Psychology and Neuroscience Faculty Database
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Psychology and Neuroscience Faculty: Publications since January 2018

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%% Adcock, Rachel A.   
@article{fds340690,
   Author = {Wang, C and Lee, J and Ho, NF and Lim, JKW and Poh, JS and Rekhi, G and Krishnan, R and Keefe, RSE and Adcock, RA and Wood, SJ and Fornito, A and Chee, MWL and Zhou, J},
   Title = {Large-Scale Network Topology Reveals Heterogeneity in
             Individuals With at Risk Mental State for Psychosis:
             Findings From the Longitudinal Youth-at-Risk
             Study.},
   Journal = {Cerebral Cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {4234-4243},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhx278},
   Abstract = {Emerging evidence demonstrates heterogeneity in clinical
             outcomes of prodromal psychosis that only a small percentage
             of at-risk individuals eventually progress to full-blown
             psychosis. To examine the neurobiological underpinnings of
             this heterogeneity from a network perspective, we tested
             whether the early patterns of large-scale brain network
             topology were associated with risk of developing clinical
             psychosis. Task-free functional MRI data were acquired from
             subjects with At Risk Mental State (ARMS) for psychosis and
             healthy controls (HC). All individuals had no history of
             drug abuse and were not on antipsychotics. We performed
             functional connectomics analysis to identify patterns of
             system-level functional brain dysconnectivity associated
             with ARMS individuals with different outcomes. In comparison
             to HC and ARMS who did not transition to psychosis at
             follow-up (ARMS-NT), ARMS individuals who did (ARMS-T)
             showed marked brain functional dysconnectivity,
             characterized by loss of network segregation and disruption
             of network communities, especially the salience, default,
             dorsal attention, sensorimotor and limbic networks (P < 0.05
             FWE-corrected, Cohen's d > 1.00), and was associated with
             baseline symptom severity. In contrast, we did not observe
             connectivity differences between ARMS-NT and HC individuals.
             Taken together, these results suggest a possible large-scale
             functional brain network topology phenotype related to risk
             of psychosis transition in ARMS individuals.},
   Doi = {10.1093/cercor/bhx278},
   Key = {fds340690}
}

@article{fds339377,
   Author = {MacDuffie, KE and MacInnes, J and Dickerson, KC and Eddington, KM and Strauman, TJ and Adcock, RA},
   Title = {Single session real-time fMRI neurofeedback has a lasting
             impact on cognitive behavioral therapy strategies.},
   Journal = {Neuroimage. Clinical},
   Volume = {19},
   Pages = {868-875},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2018.06.009},
   Abstract = {To benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT),
             individuals must not only learn new skills but also
             strategically implement them outside of session. Here, we
             tested a novel technique for personalizing CBT skills and
             facilitating their generalization to daily life. We
             hypothesized that showing participants the impact of
             specific CBT strategies on their own brain function using
             real-time functional magnetic imaging (rt-fMRI)
             neurofeedback would increase their metacognitive awareness,
             help them identify effective strategies, and motivate
             real-world use. In a within-subjects design, participants
             who had completed a clinical trial of a standardized course
             of CBT created a personal repertoire of negative
             autobiographical stimuli and mood regulation strategies.
             From each participant's repertoire, a set of experimental
             and control strategies were identified; only experimental
             strategies were practiced in the scanner. During the rt-fMRI
             neurofeedback session, participants used negative stimuli
             and strategies from their repertoire to manipulate
             activation in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region
             implicated in emotional distress. The primary outcome
             measures were changes in participant ratings of strategy
             difficulty, efficacy, and frequency of use. As predicted,
             ratings for unscanned control strategies were stable across
             observations, whereas ratings for experimental strategies
             changed after neurofeedback. At follow-up one month after
             the session, efficacy and frequency ratings for scanned
             strategies were predicted by neurofeedback during the
             rt-fMRI session. These results suggest that rt-fMRI
             neurofeedback created a salient and durable learning
             experience for patients, extending beyond the scan session
             to guide and motivate CBT skill use weeks later. This
             metacognitive approach to neurofeedback offers a promising
             model for increasing clinical benefits from cognitive
             behavioral therapy by personalizing skills and facilitating
             generalization.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.nicl.2018.06.009},
   Key = {fds339377}
}


%% Appelbaum, Lawrence G.   
@article{fds340609,
   Author = {Teel, EF and Register-Mihalik, JK and Appelbaum, LG and Battaglini,
             CL and Carneiro, KA and Guskiewicz, KM and Marshall, SW and Mihalik,
             JP},
   Title = {Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Aerobic Training and
             Common Sport-Related Concussion Outcomes in Healthy
             Participants.},
   Journal = {Journal of Athletic Training},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4085/1062-6050-7-18},
   Abstract = {CONTEXT:Aerobic exercise interventions are increasingly
             being prescribed for concussion rehabilitation, but whether
             aerobic training protocols influence clinical concussion
             diagnosis and management assessments is unknown.
             OBJECTIVES:To investigate the effects of a brief aerobic
             exercise intervention on clinical concussion outcomes in
             healthy, active participants. DESIGN:Randomized controlled
             clinical trial. SETTING:Laboratory. PATIENTS OR OTHER
             PARTICIPANTS:Healthy (uninjured) participants (n = 40) who
             exercised ≥3 times/week. INTERVENTION(S):Participants were
             randomized into the acute concussion therapy intervention
             (ACTIVE) training or nontraining group. All participants
             completed symptom, cognitive, balance, and vision
             assessments during 2 test sessions approximately 14 days
             apart. Participants randomized to ACTIVE training completed
             six 30-minute exercise sessions that progressed from 60% to
             80% of individualized maximal oxygen consumption (V˙o2max)
             across test sessions, while the nontraining group received
             no intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):CNS Vital Signs
             standardized scores, Vestibular/Ocular Motor Screening
             near-point convergence distance (cm), and Graded Symptom
             Checklist, Balance Error Scoring System, and Standardized
             Assessment of Concussion total scores. RESULTS:An
             interaction effect was found for total symptom score ( P =
             .01); the intervention group had improved symptom scores
             between sessions (session 1: 5.1 ± 5.8; session 2: 1.9 ±
             3.6). Cognitive flexibility, executive functioning,
             reasoning, and total symptom score outcomes were better but
             composite memory, verbal memory, and near-point convergence
             distance scores were worse at the second session (all P
             values < .05). However, few changes exceeded the 80%
             reliable change indices calculated for this study, and
             effect sizes were generally small to negligible.
             CONCLUSIONS:A brief aerobic training protocol had few
             meaningful effects on clinical concussion assessment in
             healthy participants, suggesting that current concussion-
             diagnostic and -assessment tools remain clinically stable in
             response to aerobic exercise training. This provides
             normative data for future researchers, who should further
             evaluate the effect of ACTIVE training on clinical outcomes
             among concussed populations. TRIAL REGISTRATION
             NUMBER:ClinicalTrials.gov : NCT02872480.},
   Doi = {10.4085/1062-6050-7-18},
   Key = {fds340609}
}

@article{fds340441,
   Author = {Davis, SW and Crowell, CA and Beynel, L and Deng, L and Lakhlani, D and Hilbig, SA and Lim, W and Nguyen, D and Peterchev, AV and Luber, BM and Lisanby, SH and Appelbaum, LG and Cabeza, R},
   Title = {Complementary topology of maintenance and manipulation brain
             networks in working memory.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {17827},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-35887-2},
   Abstract = {Working memory (WM) is assumed to consist of a process that
             sustains memory representations in an active state
             (maintenance) and a process that operates on these activated
             representations (manipulation). We examined evidence for two
             distinct, concurrent cognitive functions supporting
             maintenance and manipulation abilities by testing brain
             activity as participants performed a WM alphabetization
             task. Maintenance was investigated by varying the number of
             letters held in WM and manipulation by varying the number of
             moves required to sort the list alphabetically. We found
             that both maintenance and manipulation demand had
             significant effects on behavior that were associated with
             different cortical regions: maintenance was associated with
             bilateral prefrontal and left parietal cortex, and
             manipulation with right parietal activity, a link that is
             consistent with the role of parietal cortex in symbolic
             computations. Both structural and functional architecture of
             these systems suggested that these cognitive functions are
             supported by two dissociable brain networks. Critically,
             maintenance and manipulation functional networks became
             increasingly segregated with increasing demand, an effect
             that was positively associated with individual WM ability.
             These results provide evidence that network segregation may
             act as a protective mechanism to enable successful
             performance under increasing WM demand.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-35887-2},
   Key = {fds340441}
}

@article{fds339602,
   Author = {Addicott, MA and Daughters, SB and Strauman, TJ and Appelbaum,
             LG},
   Title = {Distress tolerance to auditory feedback and functional
             connectivity with the auditory cortex.},
   Journal = {Psychiatry Research. Neuroimaging},
   Volume = {282},
   Pages = {1-10},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pscychresns.2018.10.003},
   Abstract = {Distress tolerance is the capacity to withstand negative
             affective states in pursuit of a goal. Low distress
             tolerance may bias an individual to avoid or escape
             experiences that induce affective distress, but the neural
             mechanisms underlying the bottom-up generation of distress
             and its relationship to behavioral avoidance are poorly
             understood. During a neuroimaging scan, healthy participants
             completed a mental arithmetic task with easy and distress
             phases, which differed in cognitive demands and positive
             versus negative auditory feedback. Then, participants were
             given the opportunity to continue playing the distress phase
             for a financial bonus and were allowed to quit at any time.
             The persistence duration was the measure of distress
             tolerance. The easy and distress phases activated auditory
             cortices and fronto-parietal regions. A task-based
             functional connectivity analysis using the left secondary
             auditory cortex (i.e., planum temporale) as the seed region
             revealed stronger connectivity to fronto-parietal regions
             and anterior insula during the distress phase. The
             distress-related connectivity between the seed region and
             the left anterior insula was negatively correlated with
             distress tolerance. The results provide initial evidence of
             the role of the anterior insula as a mediating link between
             the bottom-up generation of affective distress and top-down
             behavioral avoidance of distress.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.pscychresns.2018.10.003},
   Key = {fds339602}
}

@article{fds336042,
   Author = {Teel, EF and Marshall, SW and Appelbaum, LG and Battaglini, CL and Carneiro, KA and Guskiewicz, KM and Register-Mihalik, JK and Mihalik,
             JP},
   Title = {A Randomized Controlled Trial Investigating the Feasibility
             and Adherence to an Aerobic Training Program in Healthy
             Individuals.},
   Journal = {Journal of Sport Rehabilitation},
   Pages = {1-22},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jsr.2018-0007},
   Abstract = {Concussion management is moving from passive rest strategies
             to active interventions, including aerobic exercise therapy.
             Little information is available regarding the feasibility
             and adherence of these programs.To determine whether an
             aerobic exercise training program, intended for
             rehabilitation in persons with concussion, is feasible.
             Healthy non-concussed subjects were studied in this Phase I
             trial.Phase 1 parallel-group randomized controlled trial in
             a sample of healthy (non-concussed), recreationally active
             university students.Laboratory.40 healthy, university
             students.Participants were equally randomized into acute
             concussion therapy intervention (ACTIVE) training or
             non-training groups. All participants completed maximal
             cardiopulmonary exercise tests (CPETs) on a stationary cycle
             ergometer at two test sessions approximately 14 days apart.
             During this 2-week study period, ACTIVE training
             participants completed six 30-minute cycling sessions,
             progressing from 60-80% of the participant's individualized
             maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). A subset of
             participants (NACTIVE=12, Nnon-training=11) wore physical
             activity monitors throughout the 2-week study period.Study
             protocol and randomization effectiveness, exercise safety
             and adherence, and progressive intensity of the ACTIVE
             training procedures.No adverse events occurred during any
             exercise sessions. Twelve ACTIVE training participants (60%)
             completed all training sessions and every participant
             completed at least four sessions. Heart rate increased
             throughout the training period (p<0.001), but symptom
             changes and training adherence remained stable despite the
             progressively increasing workload. ACTIVE training
             participants completed approximately 30 additional minutes
             of physical activity on training sessions days, although not
             statistically significant (p=0.20).University aged students
             were adherent to the ACTIVE training protocol. Future
             research should investigate the safety and feasibility of
             aerobic training programs in acutely concussed individuals
             to determine their appropriateness as a clinical
             rehabilitation strategy.},
   Doi = {10.1123/jsr.2018-0007},
   Key = {fds336042}
}

@misc{fds338342,
   Author = {Clements, JM and Kopper, R and Zielinski, DJ and Rao, H and Sommer, MA and Kirsch, E and Mainsah, BO and Collins, LM and Appelbaum,
             LG},
   Title = {Neurophysiology of Visual-Motor Learning During a Simulated
             Marksmanship Task in Immersive Virtual Reality},
   Journal = {2018 Ieee Conference on Virtual Reality and 3d User
             Interfaces (Vr)},
   Pages = {451-458},
   Publisher = {IEEE},
   Editor = {Kiyokawa, K and Steinicke, F and Thomas, BH and Welch,
             G},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   ISBN = {9781538633656},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/vr.2018.8446068},
   Abstract = {© 2018 IEEE. Immersive virtual reality (VR) systems offer
             flexible control of an interactive environment, along with
             precise position and orientation tracking of realistic
             movements. Immersive VR can also be used in conjunction with
             neurophysiological monitoring techniques, such as
             electroencephalography (EEG), to record neural activity as
             users perform complex tasks. As such, the fusion of VR,
             kinematic tracking, and EEG offers a powerful testbed for
             naturalistic neuroscience research. In this study, we
             combine these elements to investigate the cognitive and
             neural mechanisms that underlie motor skill learning during
             a multi-day simulated marksmanship training regimen
             conducted with 20 participants. On each of 3 days,
             participants performed 8 blocks of 60 trials in which a
             simulated clay pigeon was launched from behind a trap house.
             Participants attempted to shoot the moving target with a
             firearm game controller, receiving immediate positional
             feedback and running scores after each shot. Over the course
             of the 3 days that individuals practiced this protocol, shot
             accuracy and precision improved significantly while reaction
             times got significantly faster. Furthermore, results
             demonstrate that more negative EEG amplitudes produced over
             the visual cortices correlate with better shooting
             performance measured by accuracy, reaction times, and
             response times, indicating that early visual system
             plasticity underlies behavioral learning in this task. These
             findings point towards a naturalistic neuroscience approach
             that can be used to identify neural markers of marksmanship
             performance.},
   Doi = {10.1109/vr.2018.8446068},
   Key = {fds338342}
}

