, D and Plomin, R and Breen,
             G},
   Title = {Fine mapping genetic associations between the HLA region and
             extremely high intelligence.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {7},
   Pages = {41182},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep41182},
   Abstract = {General cognitive ability (intelligence) is one of the most
             heritable behavioural traits and most predictive of socially
             important outcomes and health. We hypothesized that some of
             the missing heritability of IQ might lie hidden in the human
             leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, which plays a critical role
             in many diseases and traits but is not well tagged in
             conventional GWAS. Using a uniquely powered design, we
             investigated whether fine-mapping of the HLA region could
             narrow the missing heritability gap. Our case-control design
             included 1,393 cases with extremely high intelligence scores
             (top 0.0003 of the population equivalent to IQ > 147)
             and 3,253 unselected population controls. We imputed
             variants in 200 genes across the HLA region, one SNP
             (rs444921) reached our criterion for study-wide
             significance. SNP-based heritability of the HLA variants was
             small and not significant (h2 = 0.3%, SE = 0.2%). A
             polygenic score from the case-control genetic association
             analysis of SNPs in the HLA region did not significantly
             predict individual differences in intelligence in an
             independent unselected sample. We conclude that although
             genetic variation in the HLA region is important to the
             aetiology of many disorders, it does not appear to be hiding
             much of the missing heritability of intelligence.},
   Doi = {10.1038/srep41182},
   Key = {fds323842}
}


%% Rabiner, David   
@article{fds331139,
   Author = {Murray, DW and Rabiner, DL and Kuhn, L and Pan, Y and Sabet,
             RF},
   Title = {Investigating teacher and student effects of the Incredible
             Years Classroom Management Program in early elementary
             school},
   Journal = {Journal of School Psychology},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2017.10.004},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jsp.2017.10.004},
   Key = {fds331139}
}


%% Rezvani, Amir H.   
@article{fds326640,
   Author = {Rezvani, AH and Slade, S and Wells, C and Yenugonda, VM and Liu, Y and Brown, ML and Xiao, Y and Kellar, KJ and Levin, ED},
   Title = {Differential efficacies of the nicotinic α4β2
             desensitizing agents in reducing nicotine
             self-administration in female rats.},
   Journal = {Psychopharmacology},
   Volume = {234},
   Number = {17},
   Pages = {2517-2523},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-017-4641-6},
   Abstract = {Desensitization of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine
             receptors holds promise as an effective treatment of tobacco
             addiction. Previously, we found that sazetidine-A (Saz-A),
             which selectively desensitizes α4β2 nicotinic receptors,
             significantly decreased intravenous (IV) nicotine
             self-administration (SA) in rats with an effective dose of
             3 mg/kg in acute and repeated injection studies. We also
             found that chronic infusions of Saz-A at doses of 2 and
             6 mg/kg/day significantly reduced nicotine SA in rats. In
             continuing studies, we have characterized other Saz-A
             analogs, YL-2-203 and VMY-2-95, to determine their
             efficacies in reducing nicotine SA in rats.Young adult
             female Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with IV catheters and
             were trained for nicotine SA (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) on a
             fixed ratio 1 schedule for ten sessions. The same rats were
             also implanted subcutaneously with osmotic minipumps to
             continually deliver 2 or 6 mg/kg body weight YL-2-203,
             VMY-2-95, or saline for four consecutive weeks.Chronic
             administration of VMY-2-95 at doses of 2 and 6 mg/kg/day
             caused significant (p < 0.01) decreases in nicotine SA
             over the 2 weeks of continued nicotine SA and for the
             1-week period of resumed access after a week of enforced
             abstinence, whereas chronic administration of YL-2-203 at
             the same doses was not found to be effective.These studies,
             together with our previous studies of Saz-A, revealed a
             spectrum of efficacies for these α4β2 nicotinic receptor
             desensitizing agents and provide a path forward for the most
             effective compounds to be further developed as possible aids
             to smoking cessation.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00213-017-4641-6},
   Key = {fds326640}
}

@article{fds328872,
   Author = {Rezvani, AH and Levin, ED and Cauley, M and Getachew, B and Tizabi,
             Y},
   Title = {Ketamine Differentially Attenuates Alcohol Intake in Male
             Versus Female Alcohol Preferring (P) Rats},
   Journal = {Journal of drug and alcohol research},
   Volume = {6},
   Pages = {1-6},
   Year = {2017},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4303/jdar/236030},
   Doi = {10.4303/jdar/236030},
   Key = {fds328872}
}


%% Richman, Laura S.   
@article{fds329145,
   Author = {Stock, ML and Gibbons, FX and Beekman, JB and Williams, KD and Richman,
             LS and Gerrard, M},
   Title = {Racial (vs. self) affirmation as a protective mechanism
             against the effects of racial exclusion on negative affect
             and substance use vulnerability among black young
             adults.},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Medicine},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10865-017-9882-7},
   Abstract = {Affirming one's racial identity may help protect against the
             harmful effects of racial exclusion on substance use
             cognitions. This study examined whether racial versus
             self-affirmation (vs. no affirmation) buffers against the
             effects of racial exclusion on substance use willingness and
             substance use word associations in Black young adults. It
             also examined anger as a potential mediator of these
             effects. After being included, or racially excluded by White
             peers, participants were assigned to a writing task:
             self-affirmation, racial-affirmation, or describing their
             sleep routine (neutral). Racial exclusion predicted greater
             perceived discrimination and anger. Excluded participants
             who engaged in racial-affirmation reported reduced perceived
             discrimination, anger, and fewer substance use cognitions
             compared to the neutral writing group. This relation between
             racial-affirmation and lower substance use willingness was
             mediated by reduced perceived discrimination and anger.
             Findings suggest racial-affirmation is protective against
             racial exclusion and, more generally, that ethnic based
             approaches to minority substance use prevention may have
             particular potential.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10865-017-9882-7},
   Key = {fds329145}
}

@article{fds326831,
   Author = {Lattanner, MR and Richman, LS},
   Title = {Effect of Stigma and Concealment on Avoidant-Oriented
             Friendship Goals},
   Journal = {Journal of Social Issues},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {379-396},
   Editor = {Cook, JE and Quinn, DM},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josi.12222},
   Doi = {10.1111/josi.12222},
   Key = {fds326831}
}

@article{fds313462,
   Author = {Pascoe, EA and Richman, LS and Kort, D},
   Title = {Validation of the Food-Linked Virtual Response
             task.},
   Journal = {Journal of Health Psychology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {111-119},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1359-1053},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/11795 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {This research validates a computerized dietary selection
             task (Food-Linked Virtual Response or FLVR) for use in
             studies of food consumption. In two studies, FLVR task
             responses were compared with measures of health
             consciousness, mood, body mass index, personality, cognitive
             restraint toward food, and actual food selections from a
             buffet table. The FLVR task was associated with variables
             which typically predict healthy decision-making and was
             unrelated to mood or body mass index. Furthermore, the FLVR
             task predicted participants' unhealthy selections from the
             buffet, but not overall amount of food. The FLVR task is an
             inexpensive, valid, and easily administered option for
             assessing momentary dietary decisions.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1359105315595452},
   Key = {fds313462}
}


%% Rosenthal, Mark Z.   
@article{fds325979,
   Author = {Chapman, AL and Rosenthal, MZ and Dixon-Gordon, KL and Turner, BJ and Kuppens, P},
   Title = {Borderline Personality Disorder and the Effects of
             Instructed Emotional Avoidance or Acceptance in Daily
             Life.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality Disorders},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {483-502},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1521/pedi_2016_30_264},
   Abstract = {This study examined the effects of avoidance- versus
             acceptance-oriented emotion regulation instructions among
             individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD; n =
             48), major depressive disorder (MDD; n = 54), and
             non-psychiatric controls (NPC; n = 50) using ecological
             momentary assessment. Participants were randomly assigned to
             either accept or avoid negative emotions, and monitored
             their moods, urges, and distress tolerance several times per
             day over 6 days. Avoidance instructions resulted in reduced
             negative affect and urges for maladaptive behaviors uniquely
             among BPD participants. Together with past research, and
             consistent with treatment approaches emphasizing the
             short-term use of skills to avoid or distract from emotions
             (e.g., DBT; Linehan, 1993b, 2015), these findings suggest
             that avoidance of negative emotions may have temporary
             benefits for individuals with BPD. Acceptance-oriented
             strategies may take longer or may require more extensive
             training to be beneficial for emotional functioning in
             everyday life in BPD.},
   Doi = {10.1521/pedi_2016_30_264},
   Key = {fds325979}
}

@article{fds328295,
   Author = {Erfanian, M and Jo Brout and J and Edelstein, M and Kumar, S and Mannino,
             M and Miller, LJ and Rouw, R and Rosenthal, MZ},
   Title = {REMOVED: Investigating misophonia: A review of the
             literature, clinical implications and research agenda
             reflecting current neuroscience and emotion research
             perspectives.},
   Journal = {European Psychiatry},
   Volume = {41S},
   Pages = {S681},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.01.1180},
   Abstract = {This article has been removed: please see Elsevier Policy on
             Article Withdrawal (https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal).
             This article has been removed at the request of the authors
             due to errors in the author list.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.01.1180},
   Key = {fds328295}
}

@article{fds325761,
   Author = {Neacsiu, AD and Fang, CM and Rodriguez, M and Rosenthal,
             MZ},
   Title = {Suicidal Behavior and Problems with Emotion
             Regulation.},
   Journal = {Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sltb.12335},
   Abstract = {We examined in two independent samples whether: (1)
             difficulties with emotion regulation predict suicide
             ideation and (2) depressed adults with a history of
             attempting suicide report and exhibit more emotion
             dysregulation compared to healthy and depressed controls.
             Difficulties with emotional clarity and relationship status
             were significant predictors of suicide ideation (Study 1).
             In Study 2, when compared to controls, depressed attempters
             reported significantly more difficulties with emotional
             clarity and emotional impulsivity. Attempters had
             significantly more difficulty than controls returning to
             heart rate baseline following a stressful task. Problems
             with emotions are therefore differentially connected to
             suicidal behaviors.},
   Doi = {10.1111/sltb.12335},
   Key = {fds325761}
}


%% Rubin, David C.   
@article{fds328627,
   Author = {Rubin, DC and Li, D and Hall, SA and Kragel, PA and Berntsen,
             D},
   Title = {Taking tests in the magnet: Brain mapping standardized
             tests.},
   Journal = {Human Brain Mapping},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {5706-5725},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23761},
   Abstract = {Standardized psychometric tests are sophisticated,
             well-developed, and consequential instruments; test outcomes
             are taken as facts about people that impact their lives in
             important ways. As part of an initial demonstration that
             human brain mapping techniques can add converging
             neural-level evidence to understanding standardized tests,
             our participants completed items from standardized tests
             during an fMRI scan. We compared tests for diagnosing
             posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the correlated
             measures of Neuroticism, Attachment, and Centrality of Event
             to a general-knowledge baseline test. Twenty-three
             trauma-exposed participants answered 20 items for each of
             our five tests in each of the three runs for a total of 60
             items per test. The tests engaged different neural
             processes; which test a participant was taking was
             accurately predicted from other participants' brain
             activity. The novelty of the application precluded specific
             anatomical predictions; however, the interpretation of
             activated regions using meta-analyses produced encouraging
             results. For instance, items on the Attachment test engaged
             regions shown to be more active for tasks involving
             judgments of others than judgments of the self. The results
             are an initial demonstration of a theoretically and
             practically important test-taking neuroimaging paradigm and
             suggest specific neural processes in answering PTSD-related
             tests. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5706-5725, 2017. © 2017 Wiley
             Periodicals, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hbm.23761},
   Key = {fds328627}
}

@article{fds318745,
   Author = {Ogle, CM and Siegler, IC and Beckham, JC and Rubin,
             DC},
   Title = {Neuroticism Increases PTSD Symptom Severity by Amplifying
             the Emotionality, Rehearsal, and Centrality of Trauma
             Memories.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality},
   Volume = {85},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {702-715},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12278},
   Abstract = {Although it is well established that neuroticism increases
             the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), little is
             known about the mechanisms that promote PTSD in individuals
             with elevated levels of neuroticism. Across two studies, we
             examined the cognitive-affective processes through which
             neuroticism leads to greater PTSD symptom
             severity.Community-dwelling adults with trauma histories
             varying widely in severity (Study 1) and clinically
             diagnosed individuals exposed to DSM-IV-TR A1 criterion
             traumas (Study 2) completed measures of neuroticism,
             negative affectivity, trauma memory characteristics, and
             PTSD symptom severity.Longitudinal data in Study 1 showed
             that individuals with higher scores on two measures of
             neuroticism assessed approximately three decades apart in
             young adulthood and midlife reported trauma memories
             accompanied by more intense physiological reactions, more
             frequent involuntary rehearsal, and greater perceived
             centrality to identity in older adulthood. These properties
             of trauma memories were in turn associated with more severe
             PTSD symptoms. Study 2 replicated these findings using
             cross-sectional data from individuals with severe trauma
             histories and three additional measures of
             neuroticism.Results suggest that neuroticism leads to PTSD
             symptoms by magnifying the emotionality, availability, and
             centrality of trauma memories as proposed in mnemonic models
             of PTSD.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jopy.12278},
   Key = {fds318745}
}

@article{fds330889,
   Author = {Ogle, CM and Rubin, DC and Siegler, IC},
   Title = {Commentary-Pre- and Posttrauma Predictors of Posttraumatic
             Stress Disorder Symptom Severity: Reply to van der Velden
             and van der Knaap (2017).},
   Journal = {Clinical Psychological Science},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {146-149},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2167702616661057},
   Doi = {10.1177/2167702616661057},
   Key = {fds330889}
}


%% Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R.   
@article{fds331245,
   Author = {Dang, LC and Samanez-Larkin, GR and Smith, CT and Castrellon, JJ and Perkins, SF and Cowan, RL and Claassen, DO and Zald,
             DH},
   Title = {FTO affects food cravings and interacts with age to
             influence age-related decline in food cravings.},
   Journal = {Physiology & Behavior},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.12.013},
   Abstract = {The fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) was the first
             gene identified by genome-wide association studies to
             correlate with higher body mass index (BMI) and increased
             odds of obesity. FTO remains the locus with the largest and
             most replicated effect on body weight, but the mechanism
             whereby FTO affects body weight and the development of
             obesity is not fully understood. Here we tested whether FTO
             is associated with differences in food cravings and a key
             aspect of dopamine function that has been hypothesized to
             influence food reward mechanisms. Moreover, as food cravings
             and dopamine function are known to decline with age, we
             explored effects of age on relations between FTO and food
             cravings and dopamine function. Seven-eight healthy subjects
             between 22 and 83years old completed the Food Cravings
             Questionnaire and underwent genotyping for FTO rs9939609,
             the first FTO single nucleotide polymorphism associated with
             obesity. Compared to TT homozygotes, individuals carrying
             the obesity-susceptible A allele had higher total food
             cravings, which correlated with higher BMI. Additionally,
             food cravings declined with age, but this age effect
             differed across variants of FTO rs9939609: while TT
             homozygotes showed the typical age-related decline in food
             cravings, there was no such decline among A carriers. All
             subjects were scanned with [18F]fallypride PET to assess a
             recent proposal that at the neurochemical level FTO alters
             dopamine D2-like receptor (DRD2) function to influence food
             reward related mechanisms. However, we observed no evidence
             of FTO effects on DRD2 availability.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.12.013},
   Key = {fds331245}
}

@article{fds329469,
   Author = {Seaman, KL and Leong, JK and Wu, CC and Knutson, B and Samanez-Larkin,
             GR},
   Title = {Individual differences in skewed financial risk-taking
             across the adult life span.},
   Journal = {Cognitive, Affective, & Behaviorial Neuroscience},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1232-1241},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13415-017-0545-5},
   Abstract = {Older adults are disproportionately targeted by fraud
             schemes that advertise unlikely but large returns
             (positively skewed risks). We examined adult age differences
             in choice and neural activity as individuals considered
             risky gambles. Gambles were symmetric (50% chance of modest
             win or loss), positively skewed (25% chance of large gain),
             or negatively skewed (25% chance of large loss). The
             willingness to accept positively skewed relative to
             symmetric gambles increased with age, and this effect
             replicated in an independent behavioral study. Whole-brain
             functional magnetic resonance imaging analyses comparing
             positively (vs. negatively) skewed trials revealed that
             relative to younger adults, older adults showed increased
             anticipatory activity for negatively skewed gambles but
             reduced activity for positively skewed gambles in the
             anterior cingulate and lateral prefrontal regions.
             Individuals who were more biased toward positively skewed
             gambles showed increased activity in a network of regions
             including the nucleus accumbens. These results reveal age
             biases toward positively skewed gambles and age differences
             in corticostriatal regions during skewed risk-taking, and
             have implications for identifying financial decision biases
             across adulthood.},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13415-017-0545-5},
   Key = {fds329469}
}

@article{fds328897,
   Author = {Dang, LC and Samanez-Larkin, GR and Castrellon, JJ and Perkins, SF and Cowan, RL and Newhouse, PA and Zald, DH},
   Title = {Spontaneous Eye Blink Rate (EBR) Is Uncorrelated with
             Dopamine D2 Receptor Availability and Unmodulated by
             Dopamine Agonism in Healthy Adults.},
   Journal = {eNeuro},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {5},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/eneuro.0211-17.2017},
   Abstract = {Spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR) has been proposed as a
             noninvasive, inexpensive marker of dopamine functioning.
             Support for a relation between EBR and dopamine function
             comes from observations that EBR is altered in populations
             with dopamine dysfunction and EBR changes under a
             dopaminergic manipulation. However, the evidence across the
             literature is inconsistent and incomplete. A direct
             correlation between EBR and dopamine function has so far
             been observed only in nonhuman animals. Given significant
             interest in using EBR as a proxy for dopamine function, this
             study aimed to verify a direct association in healthy, human
             adults. Here we measured EBR in healthy human subjects whose
             dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) availability was assessed with
             positron emission tomography (PET)-[18F]fallypride to
             examine the predictive power of EBR for DRD2 availability.
             Effects of the dopamine agonist bromocriptine on EBR also
             were examined to determine the responsiveness of EBR to
             dopaminergic stimulation and, in light of the hypothesized
             inverted-U profile of dopamine effects, the role of DRD2
             availability in EBR responsivity to bromocriptine. Results
             from 20 subjects (age 33.6 ± 7.6 years, 9F) showed no
             relation between EBR and DRD2 availability. EBR also was not
             responsive to dopaminergic stimulation by bromocriptine, and
             individual differences in DRD2 availability did not modulate
             EBR responsivity to bromocriptine. Given that EBR is
             hypothesized to be particularly sensitive to DRD2 function,
             these findings suggest caution in using EBR as a proxy for
             dopamine function in healthy humans.},
   Doi = {10.1523/eneuro.0211-17.2017},
   Key = {fds328897}
}

@article{fds326610,
   Author = {Karrer, TM and Josef, AK and Mata, R and Morris, ED and Samanez-Larkin,
             GR},
   Title = {Reduced dopamine receptors and transporters but not
             synthesis capacity in normal aging adults: a
             meta-analysis.},
   Journal = {Neurobiology of Aging},
   Volume = {57},
   Pages = {36-46},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.05.006},
   Abstract = {Many theories of cognitive aging are based on evidence that
             dopamine (DA) declines with age. Here, we performed a
             systematic meta-analysis of cross-sectional positron
             emission tomography and single-photon emission-computed
             tomography studies on the average effects of age on distinct
             DA targets (receptors, transporters, or relevant enzymes) in
             healthy adults (N = 95 studies including 2611
             participants). Results revealed significant moderate to
             large, negative effects of age on DA transporters and
             receptors. Age had a significantly larger effect on D1- than
             D2-like receptors. In contrast, there was no significant
             effect of age on DA synthesis capacity. The average age
             reductions across the DA system were 3.7%-14.0% per decade.
             A meta-regression found only DA target as a significant
             moderator of the age effect. This study precisely quantifies
             prior claims of reduced DA functionality with age. It also
             identifies presynaptic mechanisms (spared synthesis capacity
             and reduced DA transporters) that may partially account for
             previously unexplained phenomena whereby older adults appear
             to use dopaminergic resources effectively. Recommendations
             for future studies including minimum required samples sizes
             are provided.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.05.006},
   Key = {fds326610}
}

@article{fds330812,
   Author = {Löckenhoff, CE and Rutt, JL and Samanez-Larkin, GR and O'Donoghue,
             T and Reyna, VF},
   Title = {Preferences for Temporal Sequences of Real Outcomes Differ
             Across Domains but do not Vary by Age.},
   Journal = {Journals of Gerontology: Series B},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbx094},
   Abstract = {People's preferences for temporal sequences of events have
             implications for life-long health and well-being. Prior
             research suggests that other aspects of intertemporal choice
             vary by age, but evidence for age differences in
             sequence-preferences is limited and inconclusive. In
             response, the present research examined age differences in
             sequence-preferences for real outcomes administered in a
             controlled laboratory setting.A pilot study examined
             sequence-preferences for aversive electrodermal shocks in 30
             younger and 30 older adults. The main study examined
             sequence-preferences for electrodermal shocks, physical
             effort, and monetary gambles in an adult life-span sample (N
             = 120). It also examined emotional and physiological
             responses to sequences as well as underlying mechanisms
             including time perception and emotion-regulation.There were
             no significant age differences in sequence-preferences in
             either of the studies, and there were no age differences in
             responses to sequences in the main study. Instead, there was
             a domain effect with participants preferring decreasing
             sequences for shocks and mixed sequences for effort and
             money.After considering potential methodological
             limitations, theoretical contributions and implications for
             real-life decisions are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1093/geronb/gbx094},
   Key = {fds330812}
}