@article{fds332131,
   Author = {Burris, K and Vittetoe, K and Ramger, B and Suresh, S and Tokdar, ST and Reiter, JP and Appelbaum, LG},
   Title = {Sensorimotor abilities predict on-field performance in
             professional baseball.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {116},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-18565-7},
   Abstract = {Baseball players must be able to see and react in an
             instant, yet it is hotly debated whether superior
             performance is associated with superior sensorimotor
             abilities. In this study, we compare sensorimotor abilities,
             measured through 8 psychomotor tasks comprising the Nike
             Sensory Station assessment battery, and game statistics in a
             sample of 252 professional baseball players to evaluate the
             links between sensorimotor skills and on-field performance.
             For this purpose, we develop a series of Bayesian
             hierarchical latent variable models enabling us to compare
             statistics across professional baseball leagues. Within this
             framework, we find that sensorimotor abilities are
             significant predictors of on-base percentage, walk rate and
             strikeout rate, accounting for age, position, and league. We
             find no such relationship for either slugging percentage or
             fielder-independent pitching. The pattern of results
             suggests performance contributions from both visual-sensory
             and visual-motor abilities and indicates that sensorimotor
             screenings may be useful for player scouting.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-18565-7},
   Key = {fds332131}
}

@article{fds336043,
   Author = {Appelbaum, LG and Erickson, G},
   Title = {Sports vision training: A review of the state-of-the-art in
             digital training techniques},
   Journal = {International Review of Sport and Exercise
             Psychology},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {160-189},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1750984x.2016.1266376},
   Doi = {10.1080/1750984x.2016.1266376},
   Key = {fds336043}
}

@article{fds332130,
   Author = {Rao, HM and Khanna, R and Zielinski, DJ and Lu, Y and Clements, JM and Potter, ND and Sommer, MA and Kopper, R and Appelbaum,
             LG},
   Title = {Sensorimotor Learning during a Marksmanship Task in
             Immersive Virtual Reality},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Psychology},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {58},
   Pages = {58},
   Publisher = {FRONTIERS MEDIA SA},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00058},
   Abstract = {Sensorimotor learning refers to improvements that occur
             through practice in the performance of sensory-guided motor
             behaviors. Leveraging novel technical capabilities of an
             immersive virtual environment, we probed the component
             kinematic processes that mediate sensorimotor learning.
             Twenty naïve subjects performed a simulated marksmanship
             task modeled after Olympic Trap Shooting standards. We
             measured movement kinematics and shooting performance as
             participants practiced 350 trials while receiving
             trial-by-trial feedback about shooting success.
             Spatiotemporal analysis of motion tracking elucidated the
             ballistic and refinement phases of hand movements. We found
             systematic changes in movement kinematics that accompanied
             improvements in shot accuracy during training, though
             reaction and response times did not change over blocks. In
             particular, we observed longer, slower, and more precise
             ballistic movements that replaced effort spent on
             corrections and refinement. Collectively, these results
             leverage developments in immersive virtual reality
             technology to quantify and compare the kinematics of
             movement during early learning of full-body sensorimotor
             orienting.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00058},
   Key = {fds332130}
}

@article{fds324820,
   Author = {Klemish, D and Ramger, B and Vittetoe, K and Reiter, JP and Tokdar, ST and Appelbaum, LG},
   Title = {Visual abilities distinguish pitchers from hitters in
             professional baseball.},
   Journal = {Journal of Sports Sciences},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {171-179},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2017.1288296},
   Abstract = {This study aimed to evaluate the possibility that
             differences in sensorimotor abilities exist between hitters
             and pitchers in a large cohort of baseball players of
             varying levels of experience. Secondary data analysis was
             performed on 9 sensorimotor tasks comprising the Nike
             Sensory Station assessment battery. Bayesian hierarchical
             regression modelling was applied to test for differences
             between pitchers and hitters in data from 566 baseball
             players (112 high school, 85 college, 369 professional)
             collected at 20 testing centres. Explanatory variables
             including height, handedness, eye dominance, concussion
             history, and player position were modelled along with age
             curves using basis regression splines. Regression analyses
             revealed better performance for hitters relative to pitchers
             at the professional level in the visual clarity and depth
             perception tasks, but these differences did not exist at the
             high school or college levels. No significant differences
             were observed in the other 7 measures of sensorimotor
             capabilities included in the test battery, and no systematic
             biases were found between the testing centres. These
             findings, indicating that professional-level hitters have
             better visual acuity and depth perception than
             professional-level pitchers, affirm the notion that highly
             experienced athletes have differing perceptual skills.
             Findings are discussed in relation to deliberate practice
             theory.},
   Doi = {10.1080/02640414.2017.1288296},
   Key = {fds324820}
}


%% Asher, Steven R.   
@article{fds332880,
   Author = {McDonald, KL and Asher, SR},
   Title = {Pacifists and Revenge-Seekers in Response to Unambiguous
             Peer Provocation.},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1907-1925},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-017-0767-4},
   Abstract = {In order to better understand why some children retaliate
             when they feel provoked and others do not, the present study
             identified "pacifistically-oriented" children who made
             negative interpretations in response to unambiguous
             provocations, yet did not endorse revenge goals, and
             compared them to "revenge-seeking" children who also made
             negative interpretations but did endorse revenge goals.
             Groups were identified based on seventh graders'
             (N = 367; 54.77% male; 22.89% racial/ethnic minority)
             responses to hypothetical situations in which a peer
             excluded and insulted them. Comparing these groups revealed
             that Pacifists endorsed relationship-maintaining goals and
             emotion regulation goals more highly than Revenge-Seekers.
             Revenge-Seekers reported more anger and endorsed beliefs
             about negative reciprocity and aggression being legitimate
             more highly than Pacifists. Additionally, Revenge-Seekers
             were more disrespect sensitive than were Pacifists, based on
             a measure of vigilance for signs of disrespect and
             expectations that others would disrespect them. Together
             these findings point to social-cognitive and emotion-related
             processes that may inhibit revenge-seeking in unambiguous
             provocation situations, even when children interpret the
             peer's behavior quite negatively.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10964-017-0767-4},
   Key = {fds332880}
}


%% Bennett, Gary G.   
@article{fds340595,
   Author = {Kay, MC and Burroughs, J and Askew, S and Bennett, GG and Armstrong, S and Steinberg, DM},
   Title = {Digital Weight Loss Intervention for Parents of Children
             Being Treated for Obesity: A Prospective Cohort Feasibility
             Trial.},
   Journal = {Journal of Medical Internet Research},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {e11093},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/11093},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:The prevalence of childhood obesity continues to
             increase, and clinic-based treatment options have failed to
             demonstrate effectiveness. One of the strongest predictors
             of child weight is parent weight. Parental treatment for
             weight loss may indirectly reduce obesity in the child. We
             have previously demonstrated the effectiveness among adults
             of a fully automated, evidence-based digital weight loss
             intervention (Track). However, it is unknown if it is
             feasible to deliver such a treatment directly to parents
             with obesity who bring their child with obesity to a weight
             management clinic for treatment. OBJECTIVE:The objective of
             our study was to evaluate the feasibility of and engagement
             with a digital weight loss intervention among parents of
             children receiving treatment for obesity. METHODS:We
             conducted a 6-month pre-post feasibility trial among parents
             or guardians and their children aged 4-16 years presenting
             for tertiary care obesity treatment. Along with the standard
             family-based treatment protocol, parents received a 6-month
             digital weight loss intervention, which included weekly
             monitoring of personalized behavior change goals via mobile
             technologies. We examined levels of engagement by tracking
             completed weeks of self-monitoring and feasibility by
             assessing change in weight. RESULTS:Participants (N=48) were
             on average 39 years old, mostly female (35/42, 82% ),
             non-Hispanic Black individuals (21/41, 51%) with obesity
             (36/48, 75%). Over a quarter had a yearly household income
             of <US $25,000, and about a third had the equivalent of a
             high school education. Children were on average 10 years old
             and had a body mass index of 29.8 kg/m2. The median
             percentage of weeks participants tracked their behaviors was
             77% (18.5/24 total weeks; interquartile range [IQR] 6.3 to
             100). The median number of attempts via phone or text
             message (short message service) required to complete one
             tracking week was 3.3 (IQR 2.6 to 4.9). Nearly half (23/48,
             48%) had high levels of engagement, completing 80% (19/24)
             or more weeks of tracking. Of the 26 participants with
             weight measurements reported at 6 months, of which 81%
             (21/26) were self-reported, there was a median 2.44 kg (IQR
             -6.5 to 1.0) decrease in weight. CONCLUSIONS:It is feasible
             to deliver an evidence-based digital weight loss
             intervention to parents or guardians whose children are
             enrolled in a weight management program. Given the
             feasibility of this approach, future studies should
             investigate the effectiveness of digital weight loss
             interventions for parents on child weight and health
             outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.2196/11093},
   Key = {fds340595}
}

@article{fds339361,
   Author = {Bennett, GG and Steinberg, D and Askew, S and Levine, E and Foley, P and Batch, BC and Svetkey, LP and Bosworth, HB and Puleo, EM and Brewer, A and DeVries, A and Miranda, H},
   Title = {Effectiveness of an App and Provider Counseling for Obesity
             Treatment in Primary Care.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {777-786},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.005},
   Abstract = {INTRODUCTION:Obesity treatment is less successful for
             socioeconomically disadvantaged populations, particularly
             when delivered in primary care. Digital health strategies
             can extend the reach of clinical obesity treatments to care
             settings serving patients at highest risk. METHODS:Track was
             an effectiveness RCT of a 12-month digital weight-loss
             intervention, embedded within a community health center
             system. Participants were 351 adult patients (aged 21-65
             years) with obesity and hypertension, diabetes, and
             hyperlipidemia. Patients were randomized to usual care
             (n=175) or an intervention (n=176) comprising app-based
             self-monitoring of behavior change goals with tailored
             feedback, a smart scale, dietitian-delivered counseling
             calls, and clinician counseling informed by app-generated
             recommendations, delivered via electronic health record. The
             primary outcome was 12-month weight change. Randomization
             began on June 18, 2013, final assessments were completed on
             September 10, 2015. Data analysis was conducted in 2016 and
             2017. The trial retained 92% of usual care and 96% of
             intervention participants at 12 months. RESULTS:The Track
             intervention produced larger weight losses relative to usual
             care at 6 months (net effect: -4.4 kg, 95% CI= -5.5, -3.3,
             p<0.001) and 12 months (net effect: -3.8 kg, 95% CI= -5.0,
             -2.5, p<0.001). Intervention participants were more likely
             to lose ≥5% of their baseline weight at 6 months (43% vs
             6%, p<0.001) and 12 months (40% vs 17%, p<0.001).
             Intervention participants completing ≥80% of expected
             self-monitoring episodes (-3.5 kg); counseling calls (-3.0
             kg); or self-weighing days (-4.4 kg) lost significantly more
             weight than less engaged intervention participants (all
             p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS:A digital obesity treatment, integrated
             with health system resources, can produce clinically
             meaningful weight-loss outcomes among socioeconomically
             disadvantaged primary care patients with elevated
             cardiovascular disease risk. TRIAL REGISTRATION:This study
             is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01827800.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.amepre.2018.07.005},
   Key = {fds339361}
}

@article{fds337999,
   Author = {Hopkins, CM and Bennett, GG},
   Title = {Weight-Related Terms Differentially Affect Self-Efficacy and
             Perception of Obesity.},
   Journal = {Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1405-1411},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.22255},
   Abstract = {Little work has explored the effect of weight-related terms
             on treatment initiation; only one study has investigated
             weight-related terms and the psychological constructs
             associated with treatment uptake. The present study examines
             the effects of four common weight-related terms on treatment
             initiation and the moderating effect of weight bias
             internalization.Adult participants with overweight and
             obesity (n = 436) were recruited online and asked to
             read three vignettes describing clinical encounters; the
             weight-related term (i.e., "weight," "BMI," "obesity," or
             "fat") was varied randomly. Participants then reported
             self-efficacy, cognitive and emotional illness beliefs about
             obesity (i.e., illness perception), and interest in a weight
             loss program.The term "obesity" resulted in the greatest
             self-efficacy and perceived control over obesity. "Fat"
             resulted in the least illness coherence (i.e., understanding
             of obesity). Weight bias internalization did not moderate
             the effect of term on self-efficacy, nor did it moderate
             illness perception. No differences in weight loss program
             enrollment were observed.Use of the term "obesity" may
             promote patients' perceived control and self-efficacy. Use
             of "fat" should be avoided. Results suggest that, despite
             patient and clinician preference for euphemistic weight
             terms, use of clinical language such as "obesity" may
             perform better in provider intervention.},
   Doi = {10.1002/oby.22255},
   Key = {fds337999}
}

@article{fds335636,
   Author = {McVay, MA and Yancy, WS and Bennett, GG and Jung, S-H and Voils,
             CI},
   Title = {Perceived barriers and facilitators of initiation of
             behavioral weight loss interventions among adults with
             obesity: a qualitative study.},
   Journal = {Bmc Public Health},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {854},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5795-9},
   Abstract = {Evidence-based behavioral weight loss interventions are
             under-utilized. To inform efforts to increase uptake of
             these interventions, it is important to understand the
             perspectives of adults with obesity regarding barriers and
             facilitators of weight loss intervention initiation.We
             conducted a qualitative study in adults with obesity who had
             recently attempted weight loss either with assistance from
             an evidence-based behavioral intervention (intervention
             initiators) or without use of a formal intervention
             (intervention non-initiators). We recruited primary care
             patients, members of a commercial weight loss program, and
             members of a Veterans Affairs weight loss program.
             Intervention initiators and non-initiators were interviewed
             separately using a semi-structured interview guide that
             asked participants about barriers and facilitators of weight
             loss intervention initiation. Conversations were
             audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were analyzed with
             qualitative content analysis. Two researchers used open
             coding to generate the code book on a subset of transcripts
             and a single researcher coded remaining transcripts. Codes
             were combined into subthemes, which were combined in to
             higher order themes. Intervention initiators and
             non-initiators were compared.We conducted three focus groups
             with participants who had initiated interventions
             (n = 26) and three focus groups (n = 24) and 8
             individual interviews with participants who had not
             initiated interventions. Intervention initiators and
             non-initiators were, respectively, 65% and 37.5% white, 62%
             and 63% female, mean age of 55 and 54 years old, and mean
             BMI of 34 kg/m2. Three themes were identified. One theme
             was practical factors, with subthemes of reasonable cost and
             scheduling compatibility. A second theme was anticipated
             effectiveness of intervention, with subthemes of
             intervention content addressing individual needs; social
             aspects influencing effectiveness; and evaluating evidence
             of effectiveness. A third theme was anticipated pleasantness
             of intervention, with subthemes of social aspects
             influencing enjoyment; anticipated dietary and tracking
             prescriptions; and identity and self-reliance factors.
             Different perspectives were identified from intervention
             initiators and non-initiators.Strategies to engage
             individuals in evidence-based weight loss interventions can
             be developed using these results. Strategies could target
             individuals' perceived barriers and benefits to initiating
             interventions, or could focus on refining interventions to
             appeal to more individuals.},
   Doi = {10.1186/s12889-018-5795-9},
   Key = {fds335636}
}