@article{fds327149,
   Author = {Hosking, JG and Kastman, EK and Dorfman, HM and Samanez-Larkin, GR and Baskin-Sommers, A and Kiehl, KA and Newman, JP and Buckholtz,
             JW},
   Title = {Disrupted Prefrontal Regulation of Striatal Subjective Value
             Signals in Psychopathy.},
   Journal = {Neuron},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {221-231.e4},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2017.06.030},
   Abstract = {Psychopathy is a personality disorder with strong links to
             criminal behavior. While research on psychopathy has focused
             largely on socio-affective dysfunction, recent data suggest
             that aberrant decision making may also play an important
             role. Yet, the circuit-level mechanisms underlying
             maladaptive decision making in psychopathy remain unclear.
             Here, we used a multi-modality functional imaging approach
             to identify these mechanisms in a population of adult male
             incarcerated offenders. Psychopathy was associated with
             stronger subjective value-related activity within the
             nucleus accumbens (NAcc) during inter-temporal choice and
             with weaker intrinsic functional connectivity between NAcc
             and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). NAcc-vmPFC
             connectivity strength was negatively correlated with NAcc
             subjective value-related activity; however, this putative
             regulatory pattern was abolished as psychopathy severity
             increased. Finally, weaker cortico-striatal regulation
             predicted more frequent criminal convictions. These data
             suggest that cortico-striatal circuit dysregulation drives
             maladaptive decision making in psychopathy, supporting the
             notion that reward system dysfunction comprises an important
             neurobiological risk factor.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuron.2017.06.030},
   Key = {fds327149}
}

@article{fds325038,
   Author = {Dang, LC and Castrellon, JJ and Perkins, SF and Le, NT and Cowan, RL and Zald, DH and Samanez-Larkin, GR},
   Title = {Reduced effects of age on dopamine D2 receptor levels in
             physically active adults.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {148},
   Pages = {123-129},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.01.018},
   Abstract = {Physical activity has been shown to ameliorate dopaminergic
             degeneration in non-human animal models. However, the
             effects of regular physical activity on normal age-related
             changes in dopamine function in humans are unknown. Here we
             present cross-sectional data from forty-four healthy human
             subjects between 23 and 80 years old, showing that typical
             age-related dopamine D2 receptor loss, assessed with PET
             [18F]fallypride, was significantly reduced in physically
             active adults compared to less active adults.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.01.018},
   Key = {fds325038}
}

@article{fds330813,
   Author = {Smith, CT and Crawford, JL and Dang, LC and Seaman, KL and San Juan, MD and Vijay, A and Katz, DT and Matuskey, D and Cowan, RL and Morris, ED and Zald, DH and Samanez-Larkin, GR},
   Title = {Partial-volume correction increases estimated dopamine
             D2-like receptor binding potential and reduces adult age
             differences.},
   Journal = {Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism},
   Pages = {271678X17737693},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0271678x17737693},
   Abstract = {The relatively modest spatial resolution of positron
             emission tomography (PET) increases the likelihood of
             partial volume effects such that binding potential (BPND)
             may be underestimated. Given structural grey matter losses
             across adulthood, partial volume effects may be even more
             problematic in older age leading to overestimation of adult
             age differences. Here we examined the effects of partial
             volume correction (PVC) in two studies from different sites
             using different high-affinity D2-like radioligands
             (18 F-Fallypride, 11C-FLB457) and different PET camera
             resolutions (∼5 mm, 2.5 mm). Results across both data
             sets revealed that PVC increased estimated BPND and reduced,
             though did not eliminate, age effects on BPND. As expected,
             the effects of PVC were smaller in higher compared to lower
             resolution data. Analyses using uncorrected data that
             controlled for grey matter volume in each region of interest
             approximated PVC corrected data for some but not all
             regions. Overall, the findings suggest that PVC increases
             estimated BPND in general and reduces adult age differences
             especially when using lower resolution cameras. The findings
             suggest that the past 30 years of research on dopamine
             receptor availability, for which very few studies use PVC,
             may overestimate effects of aging on dopamine receptor
             availability.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0271678x17737693},
   Key = {fds330813}
}


%% Sherwood, Andrew   
@article{fds331035,
   Author = {Tyson, CC and Smith, PJ and Sherwood, A and Mabe, S and Hinderliter, AL and Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {Association between normal or mildly reduced kidney
             function, cardiovascular risk and biomarkers for
             atherosclerosis: results from the ENCORE
             trial.},
   Journal = {CKJ: Clinical Kidney Journal},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {666-671},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ckj/sfx025},
   Abstract = {Moderate-to-severe kidney dysfunction is associated with
             atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Gradations
             of normal or mildly reduced kidney function may also
             associate with ASCVD risk.We conducted a secondary analysis
             using baseline data from the Exercise and Nutritional
             Interventions for Cardiovascular Health (ENCORE) trial.
             Participants were sedentary, overweight and obese adults
             with unmedicated pre-hypertension or Stage I hypertension
             and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60
             mL/min/1.73 m2. The Pooled Cohorts Equations were used to
             estimate a 10-year risk for first ASCVD event. Carotid
             artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and brachial artery
             flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were measured to assess
             subclinical atherosclerosis and vascular endothelial
             function, respectively. Using linear regression, we examined
             the association between eGFR and ASCVD risk, IMT and
             FMD.Participants (N = 139) were predominantly women
             (65%), white (60%), with a mean age of 52.0 ± 9.6 years
             and mean eGFR of 89.1 ± 15.0 mL/min/1.73 m2. Lower
             eGFR of 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 was associated with higher
             ASCVD risk [b = -2.7% (95% confidence interval: -3.7,
             -1.8%), P < 0.001], higher IMT [b = 0.05 mm (0.03,
             0.08 mm), P < 0.001] and lower FMD [b = -0.87%
             (-1.64, -0.11%), P = 0.026]. Compared with
             eGFR ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2, those with eGFR
             60-89 mL/min/1.73 m2 had higher mean ASCVD risk (7.6%
             versus 2.7%; P < 0.001), greater mean IMT (0.74 mm
             versus 0.66 mm; P < 0.001) and lower mean FMD (2.0%
             versus 3.7%; P = 0.026). After controlling for CVD risk
             factors, the association between eGFR and IMT remained
             significant (P < 0.001), and eGFR and FMD trended toward
             significance (P = 0.08).Among overweight and obese
             adults with unmedicated high blood pressure and
             eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2, lower eGFR is associated
             with a greater 10-year risk for first ASCVD event, higher
             IMT and relatively impaired FMD.},
   Doi = {10.1093/ckj/sfx025},
   Key = {fds331035}
}

@article{fds329290,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Hill, LK and Blumenthal, JA and Hinderliter,
             AL},
   Title = {Circadian hemodynamics in men and women with high blood
             pressure: dipper vs. nondipper and racial
             differences.},
   Journal = {Journal of Hypertension},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/hjh.0000000000001533},
   Abstract = {The 'nondipping' pattern of circadian blood pressure (BP)
             variation is an established independent predictor of adverse
             cardiovascular outcomes. Although this phenomenon has been
             widely studied, its underlying circadian hemodynamics of
             cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) have
             not been well characterized. We evaluated the hypothesis
             that BP nondipping would be associated with a blunted
             night-time reduction in SVR in a biracial sample of 140 (63
             African-American and 77 white) men and women with elevated
             clinic BP (130-159/85-99 mmHg).Twenty-four-hour ambulatory
             hemodynamics were assessed using standard ambulatory BP
             monitoring coupled with synchronized ambulatory impedance
             cardiography. Using the criterion of less than 10% dip in
             SBP, there were 51 nondippers (SBP dip = 7.3 ± 2.6%)
             and 89 dippers (SBP dip = 15.5 ± 3.4%). There was
             minimal change in cardiac output from daytime to night-time
             in both dippers and nondippers. However, SVR decreased from
             daytime to night-time, but nondippers compared with dippers
             exhibited a significantly attenuated decrease in SVR from
             daytime to night-time (7.8 vs. 16.1%, P < 0.001).
             Relative to their white counterparts, African-Americans also
             exhibited blunted SBP dipping (10.9 vs. 14.6%,
             P < 0.001) as well as an attenuated decrease in SVR
             (10.8 vs. 15.6%, P < 0.001).Overall, these findings
             indicate that blunted night-time BP dipping is associated
             with impairment of the systemic vasodilation that is
             characteristic of the night-time sleep period and is
             especially prominent among African-Americans. In the context
             of high BP, these findings suggest that nondipping may be a
             manifestation, or marker, of more advanced vascular
             disease.},
   Doi = {10.1097/hjh.0000000000001533},
   Key = {fds329290}
}

@article{fds327850,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Hill, LK and Blumenthal, JA and Adams, KF and Paine, NJ and Koch, GG and O'Connor, CM and Johnson, KS and Hinderliter,
             AL},
   Title = {Blood pressure reactivity to psychological stress is
             associated with clinical outcomes in patients with heart
             failure.},
   Journal = {American Heart Journal},
   Volume = {191},
   Pages = {82-90},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2017.07.003},
   Abstract = {Cardiovascular (CV) reactivity to psychological stress has
             been implicated in the development and exacerbation of
             cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although high CV reactivity
             traditionally is thought to convey greater risk of CVD, the
             relationship between reactivity and clinical outcomes is
             inconsistent and may depend on the patient population under
             investigation. The present study examined CV reactivity in
             patients with heart failure (HF) and its potential
             association with long-term clinical outcomes.One hundred
             ninety-nine outpatients diagnosed with HF, with ejection
             fraction ≤40%, underwent an evaluation of blood pressure
             (BP) and heart rate reactivity to a laboratory-based
             simulated public-speaking stressor. Cox proportional hazards
             regression models were used to examine the prospective
             association between BP and heart rate reactivity on a
             combined end point of death or CV hospitalization over a
             5-year median follow-up period.Both systolic blood pressure
             (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) reactivity,
             quantified as continuous variables, were inversely related
             to risk of death or CV hospitalization (Ps < .01) after
             controlling for established risk factors, including HF
             disease severity and etiology. In similar models, heart rate
             reactivity was unrelated to outcome (P = .12). In models
             with tertiles of reactivity, high SBP reactivity, compared
             with intermediate SBP reactivity, was associated with lower
             risk (hazard ratio [HR] = .498, 95% CI .335-.742, P =.001),
             whereas low SBP reactivity did not differ from intermediate
             reactivity. For DBP, high reactivity was marginally
             associated with lower risk compared with intermediate DBP
             reactivity (HR = .767, 95% CI .515-1.14, P =.193), whereas
             low DBP reactivity was associated with greater risk (HR =
             1.49, 95% CI 1.027-2.155, P =.0359). No relationship of
             heart rate reactivity to outcome was identified.For HF
             patients with reduced ejection fraction, a robust increase
             in BP evoked by a laboratory-based psychological challenge
             was associated with lower risk for adverse CVD events and
             may be a novel and unique marker of left ventricular
             systolic reserve that is accompanied by a more favorable
             long-term prognosis.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ahj.2017.07.003},
   Key = {fds327850}
}

@article{fds326769,
   Author = {Blumenthal, JA and Smith, PJ and Mabe, S and Hinderliter, A and Welsh-Bohmer, K and Browndyke, JN and Lin, P-H and Kraus, W and Doraiswamy, PM and Burke, J and Sherwood, A},
   Title = {Lifestyle and Neurocognition in Older Adults With
             Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Cognitive
             Impairment.},
   Journal = {Psychosomatic Medicine},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {719-727},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/psy.0000000000000474},
   Abstract = {The aim of the study was to determine the relationship of
             lifestyle factors and neurocognitive functioning in older
             adults with vascular risk factors and cognitive impairment,
             no dementia (CIND).One hundred sixty adults (M [SD] = 65.4
             [6.8] years) with CIND completed neurocognitive assessments
             of executive function, processing speed, and memory.
             Objective measures of physical activity using accelerometry,
             aerobic capacity determined by exercise testing, and dietary
             habits quantified by the Food Frequency Questionnaire and
             4-Day Food Diary to assess adherence to the Mediterranean
             and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diets
             were obtained to assess direct effects with neurocognition.
             Potential indirect associations of high-sensitivity
             C-reactive protein and the Framingham Stroke Risk Profile
             also were examined.Greater aerobic capacity (β = 0.24) and
             daily physical activity (β = 0.15) were associated with
             better executive functioning/processing speed and verbal
             memory (βs = 0.24; 0.16). Adherence to the DASH diet was
             associated with better verbal memory (β = 0.17). Greater
             high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (βs = -0.14; -0.21) and
             Framingham Stroke Risk Profile (β = -0.18; -0.18) were
             associated with poorer executive functioning/processing
             speed and verbal memory. Greater stroke risk partially
             mediated the association of aerobic capacity with executive
             functioning/processing speed, and verbal memory and greater
             inflammation partially mediated the association of physical
             activity and aerobic fitness, with verbal memory.Higher
             levels of physical activity, aerobic fitness, and adherence
             to the DASH diet are associated with better neurocognitive
             performance in adults with CIND. These findings suggest that
             the adoption of healthy lifestyle habits could reduce the
             risk of neurocognitive decline in vulnerable older
             adults.NCT01573546.},
   Doi = {10.1097/psy.0000000000000474},
   Key = {fds326769}
}

@article{fds326641,
   Author = {Hill, LK and Watkins, LL and Hinderliter, AL and Blumenthal, JA and Sherwood, A},
   Title = {Racial differences in the association between heart rate
             variability and left ventricular mass.},
   Journal = {Experimental Physiology},
   Volume = {102},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {764-772},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1113/ep086228},
   Abstract = {What is the central question of this study? Decreased heart
             rate variability (HRV) is associated with increased
             cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, including greater left
             ventricular mass (LVM). Despite their enhanced CVD risk
             profile, African Americans have been shown to exhibit higher
             HRV, relative to Whites; however, it is unclear whether this
             pattern extends to the association between HRV and LVM. What
             is the main finding and its importance? Using ECG and
             echocardiographic data, HRV was positively associated with
             LVM in a non-clinical sample of African Americans. These
             findings suggest that current assumptions regarding the
             meaning of higher HRV might not be universal, which might
             have implications for HRV as a risk marker among African
             Americans. Increased left ventricular mass (LVM) is an early
             precursor of target organ damage attributable to
             hypertension. Diminished parasympathetic cardiac control has
             been linked to both hypertension onset and left ventricular
             impairment; however, emerging evidence suggests that this
             pattern might be different in African Americans. The present
             study sought to determine whether race impacts the
             relationship between parasympathetic cardiac control and
             LVM. The LVM was assessed via echocardiography in a sample
             (n = 148) of African American and White adults (mean
             age 33.20 ± 5.71 years) with normal or mildly elevated
             blood pressure. Parasympathetic cardiac control was assessed
             by a measure of high-frequency heart rate variability
             (HF-HRV) determined from ECG recordings during 5 min of
             rest. In regression analysis, greater HF-HRV was associated
             with greater LVM among African Americans (P = 0.002) but
             was not related to LVM in Whites (P = 0.919). These are
             the first data to demonstrate that race moderates the
             relationship between HRV and LVM and further suggest that
             race might be an important factor in the association between
             parasympathetic cardiac control and other cardiovascular
             disease risk factors.},
   Doi = {10.1113/ep086228},
   Key = {fds326641}
}

@article{fds326859,
   Author = {Dillavou, E and Turley, R and Nag, U and Sherwood, A and Lucas, J and Gardner, E and Roza, A},
   Title = {VESS27. Alternative Access for Fistula Cannulation in the
             Obese: Midterm Results from VWING Registry},
   Journal = {Journal of Vascular Surgery},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {30S-31S},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2017.03.059},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jvs.2017.03.059},
   Key = {fds326859}
}

@article{fds326858,
   Author = {Dennis, PA and Kimbrel, NA and Sherwood, A and Calhoun, PS and Watkins,
             LL and Dennis, MF and Beckham, JC},
   Title = {Trauma and Autonomic Dysregulation: Episodic-Versus
             Systemic-Negative Affect Underlying Cardiovascular Risk in
             Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.},
   Journal = {Psychosomatic Medicine},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {496-505},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/psy.0000000000000438},
   Abstract = {Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been linked to
             elevated heart rate (HR) and reduced heart rate variability
             (HRV) in cross-sectional research. Recent evidence suggests
             that this link may be driven by individual differences in
             autonomic arousal associated with momentary negative affect
             (NA). Using ecological momentary assessment (EMA) of NA and
             minute-to-minute HR/HRV monitoring, we examined whether
             NA-related HR/HRV mediated the association of PTSD symptom
             severity with 24-hour HRV and endothelial functioning.One
             hundred ninety-seven young adults (18-39 years), 93 with
             PTSD, underwent 1 day of Holter monitoring while
             concurrently reporting NA levels via EMA. Two noninvasive
             measures of endothelial functioning-flow-mediated dilation
             and hyperemic flow-were also collected. Multilevel modeling
             was used to assess the associations of momentary NA with HR
             and low- and high-frequency HRV during the 5-minute
             intervals after each EMA reading. Latent variable modeling
             was then used to determine whether individual differences in
             these associations mediated the association of PTSD symptom
             severity with 24-hour HRV, flow-mediated dilation, and
             hyperemic flow.PTSD symptom severity was positively
             associated with NA-related autonomic arousal (β = .21, p <
             .001), which significantly mediated the association of PTSD
             symptom severity with 24-hour HRV and hyperemic flow,
             accounting for 62% and 34% of their associations,
             respectively, while overshadowing the influence of smoking,
             lifetime alcohol dependence, sleep duration, mean NA, and
             episodes of acute NA.Results suggest that NA-related
             autonomic arousal is both a primary factor driving
             cardiovascular risk in PTSD and a potential point of
             intervention.},
   Doi = {10.1097/psy.0000000000000438},
   Key = {fds326858}
}

@article{fds326860,
   Author = {Hill, LK and Sherwood, A and Blumenthal, JA and Hinderliter,
             AL},
   Title = {SYNERGISTIC IMPACT OF PERCEIVED DISCRIMINATION AND HOSTILITY
             ON ADRENERGIC RESPONSIVITY},
   Journal = {Psychosomatic Medicine},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {A85-A85},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {fds326860}
}

@article{fds326861,
   Author = {Hill, LK and Watkins, LL and Sherwood, A},
   Title = {RACE DIFFERENCES IN RESTING AND STRESS-RELATED HEART RATE
             VARIABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE},
   Journal = {Psychosomatic Medicine},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {A49-A49},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {fds326861}
}

@article{fds325515,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Hill, LK and Blumenthal, JA and Johnson, KS and Hinderliter, AL},
   Title = {Race and sex differences in cardiovascular α-adrenergic and
             β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness in men and women with
             high blood pressure.},
   Journal = {Journal of Hypertension},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {975-981},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/hjh.0000000000001266},
   Abstract = {Hypertension is associated with unfavorable changes in
             adrenergic receptor responsiveness, but the relationship of
             race and sex to adrenergic receptor responsiveness in the
             development of cardiovascular disease is unclear. This study
             examined α-adrenergic and ß-adrenergic receptor
             responsiveness in African-American and white men and women
             with untreated high blood pressure (BP) (HBP) and with
             normal BP.The study sample comprised 161 African-American
             and white men and women in the age range 25-45 years.
             Isoproterenol, a nonselective ß-adrenergic receptor
             agonist, was administered intravenously to determine the
             bolus dose required to increase heart rate by 25 bpm, an
             index of β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness. Similarly,
             phenylephrine, an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, was
             administered to determine the bolus dose required to
             increase BP by 25 mmHg, an index of vascular
             α1-adrenergic receptor responsiveness. HBP (P < 0.01),
             male sex (P = 0.04), and higher BMI (P < 0.01) were
             all associated with reduced β-adrenergic receptor
             responsiveness, with a similar trend observed for
             African-American race (P = 0.07). Conversely,
             α1-adrenergic receptor responsiveness was increased in
             association with HBP (P < 0.01), female sex
             (P < 0.01), and African-American race (P < 0.01).In
             the early stages of hypertension, cardiovascular
             β-adrenergic receptors demonstrate blunted responsiveness,
             whereas conversely α1-adrenergic receptors exhibit
             increased responsiveness. This pattern of receptor changes
             is especially evident in men and African-Americans, is
             exacerbated by obesity, and may contribute to the
             development of cardiovascular disease.},
   Doi = {10.1097/hjh.0000000000001266},
   Key = {fds325515}
}