@article{fds335637,
   Author = {Ayazi, M and Johnson, KT and Merritt, MM and Di Paolo and MR and Edwards,
             CL and Koenig, HG and Bennett, GG and Whitfield, KA and Barker,
             CS},
   Title = {Religiosity, Education, John Henryism Active Coping, and
             Cardiovascular Responses to Anger Recall for African
             American Men},
   Journal = {Journal of Black Psychology},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {295-321},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0095798418765859},
   Doi = {10.1177/0095798418765859},
   Key = {fds335637}
}

@article{fds337340,
   Author = {Azar, KMJ and Bennett, GG and Nolting, LA and Rosas, LG and Burke, LE and Ma, J},
   Title = {A framework for examining the function of digital health
             technologies for weight management.},
   Journal = {Translational Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {280-294},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tbm/ibx050},
   Abstract = {Research is rapidly extending its focus to develop and
             evaluate weight management interventions that incorporate
             eHealth technologies. Comparative effectiveness of eHealth
             interventions is partly limited by the extensive
             heterogeneity in intervention design, variation in use of
             eHealth tools, and expanding development of novel tools to
             promote weight management. We closely examined,
             characterized, and categorized the use and function of
             eHealth tools across a wide range of eHealth interventions
             for weight management in order to first create a novel
             schematic framework for eHealth interventions and, second,
             to evaluate eHealth interventions using this framework. We
             examined 49 randomized controlled trials from two systematic
             reviews evaluating the effectiveness of eHealth
             interventions for weight loss. Further characterization of
             each intervention identified common use and function of
             eHealth tools represented within interventions and thus
             important to include in the proposed framework. This
             resulted in six descriptive domains. We then categorized
             each eHealth intervention within the context of the newly
             developed framework. Last, we examined efficacious
             interventions in the context of the framework. Twenty-five
             randomized controlled trials reported significantly more
             weight loss between the intervention group utilizing
             eHealth, compared to a non-eHealth control intervention
             and/or within an eHealth intervention group. Of these 25
             interventions, 15 (60%) used automated feedback (Domain 1),
             13 (52%) used non-eHealth tailored feedback by a health care
             provider (Domain 5), and 8 (32%) used tailored feedback from
             a health care professional through an electronic channel
             (Domain 2). The proposed schematic framework offers an
             alternative and novel approach for comparing across
             interventions and informing the development and evaluation
             of eHealth interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1093/tbm/ibx050},
   Key = {fds337340}
}

@article{fds332978,
   Author = {Pagoto, SL and Bennett, GG},
   Title = {Healthy Lifestyle for All Through Patient Care and
             Policy.},
   Journal = {Jama Internal Medicine},
   Volume = {178},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {152-153},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.6797},
   Doi = {10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.6797},
   Key = {fds332978}
}

@article{fds332939,
   Author = {Armstrong, S and Mendelsohn, A and Bennett, G and Taveras, EM and Kimberg, A and Kemper, AR},
   Title = {Texting Motivational Interviewing: A Randomized Controlled
             Trial of Motivational Interviewing Text Messages Designed to
             Augment Childhood Obesity Treatment.},
   Journal = {Childhood Obesity},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {4-10},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/chi.2017.0089},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Text messages improve health outcomes for adults
             engaged in weight management. Little is known about whether
             text messaging parents of children enrolled in obesity
             treatment will improve child health. METHODS:We conducted a
             2-group randomized controlled study among 101 children aged
             5-12 and their parent/guardian enrolling in tertiary-care
             obesity treatment. Participants were randomized to standard
             care or standard care plus daily motivational
             interviewing-based text messages. The primary outcome was
             change in child BMI at 3 months. Secondary outcomes included
             feasibility, health behaviors, attrition, motivation, and
             parent BMI. RESULTS:We enrolled 101 parent-child dyads and
             retained 81% to 3-month follow-up. Child participants had a
             mean age of 9.9 years, and baseline BMI of 30.5 kg/m2.
             Half (48%) of participants were Black, and 64% of parent
             participants had a high school equivalent education or less.
             Ninety-nine percent of parents owned a mobile device with
             unlimited text messaging. Parents responded to 80% of texts,
             and 95% felt the texts "always" or "almost always" helped
             them make a good health decision. We observed no
             between-group difference in child zBMI from baseline to 3
             months (0.0 vs. 0.2, p = 0.2). Intervention participants
             had significantly better adherence to clinic visits (3.3
             visits vs. 2.1 visits/3 months, p < 0.001).
             CONCLUSIONS:Parent-directed text messages did not
             significantly change child BMI. However, texting
             significantly reduced attrition for treatment visits. Nearly
             all parents in this racially diverse, low-income sample
             engaged in daily text messaging, making this a feasible
             approach.},
   Doi = {10.1089/chi.2017.0089},
   Key = {fds332939}
}


%% Bergelson, Elika   
@article{fds339362,
   Author = {Bergelson, E and Casillas, M and Soderstrom, M and Seidl, A and Warlaumont, AS and Amatuni, A},
   Title = {What Do North American Babies Hear? A large-scale
             cross-corpus analysis.},
   Journal = {Developmental Science},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {e12724},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/desc.12724},
   Abstract = {A range of demographic variables influences how much speech
             young children hear. However, because studies have used
             vastly different sampling methods, quantitative comparison
             of interlocking demographic effects has been nearly
             impossible, across or within studies. We harnessed a unique
             collection of existing naturalistic, day-long recordings
             from 61 homes across four North American cities to examine
             language input as a function of age, gender, and maternal
             education. We analyzed adult speech heard by 3- to
             20-month-olds who wore audio recorders for an entire day. We
             annotated speaker gender and speech register (child-directed
             or adult-directed) for 10,861 utterances from female and
             male adults in these recordings. Examining age, gender, and
             maternal education collectively in this ecologically valid
             dataset, we find several key results. First, the speaker
             gender imbalance in the input is striking: children heard
             2-3× more speech from females than males. Second, children
             in higher-maternal education homes heard more child-directed
             speech than those in lower-maternal education homes.
             Finally, our analyses revealed a previously unreported
             effect: the proportion of child-directed speech in the input
             increases with age, due to a decrease in adult-directed
             speech with age. This large-scale analysis is an important
             step forward in collectively examining demographic variables
             that influence early development, made possible by pooled,
             comparable, day-long recordings of children's language
             environments. The audio recordings, annotations, and
             annotation software are readily available for reuse and
             reanalysis by other researchers.},
   Doi = {10.1111/desc.12724},
   Key = {fds339362}
}

@article{fds337129,
   Author = {Bergelson, E and Amatuni, A and Dailey, S and Koorathota, S and Tor,
             S},
   Title = {Day by day, hour by hour: Naturalistic language input to
             infants.},
   Journal = {Developmental Science},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {e12715},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/desc.12715},
   Abstract = {Measurements of infants' quotidian experiences provide
             critical information about early development. However, the
             role of sampling methods in providing these measurements is
             rarely examined. Here we directly compare language input
             from hour-long video-recordings and daylong audio-recordings
             within the same group of 44 infants at 6 and 7 months. We
             compared 12 measures of language quantity and lexical
             diversity, talker variability, utterance-type, and object
             presence, finding moderate correlations across
             recording-types. However, video-recordings generally
             featured far denser noun input across these measures
             compared to the daylong audio-recordings, more akin to
             'peak' audio hours (though not as high in talkers and
             word-types). Although audio-recordings captured ~10 times
             more awake-time than videos, the noun input in them was only
             2-4 times greater. Notably, whether we compared videos to
             daylong audio-recordings or peak audio times, videos
             featured relatively fewer declaratives and more questions;
             furthermore, the most common video-recorded nouns were less
             consistent across families than the top audio-recording
             nouns were. Thus, hour-long videos and daylong
             audio-recordings revealed fairly divergent pictures of the
             language infants hear and learn from in their daily lives.
             We suggest that short video-recordings provide a dense and
             somewhat different sample of infants' language experiences,
             rather than a typical one, and should be used cautiously for
             extrapolation about common words, talkers, utterance-types,
             and contexts at larger timescales. If theories of language
             development are to be held accountable to 'facts on the
             ground' from observational data, greater care is needed to
             unpack the ramifications of sampling methods of early
             language input.},
   Doi = {10.1111/desc.12715},
   Key = {fds337129}
}

@article{fds338532,
   Author = {Laing, C and Bergelson, E},
   Title = {Mothers’ Work Status and 17-Month-Olds’ Productive
             Vocabulary},
   Journal = {Infancy},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {101-109},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/infa.12265},
   Abstract = {© International Congress of Infant Studies (ICIS)
             Literature examining the effects of mothers’ work status
             on infant language development is mixed, with little focus
             on varying work schedules and early vocabulary. We use
             naturalistic data to analyze the productive vocabulary of 44
             17-month-olds in relation to mothers’ work status (full
             time, part time, stay at home) at 6 and 18 months. Infants
             who experienced a combination of care from mothers and other
             caretakers had larger productive vocabularies than infants
             in solely full-time maternal or solely other-caretaker care.
             Our results draw from naturalistic data to suggest that this
             care combination may be particularly beneficial for early
             lexical development.},
   Doi = {10.1111/infa.12265},
   Key = {fds338532}
}

@article{fds327239,
   Author = {Bergelson, E and Swingley, D},
   Title = {Young Infants' Word Comprehension Given An Unfamiliar Talker
             or Altered Pronunciations.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1567-1576},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12888},
   Abstract = {To understand spoken words, listeners must appropriately
             interpret co-occurring talker characteristics and speech
             sound content. This ability was tested in 6- to
             14-months-olds by measuring their looking to named food and
             body part images. In the new talker condition (n = 90),
             pictures were named by an unfamiliar voice; in the
             mispronunciation condition (n = 98), infants' mothers
             "mispronounced" the words (e.g., nazz for nose). Six- to
             7-month-olds fixated target images above chance across
             conditions, understanding novel talkers, and mothers'
             phonologically deviant speech equally. Eleven- to
             14-months-olds also understood new talkers, but performed
             poorly with mispronounced speech, indicating sensitivity to
             phonological deviation. Between these ages, performance was
             mixed. These findings highlight the changing roles of
             acoustic and phonetic variability in early word
             comprehension, as infants learn which variations alter
             meaning.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.12888},
   Key = {fds327239}
}

@article{fds333673,
   Author = {Amatuni, A and He, E and Bergelson, E},
   Title = {Preserved Structure Across Vector Space Representations.},
   Journal = {CoRR},
   Volume = {abs/1802.00840},
   Year = {2018},
   Key = {fds333673}
}


%% Bilbo, Staci D.   
@article{fds340827,
   Author = {Missig, G and Robbins, JO and Mokler, EL and McCullough, KM and Bilbo,
             SD and McDougle, CJ and Carlezon, WA},
   Title = {Sex-dependent neurobiological features of prenatal immune
             activation via TLR7.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41380-018-0346-4},
   Abstract = {Immune activation during pregnancy via infection or
             autoimmune disease is a risk factor for neuropsychiatric
             illness. Mouse models of prenatal immune activation often
             involve maternal administration of agents that activate
             toll-like receptors (TLRs), a class of pattern recognition
             receptors that initiate innate immune responses. Such
             studies have focused primarily on activating the TLR3 or
             TLR4 subtypes, to mimic immune responses to viral or
             bacterial infections, respectively. Here, we characterize
             the effects of prenatal activation of TLR7, which is
             implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease.
             Prenatal TLR7 activation via administration of the selective
             agonist imiquimod (5.0 mg/kg) induces a phenotype in
             offspring characterized by reduced anxiety-like behavior,
             fragmented social behavior, and altered ultrasonic
             vocalization patterns at 6-12 weeks of age. The
             characteristics of this phenotype are readily
             distinguishable from-and in some ways opposite to-those seen
             following prenatal activation of TLR3 and/or TLR4. Prenatal
             TLR7-activated mice have normal baseline locomotor activity,
             but are hyperresponsive to stimuli including social
             partners, circadian cues, and gonadal hormone fluctuations.
             These alterations are accompanied by decreases in microglia
             density but increases in ramifications. RNA-sequencing of
             dorsal striatum, a region showing profound changes in
             microglial markers, indicates that prenatal TLR7 activation
             induces differential expression of hundreds of genes at 13
             weeks of age, with virtually no overlap in differentially
             expressed genes between males and females. Our findings
             demonstrate that prenatal immune activation can promote a
             wide range of developmental trajectories, depending on the
             type and/or pattern of TLR activation and the sex of the
             offspring.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41380-018-0346-4},
   Key = {fds340827}
}

@article{fds339552,
   Author = {Kentner, AC and Bilbo, SD and Brown, AS and Hsiao, EY and McAllister,
             AK and Meyer, U and Pearce, BD and Pletnikov, MV and Yolken, RH and Bauman,
             MD},
   Title = {Maternal immune activation: reporting guidelines to improve
             the rigor, reproducibility, and transparency of the
             model.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {245-258},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41386-018-0185-7},
   Abstract = {The 2017 American College of Neuropychopharmacology (ACNP)
             conference hosted a Study Group on 4 December 2017,
             Establishing best practice guidelines to improve the rigor,
             reproducibility, and transparency of the maternal immune
             activation (MIA) animal model of neurodevelopmental
             abnormalities. The goals of this session were to (a)
             evaluate the current literature and establish a consensus on
             best practices to be implemented in MIA studies, (b)
             identify remaining research gaps warranting additional data
             collection and lend to the development of evidence-based
             best practice design, and (c) inform the MIA research
             community of these findings. During this session, there was
             a detailed discussion on the importance of validating
             immunogen doses and standardizing the general design (e.g.,
             species, immunogenic compound used, housing) of our MIA
             models both within and across laboratories. The consensus of
             the study group was that data does not currently exist to
             support specific evidence-based model selection or
             methodological recommendations due to lack of consistency in
             reporting, and that this issue extends to other inflammatory
             models of neurodevelopmental abnormalities. This launched a
             call to establish a reporting checklist focusing on
             validation, implementation, and transparency modeled on the
             ARRIVE Guidelines and CONSORT (scientific reporting
             guidelines for animal and clinical research, respectively).
             Here we provide a summary of the discussions in addition to
             a suggested checklist of reporting guidelines needed to
             improve the rigor and reproducibility of this valuable
             translational model, which can be adapted and applied to
             other animal models as well.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41386-018-0185-7},
   Key = {fds339552}
}