@article{fds323601,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Blumenthal, JA and Koch, GG and Hoffman, BM and Watkins,
             LL and Smith, PJ and O'Connor, CM and Adams, KF and Rogers, JG and Sueta,
             C and Chang, PP and Johnson, KS and Schwartz, J and Hinderliter,
             AL},
   Title = {Effects of Coping Skills Training on Quality of Life,
             Disease Biomarkers, and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With
             Heart Failure: A Randomized Clinical Trial.},
   Journal = {Circulation: Heart Failure},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/circheartfailure.116.003410},
   Abstract = {Heart failure (HF) is a chronic disease that compromises
             patients' quality of life (QoL). Interventions designed to
             reduce distress and improve disease self-management are
             needed. We evaluated the efficacy of a telephone-based
             coping skills training (CST) intervention.This randomized
             clinical trial involved 180 HF outpatients with reduced
             ejection fraction. Participants ranged in age from 29 to 87
             years (mean=58 years); 27% were women, and 47% were
             nonwhite. Participants were randomized to either a CST
             intervention or heart failure education, both delivered over
             16 weeks. The primary outcomes were (1) postintervention
             effects on QoL and HF disease biomarkers (both with
             α=0.01), and (2) a composite measure of time to death or
             first hospitalization (with α=0.03) over a median follow-up
             period of 3 years. CST resulted in greater improvements in
             QoL compared with heart failure education (P<0.01),
             including the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire
             (P=0.009), depressive symptoms (P=0.027), and the 6-minute
             walk test (P=0.012). However, it did not differentially
             improve HF disease biomarkers or reduce risk of all-cause
             hospitalizations or death (hazard ratio=0.84 [95% confidence
             interval, 0.59-1.12]). Interestingly, exploratory analyses
             showed that participants randomized to CST experienced a
             reduction in the composite end point of worsening HF
             hospitalization or death during the 3-year follow-up period
             (hazard ratio=0.65 [95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.98];
             P=0.040).CST improved QoL in patients with HF. Monitoring
             and improving QoL is emerging as an important aspect of the
             clinical management of HF that can reduce disease burden and
             may help improve clinical outcomes in this vulnerable
             patient population.URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov.
             Unique identifier: NCT00873418.},
   Doi = {10.1161/circheartfailure.116.003410},
   Key = {fds323601}
}

@article{fds322771,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Smith, PJ and Hinderliter, AL and Georgiades, A and Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {Effects of exercise and stress management training on
             nighttime blood pressure dipping in patients with coronary
             heart disease: A randomized, controlled trial.},
   Journal = {American Heart Journal},
   Volume = {183},
   Pages = {85-90},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2016.10.011},
   Abstract = {Blunted nighttime blood pressure (BP) dipping is prognostic
             of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Patients with
             coronary heart disease (CHD) are often characterized by a
             blunted nighttime BP dipping pattern. The present study
             compared the effects of 2 behavioral intervention programs,
             aerobic exercise (EX) and stress management (SM) training,
             with a usual care (UC) control group on BP dipping in a
             sample of CHD patients.This was a secondary analysis of a
             randomized, controlled trial with allocation concealment and
             blinded outcome assessment in 134 patients with stable CHD
             and exercise-induced myocardial ischemia. Nighttime BP
             dipping was assessed by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, at
             prerandomization baseline and after 16 weeks of one of the
             following treatments: usual medical care; UC plus supervised
             aerobic EX for 35 minutes, 3 times per week; UC plus weekly
             1.5-hour sessions of SM training.The EX and SM groups
             exhibited greater improvements in systolic BP dipping
             (P=.052) and diastolic BP dipping (P=.031) compared with UC.
             Postintervention systolic BP percent-dipping means were
             12.9% (SE=1.5) for SM, 11.1% (SE=1.4) for EX, and 8.6%
             (SE=1.4) for UC. Postintervention diastolic BP
             percent-dipping means were 13.3% (SE=1.9) for SM, 14.1%
             (SE=1.8) for EX, and 8.8% (1.8) for UC.For patients with
             stable CHD, EX or SM training resulted in improved nighttime
             BP dipping compared with usual medical care. These favorable
             effects of healthy lifestyle modifications may help reduce
             the risk of adverse clinical events.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ahj.2016.10.011},
   Key = {fds322771}
}


%% Siegler, Ilene C.   
@article{fds319710,
   Author = {Ogle, CM and Siegler, IC and Beckham, JC and Rubin,
             DC},
   Title = {Neuroticism Increases PTSD Symptom Severity by Amplifying
             the Emotionality, Rehearsal, and Centrality of Trauma
             Memories.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality},
   Volume = {85},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {702-715},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12278},
   Abstract = {Although it is well established that neuroticism increases
             the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), little is
             known about the mechanisms that promote PTSD in individuals
             with elevated levels of neuroticism. Across two studies, we
             examined the cognitive-affective processes through which
             neuroticism leads to greater PTSD symptom
             severity.Community-dwelling adults with trauma histories
             varying widely in severity (Study 1) and clinically
             diagnosed individuals exposed to DSM-IV-TR A1 criterion
             traumas (Study 2) completed measures of neuroticism,
             negative affectivity, trauma memory characteristics, and
             PTSD symptom severity.Longitudinal data in Study 1 showed
             that individuals with higher scores on two measures of
             neuroticism assessed approximately three decades apart in
             young adulthood and midlife reported trauma memories
             accompanied by more intense physiological reactions, more
             frequent involuntary rehearsal, and greater perceived
             centrality to identity in older adulthood. These properties
             of trauma memories were in turn associated with more severe
             PTSD symptoms. Study 2 replicated these findings using
             cross-sectional data from individuals with severe trauma
             histories and three additional measures of
             neuroticism.Results suggest that neuroticism leads to PTSD
             symptoms by magnifying the emotionality, availability, and
             centrality of trauma memories as proposed in mnemonic models
             of PTSD.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jopy.12278},
   Key = {fds319710}
}

@article{fds326504,
   Author = {Jiang, R and Babyak, MA and Brummett, BH and Hauser, ER and Shah, SH and Becker, RC and Siegler, IC and Singh, A and Haynes, C and Chryst-Ladd,
             M and Craig, DM and Williams, RB},
   Title = {Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rs6265 (Val66Met)
             polymorphism is associated with disease severity and
             incidence of cardiovascular events in a patient
             cohort.},
   Journal = {American Heart Journal},
   Volume = {190},
   Pages = {40-45},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2017.05.002},
   Abstract = {The rs6265 (Val66Met) single-nucleotide polymorphism in the
             BDNF gene has been related to a number of endophenotypes
             that have in turn been shown to confer risk for
             atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). To date,
             however, very few studies have examined the association of
             the Val66Met single-nucleotide polymorphism with CVD
             clinical outcomes.In a cohort of 5,510 Caucasian patients
             enrolled in the CATHeterization GENetics (CATHGEN) study at
             Duke University Hospital between 2001 and 2011, we
             determined the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) and
             CVD event incidence through up to 11.8years of follow-up. We
             examined the association of Val66Met genotype with
             time-to-death or myocardial infarction, adjusting for age,
             sex, CAD risk variables, and CAD severity measures.The
             Val/Val genotype was associated with a higher risk than Met
             carriers for clinical CVD events (P=.034, hazard ratio 1.12,
             95% CI 1.01-1.24). In addition, compared with Met carriers,
             individuals with the Val/Val genotype had a greater odds of
             having more diseased vessels (odds ratio 1.17, 95% CI
             1.06-1.30, P=.002), and lower left ventricular ejection
             fraction (β=-0.72, 95% CI, -1.42 to -0.02, P=.044).The
             Val/Val genotype was associated with greater severity of CAD
             and incidence of CVD-related clinical events in a patient
             sample. If these findings are confirmed in further research,
             intervention studies in clinical groups with the Val/Val
             genotype could be undertaken to prevent disease and improve
             prognosis.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ahj.2017.05.002},
   Key = {fds326504}
}

@article{fds324506,
   Author = {Jiang, R and Babyak, MA and Brummett, BH and Siegler, IC and Kuhn, CM and Williams, RB},
   Title = {Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met
             polymorphism interacts with gender to influence cortisol
             responses to mental stress.},
   Journal = {Psychoneuroendocrinology},
   Volume = {79},
   Pages = {13-19},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.02.005},
   Abstract = {Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met
             polymorphism has been associated with cortisol responses to
             stress with gender differences reported, although the
             findings are not entirely consistent. To evaluate the role
             of Val66Met genotype and gender on cortisol responses to
             stress, we conducted a 45-min mental stress protocol
             including four tasks and four rest periods. Blood cortisol
             was collected for assay immediately before and after each
             task and rest period. A significant two-way interaction of
             Val66Met genotype×gender (P=0.022) was observed on the
             total area under the curve (AUC), a total cortisol response
             over time, such that the Val/Val genotype was associated
             with a larger cortisol response to stress as compared to the
             Met group in women but not in men. Further contrast analyses
             between the Val/Val and Met group for each stress task
             showed a similar increased cortisol pattern among women
             Val/Val genotype but not among men. The present findings
             indicate the gender differences in the effect of Val66Met
             genotype on the cortisol responses to stress protocol, and
             extend the evidence for the importance of gender and the
             role of Val66Met in the modulation of stress reactivity and
             subsequent depression prevalence. Further studies and the
             underlying mechanism need to be investigated, which may
             provide an insight for prevention, intervention, and
             treatment strategies that target those at high
             risk.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.02.005},
   Key = {fds324506}
}

@article{fds323547,
   Author = {Williams, RB and Bishop, GD and Haberstick, BC and Smolen, A and Brummett, BH and Siegler, IC and Babyak, MA and Zhang, X and Tai, ES and Lee, JJ-M and Tan, M and Teo, YY and Cai, S and Chan, E and Halpern, CT and Whitsel, EA and Bauldry, S and Harris, KM},
   Title = {Population differences in associations of serotonin
             transporter promoter polymorphism (5HTTLPR) di- and
             triallelic genotypes with blood pressure and hypertension
             prevalence.},
   Journal = {American Heart Journal},
   Volume = {185},
   Pages = {110-122},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2016.12.013},
   Abstract = {Based on prior research finding the 5HTTLPR L allele
             associated with increased cardiovascular reactivity to
             laboratory stressors and increased risk of myocardial
             infarction, we hypothesized that the 5HTTLPR L allele will
             be associated with increased blood pressure (BP) and
             increased hypertension prevalence in 2 large nationally
             representative samples in the United States and
             Singapore.Logistic regression and linear models tested
             associations between triallelic (L'S', based on rs25531)
             5HTTLPR genotypes and hypertension severity and mean
             systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP)
             collected during the Wave IV survey of the National
             Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add
             Health, N=11,815) in 2008-09 and during 2004-07 in 4196
             Singaporeans.In US Whites, L' allele carriers had higher SBP
             (0.9 mm Hg, 95% CI=0.26-1.56) and greater odds (OR=1.23, 95%
             CI=1.10-1.38) of more severe hypertension than those with
             S'S' genotypes. In African Americans, L' carriers had lower
             mean SBP (-1.27mm Hg, 95% CI=-2.53 to -0.01) and lower odds
             (OR = 0.78, 95% CI=0.65-0.94) of more severe hypertension
             than those with the S'S' genotype. In African Americans,
             those with L'L' genotypes had lower DBP (-1.13mm Hg, 95%
             CI=-2.09 to -0.16) than S' carriers. In Native Americans, L'
             carriers had lower SBP (-6.05mm Hg, 95% CI=-9.59 to -2.51)
             and lower odds of hypertension (OR = 0.34, 95% CI=0.13-0.89)
             than those with the S'S' genotype. In Asian/Pacific
             Islanders those carrying the L' allele had lower DBP
             (-1.77mm Hg, 95% CI=-3.16 to -0.38) and lower odds of
             hypertension (OR = 0.68, 95% CI=0.48-0.96) than those with
             S'S'. In the Singapore sample S' carriers had higher SBP
             (3.02mm Hg, 95% CI=0.54-5.51) and DBP (1.90mm Hg, 95%
             CI=0.49-3.31) than those with the L'L' genotype.These
             findings suggest that Whites carrying the L' allele, African
             Americans and Native Americans with the S'S' genotype, and
             Asians carrying the S' allele will be found to be at higher
             risk of developing cardiovascular disease and may benefit
             from preventive measures.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ahj.2016.12.013},
   Key = {fds323547}
}

@article{fds323727,
   Author = {Ogle, CM and Rubin, DC and Siegler, IC},
   Title = {Commentary-Pre- and Posttrauma Predictors of Posttraumatic
             Stress Disorder Symptom Severity: Reply to van der Velden
             and van der Knaap (2017).},
   Journal = {Clinical Psychological Science},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {146-149},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2167702616661057},
   Doi = {10.1177/2167702616661057},
   Key = {fds323727}
}


%% Sikkema, Kathleen J.   
@article{fds321465,
   Author = {Watt, MH and Dennis, AC and Choi, KW and Ciya, N and Joska, JA and Robertson, C and Sikkema, KJ},
   Title = {Impact of Sexual Trauma on HIV Care Engagement: Perspectives
             of Female Patients with Trauma Histories in Cape Town, South
             Africa.},
   Journal = {AIDS and Behavior},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {3209-3218},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10461-016-1617-1},
   Abstract = {South African women have disproportionately high rates of
             both sexual trauma and HIV. To understand how sexual trauma
             impacts HIV care engagement, we conducted in-depth
             qualitative interviews with 15 HIV-infected women with
             sexual trauma histories, recruited from a public clinic in
             Cape Town. Interviews explored trauma narratives, coping
             behaviors and care engagement, and transcripts were analyzed
             using a constant comparison method. Participants reported
             multiple and complex traumas across their lifetimes. Sexual
             trauma hindered HIV care engagement, especially immediately
             following HIV diagnosis, and there were indications that
             sexual trauma may interfere with future care engagement, via
             traumatic stress symptoms including avoidance. Disclosure of
             sexual trauma was limited; no women had disclosed to an HIV
             provider. Routine screening for sexual trauma in HIV care
             settings may help to identify individuals at risk of poor
             care engagement. Efficacious treatments are needed to
             address the psychological and behavioral sequelae of
             trauma.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10461-016-1617-1},
   Key = {fds321465}
}

@article{fds327435,
   Author = {Velloza, J and Watt, MH and Abler, L and Skinner, D and Kalichman, SC and Dennis, AC and Sikkema, KJ},
   Title = {HIV-Risk Behaviors and Social Support Among Men and Women
             Attending Alcohol-Serving Venues in South Africa:
             Implications for HIV Prevention.},
   Journal = {AIDS and Behavior},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {Suppl 2},
   Pages = {144-154},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10461-017-1853-z},
   Abstract = {Alcohol use is associated with increased HIV-risk behaviors,
             including unprotected sex and number of sex partners.
             Alcohol-serving venues can be places to engage in
             HIV-related sexual risk behaviors, but are also important
             sites of social support for patrons, which may mitigate
             risks. We sought to examine the relationship between
             alcohol-serving venue attendance, social support, and
             HIV-related sexual risk behavior, by gender, in South
             Africa. Adult patrons (n = 496) were recruited from six
             alcohol-serving venues and completed surveys assessing
             frequency of venue attendance, venue-based social support,
             and recent sexual behaviors. Generalized estimating
             equations tested associations between daily venue
             attendance, social support, and sexual behaviors, separately
             by gender. Interaction effects between daily attendance and
             social support were assessed. Models were adjusted for
             venue, age, education, and ethnicity. Daily attendance at
             venues was similar across genders and was associated with
             HIV-related risk behaviors, but the strength and direction
             of associations differed by gender. Among women, daily
             attendance was associated with greater number of partners
             and higher proportion of unprotected sex. Social support was
             a significant moderator, with more support decreasing the
             strength of the relationship between attendance and risk.
             Among men, daily attendance was associated with a lower
             proportion of unprotected sex; no interaction effects were
             found for attendance and social support. Frequent venue
             attendance is associated with additional HIV-related risks
             for women, but this risk is mitigated by social support in
             venues. These results were not seen for men. Successful HIV
             interventions in alcohol-serving venues should address the
             gendered context of social support and sexual risk
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10461-017-1853-z},
   Key = {fds327435}
}

@article{fds328948,
   Author = {Skalski, LM and Towe, SL and Sikkema, KJ and Meade,
             CS},
   Title = {Memory Impairment in HIV-Infected Individuals with Early and
             Late Initiation of Regular Marijuana Use.},
   Journal = {AIDS and Behavior},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10461-017-1898-z},
   Abstract = {Marijuana use is disproportionately prevalent among
             HIV-infected individuals. The strongest neurocognitive
             effect of marijuana use is impairment in the domain of
             memory. Memory impairment is also high among HIV-infected
             persons. The present study examined 69 HIV-infected
             individuals who were stratified by age of regular marijuana
             initiation to investigate how marijuana use impacts
             neurocognitive functioning. A comprehensive battery assessed
             substance use and neurocognitive functioning. Findings
             indicated early onset marijuana users (regular use prior to
             age 18), compared to non-marijuana users and late onset
             marijuana users (regular use at age 18 or later), were over
             8 times more likely to have learning impairment and nearly 4
             times more likely to have memory impairment. A similar
             pattern of early onset marijuana users performing worse in
             learning emerged when examining domain deficit scores. The
             potential for early onset of regular marijuana use to
             exacerbate already high levels of memory impairment among
             HIV-infected persons has important clinical implications,
             including increased potential for medication non-adherence
             and difficulty with independent living.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10461-017-1898-z},
   Key = {fds328948}
}

@article{fds320149,
   Author = {Magidson, JF and Dietrich, J and Otwombe, KN and Sikkema, KJ and Katz,
             IT and Gray, GE},
   Title = {Psychosocial correlates of alcohol and other substance use
             among low-income adolescents in peri-urban Johannesburg,
             South Africa: A focus on gender differences.},
   Journal = {Journal of Health Psychology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1415-1425},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1359105316628739},
   Abstract = {Alcohol and other drug use is prevalent among peri-urban,
             South African adolescents. We identified correlates of
             alcohol and other drug use by gender among adolescents
             (age = 16-18 years; N = 822) in peri-urban
             Johannesburg. Interviewer-administered surveys assessed
             sexual activity, alcohol and other drug use, and relevant
             psychosocial factors. In separate logistic regression models
             of alcohol and other drug use stratified by gender, violence
             exposure and sexual activity were associated with alcohol
             use for both males and females. For females only, depressive
             symptoms were associated with drug use. For males only,
             being older and sexually active were associated with drug
             use. Substance use interventions for South African
             adolescents should consider psychological health, sexual
             health, and tailoring by gender.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1359105316628739},
   Key = {fds320149}
}

@article{fds321676,
   Author = {Vincent, W and Fang, X and Calabrese, SK and Heckman, TG and Sikkema,
             KJ and Hansen, NB},
   Title = {HIV-related shame and health-related quality of life among
             older, HIV-positive adults.},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {434-444},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10865-016-9812-0},
   Abstract = {This study investigated how HIV-related shame is associated
             with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in older people
             living with HIV (PLHIV). Structural equation modeling tested
             whether HIV-related shame was associated with three
             dimensions of HRQoL (physical, emotional, and social
             well-being) and whether there were significant indirect
             associations of HIV-related shame with the three HRQoL
             dimensions via depression and loneliness in a sample of 299
             PLHIV ≥50 years old. Results showed that depression and
             loneliness were key mechanisms, with depression at least
             partially accounting for the association between HIV-related
             shame and both emotional and physical well-being,
             respectively, and loneliness accounting for the association
             between HIV-related shame and social well-being. HIV-related
             shame appears to be an important correlate of HRQoL in older
             PLHIV and may provide a promising leveraging point by which
             to improve HRQoL in older PLHIV.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10865-016-9812-0},
   Key = {fds321676}
}

@article{fds323693,
   Author = {Choi, KW and Sikkema, KJ and Vythilingum, B and Geerts, L and Faure, SC and Watt, MH and Roos, A and Stein, DJ},
   Title = {Maternal childhood trauma, postpartum depression, and infant
             outcomes: Avoidant affective processing as a potential
             mechanism.},
   Journal = {Journal of Affective Disorders},
   Volume = {211},
   Pages = {107-115},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2017.01.004},
   Abstract = {Women who have experienced childhood trauma may be at risk
             for postpartum depression, increasing the likelihood of
             negative outcomes among their children. Predictive pathways
             from maternal childhood trauma to child outcomes, as
             mediated by postpartum depression, require investigation.A
             longitudinal sample of South African women (N=150) was
             followed through pregnancy and postpartum. Measures included
             maternal trauma history reported during pregnancy;
             postpartum depression through six months; and
             maternal-infant bonding, infant development, and infant
             physical growth at one year. Structural equation models
             tested postpartum depression as a mediator between maternal
             experiences of childhood trauma and children's outcomes. A
             subset of women (N=33) also participated in a lab-based
             emotional Stroop paradigm, and their responses to fearful
             stimuli at six weeks were explored as a potential mechanism
             linking maternal childhood trauma, postpartum depression,
             and child outcomes.Women with childhood trauma experienced
             greater depressive symptoms through six months postpartum,
             which then predicted negative child outcomes at one year.
             Mediating effects of postpartum depression were significant,
             and persisted for maternal-infant bonding and infant growth
             after controlling for covariates and antenatal distress.
             Maternal avoidance of fearful stimuli emerged as a potential
             affective mechanism.Limitations included modest sample size,
             self-report measures, and unmeasured potential
             confounders.Findings suggest a mediating role of postpartum
             depression in the intergenerational transmission of negative
             outcomes. Perinatal interventions that address maternal
             trauma histories and depression, as well as underlying
             affective mechanisms, may help interrupt cycles of
             disadvantage, particularly in high-trauma settings such as
             South Africa.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2017.01.004},
   Key = {fds323693}
}

@article{fds318783,
   Author = {Skalski, LM and Towe, SL and Sikkema, KJ and Meade,
             CS},
   Title = {The Impact of Marijuana Use on Memory in HIV-Infected
             Patients: A Comprehensive Review of the HIV and Marijuana
             Literatures.},
   Journal = {Current Drug Abuse Reviews},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {126-141},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874473709666160502124503},
   Abstract = {The most robust neurocognitive effect of marijuana use is
             memory impairment. Memory deficits are also high among
             persons living with HIV/AIDS, and marijuana is the most
             commonly used drug in this population. Yet research
             examining neurocognitive outcomes resulting from
             co-occurring marijuana and HIV is limited.The primary
             objectives of this comprehensive review are to: (1) examine
             the literature on memory functioning in HIV-infected
             individuals; (2) examine the literature on memory
             functioning in marijuana users; (3) synthesize findings and
             propose a theoretical framework to guide future
             research.PubMed was searched for English publications
             2000-2013. Twenty-two studies met inclusion criteria in the
             HIV literature, and 23 studies in the marijuana
             literature.Among HIV-infected individuals, memory deficits
             with medium to large effect sizes were observed. Marijuana
             users also demonstrated memory problems, but results were
             less consistent due to the diversity of samples.A
             compensatory hypothesis, based on the cognitive aging
             literature, is proposed to provide a framework to explore
             the interaction between marijuana and HIV. There is some
             evidence that individuals infected with HIV recruit
             additional brain regions during memory tasks to compensate
             for HIV-related declines in neurocognitive functioning.
             Marijuana is associated with disturbance in similar brain
             systems, and thus it is hypothesized that the added neural
             strain of marijuana can exhaust neural resources, resulting
             in pronounced memory impairment. It will be important to
             test this hypothesis empirically, and future research
             priorities are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.2174/1874473709666160502124503},
   Key = {fds318783}
}

@article{fds329106,
   Author = {Watt, MH and Mosha, MV and Platt, AC and Sikkema, KJ and Wilson, SM and Turner, EL and Masenga, GG},
   Title = {A nurse-delivered mental health intervention for obstetric
             fistula patients in Tanzania: results of a pilot randomized
             controlled trial.},
   Journal = {Pilot and Feasibility Studies},
   Volume = {3},
   Pages = {35},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40814-017-0178-z},
   Abstract = {Obstetric fistula has severe psychological consequences, but
             no evidence-based interventions exist to improve mental
             health in this population. This pilot trial evaluated a
             psychological intervention for women receiving surgical care
             for obstetric fistula.A parallel two-armed pilot RCT was
             conducted between 2014 and 2016. The intervention was six
             individual sessions, based on psychological theory and
             delivered by a nurse facilitator. The study was conducted at
             a tertiary hospital in Moshi, Tanzania. Women were eligible
             if they were over age 18 and admitted to the hospital for
             surgical repair of an obstetric fistula. Sixty participants
             were randomized to the intervention or standard of care.
             Surveys were completed at baseline, post-treatment (before
             discharge), and 3 months following discharge. Standardized
             scales measured depression, anxiety, traumatic stress, and
             self-esteem. Feasibility of an RCT was assessed by
             participation and retention. Feasibility and acceptability
             of the intervention were assessed by fidelity, attendance,
             and participant ratings. Potential efficacy was assessed by
             exploratory linear regression and clinical significance
             analysis.Eighty-five percent met criteria for mental health
             dysfunction at enrollment. All eligible patients enrolled,
             with retention 100% post and 73% at 3 months. Participants
             rated the intervention acceptable and beneficial. There were
             sharp and meaningful improvements in mental health outcomes
             over time, with no evidence of differences by condition.A
             nurse-delivered mental health intervention was feasible to
             implement as part of in-patient clinical care and regarded
             positively. Mental health treatment in this population is
             warranted given high level of distress at presentation to
             care.ClinicalTrials.Gov NCT01934075.},
   Doi = {10.1186/s40814-017-0178-z},
   Key = {fds329106}
}


%% Smoski, Moria J.   
@article{fds326770,
   Author = {Dardas, LA and Silva, SG and Smoski, MJ and Noonan, D and Simmons,
             LA},
   Title = {Personal and Perceived Depression Stigma among Arab
             Adolescents: Associations with Depression Severity and
             Personal Characteristics.},
   Journal = {Archives of Psychiatric Nursing},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {499-506},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apnu.2017.06.005},
   Abstract = {In Arab communities, the selection, utilization, and
             attitudes towards mental health services are substantially
             affected by existing mental illness stigma. However, little
             is known about how the stigma of depression manifests among
             Arab adolescents, which makes it difficult to design,
             implement, and disseminate effective anti-stigma
             interventions for this vulnerable population. Therefore, the
             purpose of this study was to determine levels of depression
             stigma among Arab adolescents. The specific aims were to (1)
             describe the severity of personal and perceived depression
             stigma among Arab adolescents and its relationship to
             severity of depression, and (2) determine characteristics
             associated with severity of depression stigma among Arab
             adolescents.This study was conducted in Jordan, a Middle
             Eastern Arab country. A nationally representative,
             school-based survey was utilized. A total of 2349 Jordanian
             adolescents aged 12-17 completed and returned the survey
             packets, which included measures on individual
             characteristics, depression severity, and depression
             stigma.The majority of the adolescents (88%) reported scores
             indicating moderate to high depression stigma. Adolescents
             reported higher rates of perceived stigma than personal
             stigma. Depression stigma was not significantly associated
             with severity of depression, but with adolescent's sex, age,
             region of residence, parents' education, and history of
             mental health problem.This is the first Arab study to
             isolate the influence of adolescent depression and personal
             characteristics on personal and perceived depression
             stigmas, and highlight the presence of these distinctions
             early in adolescence. Such distinction can inform the design
             and implementation of policies and interventions to reduce
             both personal and perceived stigma. The study provides
             important recommendations on when, how, and why to utilize
             school settings for anti-depression stigma
             interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.apnu.2017.06.005},
   Key = {fds326770}
}

@article{fds323970,
   Author = {Keng, S-L and Tan, ELY and Eisenlohr-Moul, TA and Smoski,
             MJ},
   Title = {Effects of mindfulness, reappraisal, and suppression on sad
             mood and cognitive resources.},
   Journal = {Behaviour Research and Therapy},
   Volume = {91},
   Pages = {33-42},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2017.01.006},
   Abstract = {The present study investigated the relative effects of
             mindfulness, reappraisal and suppression in reducing
             sadness, and the extent to which implementation of these
             strategies affects cognitive resources in a laboratory
             context. A total of 171 Singaporean undergraduate
             participants were randomly assigned to receive brief
             training in mindfulness, reappraisal, or suppression prior
             to undergoing a sad mood induction. Individual adherence to
             Asian cultural values was assessed as a potential moderator
             of strategy effectiveness. Participants rated their mood and
             completed a Color-Word Stroop task before and after mood
             regulation instructions. Analyses using multi-level
             modelling showed that the suppression condition caused less
             robust declines in sadness over time compared to
             mindfulness. There was also a nonsignificant trend in which
             mindfulness was associated with greater sadness recovery
             compared to reappraisal. Suppression resulted in lower
             average sadness compared to mindfulness among those high on
             Asian cultural values, but not those low on Asian cultural
             values. Both mindfulness and reappraisal buffered against
             increases in Stroop interference from pre-to post-regulation
             compared to suppression. The findings highlight the
             advantage of mindfulness as a strategy effective not only in
             the regulation of sad mood, but also in the preservation of
             cognitive resources in the context of mood
             regulation.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brat.2017.01.006},
   Key = {fds323970}
}

@article{fds320766,
   Author = {Walsh, E and Carl, H and Eisenlohr-Moul, T and Minkel, J and Crowther,
             A and Moore, T and Gibbs, D and Petty, C and Bizzell, J and Smoski, MJ and Dichter, GS},
   Title = {Attenuation of Frontostriatal Connectivity During Reward
             Processing Predicts Response to Psychotherapy in Major
             Depressive Disorder.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology (Nature)},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {831-843},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2016.179},
   Abstract = {There are few reliable predictors of response to
             antidepressant treatments. In the present investigation, we
             examined pretreatment functional brain connectivity during
             reward processing as a potential predictor of response to
             Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD), a
             validated psychotherapy that promotes engagement with
             rewarding stimuli and reduces avoidance behaviors.
             Thirty-three outpatients with major depressive disorder
             (MDD) and 20 matched controls completed two runs of the
             monetary incentive delay task during functional magnetic
             resonance imaging after which participants with MDD received
             up to 15 sessions of BATD. Seed-based generalized
             psychophysiological interaction analyses focused on
             task-based connectivity across task runs, as well as the
             attenuation of connectivity from the first to the second run
             of the task. The average change in Beck Depression
             Inventory-II scores due to treatment was 10.54 points, a
             clinically meaningful response. Groups differed in
             seed-based functional connectivity among multiple
             frontostriatal regions. Hierarchical linear modeling
             revealed that improved treatment response to BATD was
             predicted by greater connectivity between the left putamen
             and paracingulate gyrus during reward anticipation. In
             addition, MDD participants with greater attenuation of
             connectivity between several frontostriatal seeds, and
             midline subcallosal cortex and left paracingulate gyrus
             demonstrated improved response to BATD. These findings
             indicate that pretreatment frontostriatal functional
             connectivity during reward processing is predictive of
             response to a psychotherapy modality that promotes improving
             approach-related behaviors in MDD. Furthermore, connectivity
             attenuation among reward-processing regions may be a
             particularly powerful endophenotypic predictor of response
             to BATD in MDD.},
   Doi = {10.1038/npp.2016.179},
   Key = {fds320766}
}

@article{fds330051,
   Author = {Dardas, LA and Silva, SG and van de Water, B and Vance, A and Smoski,
             MJ and Noonan, D and Simmons, LA},
   Title = {Psychosocial Correlates of Jordanian Adolescents'
             Help-Seeking Intentions for Depression: Findings From a
             Nationally Representative School Survey.},
   Journal = {The Journal of School Nursing},
   Pages = {1059840517731493},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1059840517731493},
   Abstract = {Little is known about help-seeking for depression among
             Jordanian adolescents who are a vulnerable population with
             high rates of depressive symptoms and few mental health
             services. The purpose of this study was to (1) explore
             Jordanian adolescents' helpseeking intentions for depression
             and (2) examine whether depression stigma, depression
             severity, or their interaction are associated with Jordanian
             adolescents' willingness to seek help for depression and the
             type of treatment they would seek. In collaboration with the
             Jordanian Ministry of Education, we conducted a nationally
             representative, school-based survey of adolescents aged
             12-17 years ( N = 2,349). One fourth of the adolescents
             reported they would not seek professional help for
             depression, and those respondents had higher average
             depression scores. Among those adolescents willing to seek
             help, the most likely sources included family member (57%),
             school counselor (46%), psychiatrist (43%), religious leader
             (39%), and general health practitioner (28%). Lower stigma
             scores were associated with greater likelihood to seek
             psychotherapy or visit a psychiatrist, while higher stigma
             scores were associated with increased likelihood to seek
             help from a school counselor or a family member. Jordanian
             adolescents experience significant barriers to seeking
             professional help for depression. However, even among
             adolescents with greater depression severity and depression
             stigma, school counselors were identified as a key resource
             for help. These findings suggest that school-based
             interventions may fill a critical service need for
             adolescents with depression and other mental health
             problems. School nurses should be leveraged along with
             counselors to address mental health issues in this
             vulnerable population.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1059840517731493},
   Key = {fds330051}
}


%% Spenner, Kenneth I.   
@article{fds328851,
   Author = {Martin, ND and Spenner, KI and Mustillo, SA},
   Title = {A Test of Leading Explanations for the College Racial-Ethnic
             Achievement Gap: Evidence from a Longitudinal Case
             Study},
   Journal = {Research in Higher Education},
   Volume = {58},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {617-645},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11162-016-9439-6},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11162-016-9439-6},
   Key = {fds328851}
}


%% Staddon, John E.   
@article{fds329016,
   Author = {Staddon, JER},
   Title = {Simply Too Many Notes},
   Journal = {The Behavior analyst / MABA},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {101-106},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40614-017-0086-9},
   Doi = {10.1007/s40614-017-0086-9},
   Key = {fds329016}
}


%% Strauman, Timothy J.   
@article{fds322027,
   Author = {Scult, MA and Knodt, AR and Hanson, JL and Ryoo, M and Adcock, RA and Hariri, AR and Strauman, TJ},
   Title = {Individual differences in regulatory focus predict neural
             response to reward.},
   Journal = {Social Neuroscience},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {419-429},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17470919.2016.1178170},
   Abstract = {Although goal pursuit is related to both functioning of the
             brain's reward circuits and psychological factors, the
             literatures surrounding these concepts have often been
             separate. Here, we use the psychological construct of
             regulatory focus to investigate individual differences in
             neural response to reward. Regulatory focus theory proposes
             two motivational orientations for personal goal pursuit: (1)
             promotion, associated with sensitivity to potential gain,
             and (2) prevention, associated with sensitivity to potential
             loss. The monetary incentive delay task was used to
             manipulate reward circuit function, along with instructional
             framing corresponding to promotion and prevention in a
             within-subject design. We observed that the more promotion
             oriented an individual was, the lower their ventral striatum
             response to gain cues. Follow-up analyses revealed that
             greater promotion orientation was associated with decreased
             ventral striatum response even to no-value cues, suggesting
             that promotion orientation may be associated with relatively
             hypoactive reward system function. The findings are also
             likely to represent an interaction between the cognitive and
             motivational characteristics of the promotion system with
             the task demands. Prevention orientation did not correlate
             with ventral striatum response to gain cues, supporting the
             discriminant validity of regulatory focus theory. The
             results highlight a dynamic association between individual
             differences in self-regulation and reward system
             function.},
   Doi = {10.1080/17470919.2016.1178170},
   Key = {fds322027}
}

@article{fds325974,
   Author = {Strauman, TJ},
   Title = {Self-Regulation and Psychopathology: Toward an Integrative
             Translational Research Paradigm.},
   Journal = {Annual Review of Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {13},
   Pages = {497-523},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-032816-045012},
   Abstract = {This article presents a general framework in which different
             manifestations of psychopathology can be conceptualized as
             dysfunctions in one or more mechanisms of self-regulation,
             defined as the ongoing process of managing personal goal
             pursuit in the face of internal, interpersonal, and
             environmental forces that would derail it. The framework is
             based on the assertion that self-regulation is a critical
             locus for the proximal influence on motivation, cognition,
             emotion, and behavior of more distal factors such as
             genetics, temperament, socialization history, and
             neurophysiology. Psychological theories of self-regulation
             are ideal platforms from which to integrate the study of
             self-regulation both within and across traditional
             disciplines. This article has two related goals: to
             elucidate how the construct of self-regulation provides a
             unique conceptual platform for the study of psychopathology
             and to illustrate that platform by presenting our research
             on depression as an example.},
   Doi = {10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-032816-045012},
   Key = {fds325974}
}

@article{fds323694,
   Author = {Luber, BM and Davis, S and Bernhardt, E and Neacsiu, A and Kwapil, L and Lisanby, SH and Strauman, TJ},
   Title = {Using neuroimaging to individualize TMS treatment for
             depression: Toward a new paradigm for imaging-guided
             intervention.},
   Journal = {NeuroImage},
   Volume = {148},
   Pages = {1-7},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.12.083},
   Abstract = {The standard clinical technique for using repetitive
             transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for major
             depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with limited
             efficacy to date. Such limited efficacy may be due to
             reliance on scalp-based targeting rather than
             state-of-the-science methods which incorporate fMRI-guided
             neuronavigation based on a specific model of neurocircuit
             dysfunction. In this review, we examine such a specific
             model drawn from regulatory focus theory, which postulates
             two brain/behavior systems, the promotion and prevention
             systems, underlying goal pursuit. Individual differences in
             these systems have been shown to predict vulnerability to
             MDD as well as to comorbid generalized anxiety disorder
             (GAD). Activation of an individual's promotion or prevention
             goals via priming leads to motivational and affective
             responses modulated by the individual's appraisal of their
             progress in attaining the goal. In addition, priming
             promotion vs. prevention goals induces discriminable
             patterns of brain activation that are sensitive to the
             effects of depression and anxiety: MDD is associated with
             promotion system failure, anhedonic/dysphoric symptoms, and
             hypoactivation in specific regions in left prefrontal
             cortex, whereas GAD is associated with prevention system
             failure, hypervigilant/agitated symptoms, and
             hyperactivation in right prefrontal cortex (PFC). These left
             and right PFC locations can be directly targeted in an
             individualized manner for TMS. Additionally, this
             individually targeted rTMS can be integrated with cognitive
             interventions designed to activate the neural circuitry
             associated with promotion vs. prevention, thus allowing the
             neuroplasticity induced by the rTMS to benefit the systems
             likely to be involved in remediating depression. Targeted
             engagement of cortical systems involved in emotion
             regulation using individualized fMRI guidance may help
             increase the efficacy of rTMS in depression.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.12.083},
   Key = {fds323694}
}

@article{fds325975,
   Author = {MacDuffie, KE and Strauman, TJ},
   Title = {Understanding Our Own Biology: The Relevance of
             Auto-Biological Attributions for Mental Health},
   Journal = {Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {50-68},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cpsp.12188},
   Doi = {10.1111/cpsp.12188},
   Key = {fds325975}
}

@article{fds324048,
   Author = {Strauman, TJ and Eddington, KM},
   Title = {Treatment of Depression From a Self-Regulation Perspective:
             Basic Concepts and Applied Strategies in Self-System
             Therapy.},
   Journal = {Cognitive Therapy and Research},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-15},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10608-016-9801-1},
   Abstract = {Self-regulation models of psychopathology provide a
             theory-based, empirically supported framework for developing
             psychotherapeutic interventions that complement and extend
             current cognitive-behavioral models. However, many
             clinicians are only minimally familiar with the psychology
             of self-regulation. The aim of the present manuscript is
             twofold. First, we provide an overview of self-regulation as
             a motivational process essential to well-being and introduce
             two related theories of self-regulation which have been
             applied to depression. Second, we describe how
             self-regulatory concepts and processes from those two
             theories have been translated into psychosocial
             interventions, focusing specifically on self-system therapy
             (SST), a brief structured treatment for depression that
             targets personal goal pursuit. Two randomized controlled
             trials have shown that SST is superior to cognitive therapy
             for depressed clients with specific self-regulatory
             deficits, and both studies found evidence that SST works in
             part by restoring adaptive self-regulation.
             Self-regulation-based psychotherapeutic approaches to
             depression hold significant promise for enhancing treatment
             efficacy and ultimately may provide an individualizable
             framework for treatment planning.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10608-016-9801-1},
   Key = {fds324048}
}

@article{fds322026,
   Author = {Scult, MA and Paulli, AR and Mazure, ES and Moffitt, TE and Hariri, AR and Strauman, TJ},
   Title = {The association between cognitive function and subsequent
             depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.},
   Journal = {Psychological Medicine},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-17},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0033291716002075},
   Abstract = {Despite a growing interest in understanding the cognitive
             deficits associated with major depressive disorder (MDD), it
             is largely unknown whether such deficits exist before
             disorder onset or how they might influence the severity of
             subsequent illness. The purpose of the present study was to
             conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of
             longitudinal datasets to determine whether cognitive
             function acts as a predictor of later MDD diagnosis or
             change in depression symptoms. Eligible studies included
             longitudinal designs with baseline measures of cognitive
             functioning, and later unipolar MDD diagnosis or symptom
             assessment. The systematic review identified 29
             publications, representing 34 unique samples, and 121 749
             participants, that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria.
             Quantitative meta-analysis demonstrated that higher
             cognitive function was associated with decreased levels of
             subsequent depression (r = -0.088, 95% confidence interval.
             -0.121 to -0.054, p < 0.001). However, sensitivity analyses
             revealed that this association is likely driven by
             concurrent depression symptoms at the time of cognitive
             assessment. Our review and meta-analysis indicate that the
             association between lower cognitive function and later
             depression is confounded by the presence of contemporaneous
             depression symptoms at the time of cognitive assessment.
             Thus, cognitive deficits predicting MDD likely represent
             deleterious effects of subclinical depression symptoms on
             performance rather than premorbid risk factors for
             disorder.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0033291716002075},
   Key = {fds322026}
}