@article{fds339917,
   Author = {Rivera, PD and Hanamsagar, R and Kan, MJ and Tran, PK and Stewart, D and Jo, YC and Gunn, M and Bilbo, SD},
   Title = {Removal of microglial-specific MyD88 signaling alters
             dentate gyrus doublecortin and enhances opioid
             addiction-like behaviors.},
   Journal = {Brain, Behavior, and Immunity},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2018.11.010},
   Abstract = {Drugs of abuse promote a potent immune response in central
             nervous system (CNS) via the activation of microglia and
             astrocytes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying
             microglial activation during addiction are not well known.
             We developed and functionally characterized a novel
             transgenic mouse (Cx3cr1-CreBTtg/0:MyD88f/f [Cretg/0])
             wherein the immune signaling adaptor gene, MyD88, was
             specifically deleted in microglia. To test the downstream
             effects of loss of microglia-specific MyD88 signaling in
             morphine addiction, Cretg/0 and Cre0/0 mice were tested for
             reward learning, extinction, and reinstatement using a
             conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. There were no
             differences in drug acquisition, but Cretg/0 mice had
             prolonged extinction and enhanced reinstatement compared to
             Cre0/0 controls. Furthermore, morphine-treated Cretg/0 mice
             showed increased doublecortin (DCX) signal relative to
             Cre0/0 control mice in the hippocampus, indicative of
             increased number of immature neurons. Additionally, there
             was an increase in colocalization of microglial lysosomal
             marker CD68 with DCX+cells in morphine-treated Cretg/0 mice
             but not in Cre0/0 or drug-naїve mice, suggesting a specific
             role for microglial MyD88 signaling in neuronal phagocytosis
             in the hippocampus. Our results show that MyD88 deletion in
             microglia may negatively impact maturing neurons within the
             adult hippocampus and thus reward memories, suggesting a
             novel protective role for microglia in opioid
             addiction.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bbi.2018.11.010},
   Key = {fds339917}
}

@article{fds340068,
   Author = {Edlow, AG and Glass, RM and Smith, CJ and Tran, PK and James, K and Bilbo,
             S},
   Title = {Placental Macrophages: A Window Into Fetal Microglial
             Function in Maternal Obesity},
   Journal = {International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience : the
             Official Journal of the International Society for
             Developmental Neuroscience},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijdevneu.2018.11.004},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ijdevneu.2018.11.004},
   Key = {fds340068}
}

@article{fds339550,
   Author = {Bordt, EA and Smith, CJ and Demarest, TG and Bilbo, SD and Kingsbury,
             MA},
   Title = {Mitochondria, Oxytocin, and Vasopressin: Unfolding the
             Inflammatory Protein Response.},
   Journal = {Neurotoxicity Research},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12640-018-9962-7},
   Abstract = {Neuroendocrine and immune signaling pathways are activated
             following insults such as stress, injury, and infection, in
             a systemic response aimed at restoring homeostasis.
             Mitochondrial metabolism and function have been implicated
             in the control of immune responses. Commonly studied along
             with mitochondrial function, reactive oxygen species (ROS)
             are closely linked to cellular inflammatory responses. It is
             also accepted that cells experiencing mitochondrial or
             endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induce response pathways
             in order to cope with protein-folding dysregulation, in
             homeostatic responses referred to as the unfolded protein
             responses (UPRs). Recent reports indicate that the UPRs may
             play an important role in immune responses. Notably, the
             homeostasis-regulating hormones oxytocin (OXT) and
             vasopressin (AVP) are also associated with the regulation of
             inflammatory responses and immune function. Intriguingly,
             OXT and AVP have been linked with ER unfolded protein
             responses (UPRER), and can impact ROS production and
             mitochondrial function. Here, we will review the evidence
             for interactions between these various factors and how these
             neuropeptides might influence mitochondrial
             processes.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s12640-018-9962-7},
   Key = {fds339550}
}

@article{fds339551,
   Author = {Kopec, AM and Smith, CJ and Ayre, NR and Sweat, SC and Bilbo,
             SD},
   Title = {Microglial dopamine receptor elimination defines
             sex-specific nucleus accumbens development and social
             behavior in adolescent rats.},
   Journal = {Nature Communications},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3769},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06118-z},
   Abstract = {Adolescence is a developmental period in which the
             mesolimbic dopaminergic "reward" circuitry of the brain,
             including the nucleus accumbens (NAc), undergoes significant
             plasticity. Dopamine D1 receptors (D1rs) in the NAc are
             critical for social behavior, but how these receptors are
             regulated during adolescence is not well understood. In this
             report, we demonstrate that microglia and
             complement-mediated phagocytic activity shapes NAc
             development by eliminating D1rs in male, but not female
             rats, during adolescence. Moreover, immune-mediated
             elimination of D1rs is required for natural developmental
             changes in male social play behavior. These data demonstrate
             for the first time that microglia and complement-mediated
             immune signaling (i) participate in adolescent brain
             development in a sex-specific manner, and (ii) are causally
             implicated in developmental changes in behavior. These data
             have broad implications for understanding the adolescent
             critical period of development, the molecular mechanisms
             underlying social behavior, and sex differences in brain
             structure and function.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41467-018-06118-z},
   Key = {fds339551}
}

@article{fds339553,
   Author = {Bilbo, SD},
   Title = {The diverse culinary habits of microglia.},
   Journal = {Nature Neuroscience},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1023-1025},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41593-018-0196-z},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41593-018-0196-z},
   Key = {fds339553}
}

@article{fds339554,
   Author = {Kopec, AM and Fiorentino, MR and Bilbo, SD},
   Title = {Gut-immune-brain dysfunction in Autism: Importance of
             sex.},
   Journal = {Brain Research},
   Volume = {1693},
   Number = {Pt B},
   Pages = {214-217},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2018.01.009},
   Abstract = {Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by social
             behavior deficits, stereotypies, cognitive rigidity, and in
             some cases severe intellectual impairment and developmental
             delay. Although ASD is most widely identified by its
             neurological deficits, gastrointestinal issues are common in
             ASD. An intimate and complex relationship exists between the
             gut, the immune system, and the brain, leading to the
             hypothesis that ASD may be a systems-level disease affecting
             the gut and immune systems, in addition to the brain.
             Despite significant advances in understanding the
             contribution of the gut and immune systems to the etiology
             of ASD, there is an intriguing commonality among patients
             that is not well understood: they are predominantly male.
             Virtually no attention has been given to the potential role
             of sex-specific regulation of gut, peripheral, and central
             immune function in ASD, despite the 4:1 male-to-female bias
             in this disorder. In this review, we discuss recent
             revelations regarding the impact of gut-immune-brain
             relationships on social behavior in rodent models and in ASD
             patients, placing them in the context of known or putative
             sex specific mechanisms.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brainres.2018.01.009},
   Key = {fds339554}
}

@article{fds339722,
   Author = {Bilbo, SD},
   Title = {Sex Differences Shape Brain Development and Function, in
             Health and Disease: Policy Implications},
   Journal = {Policy Insights From the Behavioral and Brain
             Sciences},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {104-109},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2372732217742673},
   Doi = {10.1177/2372732217742673},
   Key = {fds339722}
}

@article{fds339555,
   Author = {Bilbo, SD and Block, CL and Bolton, JL and Hanamsagar, R and Tran,
             PK},
   Title = {Beyond infection - Maternal immune activation by
             environmental factors, microglial development, and relevance
             for autism spectrum disorders.},
   Journal = {Experimental Neurology},
   Volume = {299},
   Number = {Pt A},
   Pages = {241-251},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.expneurol.2017.07.002},
   Abstract = {Immune molecules such as cytokines and chemokines and the
             cells that produce them within the brain, notably microglia,
             are critical for normal brain development. This recognition
             has in recent years led to the working hypothesis that
             inflammatory events during pregnancy, e.g. in response to
             infection, may disrupt the normal expression of immune
             molecules during critical stages of neural development and
             thereby contribute to the risk for neurodevelopmental
             disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This
             hypothesis has in large part been shepherded by the work of
             Dr. Paul Patterson and colleagues, which has elegantly
             demonstrated that a single viral infection or injection of a
             viral mimetic to pregnant mice significantly and
             persistently impacts offspring immune and nervous system
             function, changes that underlie ASD-like behavioral
             dysfunction including social and communication deficits.
             Subsequent studies by many labs - in humans and in non-human
             animal models - have supported the hypothesis that ongoing
             disrupted immune molecule expression and/or
             neuroinflammation contributes to at least a significant
             subset of ASD. The heterogeneous clinical and biological
             phenotypes observed in ASD strongly suggest that in
             genetically susceptible individuals, environmental risk
             factors combine or synergize to create a tipping or
             threshold point for dysfunction. Importantly, animal studies
             showing a link between maternal immune activation (MIA) and
             ASD-like outcomes in offspring involve different species and
             diverse environmental factors associated with ASD in humans,
             beyond infection, including toxin exposures, maternal
             stress, and maternal obesity, all of which impact
             inflammatory or immune pathways. The goal of this review is
             to highlight the broader implications of Dr. Patterson's
             work for the field of autism, with a focus on the impact
             that MIA by diverse environmental factors has on fetal brain
             development, immune system development, and the
             pathophysiology of ASD.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.expneurol.2017.07.002},
   Key = {fds339555}
}


%% Blumenthal, James A.   
@article{fds339901,
   Author = {Das, A and Roy, B and Schwarzer, G and Silverman, MG and Ziegler, O and Bandyopadhyay, D and Philpotts, LL and Sinha, S and Blumenthal, JA and Das, S},
   Title = {Comparison of treatment options for depression in heart
             failure: A network meta-analysis.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychiatric Research},
   Volume = {108},
   Pages = {7-23},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.10.007},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Depression independently predicts poor outcomes
             in heart failure (HF) patients, including increased
             mortality, morbidity and 30-day re-hospitalization. In this
             network meta-analysis, we compared different interventions
             designed to treat depression in HF. MATERIALS AND
             METHODS:Electronic searches were conducted using Ovid
             MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and PsycINFO up to
             November 2016. Included randomized clinical trials (RCTs)
             compared interventions (Exercise therapy (ET), cognitive
             behavioral therapy (CBT) or antidepressant (AD) medications)
             for depression in heart failure patients. The primary
             outcome was change in depressive symptoms based on validated
             measures of depression. Network meta-analysis based on
             random effects model estimating standardized mean difference
             (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI), compared the
             effects of the 3 classes of interventions with respect to
             usual care or placebo control conditions. RESULTS:A total of
             21 RCTs (including 4563 HF patients) reporting the effects
             of treating depression in HF patients were included in the
             analysis. In comparison to placebo or usual standard of
             care, ET (SMD -0.38; 95% CI -0.54 to -0.22) and CBT (SMD
             -0.29; 95% CI -0.58 to -0.01) were associated with reduction
             in depressive symptoms whereas AD (SMD -0.16; 95% CI -0.44
             to 0.11) was less effective. CONCLUSIONS:This meta-analysis
             is suggestive of therapeutic benefit of ET and CBT in
             comparison to usual standard of care in treating depression
             in HF patients. However, comparison among the three
             interventions was not conclusive. Future randomized clinical
             trials are warranted to compare the therapeutic effects of
             ET, CBT and AD in such patients.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.10.007},
   Key = {fds339901}
}

@article{fds338215,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Hill, LK and Blumenthal, JA and Hinderliter,
             AL},
   Title = {The Effects of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring on Sleep
             Quality in Men and Women With Hypertension: Dipper vs.
             Nondipper and Race Differences.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Hypertension},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {54-60},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajh/hpy138},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:The nondipping circadian blood pressure (BP)
             profile is associated with both poor sleep quality and
             increased cardiovascular risk. The present study aimed to
             clarify the potential confounding effects of 24-hour
             ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) used to
             characterize the circadian BP profile by assessing its
             impact on sleep quality. METHODS:Participants were 121
             middle-aged men and women with untreated hypertension (age =
             46 ± 8 years; 43% women; 45% African-American). Subjective
             sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep
             Quality Index. Wrist actigraphy was used to measure sleep
             quality objectively as sleep efficiency (SE) and total sleep
             time (TST) on 7 consecutive non-ABPM days (baseline) and 3
             subsequent 24-hour ABPM days. RESULTS:Average ambulatory BP
             was 137.2 ± 10.8/84.3 ± 8.5 mm Hg during the day and 119.6
             ± 12.4/69.5 ± 9.8 mm Hg at night. Using the criterion of
             <10% dip in systolic BP (SBP) to define nondippers, there
             were 40 nondippers (SBP dip = 7.3 ± 2.6%) and 81 dippers
             (SBP dip = 15.5 ± 3.4%). There was no effect of time on SE
             or TST over non-ABPM and ABPM days, suggesting that ABPM
             does not adversely affect sleep quality. Sleep quality was
             generally poorer (lower SE) in nondippers compared with
             dippers (P = 0.033), but differences were independent of
             whether or not participants were undergoing 24-hour ABPM.
             African-American race (P = 0.002) was also associated with
             lower SE. CONCLUSION:Sleep quality generally appears to be
             poor in men and women with untreated hypertension and
             especially among African-Americans. Importantly, for both
             dippers and nondippers, we found no evidence that ABPM had
             an adverse effect on sleep quality.},
   Doi = {10.1093/ajh/hpy138},
   Key = {fds338215}
}

@article{fds340610,
   Author = {Blumenthal, JA and Smith, PJ and Mabe, S and Hinderliter, A and Lin,
             P-H and Liao, L and Welsh-Bohmer, KA and Browndyke, JN and Kraus, WE and Doraiswamy, PM and Burke, JR and Sherwood, A},
   Title = {Lifestyle and neurocognition in older adults with cognitive
             impairments: A randomized trial.},
   Journal = {Neurology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/wnl.0000000000006784},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:To determine the independent and additive effects
             of aerobic exercise (AE) and the Dietary Approaches to Stop
             Hypertension (DASH) diet on executive functioning in adults
             with cognitive impairments with no dementia (CIND) and risk
             factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). METHODS:A 2-by-2
             factorial (exercise/no exercise and DASH diet/no DASH diet)
             randomized clinical trial was conducted in 160 sedentary men
             and women (age >55 years) with CIND and CVD risk factors.
             Participants were randomly assigned to 6 months of AE, DASH
             diet nutritional counseling, a combination of both AE and
             DASH, or health education (HE). The primary endpoint was a
             prespecified composite measure of executive function;
             secondary outcomes included measures of language/verbal
             fluency, memory, and ratings on the modified Clinical
             Dementia Rating Scale. RESULTS:Participants who engaged in
             AE (d = 0.32, p = 0.046) but not those who consumed the DASH
             diet (d = 0.30, p = 0.059) demonstrated significant
             improvements in the executive function domain. The largest
             improvements were observed for participants randomized to
             the combined AE and DASH diet group (d = 0.40, p = 0.012)
             compared to those receiving HE. Greater aerobic fitness (b =
             2.3, p = 0.049), reduced CVD risk (b = 2.6, p = 0.042), and
             reduced sodium intake (b = 0.18, p = 0.024) were associated
             with improvements in executive function. There were no
             significant improvements in the memory or language/verbal
             fluency domains. CONCLUSIONS:These preliminary findings show
             that AE promotes improved executive functioning in adults at
             risk for cognitive decline. CLINICALTRIALSGOV
             IDENTIFIER:NCT01573546. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE:This
             study provides Class I evidence that for adults with CIND,
             AE but not the DASH diet significantly improves executive
             functioning.},
   Doi = {10.1212/wnl.0000000000006784},
   Key = {fds340610}
}