%% Suarez, Edward C.   
@article{fds327211,
   Author = {Suarez, EC and Beckham, JC and Green, KT},
   Title = {The Relation of Light-to-Moderate Alcohol Consumption to
             Glucose Metabolism and Insulin Resistance in Nondiabetic
             Adults: the Moderating Effects of Depressive Symptom
             Severity, Adiposity, and Sex.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {927-936},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12529-017-9652-5},
   Abstract = {We examined the relation of alcohol consumption to glucose
             metabolism and insulin resistance (IR) as a function of
             depressive symptoms, adiposity, and sex.Healthy adults (aged
             18-65 years) provided fasting blood samples and information
             on lifestyle factors. Alcohol intake was categorized as
             never, infrequent (1-3 drinks/month), occasional (1-7
             drinks/week), and regular (≥2 drinks/day) drinkers. The
             Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to assess symptom
             severity. Primary outcomes were fasting insulin, glucose,
             and IR assessed by the homeostasis model assessment
             (HOMA).In univariate analysis, alcohol consumption was
             negatively associated with HOMA-IR (p = 0.03), insulin
             (p = 0.007), and body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.04), but
             not with glucose or BDI. Adjusting for potential confounders
             including BMI, alcohol consumption was associated with
             HOMA-IR (p = 0.01) and insulin (p = 0.009) as a function
             of BDI and sex. For women with minimal depressive symptoms,
             light-to-moderate alcohol consumption was associated with
             lower HOMA-IR and insulin. Alcohol consumption was not
             associated with metabolic markers in women with higher
             depressive symptoms and in men. In analysis using BMI as a
             continuous moderator, alcohol consumption was only
             associated with insulin (p = 0.004). Post-hoc comparisons
             between BMI groups (<25 vs ≥25 kg/m2) revealed that
             light-to-moderate alcohol consumption was associated with
             lower insulin but only in subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2.The
             benefits of light-to-moderate alcohol consumption on fasting
             insulin and IR are sex dimorphic and appear to be
             independently moderated by adiposity and depressive symptom
             severity.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s12529-017-9652-5},
   Key = {fds327211}
}

@article{fds326862,
   Author = {Suarez, EC and Sundy, JS},
   Title = {The cortisol:C-reactive protein ratio and negative affect
             reactivity in depressed adults.},
   Journal = {Health Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {852-862},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0000517},
   Abstract = {We evaluated the effect of the cortisol (CORT) to high
             sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) ratio on
             stress-induced negative affect (NA) reactivity and whether
             the association was moderated by depressive symptom severity
             and gender. The CORT/CRP ratio was used to evaluate the
             integrity of the negative feedback loop between the
             hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and inflammatory
             response system.Basal CORT and hsCRP levels were measured in
             fasting blood samples from 198 medication-free and
             nonsmoking healthy men and women. Depressive symptom
             severity was assessed using the Hamilton Rating Scale for
             Depression (HAMD). NA ratings were collected at baseline and
             at the completion of the laboratory stressors, the Anger
             Recall Interview (ARI) and reading.Adjusting for potential
             confounders and baseline NA, analysis revealed a significant
             relationship between CORT/CRP ratio and NA reactivity to ARI
             as a function of depressive symptom severity. Simple effects
             revealed that for participants with high HAMD, decreasing
             CORT/CRP ratio, suggestive of an insufficient CORT release
             relative to higher hsCRP, predicted increasing
             stress-induced NA reactivity. For participants with low
             HAMD, the CORT/CRP ratio failed to predict NA reactivity.
             Gender did not moderate the joint effect of depressive
             symptom severity and the CORT/CRP ratio on stress-induced NA
             reactivity.This is the first study to document that a
             premorbid dysregulation of the neuro-immune relationship,
             characterized by an insufficient release of CORT in
             conjunction with higher CRP, plays a role in stress
             sensitivity, and specifically NA reactivity, in individuals
             with elevated levels of depression symptoms. (PsycINFO
             Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/hea0000517},
   Key = {fds326862}
}

@article{fds136724,
   Title = {Suarez EC, Sherwood A, Hinderliter AL: Hostility and
             adrenergic receptor responsiveness in high hostile men.
             Journal Psychosomatic Research (In press).},
   Key = {fds136724}
}


%% Svetlova, Margarita L.   
@article{fds326699,
   Author = {Kachel, U and Svetlova, M and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Three-Year-Olds' Reactions to a Partner's Failure to Perform
             Her Role in a Joint Commitment.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12816},
   Abstract = {When children make a joint commitment to collaborate,
             obligations are created. Pairs of 3-year-old children
             (N = 144) made a joint commitment to play a game. In three
             different conditions the game was interrupted in the middle
             either because: (a) the partner child intentionally
             defected, (b) the partner child was ignorant about how to
             play, or (c) the apparatus broke. The subject child reacted
             differently in the three cases, protesting normatively
             against defection (with emotional arousal and later
             tattling), teaching when the partner seemed to be ignorant,
             or simply blaming the apparatus when it broke. These results
             suggest that 3-year-old children are competent in making
             appropriate normative evaluations of intentions and
             obligations of collaborative partners.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.12816},
   Key = {fds326699}
}


%% Swartzwelder, Scott   
@article{fds329550,
   Author = {Swartzwelder, HS and Park, M-H and Acheson, S},
   Title = {Adolescent Ethanol Exposure Enhances NMDA Receptor-Mediated
             Currents in Hippocampal Neurons: Reversal by
             Gabapentin.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {13133},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-12956-6},
   Abstract = {Adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE) exposure compromises
             neural function into adulthood. We have reported that
             astrocyte-secreted thrombospondins, and their target
             neuronal receptors (α2δ-1) are upregulated in the
             hippocampus in adulthood after AIE, suggesting aberrant
             excitatory synaptogenesis and hyperexcitability in
             memory-related circuits. Gabapentin antagonizes the
             interaction of thrombospondins (TSPs) with the α2δ-1
             receptor, and thus may reverse or ameliorate the effects of
             AIE on hippocampal function. Adolescent rats were exposed to
             AIE or vehicle. In adulthood, hippocampal slices were
             prepared. Half of the slices from each animal were
             pre-incubated in normal artificial cerebrospinal fluid
             (aCSF) while half were pre-incubated in aCSF containing
             gabapentin. Whole-cell voltage clamp recordings were then
             made from CA1 pyramidal cells in normal aCSF. Evoked,
             N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated currents were
             recorded at baseline, and after application of the GluN2B
             antagonist, RO25-6981. Current amplitudes were higher in
             neurons from AIE-exposed animals. However, no amplitude
             increase was observed in neurons from slices that had been
             pre-incubation in gabapentin. GluN2B antagonism reduced NMDA
             receptor-mediated currents more efficaciously in cells from
             AIE-exposed animals, an effect that was also reversed by
             pre-incubation in gabapentin. These findings identify a
             mechanism underlying the enduring effects of AIE, and a
             clinically-utilized agent that may ameliorate those
             effects.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-12956-6},
   Key = {fds329550}
}

@article{fds327139,
   Author = {Miller, KM and Risher, M-L and Acheson, SK and Darlow, M and Sexton, HG and Schramm-Sapyta, N and Swartzwelder, HS},
   Title = {Behavioral Inefficiency on a Risky Decision-Making Task in
             Adulthood after Adolescent Intermittent Ethanol Exposure in
             Rats.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {4680},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-04704-7},
   Abstract = {Adolescence is a period of development in neural circuits
             that are critical for adult functioning. There is a
             relationship between alcohol exposure and risky
             decision-making, though the enduring effects of adolescent
             ethanol exposure on risky decision-making in adulthood have
             not been fully explored. Studies using positive
             reinforcement have shown that adolescent intermittent
             ethanol (AIE) exposure results in higher levels of risky
             decision-making in adulthood, but the effects of AIE on
             punishment-mediated decision-making have not been explored.
             Adolescent rats were exposed to AIE or saline vehicle across
             a 16-day period, and then allowed to mature into adulthood.
             They were then trained to lever press for food reward and
             were assessed for risky decision-making by pairing increased
             levels of food reward with the probability of footshock
             punishment. AIE did not alter punishment-mediated risky
             decision-making. However, it did result in a significant
             increase in the delay to lever pressing. This finding is
             consistent with previous reports, using other behavioral
             tasks, which show decreased behavioral efficiency in
             adulthood after AIE. These findings indicate that AIE
             increases behavioral inefficiency, but not
             punishment-mediated risk-taking, in adulthood. Thus they
             contribute to a more nuanced understanding of the long-term
             effects of AIE on adult behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-04704-7},
   Key = {fds327139}
}

@article{fds326257,
   Author = {Tupler, LA and Zapp, D and DeJong, W and Ali, M and O'Rourke, S and Looney,
             J and Swartzwelder, HS},
   Title = {Alcohol-Related Blackouts, Negative Alcohol-Related
             Consequences, and Motivations for Drinking Reported by Newly
             Matriculating Transgender College Students.},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1012-1023},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acer.13358},
   Abstract = {Many transgender college students struggle with identity
             formation and other emotional, social, and developmental
             challenges associated with emerging adulthood. A potential
             maladaptive coping strategy employed by such students is
             heavy drinking. Prior literature has suggested greater
             consumption and negative alcohol-related consequences (ARCs)
             in transgender students compared with their cisgender peers,
             but little is known about their differing experiences with
             alcohol-related blackouts (ARBs). We examined the level of
             alcohol consumption, the frequency of ARBs and other ARCs,
             and motivations for drinking reported by the largest sample
             of transgender college students to date.A Web survey from an
             alcohol-prevention program, AlcoholEdu for College™,
             assessed student demographics and drinking-related
             behaviors, experiences, and motivations of newly
             matriculating first-year college students. A self-reported
             drinking calendar was used to examine each of the following
             measures over the previous 14 days: number of drinking
             days, total number of drinks, and maximum number of drinks
             on any single day. A 7-point Likert scale was used to
             measure ARCs, ARBs, and drinking motivations. Transgender
             students of both sexes were compared with their cisgender
             peers.A total of 989 of 422,906 students (0.2%) identified
             as transgender. Over a 14-day period, transgender compared
             with cisgender students were more likely to consume alcohol
             over more days, more total drinks, and a greater number of
             maximum drinks on a single day. Transgender students (36%)
             were more likely to report an ARB than cisgender students
             (25%) as well as more negative academic,
             confrontation-related, social, and sexual ARCs. Transgender
             respondents more often cited stress reduction, social
             anxiety, self-esteem issues, and the inherent properties of
             alcohol as motivations for drinking. For nearly all
             measures, higher values were yielded by male-to-female than
             female-to-male transgender students.Transgender compared
             with cisgender first-year students engage in higher-risk
             drinking patterns and experience more ARBs and other
             negative ARCs. Broad institutional efforts are required to
             address the unique circumstances of transgender men and
             women and to reduce negative ARCs in college students,
             regardless of their sex or gender identity.},
   Doi = {10.1111/acer.13358},
   Key = {fds326257}
}

@article{fds323142,
   Author = {Ruby, CL and Palmer, KN and Zhang, J and Risinger, MO and Butkowski, MA and Swartzwelder, HS},
   Title = {Differential Sensitivity to Ethanol-Induced Circadian Rhythm
             Disruption in Adolescent and Adult Mice.},
   Journal = {Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {187-196},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acer.13275},
   Abstract = {Growing evidence supports a central role for the circadian
             system in alcohol use disorders, but few studies have
             examined this relationship during adolescence. In mammals,
             circadian rhythms are regulated by the suprachiasmatic
             nucleus, a biological clock whose timing is synchronized
             (reset) to the environment primarily by light (photic)
             input. Alcohol (ethanol [EtOH]) disrupts circadian timing in
             part by attenuating photic phase-resetting responses in
             adult rodents. However, circadian rhythms change throughout
             life and it is not yet known whether EtOH has similar
             effects on circadian regulation during adolescence.General
             circadian locomotor activity was monitored in male C57BL6/J
             mice beginning in adolescence (P27) or adulthood (P61) in a
             12-hour light, 12-hour dark photocycle for ~2 weeks to
             establish baseline circadian activity measures. On the day
             of the experiment, mice received an acute injection of EtOH
             (1.5 g/kg, i.p.) or equal volume saline 15 minutes prior
             to a 30-minute light pulse at Zeitgeber Time 14 (2 hours
             into the dark phase) and then were released into constant
             darkness (DD) for ~2 weeks to assess phase-resetting
             responses. Control mice of each age-group received
             injections but no light pulse prior to DD.While adults
             showed the expected decrease in photic phase-delays induced
             by acute EtOH, this effect was absent in adolescent mice.
             Adolescents also showed baseline differences in circadian
             rhythmicity compared to adults, including advanced
             photocycle entrainment, larger photic phase-delays, a
             shorter free-running (endogenous) circadian period, and
             greater circadian rhythm amplitude.Collectively, our results
             indicate that adolescent mice are less sensitive to the
             effect of EtOH on circadian photic phase-resetting and that
             their daily activity rhythms are markedly different than
             those of adults.},
   Doi = {10.1111/acer.13275},
   Key = {fds323142}
}


%% Thompson, Robert J.   
@article{fds323695,
   Author = {Jonson, JL and Thompson, RJ and Guetterman, TC and Mitchell,
             N},
   Title = {The Effect of Informational Characteristics and Faculty
             Knowledge and Beliefs on the Use of Assessment},
   Journal = {Innovative Higher Education},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {33-47},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10755-016-9366-7},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10755-016-9366-7},
   Key = {fds323695}
}


%% Tomasello, Michael   
@article{fds330413,
   Author = {Köymen, B and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Children's meta-talk in their collaborative decision making
             with peers.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Child Psychology},
   Volume = {166},
   Pages = {549-566},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2017.09.018},
   Abstract = {In collaborative decision making, children must evaluate the
             evidence behind their respective claims and the rationality
             of their respective proposals with their partners. In the
             main study, 5- and 7-year-old peer dyads (N = 196) were
             presented with a novel animal. In the key condition,
             children in a dyad individually received conflicting
             information about what the animal needs (e.g., rocks vs.
             sand for food) from sources that differ in reliability (with
             first-hand vs. indirect evidence). Dyads in both age groups
             were able to reliably settle on the option with the best
             supporting evidence. Moreover, in making their decision,
             children, especially 7-year-olds, engaged in various kinds
             of meta-talk about the evidence and its validity. In a
             modified version of the key condition in Study 2, 3- and
             5-year-olds (N = 120) interacted with a puppet who tried
             to convince children to change their minds by producing
             meta-talk. When the puppet insisted and produced meta-talk,
             5-year-olds, but not 3-year-olds, were more likely to change
             their minds if their information was unreliable. These
             results suggest that even preschoolers can engage in
             collaborative reasoning successfully, but the ability to
             reflect on the process by stepping back to jointly examine
             the evidence emerges only during the early school
             years.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jecp.2017.09.018},
   Key = {fds330413}
}

@article{fds329017,
   Author = {Grocke, P and Rossano, F and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Young children are more willing to accept group decisions in
             which they have had a voice.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Child Psychology},
   Volume = {166},
   Pages = {67-78},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2017.08.003},
   Abstract = {People accept an unequal distribution of resources if they
             judge that the decision-making process was fair. In this
             study, 3- and 5-year-old children played an allocation game
             with two puppets. The puppets decided against a fair
             distribution in all conditions, but they allowed children to
             have various degrees of participation in the decision-making
             process. Children of both ages protested less when they were
             first asked to agree with the puppets' decision compared
             with when there was no agreement. When ignored, the younger
             children protested less than the older children-perhaps
             because they did not expect to have a say in the
             process-whereas they protested more when they were given an
             opportunity to voice their opinion-perhaps because their
             stated opinion was ignored. These results suggest that
             during the preschool years, children begin to expect to be
             asked for their opinion in a decision, and they accept
             disadvantageous decisions if they feel that they have had a
             voice in the decision-making process.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jecp.2017.08.003},
   Key = {fds329017}
}

@article{fds328848,
   Author = {Schmidt, MFH and Gonzalez-Cabrera, I and Tomasello,
             M},
   Title = {Children's developing metaethical judgments.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Child Psychology},
   Volume = {164},
   Pages = {163-177},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2017.07.008},
   Abstract = {Human adults incline toward moral objectivism but may
             approach things more relativistically if different cultures
             are involved. In this study, 4-, 6-, and 9-year-old children
             (N=136) witnessed two parties who disagreed about moral
             matters: a normative judge (e.g., judging that it is wrong
             to do X) and an antinormative judge (e.g., judging that it
             is okay to do X). We assessed children's metaethical
             judgment, that is, whether they judged that only one party
             (objectivism) or both parties (relativism) could be right.
             We found that 9-year-olds, but not younger children, were
             more likely to judge that both parties could be right when a
             normative ingroup judge disagreed with an antinormative
             extraterrestrial judge (with different preferences and
             background) than when the antinormative judge was another
             ingroup individual. This effect was not found in a
             comparison case where parties disagreed about the
             possibility of different physical laws. These findings
             suggest that although young children often exhibit moral
             objectivism, by early school age they begin to temper their
             objectivism with culturally relative metaethical
             judgments.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jecp.2017.07.008},
   Key = {fds328848}
}

@article{fds330414,
   Author = {Engelmann, JM and Herrmann, E and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Concern for Group Reputation Increases Prosociality in Young
             Children.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Pages = {956797617733830},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797617733830},
   Abstract = {The motivation to build and maintain a positive personal
             reputation promotes prosocial behavior. But individuals also
             identify with their groups, and so it is possible that the
             desire to maintain or enhance group reputation may have
             similar effects. Here, we show that 5-year-old children
             actively invest in the reputation of their group by acting
             more generously when their group's reputation is at stake.
             Children shared significantly more resources with fictitious
             other children not only when their individual donations were
             public rather than private but also when their group's
             donations (effacing individual donations) were public rather
             than private. These results provide the first experimental
             evidence that concern for group reputation can lead to
             higher levels of prosociality.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0956797617733830},
   Key = {fds330414}
}

@article{fds329385,
   Author = {Hepach, R and Vaish, A and Müller, K and Tomasello,
             M},
   Title = {The relation between young children's physiological arousal
             and their motivation to help others.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychologia},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.10.010},
   Abstract = {Children are motivated to help others from an early age.
             However, little is known about the internal biological
             mechanisms underlying their motivation to help. Here, we
             compiled data from five separate studies in which children,
             ranging in age from 18 months to 5.5 years, witnessed an
             adult needing help. In all studies, we assessed both (1)
             children's internal physiological arousal via changes in
             their pupil dilation, and (2) the latency and likelihood of
             them providing help. The results showed that the greater the
             baseline-corrected change in children's internal arousal in
             response to witnessing the need situation, the faster and
             more likely children were to help the adult. This was not
             the case for the baseline measure of children's tonic
             arousal state. Together, these results suggest that
             children's propensity to help is systematically related to
             their physiological arousal after they witness others
             needing help. This sheds new light on the biological
             mechanisms underlying not only young children's social
             perception but also their prosocial motivation more
             generally.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.10.010},
   Key = {fds329385}
}

@article{fds329386,
   Author = {Domberg, A and Köymen, B and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Children's reasoning with peers in cooperative and
             competitive contexts.},
   Journal = {British Journal of Developmental Psychology},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjdp.12213},
   Abstract = {We report two studies that demonstrate how five- and
             seven-year-olds adapt their production of arguments to
             either a cooperative or a competitive context. Two games
             elicited agreements from peer dyads about placing animals on
             either of two halves of a playing field owned by either
             child. Children had to produce arguments to justify these
             decisions. Played in a competitive context that encouraged
             placing animals on one's own half, children's arguments
             showed a bias that was the result of withholding known
             arguments. In a cooperative context, children produced not
             only more arguments, but also more 'two-sided' arguments.
             Also, seven-year-olds demonstrated a more frequent and
             strategic use of arguments that specifically refuted
             decisions that would favour their peers. The results suggest
             that cooperative contexts provide a more motivating context
             for children to produce arguments. Statement of contribution
             What is already known on this subject? Reasoning is a social
             skill that allows people to reach joint decisions.
             Preschoolers give reasons for their proposals in their peer
             conversations. By adolescence, children use sophisticated
             arguments (e.g., refutations and rebuttals). What the
             present study adds? Cooperation offers a more motivating
             context for children's argument production. Seven-year-olds
             are more strategic than five-year-olds in their reasoning
             with peers. Children's reasoning with others becomes more
             sophisticated after preschool years.},
   Doi = {10.1111/bjdp.12213},
   Key = {fds329386}
}

@article{fds326493,
   Author = {Tomasello, M and Gonzalez-Cabrera, I},
   Title = {The Role of Ontogeny in the Evolution of Human
             Cooperation.},
   Journal = {Human Nature},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {274-288},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12110-017-9291-1},
   Abstract = {To explain the evolutionary emergence of uniquely human
             skills and motivations for cooperation, Tomasello et al.
             (2012, in Current Anthropology 53(6):673-92) proposed the
             interdependence hypothesis. The key adaptive context in this
             account was the obligate collaborative foraging of early
             human adults. Hawkes (2014, in Human Nature 25(1):28-48),
             following Hrdy (Mothers and Others, Harvard University
             Press, 2009), provided an alternative account for the
             emergence of uniquely human cooperative skills in which the
             key was early human infants' attempts to solicit care and
             attention from adults in a cooperative breeding context.
             Here we attempt to reconcile these two accounts. Our
             composite account accepts Hrdy's and Hawkes's contention
             that the extremely early emergence of human infants'
             cooperative skills suggests an important role for
             cooperative breeding as adaptive context, perhaps in early
             Homo. But our account also insists that human cooperation
             goes well beyond these nascent skills to include such things
             as the communicative and cultural conventions, norms, and
             institutions created by later Homo and early modern humans
             to deal with adult problems of social coordination. As part
             of this account we hypothesize how each of the main stages
             of human ontogeny (infancy, childhood, adolescence) was
             transformed during evolution both by infants' cooperative
             skills "migrating up" in age and by adults' cooperative
             skills "migrating down" in age.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s12110-017-9291-1},
   Key = {fds326493}
}