@article{fds339902,
   Author = {Zhu, Y and Yu, X and Wu, Y and Shi, C and Zhang, A and Jiang, R and Li, S and Guo, G and Gao, R and Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {Association of Depression and Unhealthy Lifestyle Behaviors
             in Chinese Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes},
   Journal = {Journal of the American College of Cardiology},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {16},
   Pages = {C189-C190},
   Publisher = {ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2018.08.834},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jacc.2018.08.834},
   Key = {fds339902}
}

@article{fds337029,
   Author = {Smith, PJ and Blumenthal, JA and Hinderliter, AL and Watkins, LL and Hoffman, BM and Sherwood, A},
   Title = {Microvascular Endothelial Function and Neurocognition Among
             Adults With Major Depressive Disorder.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1061-1069},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2018.06.011},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) and
             endothelial dysfunction have been associated independently
             with poorer neurocognition in middle-aged adults,
             particularly on tests of frontal lobe function. However, to
             our knowledge, no studies have examined markers of
             microvascular dysfunction on neurocognition or the potential
             interaction between macro- and microvascular biomarkers on
             neurocognition in middle-aged and older adults with major
             depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS:Participants included 202
             adults with MDD who were not receiving mental health
             treatment. Microvascular endothelial function was assessed
             using a noninvasive marker of forearm reactive hyperemia
             velocity while macrovascular endothelial function was
             assessed using flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial
             artery. CVRFs were assessed using the Framingham Stroke Risk
             Profile and fasting lipid levels. A standardized
             neurocognitive assessment battery was used to assess three
             cognitive domains: executive function, working memory, and
             verbal memory. RESULTS:Greater microvascular dysfunction was
             associated with poorer neurocognition across all three
             domains. Microvascular function continued to predict verbal
             memory performance after accounting for background factors
             and CVRFs. Macro- and microvascular function interacted to
             predict working memory performance (F = 4.511, 178,
             p = 0.035), with a similar nonsignificant association
             for executive function (F = 2.731, 178, p = 0.095),
             with moderate associations observed between microvascular
             function and neurocognition in the presence of preserved FMD
             (r61 = 0.40, p = 0.001), but not when FMD was
             impaired (r63 = -0.05, p = 0.675).
             CONCLUSION:Greater microvascular dysfunction is associated
             with poorer neurocognition among middle-aged and older
             adults. This association was strongest in participants with
             preserved macrovascular function.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jagp.2018.06.011},
   Key = {fds337029}
}

@article{fds339903,
   Author = {Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {THE VALUE OF STRESS MANAGEMENT TRAINING IN EXERCISE-BASED
             CARDIAC REHABILITATION},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {25},
   Pages = {S99-S100},
   Publisher = {SPRINGER},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   Key = {fds339903}
}

@article{fds336044,
   Author = {Li, S and Blumenthal, JA and Shi, C and Millican, D and Li, X and Du, X and Patel, A and Gao, P and Delong, E and Maulik, PK and Gao, R and Yu, X and Wu,
             Y},
   Title = {I-CARE randomized clinical trial integrating depression and
             acute coronary syndrome care in low-resource hospitals in
             China: Design and rationale.},
   Journal = {American Heart Journal},
   Volume = {202},
   Pages = {109-115},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2018.05.004},
   Abstract = {Depression and acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are both
             common public health challenges. Patients with ACS often
             develop depression, which in turn adversely affects
             prognosis. Low-cost, sustainable, and effective service
             models that integrate depression care into the management of
             ACS patients to reduce depression and improve ACS outcomes
             are critically needed. Integrating Depression Care in ACS
             patients in Low Resource Hospitals in China (I-CARE) is a
             multicenter, randomized controlled trial to evaluate the
             efficacy of an 11-month integrated care (IC) intervention
             compared to usual care (UC) in management of ACS patients.
             Four thousand inpatients will be recruited and then
             randomized in a 1:1 ratio to an IC intervention consisting
             of nurse-led risk factor management, group-based counseling
             supplemented by individual problem-solving therapy, and
             antidepressant medications as needed, or to UC. The primary
             outcomes are depression symptoms measured by the Patient
             Health Questionnaire-9 at 6 and 12 months. Secondary
             endpoints include anxiety measured by the Generalized
             Anxiety Disorder-7; quality of life measured by the EQ-5D at
             6 and 12 months; and major adverse events including the
             combined end point of all-cause death, suicide attempts,
             nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, and
             all-cause rehospitalization at yearly intervals for a median
             follow-up of 2 years. Analyses of the cost-effectiveness
             and cost-utility of IC also will be performed. I-CARE trial
             will be the largest study to test the effectiveness of an
             integrated care model on depression and cardiovascular
             outcomes among ACS patients in resource-limited clinical
             settings.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ahj.2018.05.004},
   Key = {fds336044}
}

@article{fds336045,
   Author = {Farquhar, JM and Stonerock, GL and Blumenthal,
             JA},
   Title = {Treatment of Anxiety in Patients With Coronary Heart
             Disease: A Systematic Review.},
   Journal = {Psychosomatics},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {318-332},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2018.03.008},
   Abstract = {Anxiety is common in patients with coronary heart disease
             (CHD) and is associated with an increased risk for adverse
             outcomes. There has been a relative paucity of studies
             concerning treatment of anxiety in patients with CHD.We
             conducted a systematic review to organize and assess
             research into the treatment of anxiety in patients with
             CHD.We searched CCTR/CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and
             CINAHL for randomized clinical trials conducted before
             October 2016 that measured anxiety before and after an
             intervention for patients with CHD.A total of 475 articles
             were subjected to full text review, yielding 112
             publications that met inclusion criteria plus an additional
             7 studies from reference lists and published reviews,
             yielding 119 studies. Sample size, country of origin, study
             quality, and demographics varied widely among studies. Most
             studies were conducted with nonanxious patients. The
             Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and State-Trait
             Anxiety Inventory were the most frequently used instruments
             to assess anxiety. Interventions included pharmacological,
             counseling, relaxation-based, educational, or "alternative"
             therapies. Forty (33% of total) studies reported that the
             interventions reduced anxiety; treatment efficacy varied by
             study and type of intervention. Elevated anxiety was an
             inclusion criterion in only 4 studies, with inconsistent
             results.Although there have been a number of randomized
             clinical trials of patients with CHD that assessed anxiety,
             in most cases anxiety was a secondary outcome, and only
             one-third found that symptoms of anxiety were reduced with
             treatment. Future studies need to target anxious patients
             and evaluate the effects of treatment on anxiety and
             relevant clinical endpoints.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psym.2018.03.008},
   Key = {fds336045}
}

@article{fds332217,
   Author = {Smith, PJ and Sherwood, A and Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {Effects of aerobic exercise on white matter
             hyperintensities: An exploratory analysis.},
   Journal = {General Hospital Psychiatry},
   Volume = {53},
   Pages = {84-85},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2018.01.007},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2018.01.007},
   Key = {fds332217}
}

@article{fds336046,
   Author = {Zhu, Y and Blumenthal, JA and Shi, C and Jiang, R and Patel, A and Zhang,
             A and Yu, X and Gao, R and Wu, Y},
   Title = {Sedentary Behavior and the Risk of Depression in Patients
             With Acute Coronary Syndromes.},
   Journal = {The American Journal of Cardiology},
   Volume = {121},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1456-1460},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.02.031},
   Abstract = {Although there is good evidence that sedentary behavior is
             associated with poor health outcomes in healthy persons and
             patients with cardiovascular disease, the mental health
             consequences of sedentary behavior have not been widely
             studied. In this report, we conducted a cross-sectional
             analysis to examine the relation of self-reported sedentary
             behavior and depression in a sample of 4,043 hospitalized
             men and women with acute coronary syndrome enrolled in a
             randomized clinical trial in rural China. Sedentary behavior
             was assessed by self-report, and depression was assessed
             with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9); a subset of
             1,209 patients also completed the Beck Depression
             Inventory-II. Results revealed that greater sedentary
             behavior was associated with higher levels of depressive
             symptoms measured by both the PHQ-9 (p <0.001) and the
             Beck Depression Inventory-II (p <0.001). Compared with
             patients who reported that they were seldom sedentary,
             patients reporting that they were frequently sedentary were
             4.7 times (odds ratio 4.73, 95% confidence interval 2.71 to
             8.24) more likely to be clinically depressed defined as
             PHQ-9 scores ≥10 after adjusting for demographic factors,
             lifestyle behaviors, clinical characteristics, and
             in-hospital treatments. In conclusion, greater sedentary
             behavior is significantly related to greater depression in
             Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome, independent
             of physical activity. These findings suggest that strategies
             to reduce sedentary behavior may improve medical outcomes
             and reduce risk for depression.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.02.031},
   Key = {fds336046}
}

@article{fds336047,
   Author = {Farquhar, JM and Stonerock, GL and Blumenthal,
             JA},
   Title = {When Something is Better Than Nothing: Response to Tully and
             Cosh.},
   Journal = {Psychosomatics},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2018.05.001},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psym.2018.05.001},
   Key = {fds336047}
}

@article{fds331180,
   Author = {Smith, PJ and Snyder, LD and Palmer, SM and Hoffman, BM and Stonerock,
             GL and Ingle, KK and Saulino, CK and Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {Depression, social support, and clinical outcomes following
             lung transplantation: a single-center cohort
             study.},
   Journal = {Transplant International : Official Journal of the European
             Society for Organ Transplantation},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {495-502},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tri.13094},
   Abstract = {Depressive symptoms are common among lung transplant
             candidates and have been associated with poorer clinical
             outcomes in some studies. Previous studies have been plagued
             by methodologic problems, including small sample sizes, few
             clinical events, and uncontrolled confounders, particularly
             perioperative complications. In addition, few studies have
             examined social support as a potential protective factor. We
             therefore examined the association between pretransplant
             depressive symptoms, social support, and mortality in a
             large sample of lung transplant recipients. As a secondary
             aim, we also examined the associations between psychosocial
             factors, perioperative outcomes [indexed by hospital length
             of stay (LOS)], and mortality. We hypothesized that
             depression would be associated with longer LOS and that the
             association between depression, social support, and
             mortality would be moderated by LOS. Participants included
             lung transplant recipients, transplanted at Duke University
             Medical Center from January 2009 to December 2014.
             Depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Beck Depression
             Inventory (BDI-II) and social support using the Perceived
             Social Support Scale (PSSS). Medical risk factors included
             forced vital capacity (FVC), partial pressure of carbon
             dioxide (PCO2 ), donor age, acute rejection, and transplant
             type. Functional status was assessed using six-minute walk
             distance (6MWD). We also controlled for demographic factors,
             including age, gender, and native disease. Transplant
             hospitalization LOS was examined as a marker of
             perioperative clinical outcomes. Participants included 273
             lung recipients (174 restrictive, 67 obstructive, 26 cystic
             fibrosis, and six "other"). Pretransplant depressive
             symptoms were common, with 56 participants (21%) exhibiting
             clinically elevated levels (BDI-II ≥ 14). Greater
             depressive symptoms were associated with longer LOS
             [adjusted b = 0.20 (2 days per 7-point higher BDI-II score),
             P < 0.01]. LOS moderated the associations between depressive
             symptoms (P = 0.019), social support (P < 0.001), and
             mortality, such that greater depressive symptoms and lower
             social support were associated with greater mortality only
             among individuals with longer LOS. For individuals with LOS
             ≥ 1 month, clinically elevated depressive symptoms (BDI-II
             ≥ 14) were associated with a threefold increased risk of
             mortality (HR = 2.97). Greater pretransplant depressive
             symptoms and lower social support may be associated with
             greater mortality among a subset of individuals with worse
             perioperative outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1111/tri.13094},
   Key = {fds331180}
}

@article{fds338569,
   Author = {Hayano, J and Yoshida, Y and Carbey, RM and Blumenthal, JA and Yuda,
             E},
   Title = {Blunted Cardiac Response to Sleep Apnea a Marker of
             Depression After Acute Myocardial Infarction},
   Journal = {2018 Ieee International Conference on Consumer Electronics
             Taiwan (Icce Tw)},
   Publisher = {IEEE},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   ISBN = {9781538663011},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/icce-china.2018.8448812},
   Abstract = {© 2018 IEEE. While depression is often overlooked in
             patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), it is an
             important risk of death among these patients. We examined if
             heart rate variability (HRV) particularly those related to
             sleep apnea can be a maker of depression after AMI.
             According to the prognosis of depression, 707 post-AMI
             patients were divided into 349 never, 138 remitting, 25
             newly onset, and 195 persistent depression. Regardless of
             future prognosis, currently depressed patients had higher
             heart rate, lower HRV, and blunted cyclic variation of heart
             rate to sleep apnea during the night.},
   Doi = {10.1109/icce-china.2018.8448812},
   Key = {fds338569}
}

@article{fds333684,
   Author = {Blumenthal, JA and Sherwood, A and Smith, PJ and Hinderliter,
             A},
   Title = {The Role of Salt Reduction in the Management of
             Hypertension.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American College of Cardiology},
   Volume = {71},
   Number = {14},
   Pages = {1597-1598},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2018.01.071},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jacc.2018.01.071},
   Key = {fds333684}
}

@article{fds336050,
   Author = {Smith, PJ and Stonerock, GL and Ingle, KK and Saulino, CK and Hoffman,
             B and Wasserman, B and Blumenthal, JA and Palmer, SM and Klapper, JA and Hartwig, MG and Esposito, VR and Snyder, LD},
   Title = {Neurological Sequelae and Clinical Outcomes After Lung
             Transplantation.},
   Journal = {Transplantation Direct},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {e353},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TXD.0000000000000766},
   Abstract = {Neurological complications are common after lung
             transplantation. However, no large cohort studies have
             examined the incidence, predictors, and clinical
             significance of neurological events sustained by lung
             transplant recipients.We conducted a retrospective cohort
             analysis of a consecutive series of lung transplant
             recipients, transplanted at Duke University Medical Center
             between May 2014 and February 2017 (n = 276). Early
             neurological complications (ie, occurring during the first
             week after transplant) were documented by transplant mental
             health specialists and included delirium, ischemic injury,
             and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Analyses
             accounted for age, native disease, sex, type of transplant,
             lung allocation score, and primary graft dysfunction. The
             objectives of the study were to characterize the prevalence
             and predictors of early neurological sequelae (NSE),
             occurring during the first week posttransplant, and the
             association between NSE and subsequent clinical outcomes,
             including length of stay and mortality.Neurological sequelae
             were common, occurring in 123 (45%) patients. Fifty-seven
             patients died over a follow-up interval of 2.1 years. The
             most common NSE were postoperative delirium (n = 110 [40%])
             and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (n = 12
             [4%]), followed by stroke/transient ischemic attack and
             neurotoxicity. Higher lung allocation score was the
             strongest predictor of delirium. The presence of a NSE was
             associated with longer length of hospital stay (32 days vs
             17 days, P < 0.001) and greater mortality (hazard ratio,
             1.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.32], P = 0.024), with
             the greatest mortality risk occurring approximately 2 years
             after transplantation.Neurological events are relatively
             common after lung transplantation and associated with
             adverse clinical outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1097/TXD.0000000000000766},
   Key = {fds336050}
}