@article{fds320781,
   Author = {Hepach, R and Kante, N and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Toddlers Help a Peer.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1642-1652},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12686},
   Abstract = {Toddlers are remarkably prosocial toward adults, yet little
             is known about their helping behavior toward peers. In the
             present study with 18- and 30-month-old toddlers (n = 192,
             48 dyads per age group), one child needed help reaching an
             object to continue a task that was engaging for both
             children. The object was within reach of the second child
             who helped significantly more often compared to a no-need
             control condition. The helper also fulfilled the peer's need
             when the task was engaging only for the child needing help.
             These findings suggest that toddlers' skills and motivations
             of helping do not depend on having a competent and helpful
             recipient, such as an adult, but rather they are much more
             flexible and general.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.12686},
   Key = {fds320781}
}

@article{fds327646,
   Author = {Kano, F and Krupenye, C and Hirata, S and Call, J and Tomasello,
             M},
   Title = {Submentalizing Cannot Explain Belief-Based Action
             Anticipation in Apes.},
   Journal = {Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {633-634},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2017.06.011},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.tics.2017.06.011},
   Key = {fds327646}
}

@article{fds328849,
   Author = {Grueneisen, S and Duguid, S and Saur, H and Tomasello,
             M},
   Title = {Children, chimpanzees, and bonobos adjust the visibility of
             their actions for cooperators and competitors.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {8504},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-08435-7},
   Abstract = {Chimpanzees and bonobos are highly capable of tracking
             other's mental states. It has been proposed, however, that
             in contrast to humans, chimpanzees are only able to do this
             in competitive interactions but this has rarely been
             directly tested. Here, pairs of chimpanzees or bonobos
             (Study 1) and 4-year-old children (Study 2) were presented
             with two almost identical tasks differing only regarding the
             social context. In the cooperation condition, players'
             interests were matched: they had to make corresponding
             choices to be mutually rewarded. To facilitate coordination,
             subjects should thus make their actions visible to their
             partner whose view was partially occluded. In the
             competition condition, players' interests were directly
             opposed: the partner tried to match the subject's choice but
             subjects were only rewarded if they chose differently, so
             that they benefited from hiding their actions. The apes
             successfully adapted their decisions to the social context
             and their performance was markedly better in the cooperation
             condition. Children also distinguished between the two
             contexts, but somewhat surprisingly, performed better in the
             competitive condition. These findings demonstrate
             experimentally that chimpanzees and bonobos can take into
             account what others can see in cooperative interactions.
             Their social-cognitive skills are thus more flexible than
             previously assumed.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-08435-7},
   Key = {fds328849}
}

@article{fds326494,
   Author = {Haux, L and Engelmann, JM and Herrmann, E and Tomasello,
             M},
   Title = {Do young children preferentially trust gossip or firsthand
             observation in choosing a collaborative partner?},
   Journal = {Social Development},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {466-474},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sode.12225},
   Doi = {10.1111/sode.12225},
   Key = {fds326494}
}

@article{fds328850,
   Author = {Engelmann, JM and Clift, JB and Herrmann, E and Tomasello,
             M},
   Title = {Social disappointment explains chimpanzees' behaviour in the
             inequity aversion task.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the Royal Society of London: Biological
             Sciences},
   Volume = {284},
   Number = {1861},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2017.1502},
   Abstract = {Chimpanzees' refusal of less-preferred food when an
             experimenter has previously provided preferred food to a
             conspecific has been taken as evidence for a sense of
             fairness. Here, we present a novel hypothesis-the social
             disappointment hypothesis-according to which food refusals
             express chimpanzees' disappointment in the human
             experimenter for not rewarding them as well as they could
             have. We tested this hypothesis using a two-by-two design in
             which food was either distributed by an experimenter or a
             machine and with a partner present or absent. We found that
             chimpanzees were more likely to reject food when it was
             distributed by an experimenter rather than by a machine and
             that they were not more likely to do so when a partner was
             present. These results suggest that chimpanzees' refusal of
             less-preferred food stems from social disappointment in the
             experimenter and not from a sense of fairness.},
   Doi = {10.1098/rspb.2017.1502},
   Key = {fds328850}
}

@article{fds320785,
   Author = {Hepach, R and Vaish, A and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Children's Intrinsic Motivation to Provide Help Themselves
             After Accidentally Harming Others.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1251-1264},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12646},
   Abstract = {Little is known about the flexibility of children's
             prosocial motivation. Here, 2- and 3-year-old children's
             (n = 128) internal arousal, as measured via changes in
             pupil dilation, was increased after they accidentally harmed
             a victim but were unable to repair the harm. If they were
             able to repair (or if they themselves did not cause the harm
             and the help was provided by someone else) their arousal
             subsided. This suggests that children are especially
             motivated to help those whom they have harmed, perhaps out
             of a sense of guilt and a desire to reconcile with them.
             Young children care not only about the well-being of others
             but also about the relationship they have with those who
             depend on their help.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.12646},
   Key = {fds320785}
}

@article{fds325488,
   Author = {Kanngiesser, P and Köymen, B and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Young children mostly keep, and expect others to keep, their
             promises.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Child Psychology},
   Volume = {159},
   Pages = {140-158},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2017.02.004},
   Abstract = {Promises are speech acts that create an obligation to do the
             promised action. In three studies, we investigated whether
             3- and 5-year-olds (N=278) understand the normative
             implications of promising in prosocial interactions. In
             Study 1, children helped a partner who promised to share
             stickers. When the partner failed to uphold the promise, 3-
             and 5-year-olds protested and referred to promise norms. In
             Study 2, when children in this same age range were asked to
             promise to continue a cleaning task-and they agreed-they
             persisted longer on the task and mentioned their obligation
             more frequently than without such a promise. They also
             persisted longer after a promise than after a cleaning
             reminder (Study 3). In prosocial interactions, thus, young
             children feel a normative obligation to keep their promises
             and expect others to keep their promises as
             well.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jecp.2017.02.004},
   Key = {fds325488}
}

@article{fds327020,
   Author = {Schmelz, M and Grueneisen, S and Kabalak, A and Jost, J and Tomasello,
             M},
   Title = {Chimpanzees return favors at a personal cost.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of
             USA},
   Volume = {114},
   Number = {28},
   Pages = {7462-7467},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1700351114},
   Abstract = {Humans regularly provide others with resources at a personal
             cost to themselves. Chimpanzees engage in some cooperative
             behaviors in the wild as well, but their motivational
             underpinnings are unclear. In three experiments, chimpanzees
             (Pan troglodytes) always chose between an option delivering
             food both to themselves and a partner and one delivering
             food only to themselves. In one condition, a conspecific
             partner had just previously taken a personal risk to make
             this choice available. In another condition, no assistance
             from the partner preceded the subject's decision.
             Chimpanzees made significantly more prosocial choices after
             receiving their partner's assistance than when no assistance
             was given (experiment 1) and, crucially, this was the case
             even when choosing the prosocial option was materially
             costly for the subject (experiment 2). Moreover, subjects
             appeared sensitive to the risk of their partner's assistance
             and chose prosocially more often when their partner risked
             losing food by helping (experiment 3). These findings
             demonstrate experimentally that chimpanzees are willing to
             incur a material cost to deliver rewards to a conspecific,
             but only if that conspecific previously assisted them, and
             particularly when this assistance was risky. Some key
             motivations involved in human cooperation thus may have
             deeper phylogenetic roots than previously
             suspected.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.1700351114},
   Key = {fds327020}
}

@article{fds326491,
   Author = {Hardecker, S and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {From imitation to implementation: How two- and
             three-year-old children learn to enforce social
             norms},
   Journal = {British Journal of Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {237-248},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjdp.12159},
   Doi = {10.1111/bjdp.12159},
   Key = {fds326491}
}

@article{fds326492,
   Author = {Rapp, DJ and Engelmann, JM and Herrmann, E and Tomasello,
             M},
   Title = {The impact of choice on young children’s prosocial
             motivation},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Child Psychology},
   Volume = {158},
   Pages = {112-121},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2017.01.004},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jecp.2017.01.004},
   Key = {fds326492}
}

@article{fds326490,
   Author = {Sánchez-Amaro, A and Duguid, S and Call, J and Tomasello,
             M},
   Title = {Chimpanzees, bonobos and children successfully coordinate in
             conflict situations.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the Royal Society of London: Biological
             Sciences},
   Volume = {284},
   Number = {1856},
   Publisher = {Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological
             Sciences},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2017.0259},
   Abstract = {Social animals need to coordinate with others to reap the
             benefits of group-living even when individuals' interests
             are misaligned. We compare how chimpanzees, bonobos and
             children coordinate their actions with a conspecific in a
             Snowdrift game, which provides a model for understanding how
             organisms coordinate and make decisions under conflict. In
             study 1, we presented pairs of chimpanzees, bonobos and
             children with an unequal reward distribution. In the
             critical condition, the preferred reward could only be
             obtained by waiting for the partner to act, with the risk
             that if no one acted, both would lose the rewards. Apes and
             children successfully coordinated to obtain the rewards.
             Children used a 'both-partner-pull' strategy and
             communicated during the task, while some apes relied on an
             'only-one-partner-pulls' strategy to solve the task,
             although there were also signs of strategic behaviour as
             they waited for their partner to pull when that strategy led
             to the preferred reward. In study 2, we presented pairs of
             chimpanzees and bonobos with the same set-up as in study 1
             with the addition of a non-social option that provided them
             with a secure reward. In this situation, apes had to
             actively decide between the unequal distribution and the
             alternative. In this set-up, apes maximized their rewards by
             taking their partners' potential actions into account. In
             conclusion, children and apes showed clear instances of
             strategic decision-making to maximize their own rewards
             while maintaining successful coordination.},
   Doi = {10.1098/rspb.2017.0259},
   Key = {fds326490}
}

@article{fds326700,
   Author = {Kachel, U and Svetlova, M and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Three-Year-Olds' Reactions to a Partner's Failure to Perform
             Her Role in a Joint Commitment.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12816},
   Abstract = {When children make a joint commitment to collaborate,
             obligations are created. Pairs of 3-year-old children
             (N = 144) made a joint commitment to play a game. In three
             different conditions the game was interrupted in the middle
             either because: (a) the partner child intentionally
             defected, (b) the partner child was ignorant about how to
             play, or (c) the apparatus broke. The subject child reacted
             differently in the three cases, protesting normatively
             against defection (with emotional arousal and later
             tattling), teaching when the partner seemed to be ignorant,
             or simply blaming the apparatus when it broke. These results
             suggest that 3-year-old children are competent in making
             appropriate normative evaluations of intentions and
             obligations of collaborative partners.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.12816},
   Key = {fds326700}
}

@article{fds320783,
   Author = {Hardecker, S and Schmidt, MFH and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Children’s Developing Understanding of the Conventionality
             of Rules},
   Journal = {Journal of Cognition and Development},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {163-188},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2016.1255624},
   Doi = {10.1080/15248372.2016.1255624},
   Key = {fds320783}
}

@article{fds320782,
   Author = {Ulber, J and Hamann, K and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Young children, but not chimpanzees, are averse to
             disadvantageous and advantageous inequities.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Child Psychology},
   Volume = {155},
   Pages = {48-66},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2016.10.013},
   Abstract = {The age at which young children show an aversion to
             inequitable resource distributions, especially those
             favoring themselves, is unclear. It is also unclear whether
             great apes, as humans' nearest evolutionary relatives, have
             an aversion to inequitable resource distributions at all.
             Using a common methodology across species and child ages,
             the current two studies found that 3- and 4-year-old
             children (N=64) not only objected when they received less
             than a collaborative partner but also sacrificed to equalize
             when they received more. They did neither of these things in
             a nonsocial situation, demonstrating the fundamental role of
             social comparison. In contrast, chimpanzees (N=9) showed no
             aversion to inequitable distributions, only a concern for
             maximizing their own resources, with no differences between
             social and nonsocial conditions. These results underscore
             the unique importance for humans, even early in ontogeny,
             for treating others fairly, presumably as a way of becoming
             a cooperative member of one's cultural group.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jecp.2016.10.013},
   Key = {fds320782}
}

@article{fds325489,
   Author = {Grueneisen, S and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Children coordinate in a recurrent social dilemma by taking
             turns and along dominance asymmetries.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {265-273},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000236},
   Abstract = {Humans constantly have to coordinate their decisions with
             others even when their interests are conflicting (e.g., when
             2 drivers have to decide who yields at an intersection). So
             far, however, little is known about the development of these
             abilities. Here, we present dyads of 5-year-olds (N = 40)
             with a repeated chicken game using a novel methodology: Two
             children each steered an automated toy train carrying a
             reward. The trains simultaneously moved toward each other so
             that in order to avoid a crash-which left both children
             empty-handed-1 train had to swerve. By swerving, however,
             the trains lost a portion of the rewards so that it was in
             each child's interest to go straight. Children coordinated
             their decisions successfully over multiple rounds, and they
             mostly did so by taking turns at swerving. In dyads in which
             turn-taking was rare, dominant children obtained
             significantly higher payoffs than their partners. Moreover,
             the coordination process was more efficient in turn-taking
             dyads as indicated by a significant reduction in conflicts
             and verbal protest. These findings indicate that already by
             the late preschool years children can independently
             coordinate decisions with peers in recurrent conflicts of
             interest. (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/dev0000236},
   Key = {fds325489}
}

@article{fds329018,
   Author = {Krupenye, C and Kano, F and Hirata, S and Call, J and Tomasello,
             M},
   Title = {A test of the submentalizing hypothesis: Apes' performance
             in a false belief task inanimate control.},
   Journal = {Communicative & integrative biology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {e1343771},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19420889.2017.1343771},
   Abstract = {Much debate concerns whether any nonhuman animals share with
             humans the ability to infer others' mental states, such as
             desires and beliefs. In a recent eye-tracking false-belief
             task, we showed that great apes correctly anticipated that a
             human actor would search for a goal object where he had last
             seen it, even though the apes themselves knew that it was no
             longer there. In response, Heyes proposed that apes' looking
             behavior was guided not by social cognitive mechanisms but
             rather domain-general cueing effects, and suggested the use
             of inanimate controls to test this alternative
             submentalizing hypothesis. In the present study, we
             implemented the suggested inanimate control of our previous
             false-belief task. Apes attended well to key events but
             showed markedly fewer anticipatory looks and no significant
             tendency to look to the correct location. We thus found no
             evidence that submentalizing was responsible for apes'
             anticipatory looks in our false-belief task.},
   Doi = {10.1080/19420889.2017.1343771},
   Key = {fds329018}
}

@article{fds322245,
   Author = {Hepach, R and Vaish, A and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {The fulfillment of others' needs elevates children's body
             posture.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {100-113},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000173},
   Abstract = {Much is known about young children's helping behavior, but
             little is known about the underlying motivations and
             emotions involved. In 2 studies we found that 2-year-old
             children showed positive emotions of similar magnitude-as
             measured by changes in their postural elevation using depth
             sensor imaging technology-after they achieved a goal for
             themselves and after they helped another person achieve her
             goal. Conversely, children's posture decreased in elevation
             when their actions did not result in a positive outcome.
             These results suggest that for young children, working for
             themselves and helping others are similarly rewarding.
             (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/dev0000173},
   Key = {fds322245}
}

@article{fds326212,
   Author = {Buttelmann, D and Buttelmann, F and Carpenter, M and Call, J and Tomasello, M},
   Title = {Great apes distinguish true from false beliefs in an
             interactive helping task.},
   Journal = {PloS one},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {e0173793},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0173793},
   Abstract = {Understanding the behavior of others in a wide variety of
             circumstances requires an understanding of their
             psychological states. Humans' nearest primate relatives, the
             great apes, understand many psychological states of others,
             for example, perceptions, goals, and desires. However, so
             far there is little evidence that they possess the key
             marker of advanced human social cognition: an understanding
             of false beliefs. Here we demonstrate that in a nonverbal
             (implicit) false-belief test which is passed by human
             1-year-old infants, great apes as a group, including
             chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), bonobos (Pan paniscus), and
             orangutans (Pongo abelii), distinguish between true and
             false beliefs in their helping behavior. Great apes thus may
             possess at least some basic understanding that an agent's
             actions are based on her beliefs about reality. Hence, such
             understanding might not be the exclusive province of the
             human species.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0173793},
   Key = {fds326212}
}


%% Weinfurt, Kevin P.   
@article{fds331316,
   Author = {Dickert, NW and Eyal, N and Goldkind, SF and Grady, C and Joffe, S and Lo,
             B and Miller, FG and Pentz, RD and Silbergleit, R and Weinfurt, KP and Wendler, D and Kim, SYH},
   Title = {Reframing Consent for Clinical Research: A Function-Based
             Approach.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Bioethics},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {3-11},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15265161.2017.1388448},
   Abstract = {Although informed consent is important in clinical research,
             questions persist regarding when it is necessary, what it
             requires, and how it should be obtained. The standard view
             in research ethics is that the function of informed consent
             is to respect individual autonomy. However, consent
             processes are multidimensional and serve other ethical
             functions as well. These functions deserve particular
             attention when barriers to consent exist. We argue that
             consent serves seven ethically important and conceptually
             distinct functions. The first four functions pertain
             principally to individual participants: (1) providing
             transparency; (2) allowing control and authorization; (3)
             promoting concordance with participants' values; and (4)
             protecting and promoting welfare interests. Three other
             functions are systemic or policy focused: (5) promoting
             trust; (6) satisfying regulatory requirements; and (7)
             promoting integrity in research. Reframing consent around
             these functions can guide approaches to consent that are
             context sensitive and that maximize achievable
             goals.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15265161.2017.1388448},
   Key = {fds331316}
}

@article{fds329323,
   Author = {DeLamater, JD and Weinfurt, KP and Flynn, KE},
   Title = {Patients' Conceptions of Terms Related to Sexual Interest,
             Desire, and Arousal.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Sexual Medicine},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1327-1335},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2017.09.009},
   Abstract = {Measurement of sexual function typically uses self-report,
             which, to work as intended, must use language that is
             understood consistently by diverse respondents. Commonly
             used measures employ multiple terms, primarily (sexual)
             interest, desire, and arousal, that might not be understood
             in the same way by laypeople and professionals.To inform
             self-reported measurement efforts for research and clinical
             settings by examining how US men and women recruited from a
             health care setting understand and interpret different
             terms.We conducted 10 focus groups in Durham, NC (N = 57).
             Discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed, and the
             content of the discussions was systematically analyzed in 2
             phases of coding by the research team, facilitated by Nvivo
             qualitative analysis software (QSR International, Doncaster,
             VIC, Australia).Patient focus group discussions about the
             meanings and connotations of multiple terms related to
             sexual function, especially interest, desire, and arousal.5
             groups included male participants and 5 included female
             participants. Participants characterized (sexual) interest
             as a cognitive phenomenon and a situational response to a
             specific person. Similarly, they characterized (sexual)
             desire as a situational person-specific experience with some
             support for it as a cognitive phenomenon but more support
             for it as a physical phenomenon. In contrast, participants
             characterized sexual arousal as a physical phenomenon
             occurring in response to physical or visual stimulation and
             not related to a specific person.These results can help us
             understand how laypeople are using and responding to these
             terms when they are used in clinical and research
             settings.Patient participants in these groups were diverse
             in age, gender, sexual orientation, and health, with the
             potential to voice diverse perspectives on sexual
             functioning; however, the sample was limited to a single
             city in the southeastern United States.The meanings of
             interest, desire, and arousal were defined, compared, and
             contrasted in the context of patient focus groups.
             Qualitative coding showed that interest was considered the
             most "cognitive," arousal the most "physical," and desire
             somewhere in between. DeLamater JD, Weinfurt KP, Flynn KE.
             Patients' Conceptions of Terms Related to Sexual Interest,
             Desire, and Arousal. J Sex Med 2017;14:1327-1335.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jsxm.2017.09.009},
   Key = {fds329323}
}