@article{fds336048,
   Author = {Chu, MC and Smith, PJ and Stonerock, GL and Blumenthal,
             JA},
   Title = {DEPRESSION AND MEDICATION NONADHERENCE FOLLOWING LUNG
             TRANSPLANTATION},
   Journal = {Annals of Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {52},
   Pages = {S560-S560},
   Publisher = {OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {fds336048}
}

@article{fds336049,
   Author = {Smith, PJ and Blumenthal, JA and Hinderliter, A and Sherwood,
             A},
   Title = {MICROVASCULAR FUNCTION AND COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE AMONG
             INDIVIDUALS WITH MAJOR DEPRESSION},
   Journal = {Psychosomatic Medicine},
   Volume = {80},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {A123-A124},
   Publisher = {LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {fds336049}
}

@article{fds330458,
   Author = {Smith, PJ and Blumenthal, JA and Hoffman, BM and Davis, RD and Palmer,
             SM},
   Title = {Postoperative cognitive dysfunction and mortality following
             lung transplantation.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of
             the American Society of Transplantation and the American
             Society of Transplant Surgeons},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {696-703},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajt.14570},
   Abstract = {Preliminary evidence suggests that postoperative cognitive
             dysfunction (POCD) is common after lung transplantation. The
             impact of POCD on clinical outcomes has yet to be studied.
             The association between POCD and longer-term survival was
             therefore examined in a pilot study of posttransplantation
             survivors. Forty-nine participants from a prior randomized
             clinical trial underwent a neurocognitive assessment battery
             pretransplantation and 6 months posttransplantation,
             including assessments of the domains of Executive Function
             (Trail Making Test, Stroop, Digit Span), Processing Speed
             (Ruff 2 and 7 Test, Digit Symbol Substitution Test), and
             Verbal Memory (Verbal Paired Associates, Logical Memory,
             Animal Naming, and Controlled Oral Word Association Test).
             During a 13-year follow-up, 33 (67%) participants died.
             Greater neurocognition was associated with longer survival
             (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49 [0.25-0.96], P = .039), and
             this association was strongest on tests assessing Processing
             Speed (HR = 0.58 [0.36-0.95], P = .03) and Executive
             Function (HR = 0.52 [0.28-0.97], P = .040). In addition,
             unadjusted analyses suggested an association between greater
             Memory performance and lower risk of CLAD (HR = 0.54
             [0.29-1.00], P = .050). Declines in Executive Function
             tended to be predictive of worse survival. These preliminary
             findings suggest that postoperative neurocognition is
             predictive of subsequent mortality among lung transplant
             recipients. Further research is needed to confirm these
             findings in a larger sample and to examine mechanisms
             responsible for this relationship.},
   Doi = {10.1111/ajt.14570},
   Key = {fds330458}
}

@article{fds329487,
   Author = {Sherwood, A and Hill, LK and Blumenthal, JA and Hinderliter,
             AL},
   Title = {Circadian hemodynamics in men and women with high blood
             pressure: dipper vs. nondipper and racial
             differences.},
   Journal = {Journal of Hypertension},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {250-258},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/hjh.0000000000001533},
   Abstract = {The 'nondipping' pattern of circadian blood pressure (BP)
             variation is an established independent predictor of adverse
             cardiovascular outcomes. Although this phenomenon has been
             widely studied, its underlying circadian hemodynamics of
             cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) have
             not been well characterized. We evaluated the hypothesis
             that BP nondipping would be associated with a blunted
             night-time reduction in SVR in a biracial sample of 140 (63
             African-American and 77 white) men and women with elevated
             clinic BP (130-159/85-99 mmHg).Twenty-four-hour ambulatory
             hemodynamics were assessed using standard ambulatory BP
             monitoring coupled with synchronized ambulatory impedance
             cardiography. Using the criterion of less than 10% dip in
             SBP, there were 51 nondippers (SBP dip = 7.3 ± 2.6%)
             and 89 dippers (SBP dip = 15.5 ± 3.4%). There was
             minimal change in cardiac output from daytime to night-time
             in both dippers and nondippers. However, SVR decreased from
             daytime to night-time, but nondippers compared with dippers
             exhibited a significantly attenuated decrease in SVR from
             daytime to night-time (7.8 vs. 16.1%, P < 0.001).
             Relative to their white counterparts, African-Americans also
             exhibited blunted SBP dipping (10.9 vs. 14.6%,
             P < 0.001) as well as an attenuated decrease in SVR
             (10.8 vs. 15.6%, P < 0.001).Overall, these findings
             indicate that blunted night-time BP dipping is associated
             with impairment of the systemic vasodilation that is
             characteristic of the night-time sleep period and is
             especially prominent among African-Americans. In the context
             of high BP, these findings suggest that nondipping may be a
             manifestation, or marker, of more advanced vascular
             disease.},
   Doi = {10.1097/hjh.0000000000001533},
   Key = {fds329487}
}

@article{fds336051,
   Author = {Blumenthal, JA and Sherwood, A},
   Title = {Missing ingredients for a lifestyle recipe to treat
             hypertension.},
   Journal = {Journal of Thoracic Disease},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {653-656},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/jtd.2018.01.06},
   Doi = {10.21037/jtd.2018.01.06},
   Key = {fds336051}
}

@article{fds331882,
   Author = {Hill, LK and Sherwood, A and McNeilly, M and Anderson, NB and Blumenthal, JA and Hinderliter, AL},
   Title = {Impact of Racial Discrimination and Hostility on Adrenergic
             Receptor Responsiveness in African American
             Adults.},
   Journal = {Psychosomatic Medicine},
   Volume = {80},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {208-215},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/psy.0000000000000547},
   Abstract = {Racial discrimination is increasingly recognized as a
             contributor to increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk
             among African Americans. Previous research has shown
             significant overlap between racial discrimination and
             hostility, an established predictor of CVD risk including
             alterations in adrenergic receptor functioning. The present
             study examined the associations of racial discrimination and
             hostility with adrenergic receptor responsiveness.In a
             sample (N = 57) of young to middle-aged African American
             adults (51% female) with normal and mildly elevated blood
             pressure, a standardized isoproterenol sensitivity test
             (CD25) was used to evaluate β-AR responsiveness, whereas
             the dose of phenylephrine required to increase mean arterial
             pressure by 25 mm Hg (PD25) was used to assess α1-AR
             responsiveness. Racial discrimination was measured using the
             Perceived Racism Scale and hostility was assessed using the
             Cook-Medley Hostility Scale.In hierarchical regression
             models, greater racial discrimination, but not hostility,
             emerged as a significant predictor of decreased
             β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness (β = .38, p = .004).
             However, moderation analysis revealed that the association
             between racial discrimination and blunted β-adrenergic
             receptor responsiveness was strongest among those with
             higher hostility (β = .49, 95% confidence interval =
             .17-.82, p = .004). In addition, hostility, but not racial
             discrimination, significantly predicted α1-AR
             responsiveness.These findings suggest racial discrimination
             was associated with blunted β-adrenergic receptor
             responsiveness, providing further evidence of the potential
             contribution of racial discrimination to increased CVD risk
             among African Americans. The adverse effects of
             discrimination on cardiovascular health may be enhanced in
             individuals with higher levels of hostility.},
   Doi = {10.1097/psy.0000000000000547},
   Key = {fds331882}
}

@article{fds330457,
   Author = {Farquhar, JM and Smith, PJ and Snyder, L and Gray, AL and Reynolds, JM and Blumenthal, JA},
   Title = {Patterns and predictors of pain following lung
             transplantation.},
   Journal = {General Hospital Psychiatry},
   Volume = {50},
   Pages = {125-130},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2017.11.007},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:Our objective was to examine variability in pain
             levels following lung transplantation, and examine
             individual biopsychosocial factors influencing changes in
             pain. METHOD:We performed a retrospective study of a cohort
             of 150 patients transplanted and discharged from Duke
             University Hospital between January 2015 and September 2016.
             During hospitalization and at clinic visits up to two months
             after discharge, subjective pain ratings were obtained using
             a 0-10 Numeric Rating Scale. Psychiatric diagnoses of
             anxiety and depression and Center for Epidemiological
             Studies - Depression (CES-D) scores collected after hospital
             discharge were examined as predictors of post-surgery pain.
             Medical and surgical variables were examined as covariates.
             RESULTS:During hospitalization, pain ratings decreased over
             time (p<0.001). Predictors of higher pain levels included
             pre-transplant history of depression (p=0.001) and anxiety
             (p=0.04), bilateral lung transplant (p=0.03), and lower
             six-minute walk distance (p=0.02). Two months after
             discharge, 18% of patients reported continued pain and 34%
             remained on opioid pain medications. Two months after
             discharge, more frequent post-operative complications
             predicted higher pain levels in a univariate analysis
             (p=0.02) although this relationship was attenuated after
             adjustment for depression. In a multivariate analysis,
             elevated CES-D scores (p=0.002), and greater opioid use
             (p=0.031) predicted higher pain levels 2-months
             post-discharge. CONCLUSION:We conclude that patients with
             psychiatric comorbidities may be at risk for greater pain,
             and may require additional strategies for more effective
             pain management.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2017.11.007},
   Key = {fds330457}
}


%% Bonner, Melanie J.   
@article{fds339603,
   Author = {Jasien, JM and Bonner, M and D'alli, R and Prange, L and Mclean, M and Sachdev, M and Uchitel, J and Ricano, J and Smith, B and Mikati,
             MA},
   Title = {Cognitive, adaptive, and behavioral profiles and management
             of alternating hemiplegia of childhood.},
   Journal = {Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.14077},
   Abstract = {AIM:To determine the neuropsychological abnormalities that
             occur in alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) and
             report on our experience in managing them. METHOD:Patients
             underwent evaluations according to our standardized AHC
             pathway. Data were entered into our prospective AHC database
             and then analyzed. RESULTS:Of the cohort of 25 consecutive
             patients (ages 15mo-42y), eight had initial chief complaints
             about cognition, 14 language, five attention, and 11
             behavior. As compared to population norms means,
             neuropsychological and behavioral assessment tools
             (including Child Behavior Checklist, Vineland Adaptive
             Behavior Scales, Peabody Picture Vocabulary, and Wechsler
             Intelligence Quotient tests) showed significant impairments
             in multiple domains: cognition, expressive and receptive
             language, executive function/attention, and behavior (p<0.05
             in all comparisons). Evaluations generated management
             recommendations in all patients. Twenty had neuropsychiatric
             diagnoses: 10 attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
             (ADHD), seven disruptive behavior, and three anxiety
             disorder. Eight out of nine patients with ADHD who were
             prescribed medications responded to pharmacotherapy.
             INTERPRETATION:Patients with AHC have developmental
             difficulties related to impairments in multiple
             neuropsychological domains. This supports the hypothesis
             that the underlying AHC pathophysiology involves diffuse
             neuronal dysfunction. Testing generated recommendations to
             help manage these difficulties. Patients with AHC also have
             a range of neuropsychiatric diagnoses, the most common being
             ADHD which responds to pharmacotherapy. WHAT THIS PAPER
             ADDS:Patients with alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC)
             have developmental difficulties with underlying
             neuropsychological impairments. The findings in this study
             are consistent with an underlying AHC pathophysiology which
             involves diffuse neuronal, probably largely GABAergic,
             dysfunction. Patients with AHC have a range of
             neuropsychiatric diagnoses, the most common being
             attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.},
   Doi = {10.1111/dmcn.14077},
   Key = {fds339603}
}

@article{fds338616,
   Author = {Tan, QK-G and Cope, H and Spillmann, RC and Stong, N and Jiang, Y-H and McDonald, MT and Rothman, JA and Butler, MW and Frush, DP and Lachman,
             RS and Lee, B and Bacino, CA and Bonner, MJ and McCall, CM and Pendse, AA and Walley, N and Undiagnosed Diseases Network, and Shashi, V and Pena,
             LDM},
   Title = {Further evidence for the involvement of EFL1 in a
             Shwachman-Diamond-like syndrome and expansion of the
             phenotypic features.},
   Journal = {Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {5},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/mcs.a003046},
   Abstract = {Recent evidence has implicated EFL1 in a phenotype
             overlapping Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), with the
             functional interplay between EFL1 and the previously known
             causative gene SBDS accounting for the similarity in
             clinical features. Relatively little is known about the
             phenotypes associated with pathogenic variants in the EFL1
             gene, but the initial indication was that phenotypes may be
             more severe, when compared with SDS. We report a pediatric
             patient who presented with a metaphyseal dysplasia and was
             found to have biallelic variants in EFL1 on reanalysis of
             trio whole-exome sequencing data. The variant had not been
             initially reported because of the research laboratory's
             focus on de novo variants. Subsequent phenotyping revealed
             variability in her manifestations. Although her metaphyseal
             abnormalities were more severe than in the original reported
             cohort with EFL1 variants, the bone marrow abnormalities
             were generally mild, and there was equivocal evidence for
             pancreatic insufficiency. Despite the limited number of
             reported patients, variants in EFL1 appear to cause a
             broader spectrum of symptoms that overlap with those seen in
             SDS. Our report adds to the evidence of EFL1 being
             associated with an SDS-like phenotype and provides
             information adding to our understanding of the phenotypic
             variability of this disorder. Our report also highlights the
             value of exome data reanalysis when a diagnosis is not
             initially apparent.},
   Doi = {10.1101/mcs.a003046},
   Key = {fds338616}
}

@article{fds336054,
   Author = {Anderson, LM and Leonard, S and Jonassaint, J and Lunyera, J and Bonner,
             M and Shah, N},
   Title = {Mobile health intervention for youth with sickle cell
             disease: Impact on adherence, disease knowledge, and quality
             of life},
   Journal = {Pediatric Blood & Cancer},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {e27081-e27081},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.27081},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Background: Adherence to
             illness self-management among youth with sickle cell disease
             (SCD) positively impacts health outcomes and decreases
             overall healthcare costs. Despite this, children with SCD
             face several barriers to adherence, with adherence rates
             that remain moderate to low. The current feasibility study
             examined the Intensive Training Program (ITP), a mobile
             health (mHealth) intervention for youth with SCD designed to
             promote disease knowledge, adherence, and patient-provider
             communication. Procedure: Youth with SCD prescribed
             hydroxyurea between ages 7–18 completed baseline disease
             knowledge and psychosocial assessments and then were
             provided with the ITP app. Youth participated in the 90-day
             ITP, during which they completed three education modules,
             tracked adherence through daily self-recorded videos on the
             app, and received video messages from providers.
             Participants completed poststudy knowledge, psychosocial,
             and feasibility questionnaires. Medication possession ratio
             (MPR) was obtained via pharmacy-refill rates. Results:
             Thirty-two youths (mean age = 13.0 years) participated,
             with an average adherence tracking rate of 0.6 (standard
             deviation = 0.34). All participants demonstrated increased
             MPR (0.57–0.74, P < 0.001, d = 0.75) and disease
             knowledge (59.6–88.6%, P < 0.001). There was variable
             engagement in the ITP; completers demonstrated significantly
             better SCD-related functioning (P < 0.05), higher
             parent-reported treatment functioning (P < 0.05), and
             lower pain impact than noncompleters of the ITP
             (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Results support the ITP can
             feasibly be implemented to promote adherence among youth
             with SCD. All participants demonstrated increased adherence
             and disease knowledge. However, there was variable
             engagement and only intervention completers showed
             improvements in psychosocial outcomes. Further research is
             needed to evaluate long-term outcomes and ways to promote
             engagement in mHealth interventions among the
             youth.},
   Doi = {10.1002/pbc.27081},
   Key = {fds336054}
}


%% Brownell, Kelly D.   
@article{fds339799,
   Author = {Barnhill, A and Palmer, A and Weston, CM and Brownell, KD and Clancy, K and Economos, CD and Gittelsohn, J and Hammond, RA and Kumanyika, S and Bennett, WL},
   Title = {Grappling With Complex Food Systems to Reduce Obesity: A US
             Public Health Challenge.},
   Journal = {Public Health Reports (Washington, D.C. :
             1974)},
   Volume = {133},
   Number = {1_suppl},
   Pages = {44S-53S},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0033354918802793},
   Abstract = {Despite 2 decades of effort by the public health community
             to combat obesity, obesity rates in the United States
             continue to rise. This lack of progress raises fundamental
             questions about the adequacy of our current approaches.
             Although the causes of population-wide obesity are
             multifactorial, attention to food systems as potential
             drivers of obesity has been prominent. However, the
             relationships between broader food systems and obesity are
             not always well understood. Our efforts to address obesity
             can be advanced and improved by the use of systems
             approaches that consider outcomes of the interconnected
             global food system, including undernutrition, climate
             change, the environmental sustainability of agriculture, and
             other social and economic concerns. By implementing
             innovative local and state programs, taking new approaches
             to overcome political obstacles to effect policy, and
             reconceptualizing research needs, we can improve obesity
             prevention efforts that target the food systems, maximize
             positive outcomes, and minimize adverse consequences. We
             recommend strengthening innovative local policies and
             programs, particularly those that involve community members
             in identifying problems and potential solutions and that
             embrace a broad set of goals beyond making eating patterns
             healthier. We also recommend undertaking interdisciplinary
             research projects that go beyond testing targeted
             interventions in specific populations and aim to build an
             understanding of the broader social, political, and economic
             context.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0033354918802793},
   Key = {fds339799}
}

@article{fds335162,
   Author = {Tomaselli, G and Roach, WH and Piña, IL and Oster, ME and Dietz, WH and Horton, K and Borden, WB and Brownell, K and Gibbons, RJ and Otten, JJ and Lee, CS and Hill, C and Heidenreich, PA and Siscovick, DS and Whitsel,
             LP},
   Title = {Government continues to have an important role in promoting
             cardiovascular health.},
   Journal = {American Heart Journal},
   Volume = {198},
   Pages = {160-165},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2017.11.002},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ahj.2017.11.002},
   Key = {fds335162}
}

@article{fds335161,
   Author = {Bragg, MA and Miller, AN and Roberto, CA and Sam, R and Sarda, V and Harris, JL and Brownell, KD},
   Title = {Sports Sponsorships of Food and Nonalcoholic
             Beverages},
   Journal = {Pediatrics},
   Volume = {141},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {e20172822-e20172822},
   Publisher = {American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-2822},
   Abstract = {© 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics. BACKGROUND:
             Food and nonalcoholic beverage companies spend millions of
             dollars on professional sports sponsorships, yet this form
             of marketing is understudied. These sponsorships are
             valuable marketing tools but prompt concerns when unhealthy
             products are associated with popular sports organizations,
             especially those viewed by youth. METHODS: This descriptive
             study used Nielsen audience data to select 10 sports
             organizations with the most 2-17 year old viewers of 2015
             televised events. Sponsors of these organizations were
             identified and assigned to product categories. We identified
             advertisements promoting food and/or nonalcoholic beverage
             sponsorships on television, YouTube, and sports organization
             Web sites from 2006 to 2016, and the number of YouTube
             advertisement views. The nutritional quality of advertised
             products was assessed. RESULTS: Youth watched telecasts
             associated with these sports organizations over 412 million
             times. These organizations had 44 food and/or nonalcoholic
             beverage sponsors (18.8% of sponsors), second to automotive
             sponsors (n = 46). The National Football League had the most
             food and/or nonalcoholic beverage sponsors (n = 10),
             followed by the National Hockey League (n = 7) and Little
             League (n = 7). We identified 273 advertisements that
             featured food and/or nonalcoholic beverage products 328
             times and product logos 83 times (some advertisements showed
             multiple products). Seventy-six percent (n = 132) of foods
             had unhealthy nutrition scores, and 52.4% (n = 111) of
             nonalcoholic beverages were sugarsweetened. YouTube
             sponsorship advertisements totaled 195.6 million views.
             CONCLUSIONS: Sports sponsorships are commonly used to market
             unhealthy food and nonalcoholic beverages, exposing millions
             of consumers to these advertisements.},
   Doi = {10.1542/peds.2017-2822},
   Key = {fds335161}
}

@article{fds331326,
   Author = {Bragg, MA and Roberto, CA and Harris, JL and Brownell, KD and Elbel,
             B},
   Title = {Marketing Food and Beverages to Youth Through
             Sports},
   Journal = {Journal of Adolescent Health},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {5-13},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.06.016},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.06.016},
   Key = {fds331326}
}

@misc{fds340743,
   Author = {Lobel, O and Steinzor, R and Wansley, M and Sunstein, CR and Thaler, RH and Marks, AB and Sharma, LL and Teret, SP and Brownell, KD and Beckett,
             K},
   Title = {Direct regulation for the public’s health and
             safety},
   Pages = {233-273},
   Booktitle = {Public Health Law and Ethics: A Reader, Third
             Edition},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780520967731},
   Key = {fds340743}
}


%% Cabeza, Roberto   
@article{fds340434,
   Author = {Davis, SW and Crowell, CA and Beynel, L and Deng, L and Lakhlani, D and Hilbig, SA and Lim, W and Nguyen, D and Peterchev, AV and Luber, BM and Lisanby, SH and Appelbaum, LG and Cabeza, R},
   Title = {Complementary topology of maintenance and manipulation brain
             networks in working memory.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {17827},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-35887-2},
   Abstract = {Working memory (WM) is assumed to consist of a process that
             sustains memory representations in an active state
             (maintenance) and a process that operates on these activated
             representations (manipulation). We examined evidence for two
             distinct, concurrent cognitive functions supporting
             maintenance and manipulation abilities by testing brain
             activity as participants performed a WM alphabetization
             task. Maintenance was investigated by varying the number of
             letters held in WM and manipulation by varying the number of
             moves required to sort the list alphabetically. We found
             that both maintenance and manipulation demand had
             significant effects on behavior that were associated with
             different cortical regions: maintenance was associated with
             bilateral prefrontal and left parietal cortex, and
             manipulation with right parietal activity, a link that is
             consistent with the role of parietal cortex in symbolic
             computations. Both structural and functional architecture of
             these systems suggested that these cognitive functions are
             supported by two dissociable brain networks. Critically,
             maintenance and manipulation functional networks became
             increasingly segregated with increasing demand, an effect
             that was positively associated with individual WM ability.
             These results provide evidence that network segregation may
             act as a protective mechanism to enable successful
             performance under increasing WM demand.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-35887-2},
   Key = {fds340434}
}

@article{fds339748,
   Author = {Cabeza, R and Albert, M and Belleville, S and Craik, FIM and Duarte, A and Grady, CL and Lindenberger, U and Nyberg, L and Park, DC and Reuter-Lorenz, PA and Rugg, MD and Steffener, J and Rajah,
             MN},
   Title = {Publisher Correction: Maintenance, reserve and compensation:
             the cognitive neuroscience of healthy ageing},
   Journal = {Nature Reviews. Neuroscience},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {772-772},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature America, Inc},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0087-z},
   Abstract = {© 2018, Springer Nature Limited. In Figure 3b of the
             originally published article, the colours of the bars were
             incorrectly reversed. The bars shown in green should have
             been shown in blue to represent the findings from older
             adults, whereas the bars shown in blue should have been
             shown in green to represent the findings from young adults.
             This has been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the
             article. Images of the original figure are shown in the
             correction notice.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41583-018-0087-z},
   Key = {fds339748}
}

@article{fds339584,
   Author = {Cabeza, R and Albert, M and Belleville, S and Craik, FIM and Duarte, A and Grady, CL and Lindenberger, U and Nyberg, L and Park, DC and Reuter-Lorenz, PA and Rugg, MD and Steffener, J and Rajah,
             MN},
   Title = {Author Correction: Maintenance, reserve and compensation:
             the cognitive neuroscience of healthy ageing.},
   Journal = {Nature Reviews. Neuroscience},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {772},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0086-0},
   Abstract = {In the originally published version of article, there were
             two errors in the references. The reference "Nilsson, J. &
             Lövdén, M. Naming is not explaining: future directions for
             the "cognitive reserve" and "brain maintenance" theories.
             Alzheimer's Res. Ther. 10, 34 (2018)" was missing. This
             reference has been added as REF. 14 in the HTML and PDF
             versions of the article and cited at the end of the sentence
             "However, over the years, these terms have been used
             inconsistently, creating confusion and slowing progress." on
             page 701 and at the end of the sentence "If reserve is
             defined merely as the factor that individuals with greater
             reserve have and then this factor is used to explain why
             some individuals have greater reserve, the argument is
             clearly circular." on page 704. The reference list has been
             renumbered accordingly. In addition, in the original
             reference list, REF. 91 was incorrect. The reference should
             have read "Cabeza, R. Hemispheric asymmetry reduction in
             older adults. The HAROLD model. Psychol. Aging 17, 85-100
             (2002)". This reference, which is REF. 92 in the corrected
             reference list, has been corrected in the HTML and PDF
             versions of the article.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41583-018-0086-0},
   Key = {fds339584}
}

@article{fds339518,
   Author = {Wang, W-C and Brashier, NM and Wing, EA and Marsh, EJ and Cabeza,
             R},
   Title = {Neural basis of goal-driven changes in knowledge
             activation.},
   Journal = {The European Journal of Neuroscience},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {3389-3396},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejn.14196},
   Abstract = {Depending on a person's goals, different aspects of stored
             knowledge are accessed. Decades of behavioral work document
             the flexible use of knowledge, but little neuroimaging work
             speaks to these questions. We used representational
             similarity analysis to investigate whether the relationship
             between brain activity and semantic structure of statements
             varied in two tasks hypothesized to differ in the degree to
             which knowledge is accessed: judging truth (semantic task)
             and judging oldness (episodic task). During truth judgments,
             but not old/new recognition judgments, a left-lateralized
             network previously associated with semantic memory exhibited
             correlations with semantic structure. At a neural level,
             people activate knowledge representations in different ways
             when focused on different goals. The present results
             demonstrate the potential of multivariate approaches in
             characterizing knowledge storage and retrieval, as well as
             the ways that it shapes our understanding and long-term
             memory.},
   Doi = {10.1111/ejn.14196},
   Key = {fds339518}
}

@article{fds338000,
   Author = {Cabeza, R and Stanley, ML and Moscovitch, M},
   Title = {Process-Specific Alliances (PSAs) in Cognitive
             Neuroscience.},
   Journal = {Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {996-1010},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2018.08.005},
   Abstract = {Most cognitive neuroscience theories have focused on the
             functions of individual brain regions, but cognitive
             abilities depend also on functional interactions among
             multiple regions. Many recent studies on these interactions
             have examined large-scale, resting-state networks, but these
             networks are difficult to link to theories about specific
             cognitive processes. Cognitive theories are easier to link
             to the mini-networks we call process specific alliances
             (PSAs). A PSA is a small team of brain regions that rapidly
             assemble to mediate a cognitive process in response to task
             demands but quickly disassemble when the process is no
             longer needed. We compare PSAs to resting-state networks and
             to other connectivity-based, task-related networks, and we
             characterize the advantages and disadvantages of each type
             of network.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.tics.2018.08.005},
   Key = {fds338000}
}

@article{fds339245,
   Author = {Cabeza, R and Albert, M and Belleville, S and Craik, FIM and Duarte, A and Grady, CL and Lindenberger, U and Nyberg, L and Park, DC and Reuter-Lorenz, PA and Rugg, MD and Steffener, J and Rajah,
             MN},
   Title = {Maintenance, reserve and compensation: the cognitive
             neuroscience of healthy ageing.},
   Journal = {Nature Reviews. Neuroscience},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {701-710},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0068-2},
   Abstract = {Cognitive ageing research examines the cognitive abilities
             that are preserved and/or those that decline with advanced
             age. There is great individual variability in cognitive
             ageing trajectories. Some older adults show little decline
             in cognitive ability compared with young adults and are thus
             termed 'optimally ageing'. By contrast, others exhibit
             substantial cognitive decline and may develop dementia.
             Human neuroimaging research has led to a number of important
             advances in our understanding of the neural mechanisms
             underlying these two outcomes. However, interpreting the
             age-related changes and differences in brain structure,
             activation and functional connectivity that this research
             reveals is an ongoing challenge. Ambiguous terminology is a
             major source of difficulty in this venture. Three terms in
             particular - compensation, maintenance and reserve - have
             been used in a number of different ways, and researchers
             continue to disagree about the kinds of evidence or patterns
             of results that are required to interpret findings related
             to these concepts. As such inconsistencies can impede
             progress in both theoretical and empirical research, here,
             we aim to clarify and propose consensual definitions of
             these terms.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41583-018-0068-2},
   Key = {fds339245}
}

@article{fds335638,
   Author = {Monge, ZA and Stanley, ML and Geib, BR and Davis, SW and Cabeza,
             R},
   Title = {Functional networks underlying item and source memory:
             shared and distinct network components and age-related
             differences.},
   Journal = {Neurobiology of Aging},
   Volume = {69},
   Pages = {140-150},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.05.016},
   Abstract = {Although the medial temporal lobes (MTLs) are critical for
             both item memory (IM) and source memory (SM), the lateral
             prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex play a
             greater role during SM than IM. It is unclear, however, how
             these differences translate into shared and distinct IM
             versus SM network components and how these network
             components vary with age. Within a sample of younger adults
             (YAs; n = 15, Mage = 19.5 years) and older adults (OAs;
             n = 40, Mage = 68.6 years), we investigated the
             functional networks underlying IM and SM. Before functional
             MRI scanning, participants encoded nouns while making either
             pleasantness or size judgments. During functional MRI
             scanning, participants completed IM and SM retrieval tasks.
             We found that MTL nodes were similarly interconnected among
             each other during both IM and SM (shared network components)
             but maintained more intermodule connections during SM
             (distinct network components). Also, during SM, OAs
             (compared to YAs) had MTL nodes with more widespread
             connections. These findings provide a novel viewpoint on
             neural mechanism differences underlying IM versus SM in YAs
             and OAs.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.05.016},
   Key = {fds335638}
}