@article{fds327306,
   Author = {Weinfurt, KP and Bollinger, JM and Brelsford, KM and Bresciani, M and Lampron, Z and Lin, L and Topazian, RJ and Sugarman,
             J},
   Title = {Comparison of Approaches for Notification and Authorization
             in Pragmatic Clinical Research Evaluating Commonly Used
             Medical Practices.},
   Journal = {Medical Care},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {970-978},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/mlr.0000000000000762},
   Abstract = {For pragmatic clinical research comparing commonly used
             treatments, questions exist about if and how to notify
             participants about it and secure their authorization for
             participation.To determine how patients react when they seek
             clinical care and encounter one of several different
             pragmatic clinical research studies.In an online survey
             using a between-subjects experimental design, respondents
             read and responded to 1 of 24 hypothetical research
             scenarios reflecting different types of studies and
             approaches to notification and authorization (eg, general
             notification, oral consent, written consent).English-speaking
             US adults 18 years and older.Willingness to participate in
             the hypothetical study, acceptability of the notification
             and authorization approach, understanding of the study,
             perceptions of benefit/harm, trust, and perception of amount
             of study information received.Willingness to participate did
             not differ by notification and authorization approach. Some
             (21%-36%) of the patients randomized to general notification
             with an explicit opt-out provision were not aware they would
             be enrolled by default. Acceptability was greatest for and
             similar among notification and authorization approaches that
             actively engaged the patient (eg, oral or written consent)
             and lower for approaches with less engagement (eg, general
             notification). Problems of understanding were found among
             20%-55% of respondents, depending on the particular
             scenario. Most respondents (77%-94%) felt that participation
             in the hypothetical study posed no risks of harm to their
             health or privacy.Current attitudes about notification and
             authorization approaches and difficulties understanding
             pragmatic clinical research pose significant challenges for
             pragmatic research. Data from this study provide a starting
             point to developing solutions to these surprisingly complex
             issues.},
   Doi = {10.1097/mlr.0000000000000762},
   Key = {fds327306}
}

@article{fds328938,
   Author = {Weinfurt, KP and Hernandez, AF and Coronado, GD and DeBar, LL and Dember, LM and Green, BB and Heagerty, PJ and Huang, SS and James, KT and Jarvik, JG and Larson, EB and Mor, V and Platt, R and Rosenthal, GE and Septimus, EJ and Simon, GE and Staman, KL and Sugarman, J and Vazquez,
             M and Zatzick, D and Curtis, LH},
   Title = {Pragmatic clinical trials embedded in healthcare systems:
             generalizable lessons from the NIH Collaboratory.},
   Journal = {BMC Medical Research Methodology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {144},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-017-0420-7},
   Abstract = {The clinical research enterprise is not producing the
             evidence decision makers arguably need in a timely and cost
             effective manner; research currently involves the use of
             labor-intensive parallel systems that are separate from
             clinical care. The emergence of pragmatic clinical trials
             (PCTs) poses a possible solution: these large-scale trials
             are embedded within routine clinical care and often involve
             cluster randomization of hospitals, clinics, primary care
             providers, etc. Interventions can be implemented by health
             system personnel through usual communication channels and
             quality improvement infrastructure, and data collected as
             part of routine clinical care. However, experience with
             these trials is nascent and best practices regarding design
             operational, analytic, and reporting methodologies are
             undeveloped.To strengthen the national capacity to implement
             cost-effective, large-scale PCTs, the Common Fund of the
             National Institutes of Health created the Health Care
             Systems Research Collaboratory (Collaboratory) to support
             the design, execution, and dissemination of a series of
             demonstration projects using a pragmatic research design.In
             this article, we will describe the Collaboratory, highlight
             some of the challenges encountered and solutions developed
             thus far, and discuss remaining barriers and opportunities
             for large-scale evidence generation using PCTs.A planning
             phase is critical, and even with careful planning, new
             challenges arise during execution; comparisons between arms
             can be complicated by unanticipated changes. Early and
             ongoing engagement with both health care system leaders and
             front-line clinicians is critical for success. There is also
             marked uncertainty when applying existing ethical and
             regulatory frameworks to PCTS, and using existing electronic
             health records for data capture adds complexity.},
   Doi = {10.1186/s12874-017-0420-7},
   Key = {fds328938}
}

@article{fds331471,
   Author = {Griffith, JW and Messersmith, EE and Gillespie, BW and Wiseman, JB and Flynn, KE and Kirkali, Z and Kusek, JW and Bavendam, T and Cella, D and Kreder, KJ and Nero, JJ and Corona, ME and Bradley, CS and Kenton, KS and Helfand, BT and Merion, RM and Weinfurt, KP and LURN Study
             Group},
   Title = {Reasons for Seeking Clinical Care for Lower Urinary Tract
             Symptoms: A Mixed Methods Study.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Urology},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2017.07.067},
   Abstract = {The primary objective of this study was to evaluate reasons
             for seeking care among men and women with lower urinary
             tract symptoms.Participants were recruited from urology and
             urogynecology clinics, and the community. The sample was
             enriched with persons expected to have abnormal or
             diminished bladder sensations (eg participants with lower
             back surgery and participants 65 years old or older).
             Interviews were performed in person beginning with an
             open-ended assessment of urinary symptoms and associated
             bother followed by more directed questions, including
             reasons for seeking or not seeking treatment. We also
             examined the relationship between symptom frequency and
             bother using the LUTS (Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms) Tool.A
             total of 88 participants, including 38 men and 50 women,
             with a mean ± SD age of 52.2 ± 14.3 years provided
             information about urinary symptoms, including a range of
             quality of life consequences and coping behaviors. They
             sought treatment mostly because of new, continuing or
             bothersome symptoms. Factors associated with not seeking
             treatment included low symptom severity and concerns about
             the costs vs the benefits of treatment (eg side effects of
             medication). Symptom frequency and bother were associated
             with each other across symptoms assessed by the LUTS Tool.In
             this large qualitative study we obtained useful insights
             into the impact of lower urinary tract symptoms from the
             perspective of the person with the symptoms. Removing
             barriers and misconceptions about the treatment of lower
             urinary tract symptoms may increase the number of people who
             seek clinical care and improve the clinical course of men
             and women who experience lower urinary tract
             symptoms.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.juro.2017.07.067},
   Key = {fds331471}
}

@article{fds326416,
   Author = {Beskow, LM and Lin, L and Dombeck, CB and Gao, E and Weinfurt,
             KP},
   Title = {Improving biobank consent comprehension: a national
             randomized survey to assess the effect of a simplified form
             and review/retest intervention.},
   Journal = {Genetics in Medicine},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {505-512},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/gim.2016.157},
   Abstract = {To determine the individual and combined effects of a
             simplified form and a review/retest intervention on
             biobanking consent comprehension.We conducted a national
             online survey in which participants were randomized within
             four educational strata to review a simplified or
             traditional consent form. Participants then completed a
             comprehension quiz; for each item answered incorrectly, they
             reviewed the corresponding consent form section and answered
             another quiz item on that topic.Consistent with our first
             hypothesis, comprehension among those who received the
             simplified form was not inferior to that among those who
             received the traditional form. Contrary to expectations,
             receipt of the simplified form did not result in
             significantly better comprehension compared with the
             traditional form among those in the lowest educational
             group. The review/retest procedure significantly improved
             quiz scores in every combination of consent form and
             education level. Although improved, comprehension remained a
             challenge in the lowest-education group. Higher quiz scores
             were significantly associated with willingness to
             participate.Ensuring consent comprehension remains a
             challenge, but simplified forms have virtues independent of
             their impact on understanding. A review/retest intervention
             may have a significant effect, but assessing comprehension
             raises complex questions about setting thresholds for
             understanding and consequences of not meeting them.Genet Med
             advance online publication 13 October 2016.},
   Doi = {10.1038/gim.2016.157},
   Key = {fds326416}
}

@article{fds323758,
   Author = {Flynn, KE and Carter, J and Lin, L and Lindau, ST and Jeffery, DD and Reese, JB and Schlosser, BJ and Weinfurt, KP},
   Title = {Assessment of vulvar discomfort with sexual activity among
             women in the United States.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology},
   Volume = {216},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {391.e1-391.e8},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2016.12.006},
   Abstract = {Multidimensional self-report measures of sexual function for
             women do not include the assessment of vulvar discomfort,
             limiting our understanding of its prevalence. In an effort
             to improve the measurement of patient-reported health, the
             National Institutes of Health funded the creation of the
             Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System
             (PROMIS). This included the development of the PROMIS Sexual
             Function and Satisfaction measure, and version 2.0 of the
             Sexual Function and Satisfaction measure included 2 scales
             to measure vulvar discomfort with sexual activity.The
             objectives of the study were to describe the development of
             2 self-reported measures of vulvar discomfort with sexual
             activity, describe the relationships between these
             scales and scales for lubrication and vaginal discomfort,
             and report the prevalence of vulvar discomfort with sexual
             activity in a large, nationally representative sample of
             US women.We followed PROMIS measure development standards,
             including qualitative development work with patients and
             clinicians and psychometric evaluation of candidate items
             based on item response theory, in a probability sample of
             1686 English-speaking US adult women. We tested 16 candidate
             items on vulvar discomfort. We present descriptive
             statistics for these items, correlation coefficients among
             the vulvar and vaginal scales, and mean PROMIS scores with
             95% confidence intervals separately by menopausal status for
             the 1046 women who reported sexual activity in the past
             30 days.Based on the psychometric evaluation of the
             candidate items, we created 2 separate 4 item scales, one to
             measure labial discomfort and pain and one to measure
             clitoral discomfort and pain. Additional items not included
             in the scales assess pain quality, numbness, and bleeding.
             The correlations between the lubrication, vaginal
             discomfort, and the 2 vulvar discomfort measures ranged from
             0.46 to 0.77, suggesting that these measures represent
             related yet distinct concepts. In our nationally
             representative sample, 1 in 5 US women endorsed some degree
             of vulvar discomfort with sexual activity in the past 30
             days. Menopausal status was associated with lower
             lubrication and higher vaginal discomfort but not with
             vulvar discomfort.The PROMIS Vulvar Discomfort with Sexual
             Activity-Labial and Vulvar Discomfort with Sexual
             Activity-Clitoral scales are publicly available for use in
             research and clinical settings. There is limited overlap
             between vulvar discomfort and lubrication or vaginal
             discomfort. The importance of measuring vulvar discomfort as
             part of a comprehensive assessment of sexual function is
             underscored by its prevalence.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ajog.2016.12.006},
   Key = {fds323758}
}

@article{fds326258,
   Author = {Flynn, KE and Lin, L and Weinfurt, KP},
   Title = {Sexual function and satisfaction among heterosexual and
             sexual minority U.S. adults: A cross-sectional
             survey.},
   Journal = {PloS one},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {e0174981},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0174981},
   Abstract = {Despite known health disparities for sexual minorities, few
             studies have described sexual function by sexual orientation
             using a robust approach to measurement of sexual function.
             We compared recent sexual function and satisfaction by
             sexual orientation among English-speaking US
             adults.Cross-sectional surveys were administered by
             KnowledgePanel® (GfK), an online panel that uses
             address-based probability sampling and is representative of
             the civilian, noninstitutionalized US population. Data were
             collected in 2013 from the general population (n = 3314, 35%
             response rate) and in 2014 from self-identified lesbian,
             gay, and bisexual adults (n = 1011, 50% response rate).
             Sexual function and satisfaction were measured using the
             Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System®
             Sexual Function and Satisfaction measure version 2.0 (PROMIS
             SexFS v2). The PROMIS SexFS v2 is a comprehensive,
             customizable measurement system with evidence for validity
             in diverse populations. A score of 50 (SD 10) on each domain
             corresponds to the average for US adults sexually active in
             the past 30 days. We adjusted all statistics for the complex
             sample designs and report differences within each sex where
             the 95% CIs do not overlap, corresponding to p<0.01. Among
             US men who reported any sexual activity in the past 30 days,
             there were no differences in erectile function or
             orgasm-ability. Compared to heterosexual men, sexual
             minority men reported higher oral dryness and lower
             orgasm-pleasure and satisfaction. Compared to heterosexual
             men, gay men reported lower interest, higher anal discomfort
             and higher oral discomfort. Among sexually active women,
             there were no differences in the domains of vulvar
             discomfort-clitoral, orgasm-pleasure, or satisfaction.
             Compared to heterosexual women, sexual minority women
             reported higher oral dryness. Lesbian women reported lower
             vaginal discomfort than other women; lesbian women reported
             higher lubrication and orgasm-ability than heterosexual
             women. Bisexual women reported higher interest, higher
             vulvar discomfort-labial and higher anal discomfort than
             other women, as well as higher oral discomfort compared to
             heterosexual women.Recent sexual function and satisfaction
             differed by sexual orientation among US adults. Sexual
             minority men and women had decrements in domains of sexual
             function that have not traditionally been included in
             multi-dimensional self-report measures. Clinicians should
             make themselves aware of their patients' sexual concerns and
             recognize that sexual minority patients may be more
             vulnerable to certain sexual difficulties than heterosexual
             patients.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0174981},
   Key = {fds326258}
}


%% Wells, Karen C.   
@article{fds330460,
   Author = {Roy, A and Hechtman, L and Arnold, LE and Swanson, JM and Molina, BS and Sibley, MH and Howard, AL and Vitiello, B and Severe, JB and Jensen, PS and Arnold, LE and Hoagwood, K and Richters, J and Vereen, D and Hinshaw,
             SP and Elliott, GR and Wells, KC and Epstein, JN and Murray, DW and Conners, CK and March, J and Swanson, J and Wigal, T and Cantwell, DP and Abikoff, HB and Hechtman, L and Greenhill, LL and Newcorn, JH and Molina, B and Hoza, B and Pelham, WE and Gibbons, RD and Marcus, S and Hur,
             K and Kraemer, HC and Hanley, T and Stern, K},
   Title = {Childhood Predictors of Adult Functional Outcomes in the
             Multimodal Treatment Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity
             Disorder (MTA)},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {687-695.e7},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.05.020},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2017.05.020},
   Key = {fds330460}
}

@article{fds330163,
   Author = {Sibley, MH and Swanson, JM and Arnold, LE and Hechtman, LT and Owens,
             EB and Stehli, A and Abikoff, H and Hinshaw, SP and Molina, BSG and Mitchell, JT and Jensen, PS and Howard, AL and Lakes, KD and Pelham, WE and MTA Cooperative Group},
   Title = {Defining ADHD symptom persistence in adulthood: optimizing
             sensitivity and specificity.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {58},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {655-662},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12620},
   Abstract = {Longitudinal studies of children diagnosed with ADHD report
             widely ranging ADHD persistence rates in adulthood (5-75%).
             This study documents how information source (parent vs.
             self-report), method (rating scale vs. interview), and
             symptom threshold (DSM vs. norm-based) influence reported
             ADHD persistence rates in adulthood.Five hundred
             seventy-nine children were diagnosed with DSM-IV
             ADHD-Combined Type at baseline (ages 7.0-9.9 years) 289
             classmates served as a local normative comparison group
             (LNCG), 476 and 241 of whom respectively were evaluated in
             adulthood (Mean Age = 24.7). Parent and self-reports of
             symptoms and impairment on rating scales and structured
             interviews were used to investigate ADHD persistence in
             adulthood.Persistence rates were higher when using parent
             rather than self-reports, structured interviews rather than
             rating scales (for self-report but not parent report), and a
             norm-based (NB) threshold of 4 symptoms rather than DSM
             criteria. Receiver-Operating Characteristics (ROC) analyses
             revealed that sensitivity and specificity were optimized by
             combining parent and self-reports on a rating scale and
             applying a NB threshold.The interview format optimizes young
             adult self-reporting when parent reports are not available.
             However, the combination of parent and self-reports from
             rating scales, using an 'or' rule and a NB threshold
             optimized the balance between sensitivity and specificity.
             With this definition, 60% of the ADHD group demonstrated
             symptom persistence and 41% met both symptom and impairment
             criteria in adulthood.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jcpp.12620},
   Key = {fds330163}
}

@article{fds330164,
   Author = {Swanson, JM and Arnold, LE and Molina, BSG and Sibley, MH and Hechtman,
             LT and Hinshaw, SP and Abikoff, HB and Stehli, A and Owens, EB and Mitchell, JT and Nichols, Q and Howard, A and Greenhill, LL and Hoza, B and Newcorn, JH and Jensen, PS and Vitiello, B and Wigal, T and Epstein, JN and Tamm, L and Lakes, KD and Waxmonsky, J and Lerner, M and Etcovitch, J and Murray, DW and Muenke, M and Acosta, MT and Arcos-Burgos, M and Pelham,
             WE and Kraemer, HC and MTA Cooperative Group},
   Title = {Young adult outcomes in the follow-up of the multimodal
             treatment study of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder:
             symptom persistence, source discrepancy, and height
             suppression.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {58},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {663-678},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12684},
   Abstract = {The Multimodal Treatment Study (MTA) began as a 14-month
             randomized clinical trial of behavioral and pharmacological
             treatments of 579 children (7-10 years of age) diagnosed
             with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
             (ADHD)-combined type. It transitioned into an observational
             long-term follow-up of 515 cases consented for continuation
             and 289 classmates (258 without ADHD) added as a local
             normative comparison group (LNCG), with assessments
             2-16 years after baseline.Primary (symptom severity) and
             secondary (adult height) outcomes in adulthood were
             specified. Treatment was monitored to age 18, and
             naturalistic subgroups were formed based on three patterns
             of long-term use of stimulant medication (Consistent,
             Inconsistent, and Negligible). For the follow-up,
             hypothesis-generating analyses were performed on outcomes in
             early adulthood (at 25 years of age). Planned comparisons
             were used to estimate ADHD-LNCG differences reflecting
             persistence of symptoms and naturalistic subgroup
             differences reflecting benefit (symptom reduction) and cost
             (height suppression) associated with extended use of
             medication.For ratings of symptom severity, the ADHD-LNCG
             comparison was statistically significant for the
             parent/self-report average (0.51 ± 0.04, p < .0001,
             d = 1.11), documenting symptom persistence, and for the
             parent/self-report difference (0.21 ± 0.04, p < .0001,
             d = .60), documenting source discrepancy, but the
             comparisons of naturalistic subgroups reflecting medication
             effects were not significant. For adult height, the ADHD
             group was 1.29 ± 0.55 cm shorter than the LNCG
             (p < .01, d = .21), and the comparisons of the
             naturalistic subgroups were significant: the treated group
             with the Consistent or Inconsistent pattern was
             2.55 ± 0.73 cm shorter than the subgroup with the
             Negligible pattern (p < .0005, d = .42), and within the
             treated group, the subgroup with the Consistent pattern was
             2.36 ± 1.13 cm shorter than the subgroup with the
             Inconsistent pattern (p < .04, d = .38).In the MTA
             follow-up into adulthood, the ADHD group showed symptom
             persistence compared to local norms from the LNCG. Within
             naturalistic subgroups of ADHD cases, extended use of
             medication was associated with suppression of adult height
             but not with reduction of symptom severity.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jcpp.12684},
   Key = {fds330164}
}


%% Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.   
@article{fds330585,
   Author = {Browndyke, JN and Berger, M and Smith, PJ and Harshbarger, TB and Monge,
             ZA and Panchal, V and Bisanar, TL and Glower, DD and Alexander, JH and Cabeza, R and Welsh-Bohmer, K and Newman, MF and Mathew, JP and Duke
             Neurologic Outcomes Research Group (NORG)},
   Title = {Task-related changes in degree centrality and local
             coherence of the posterior cingulate cortex after major
             cardiac surgery in older adults.},
   Journal = {Human Brain Mapping},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23898},
   Abstract = {Older adults often display postoperative cognitive decline
             (POCD) after surgery, yet it is unclear to what extent
             functional connectivity (FC) alterations may underlie these
             deficits. We examined for postoperative voxel-wise FC
             changes in response to increased working memory load demands
             in cardiac surgery patients and nonsurgical controls.Older
             cardiac surgery patients (n = 25) completed a verbal
             N-back working memory task during MRI scanning and cognitive
             testing before and 6 weeks after surgery; nonsurgical
             controls with cardiac disease (n = 26) underwent these
             assessments at identical time intervals. We measured
             postoperative changes in degree centrality, the number of
             edges attached to a brain node, and local coherence, the
             temporal homogeneity of regional functional correlations,
             using voxel-wise graph theory-based FC metrics. Group ×
             time differences were evaluated in these FC metrics
             associated with increased N-back working memory load
             (2-back > 1-back), using a two-stage partitioned
             variance, mixed ANCOVA.Cardiac surgery patients demonstrated
             postoperative working memory load-related degree centrality
             increases in the left dorsal posterior cingulate cortex
             (dPCC; p < .001, cluster p-FWE < .05). The dPCC also
             showed a postoperative increase in working memory
             load-associated local coherence (p < .001, cluster
             p-FWE < .05). dPCC degree centrality and local coherence
             increases were inversely associated with global cognitive
             change in surgery patients (p < .01), but not in
             controls.Cardiac surgery patients showed postoperative
             increases in working memory load-associated degree
             centrality and local coherence of the dPCC that were
             inversely associated with postoperative global cognitive
             outcomes and independent of perioperative cerebrovascular
             damage.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hbm.23898},
   Key = {fds330585}
}

@article{fds328886,
   Author = {Sims, R and van der Lee, SJ and Naj, AC and Bellenguez, C and Badarinarayan, N and Jakobsdottir, J and Kunkle, BW and Boland, A and Raybould, R and Bis, JC and Martin, ER and Grenier-Boley, B and Heilmann-Heimbach, S and Chouraki, V and Kuzma, AB and Sleegers, K and Vronskaya, M and Ruiz, A and Graham, RR and Olaso, R and Hoffmann, P and Grove, ML and Vardarajan, BN and Hiltunen, M and Nöthen, MM and White,
             CC and Hamilton-Nelson, KL and Epelbaum, J and Maier, W and Choi, S-H and Beecham, GW and Dulary, C and Herms, S and Smith, AV and Funk, CC and Derbois, C and Forstner, AJ and Ahmad, S and Li, H et
             al.},
   Title = {Rare coding variants in PLCG2, ABI3, and TREM2 implicate
             microglial-mediated innate immunity in Alzheimer's
             disease.},
   Journal = {Nature Genetics},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1373-1384},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3916},
   Abstract = {We identified rare coding variants associated with
             Alzheimer's disease in a three-stage case-control study of
             85,133 subjects. In stage 1, we genotyped 34,174 samples
             using a whole-exome microarray. In stage 2, we tested
             associated variants (P < 1 × 10-4) in 35,962 independent
             samples using de novo genotyping and imputed genotypes. In
             stage 3, we used an additional 14,997 samples to test the
             most significant stage 2 associations (P < 5 × 10-8) using
             imputed genotypes. We observed three new genome-wide
             significant nonsynonymous variants associated with
             Alzheimer's disease: a protective variant in PLCG2
             (rs72824905: p.Pro522Arg, P = 5.38 × 10-10, odds ratio (OR)
             = 0.68, minor allele frequency (MAF)cases = 0.0059,
             MAFcontrols = 0.0093), a risk variant in ABI3 (rs616338:
             p.Ser209Phe, P = 4.56 × 10-10, OR = 1.43, MAFcases = 0.011,
             MAFcontrols = 0.008), and a new genome-wide significant
             variant in TREM2 (rs143332484: p.Arg62His, P = 1.55 ×
             10-14, OR = 1.67, MAFcases = 0.0143, MAFcontrols = 0.0089),
             a known susceptibility gene for Alzheimer's disease. These
             protein-altering changes are in genes highly expressed in
             microglia and highlight an immune-related protein-protein
             interaction network enriched for previously identified risk
             genes in Alzheimer's disease. These genetic findings provide
             additional evidence that the microglia-mediated innate
             immune response contributes directly to the development of
             Alzheimer's disease.},
   Doi = {10.1038/ng.3916},
   Key = {fds328886}
}

@article{fds327422,
   Author = {Jun, GR and Chung, J and Mez, J and Barber, R and Beecham, GW and Bennett,
             DA and Buxbaum, JD and Byrd, GS and Carrasquillo, MM and Crane, PK and Cruchaga, C and De Jager and P and Ertekin-Taner, N and Evans, D and Fallin, MD and Foroud, TM and Friedland, RP and Goate, AM and Graff-Radford, NR and Hendrie, H and Hall, KS and Hamilton-Nelson,
             KL and Inzelberg, R and Kamboh, MI and Kauwe, JSK and Kukull, WA and Kunkle, BW and Kuwano, R and Larson, EB and Logue, MW and Manly, JJ and Martin, ER and Montine, TJ and Mukherjee, S and Naj, A and Reiman, EM and Reitz, C and Sherva, R and St George-Hyslop and PH et
             al.},
   Title = {Transethnic genome-wide scan identifies novel Alzheimer's
             disease loci.},
   Journal = {Alzheimer's & Dementia},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {727-738},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2016.12.012},
   Abstract = {Genetic loci for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been
             identified in whites of European ancestry, but the genetic
             architecture of AD among other populations is less
             understood.We conducted a transethnic genome-wide
             association study (GWAS) for late-onset AD in Stage 1 sample
             including whites of European Ancestry, African-Americans,
             Japanese, and Israeli-Arabs assembled by the Alzheimer's
             Disease Genetics Consortium. Suggestive results from Stage 1
             from novel loci were followed up using summarized results in
             the International Genomics Alzheimer's Project GWAS
             dataset.Genome-wide significant (GWS) associations in
             single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based tests (P < 5 ×
             10-8) were identified for SNPs in PFDN1/HBEGF,
             USP6NL/ECHDC3, and BZRAP1-AS1 and for the interaction of the
             (apolipoprotein E) APOE ε4 allele with NFIC SNP. We also
             obtained GWS evidence (P < 2.7 × 10-6) for gene-based
             association in the total sample with a novel locus, TPBG
             (P = 1.8 × 10-6).Our findings highlight the value of
             transethnic studies for identifying novel AD susceptibility
             loci.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jalz.2016.12.012},
   Key = {fds327422}
}

@article{fds326771,
   Author = {Blumenthal, JA and Smith, PJ and Mabe, S and Hinderliter, A and Welsh-Bohmer, K and Browndyke, JN and Lin, P-H and Kraus, W and Doraiswamy, PM and Burke, J and Sherwood, A},
   Title = {Lifestyle and Neurocognition in Older Adults With
             Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Cognitive
             Impairment.},
   Journal = {Psychosomatic Medicine},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {719-727},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/psy.0000000000000474},
   Abstract = {The aim of the study was to determine the relationship of
             lifestyle factors and neurocognitive functioning in older
             adults with vascular risk factors and cognitive impairment,
             no dementia (CIND).One hundred sixty adults (M [SD] = 65.4
             [6.8] years) with CIND completed neurocognitive assessments
             of executive function, processing speed, and memory.
             Objective measures of physical activity using accelerometry,
             aerobic capacity determined by exercise testing, and dietary
             habits quantified by the Food Frequency Questionnaire and
             4-Day Food Diary to assess adherence to the Mediterranean
             and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diets
             were obtained to assess direct effects with neurocognition.
             Potential indirect associations of high-sensitivity
             C-reactive protein and the Framingham Stroke Risk Profile
             also were examined.Greater aerobic capacity (β = 0.24) and
             daily physical activity (β = 0.15) were associated with
             better executive functioning/processing speed and verbal
             memory (βs = 0.24; 0.16). Adherence to the DASH diet was
             associated with better verbal memory (β = 0.17). Greater
             high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (βs = -0.14; -0.21) and
             Framingham Stroke Risk Profile (β = -0.18; -0.18) were
             associated with poorer executive functioning/processing
             speed and verbal memory. Greater stroke risk partially
             mediated the association of aerobic capacity with executive
             functioning/processing speed, and verbal memory and greater
             inflammation partially mediated the association of physical
             activity and aerobic fitness, with verbal memory.Higher
             levels of physical activity, aerobic fitness, and adherence
             to the DASH diet are associated with better neurocognitive
             performance in adults with CIND. These findings suggest that
             the adoption of healthy lifestyle habits could reduce the
             risk of neurocognitive decline in vulnerable older
             adults.NCT01573546.},
   Doi = {10.1097/psy.0000000000000474},
   Key = {fds326771}
}

@article{fds322219,
   Author = {Browndyke, JN and Berger, M and Harshbarger, TB and Smith, PJ and White,
             W and Bisanar, TL and Alexander, JH and Gaca, JG and Welsh-Bohmer, K and Newman, MF and Mathew, JP},
   Title = {Resting-State Functional Connectivity and Cognition After
             Major Cardiac Surgery in Older Adults without Preoperative
             Cognitive Impairment: Preliminary Findings.},
   Journal = {Journal of American Geriatrics Society},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {e6-e12},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgs.14534},
   Abstract = {To look for changes in intrinsic functional brain
             connectivity associated with postoperative changes in
             cognition, a common complication in seniors undergoing major
             surgery, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance
             imaging.Objective cognitive testing and functional brain
             imaging were prospectively performed at preoperative
             baseline and 6 weeks after surgery and at the same time
             intervals in nonsurgical controls.Academic medical
             center.Older adults undergoing cardiac surgery (n = 12) and
             nonsurgical older adult controls with a history of coronary
             artery disease (n = 12); no participants had cognitive
             impairment at preoperative baseline (Mini-Mental State
             Examination score >27).Differences in resting-state
             functional connectivity (RSFC) and global cognitive change
             relationships were assessed using a voxel-wise intrinsic
             connectivity method, controlling for demographic factors and
             pre- and perioperative cerebral white matter disease volume.
             Analyses were corrected for multiple comparisons (false
             discovery rate P < .01).Global cognitive change after
             cardiac surgery was significantly associated with intrinsic
             RSFC changes in regions of the posterior cingulate cortex
             and right superior frontal gyrus-anatomical and functional
             locations of the brain's default mode network (DMN). No
             statistically significant relationships were found between
             global cognitive change and RSFC change in nonsurgical
             controls.Clinicians have long known that some older adults
             develop postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) after
             anesthesia and surgery, yet the neurobiological correlates
             of POCD are not well defined. The current results suggest
             that altered RSFC in specific DMN regions is positively
             correlated with global cognitive change 6 weeks after
             cardiac surgery, suggesting that DMN activity and
             connectivity could be important diagnostic markers of POCD
             or intervention targets for potential POCD treatment
             efforts.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jgs.14534},
   Key = {fds322219}
}

@article{fds135097,
   Title = {Hulette, C.M., Welsh-Bohmer, K.A., Murray, M.G., Mash, D.&
             McIntyre, L.M. Neuropathological and neuropsychological
             changes in "normal" aging: Evidence for preclinical
             Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Neuropathology and
             Experimental Neurology, 57, 1168-1174.},
   Key = {fds135097}
}


%% Whitfield, Keith E.   
@article{fds324442,
   Author = {Whitfield, KE and Thorpe, RJ},
   Title = {Perspective: Longevity, stress, genes and African
             Americans},
   Journal = {Ethnicity & disease},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-2},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.18865/ed.27.1.1},
   Doi = {10.18865/ed.27.1.1},
   Key = {fds324442}
}

@article{fds326611,
   Author = {Bogl, LH and Jelenkovic, A and Vuoksimaa, E and Ahrenfeldt, L and Pietiläinen, KH and Stazi, MA and Fagnani, C and D'Ippolito, C and Hur,
             Y-M and Jeong, H-U and Silberg, JL and Eaves, LJ and Maes, HH and Bayasgalan, G and Narandalai, D and Cutler, TL and Kandler, C and Jang,
             KL and Christensen, K and Skytthe, A and Kyvik, KO and Cozen, W and Hwang,
             AE and Mack, TM and Derom, CA and Vlietinck, RF and Nelson, TL and Whitfield, KE and Corley, RP and Huibregtse, BM and McAdams, TA and Eley, TC and Gregory, AM and Krueger, RF and McGue, M and Pahlen, S and Willemsen, G and Bartels, M and van Beijsterveldt, TCEM et
             al.},
   Title = {Does the sex of one's co-twin affect height and BMI in
             adulthood? A study of dizygotic adult twins from 31
             cohorts.},
   Journal = {Biology of Sex Differences},
   Volume = {8},
   Pages = {14},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13293-017-0134-x},
   Abstract = {The comparison of traits in twins from opposite-sex (OS) and
             same-sex (SS) dizygotic twin pairs is considered a proxy
             measure of prenatal hormone exposure. To examine possible
             prenatal hormonal influences on anthropometric traits, we
             compared mean height, body mass index (BMI), and the
             prevalence of being overweight or obese between men and
             women from OS and SS dizygotic twin pairs.The data were
             derived from the COllaborative project of Development of
             Anthropometrical measures in Twins (CODATwins) database, and
             included 68,494 SS and 53,808 OS dizygotic twin individuals
             above the age of 20 years from 31 twin cohorts representing
             19 countries. Zygosity was determined by questionnaires or
             DNA genotyping depending on the study. Multiple regression
             and logistic regression models adjusted for cohort, age, and
             birth year with the twin type as a predictor were carried
             out to compare height and BMI in twins from OS pairs with
             those from SS pairs and to calculate the adjusted odds
             ratios and 95% confidence intervals for being overweight or
             obese.OS females were, on average, 0.31 cm (95% confidence
             interval (CI) 0.20, 0.41) taller than SS females. OS males
             were also, on average, taller than SS males, but this
             difference was only 0.14 cm (95% CI 0.02, 0.27). Mean BMI
             and the prevalence of overweight or obesity did not differ
             between males and females from SS and OS twin pairs. The
             statistically significant differences between OS and SS
             twins for height were small and appeared to reflect our
             large sample size rather than meaningful differences of
             public health relevance.We found no evidence to support the
             hypothesis that prenatal hormonal exposure or postnatal
             socialization (i.e., having grown up with a twin of the
             opposite sex) has a major impact on height and BMI in
             adulthood.},
   Doi = {10.1186/s13293-017-0134-x},
   Key = {fds326611}
}


%% Wilbourn, Makeba P.   
@article{fds328072,
   Author = {Ruba, AL and Johnson, KM and Harris, LT and Wilbourn,
             MP},
   Title = {Developmental changes in infants' categorization of anger
             and disgust facial expressions.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1826-1832},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000381},
   Abstract = {For decades, scholars have examined how children first
             recognize emotional facial expressions. This research has
             found that infants younger than 10 months can discriminate
             negative, within-valence facial expressions in looking time
             tasks, and children older than 24 months struggle to
             categorize these expressions in labeling and free-sort
             tasks. Specifically, these older children, and even adults,
             consistently misidentify disgust expressions as anger.
             Although some scholars have hypothesized that young infants
             would also be unable to categorize anger and disgust
             expressions, this question has not been empirically tested.
             In addition, very little research has examined developmental
             changes in infants' perceptual categorization abilities with
             high arousal, within-valence emotions. For this reason, the
             current study tested 10- and 18-month-olds in a looking time
             task and found that both age groups could perceptually
             categorize anger and disgust facial expressions.
             Furthermore, 18-month-olds showed a heightened sensitivity
             to novel anger expressions, suggesting that, over the second
             year of life, infants' emotion categorization skills undergo
             developmental change. These findings are the first to
             demonstrate that young infants can categorize anger and
             disgust facial expressions and to document how this skill
             develops and changes over time. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/dev0000381},
   Key = {fds328072}
}

@article{fds329019,
   Author = {Ruba, AL and Wilbourn, MP and Ulrich, DM and Harris,
             LT},
   Title = {Constructing Emotion Categorization: Insights From
             Developmental Psychology Applied to a Young Adult
             Sample},
   Journal = {Emotion},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/emo0000364},
   Abstract = {© 2017 APA, all rights reserved). Previous research has
             found that the categorization of emotional facial
             expressions is influenced by a variety of factors, such as
             processing time, facial mimicry, emotion labels, and
             perceptual cues. However, past research has frequently
             confounded these factors, making it impossible to ascertain
             how adults use this varied information to categorize
             emotions. The current study is the first to explore the
             magnitude of impact for each of these factors on emotion
             categorization in the same paradigm. Participants (N = 102)
             categorized anger and disgust emotional facial expressions
             in a novel computerized task, modeled on similar tasks in
             the developmental literature with preverbal infants.
             Experimental conditions manipulated (a) whether the task was
             time-restricted, and (b) whether the labels "anger" and
             "disgust" were used in the instructions. Participants were
             significantly more accurate when provided with unlimited
             response time and emotion labels. Participants who were
             given restricted sorting time (2s) and no emotion labels
             tended to focus on perceptual features of the faces when
             categorizing the emotions, which led to low sorting
             accuracy. In addition, facial mimicry related to greater
             sorting accuracy. These results suggest that when high-level
             (labeling) categorization strategies are unavailable, adults
             use low-level (perceptual) strategies to categorize facial
             expressions. Methodological implications for the study of
             emotion are discussed. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/emo0000364},
   Key = {fds329019}
}


%% Williams, Redford B.   
@article{fds330191,
   Author = {Jiang, R and Babyak, MA and Brummett, BH and Hauser, ER and Haberstick,
             BC and Smolen, A and Siegler, IC and Harris, KM and Williams,
             RB},
   Title = {Gender Differences in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
             (BDNF) Val66Met Variants and Stressful Life Events on
             Psychological and Metabolic Phenotypes},
   Journal = {Genetic Epidemiology},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {665-665},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {fds330191}
}

@article{fds330190,
   Author = {Jiang, R and Babyak, MA and Brummett, BH and Hauser, ER and Singh, A and Siegler, IC and Williams, RB},
   Title = {The effect of Brain- Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)
             Val66Met Variants on the Path from Psychosocial Stress to
             Depression, Body Mass Index and Pre-Clinical
             Atherosclerosis},
   Journal = {Genetic Epidemiology},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {665-666},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {fds330190}
}

@article{fds326787,
   Author = {Proeschold-Bell, RJ and Turner, EL and Bennett, GG and Yao, J and Li,
             X-F and Eagle, DE and Meyer, RA and Williams, RB and Swift, RY and Moore,
             HE and Kolkin, MA and Weisner, CC and Rugani, KM and Hough, HJ and Williams, VP and Toole, DC},
   Title = {A 2-Year Holistic Health and Stress Intervention: Results of
             an RCT in Clergy.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {290-299},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2017.04.009},
   Abstract = {This study sought to determine the effect of a 2-year,
             multicomponent health intervention (Spirited Life) targeting
             metabolic syndrome and stress simultaneously.An RCT using a
             three-cohort multiple baseline design was conducted in
             2010-2014.Participants were United Methodist clergy in North
             Carolina, U.S., in 2010, invited based on occupational
             status. Of invited 1,745 clergy, 1,114 consented, provided
             baseline data, and were randomly assigned to immediate
             intervention (n=395), 1-year waitlist (n=283), or 2-year
             waitlist (n=436) cohorts for a 48-month trial duration.The
             2-year intervention consisted of personal goal setting and
             encouragement to engage in monthly health coaching, an
             online weight loss intervention, a small grant, and three
             workshops delivering stress management and theological
             content supporting healthy behaviors. Participants were not
             blinded to intervention.Trial outcomes were metabolic
             syndrome (primary) and self-reported stress and depressive
             symptoms (secondary). Intervention effects were estimated in
             2016 in an intention-to-treat framework using generalized
             estimating equations with adjustment for baseline level of
             the outcome and follow-up time points. Log-link Poisson
             generalized estimating equations with robust SEs was used to
             estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) for binary outcomes; mean
             differences were used for continuous/score outcomes.Baseline
             prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 50.9% and depression
             was 11.4%. The 12-month intervention effect showed a benefit
             for metabolic syndrome (PR=0.86, 95% CI=0.79, 0.94,
             p<0.001). This benefit was sustained at 24 months of
             intervention (PR=0.88; 95% CI=0.78, 1.00, p=0.04). There was
             no significant effect on depression or stress scores.The
             Spirited Life intervention improved metabolic syndrome
             prevalence in a population of U.S. Christian clergy and
             sustained improvements during 24 months of intervention.
             These findings offer support for long-duration behavior
             change interventions and population-level interventions that
             allow participants to set their own health goals.This study
             is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01564719.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.amepre.2017.04.009},
   Key = {fds326787}
}

@article{fds327309,
   Author = {Jiang, R and Babyak, MA and Brummett, BH and Hauser, ER and Shah, SH and Becker, RC and Siegler, IC and Singh, A and Haynes, C and Chryst-Ladd,
             M and Craig, DM and Williams, RB},
   Title = {Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rs6265 (Val66Met)
             polymorphism is associated with disease severity and
             incidence of cardiovascular events in a patient
             cohort.},
   Journal = {American Heart Journal},
   Volume = {190},
   Pages = {40-45},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2017.05.002},
   Abstract = {The rs6265 (Val66Met) single-nucleotide polymorphism in the
             BDNF gene has been related to a number of endophenotypes
             that have in turn been shown to confer risk for
             atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). To date,
             however, very few studies have examined the association of
             the Val66Met single-nucleotide polymorphism with CVD
             clinical outcomes.In a cohort of 5,510 Caucasian patients
             enrolled in the CATHeterization GENetics (CATHGEN) study at
             Duke University Hospital between 2001 and 2011, we
             determined the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) and
             CVD event incidence through up to 11.8years of follow-up. We
             examined the association of Val66Met genotype with
             time-to-death or myocardial infarction, adjusting for age,
             sex, CAD risk variables, and CAD severity measures.The
             Val/Val genotype was associated with a higher risk than Met
             carriers for clinical CVD events (P=.034, hazard ratio 1.12,
             95% CI 1.01-1.24). In addition, compared with Met carriers,
             individuals with the Val/Val genotype had a greater odds of
             having more diseased vessels (odds ratio 1.17, 95% CI
             1.06-1.30, P=.002), and lower left ventricular ejection
             fraction (β=-0.72, 95% CI, -1.42 to -0.02, P=.044).The
             Val/Val genotype was associated with greater severity of CAD
             and incidence of CVD-related clinical events in a patient
             sample. If these findings are confirmed in further research,
             intervention studies in clinical groups with the Val/Val
             genotype could be undertaken to prevent disease and improve
             prognosis.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ahj.2017.05.002},
   Key = {fds327309}
}

@article{fds326041,
   Author = {Jiang, R and Babyak, MA and Brummett, BH and Siegler, IC and Kuhn, CM and Williams, RB},
   Title = {Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met
             polymorphism interacts with gender to influence cortisol
             responses to mental stress.},
   Journal = {Psychoneuroendocrinology},
   Volume = {79},
   Pages = {13-19},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.02.005},
   Abstract = {Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met
             polymorphism has been associated with cortisol responses to
             stress with gender differences reported, although the
             findings are not entirely consistent. To evaluate the role
             of Val66Met genotype and gender on cortisol responses to
             stress, we conducted a 45-min mental stress protocol
             including four tasks and four rest periods. Blood cortisol
             was collected for assay immediately before and after each
             task and rest period. A significant two-way interaction of
             Val66Met genotype×gender (P=0.022) was observed on the
             total area under the curve (AUC), a total cortisol response
             over time, such that th