@article{fds337616,
   Author = {Lighthall, NR and Pearson, JM and Huettel, SA and Cabeza,
             R},
   Title = {Feedback-Based Learning in Aging: Contributions and
             Trajectories of Change in Striatal and Hippocampal
             Systems.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the
             Society for Neuroscience},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {39},
   Pages = {8453-8462},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.0769-18.2018},
   Abstract = {The striatum supports learning from immediate feedback by
             coding prediction errors (PEs), whereas the hippocampus (HC)
             plays a parallel role in learning from delayed feedback.
             Both regions show evidence of decline in human aging, but
             behavioral research suggests greater decline in HC versus
             striatal functions. The present study included male and
             female humans and used fMRI to examine younger and older
             adults' brain activation patterns during a learning task
             with choice feedback presented immediately or after a brief
             delay. Participants then completed a surprise memory task
             that tested their recognition of trial-unique feedback
             stimuli, followed by assessments of postlearning cue
             preference, outcome probability awareness, and willingness
             to pay. The study yielded three main findings. First,
             behavioral measures indicated similar rates of learning in
             younger and older adults across conditions, but postlearning
             measures indicated impairment in older adults' ability to
             subsequently apply learning to discriminate between cues.
             Second, PE signals in the striatum were greater for
             immediate versus delayed feedback in both age groups, but PE
             signals in the HC were greater for delayed versus immediate
             feedback only in younger adults. Third, unlike younger
             adults, older adults failed to exhibit enhanced episodic
             memory for outcome stimuli in the delayed-feedback
             condition. Together, these findings indicate that HC
             circuits supporting learning and memory decline more than
             striatal circuits in healthy aging, which suggests that
             declines in HC learning signals may be an important
             predictor of deficits in learning-dependent economic
             decisions among older adults.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The
             hippocampus (HC) and striatum play distinct and critical
             roles in learning. Substantial research suggests that
             age-related decline in learning supported by the HC outpaces
             decline in learning supported by the striatum; however, such
             inferences have been drawn by comparing performance in tasks
             with fundamentally different structures. The present study
             overcomes this obstacle by implementing a single
             fMRI-learning paradigm with a subtle variation in feedback
             timing to examine differential age effects on memory
             supported by the HC and striatum. Our results provide
             converging behavioral and brain-imaging evidence showing
             that HC circuits supporting learning and memory decline more
             than striatal circuits in healthy aging and that declines in
             HC learning signals may predict early deficits in
             learning-dependent decisions among older
             adults.},
   Doi = {10.1523/jneurosci.0769-18.2018},
   Key = {fds337616}
}

@article{fds337615,
   Author = {Wang, W-C and Wing, EA and Murphy, DLK and Luber, BM and Lisanby, SH and Cabeza, R and Davis, SW},
   Title = {Excitatory TMS modulates memory representations.},
   Journal = {Cognitive Neuroscience},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {3-4},
   Pages = {151-166},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17588928.2018.1512482},
   Abstract = {Brain stimulation technologies have seen increasing
             application in basic science investigations, specifically
             toward the goal of improving memory function. However,
             proposals concerning the neural mechanisms underlying
             cognitive enhancement often rely on simplified notions of
             excitation. As a result, most applications examining the
             effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on
             functional neuroimaging measures have been limited to
             univariate analyses of brain activity. We present here
             analyses using representational similarity analysis (RSA)
             and encoding-retrieval similarity (ERS) analysis to quantify
             the effect of TMS on memory representations. To test whether
             an increase in local excitability in PFC can have measurable
             influences on upstream representations in earlier temporal
             memory regions, we compared 1 and 5Hz stimulation to the
             left dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC). We found that 5Hz rTMS,
             relative to 1Hz, had multiple effects on neural
             representations: 1) greater representational similarity
             during both encoding and retrieval in ventral stream
             regions, 2) greater ERS in the hippocampus, and, critically,
             3) increasing ERS in MTL was correlated with increasing
             univariate activity in DLPFC, and greater functional
             connectivity for hits than misses between these regions.
             These results provide the first evidence of rTMS modulating
             semantic representations and strengthen the idea that rTMS
             may affect the reinstatement of previously experienced
             events in upstream regions.},
   Doi = {10.1080/17588928.2018.1512482},
   Key = {fds337615}
}

@article{fds337617,
   Author = {Martinikorena, I and Cabeza, R and Villanueva, A and Urtasun, I and Larumbe, A},
   Title = {Fast and robust ellipse detection algorithm for head-mounted
             eye tracking systems},
   Journal = {Machine Vision and Applications},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {845-860},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00138-018-0940-0},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00138-018-0940-0},
   Key = {fds337617}
}

@article{fds335639,
   Author = {Wang, W-C and Brashier, NM and Wing, EA and Marsh, EJ and Cabeza,
             R},
   Title = {Knowledge supports memory retrieval through familiarity, not
             recollection.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychologia},
   Volume = {113},
   Pages = {14-21},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.01.019},
   Abstract = {Semantic memory, or general knowledge of the world, guides
             learning and supports the formation and retrieval of new
             episodic memories. Behavioral evidence suggests that this
             knowledge effect is supported by recollection-a more
             controlled form of memory retrieval generally accompanied by
             contextual details-to a greater degree than familiarity-a
             more automatic form of memory retrieval generally absent of
             contextual details. In the current study, we used functional
             magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the role
             that regions associated with recollection and familiarity
             play in retrieving recent instances of known (e.g., The
             Summer Olympic Games are held four years apart) and unknown
             (e.g., A flaky deposit found in port bottles is beeswing)
             statements. Our results revealed a surprising pattern:
             Episodic retrieval of known statements recruited regions
             associated with familiarity, but not recollection. Instead,
             retrieval of unknown statements recruited regions associated
             with recollection. These data, in combination with quicker
             reaction times for the retrieval of known than unknown
             statements, suggest that known statements can be
             successfully retrieved on the basis of familiarity, whereas
             unknown statements were retrieved on the basis of
             recollection. Our results provide insight into how knowledge
             influences episodic retrieval and demonstrate the role of
             neuroimaging in providing insights into cognitive processes
             in the absence of explicit behavioral responses.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.01.019},
   Key = {fds335639}
}

@article{fds332826,
   Author = {Wing, EA and Iyengar, V and Hess, TM and LaBar, KS and Huettel, SA and Cabeza, R},
   Title = {Neural mechanisms underlying subsequent memory for personal
             beliefs:An fMRI study.},
   Journal = {Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {216-231},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13415-018-0563-y},
   Abstract = {Many fMRI studies have examined the neural mechanisms
             supporting emotional memory for stimuli that generate
             emotion rather automatically (e.g., a picture of a dangerous
             animal or of appetizing food). However, far fewer studies
             have examined how memory is influenced by emotion related to
             social and political issues (e.g., a proposal for large
             changes in taxation policy), which clearly vary across
             individuals. In order to investigate the neural substrates
             of affective and mnemonic processes associated with personal
             opinions, we employed an fMRI task wherein participants
             rated the intensity of agreement/disagreement to
             sociopolitical belief statements paired with neural face
             pictures. Following the rating phase, participants performed
             an associative recognition test in which they distinguished
             identical versus recombined face-statement pairs. The study
             yielded three main findings: behaviorally, the intensity of
             agreement ratings was linked to greater subjective emotional
             arousal as well as enhanced high-confidence subsequent
             memory. Neurally, statements that elicited strong (vs. weak)
             agreement or disagreement were associated with greater
             activation of the amygdala. Finally, a subsequent memory
             analysis showed that the behavioral memory advantage for
             statements generating stronger ratings was dependent on the
             medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Together, these results
             both underscore consistencies in neural systems supporting
             emotional arousal and suggest a modulation of
             arousal-related encoding mechanisms when emotion is
             contingent on referencing personal beliefs.},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13415-018-0563-y},
   Key = {fds332826}
}

@article{fds327833,
   Author = {Monge, ZA and Wing, EA and Stokes, J and Cabeza, R},
   Title = {Search and recovery of autobiographical and laboratory
             memories: Shared and distinct neural components.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychologia},
   Volume = {110},
   Pages = {44-54},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.07.030},
   Abstract = {Functional neuroimaging evidence suggests that there are
             differences in the neural correlates of episodic memory for
             laboratory stimuli (laboratory memory) and for events from
             one's own life (autobiographical memory). However, this
             evidence is scarce and often confounded with differences in
             memory testing procedures. Here, we directly compared the
             neural mechanisms underlying the search and recovery of
             autobiographical and laboratory memories while minimizing
             testing differences. Before scanning, participants completed
             a laboratory memory encoding task in which they studied
             four-word "chains" spread across three word pairs. During
             scanning, participants completed a laboratory memory
             retrieval task, in which they recalled the word chains, and
             an autobiographical memory retrieval task, in which they
             recalled specific personal events associated with word cues.
             Importantly, response times were similar in the two tasks,
             allowing for a direct comparison of the activation time
             courses. We found that during memory search (searching for
             the memory target), similar brain regions were activated
             during both the autobiographical and laboratory tasks,
             whereas during memory recovery (accessing the memory traces;
             i.e., ecphory), clear differences emerged: regions of the
             default mode network (DMN) were activated greater during
             autobiographical than laboratory memory, whereas the
             bilateral superior parietal lobules were activated greater
             during laboratory than autobiographical memory. Also,
             multivariate functional connectivity analyses revealed that
             regardless of memory stage, the DMN and ventral attention
             network exhibited a more integrated topology in the
             functional network underlying autobiographical (vs.
             laboratory) memory retrieval, whereas the fronto-parietal
             task control network exhibited a more integrated topology in
             the functional network underlying laboratory (vs.
             autobiographical) memory retrieval. These findings further
             characterize the shared and distinct neural components
             underlying autobiographical and laboratory memories, and
             suggest that differences in autobiographical vs. laboratory
             memory brain activation previously reported in the
             literature reflect memory recovery rather than search
             differences.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.07.030},
   Key = {fds327833}
}

@article{fds333712,
   Author = {Fandakova, Y and Sander, MC and Grandy, TH and Cabeza, R and Werkle-Bergner, M and Shing, YL},
   Title = {Age differences in false memory: The importance of retrieval
             monitoring processes and their modulation by memory
             quality.},
   Journal = {Psychology and Aging},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {119-133},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pag0000212},
   Abstract = {Older adults are more likely than younger adults to falsely
             recall past episodes that occurred differently or not at
             all. We examined whether older adults' propensity for false
             associative memory is related to declines in postretrieval
             monitoring processes and their modulation with varying
             memory representations. Younger (N = 20) and older adults (N
             = 32) studied and relearned unrelated scene-word pairs,
             followed by a final cued recall that was used to distribute
             the pairs for an associative recognition test 24 hours
             later. This procedure allowed individualized formation of
             rearranged pairs that were made up of elements of pairs that
             were correctly recalled in the final cued recall
             ("high-quality" pairs), and of pairs that were not correctly
             recalled ("low-quality" pairs). Both age groups falsely
             recognized more low-quality than high-quality rearranged
             pairs, with a less pronounced reduction in false alarms to
             high-quality pairs in older adults. In younger adults,
             cingulo-opercular activity was enhanced for false alarms and
             for low-quality correct rejections, consistent with its role
             in postretrieval monitoring. Older adults did not show such
             modulated recruitment, suggesting deficits in their
             selective engagement of monitoring processes given
             variability in the fidelity of memory representations. There
             were no age differences in hippocampal activity, which was
             higher for high-quality than low-quality correct rejections
             in both age groups. These results demonstrate that the
             engagement of cingulo-opercular monitoring mechanisms varies
             with memory representation quality and contributes to
             age-related deficits in false associative memory. (PsycINFO
             Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/pag0000212},
   Key = {fds333712}
}

@article{fds330539,
   Author = {Browndyke, JN and Berger, M and Smith, PJ and Harshbarger, TB and Monge,
             ZA and Panchal, V and Bisanar, TL and Glower, DD and Alexander, JH and Cabeza, R and Welsh-Bohmer, K and Newman, MF and Mathew, JP and Duke
             Neurologic Outcomes Research Group (NORG)},
   Title = {Task-related changes in degree centrality and local
             coherence of the posterior cingulate cortex after major
             cardiac surgery in older adults.},
   Journal = {Human Brain Mapping},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {985-1003},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23898},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVES:Older adults often display postoperative
             cognitive decline (POCD) after surgery, yet it is unclear to
             what extent functional connectivity (FC) alterations may
             underlie these deficits. We examined for postoperative
             voxel-wise FC changes in response to increased working
             memory load demands in cardiac surgery patients and
             nonsurgical controls. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:Older cardiac
             surgery patients (n = 25) completed a verbal N-back
             working memory task during MRI scanning and cognitive
             testing before and 6 weeks after surgery; nonsurgical
             controls with cardiac disease (n = 26) underwent these
             assessments at identical time intervals. We measured
             postoperative changes in degree centrality, the number of
             edges attached to a brain node, and local coherence, the
             temporal homogeneity of regional functional correlations,
             using voxel-wise graph theory-based FC metrics. Group ×
             time differences were evaluated in these FC metrics
             associated with increased N-back working memory load
             (2-back > 1-back), using a two-stage partitioned
             variance, mixed ANCOVA. PRINCIPAL OBSERVATIONS:Cardiac
             surgery patients demonstrated postoperative working memory
             load-related degree centrality increases in the left dorsal
             posterior cingulate cortex (dPCC; p < .001, cluster
             p-FWE < .05). The dPCC also showed a postoperative
             increase in working memory load-associated local coherence
             (p < .001, cluster p-FWE < .05). dPCC degree
             centrality and local coherence increases were inversely
             associated with global cognitive change in surgery patients
             (p < .01), but not in controls. CONCLUSIONS:Cardiac
             surgery patients showed postoperative increases in working
             memory load-associated degree centrality and local coherence
             of the dPCC that were inversely associated with
             postoperative global cognitive outcomes and independent of
             perioperative cerebrovascular damage.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hbm.23898},
   Key = {fds330539}
}

@article{fds333223,
   Author = {Davis, SW and Wing, EA and Cabeza, R},
   Title = {Contributions of the ventral parietal cortex to declarative
             memory.},
   Journal = {Handbook of Clinical Neurology},
   Volume = {151},
   Pages = {525-553},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/b978-0-444-63622-5.00027-9},
   Abstract = {Our understanding of the role that ventral parietal cortex
             (VPC) plays in declarative memory processes has changed
             dramatically over the last two decades. The goal of this
             chapter is to provide a concise overview data concerning VPC
             involvement in episodic memory (EM), and to connect this
             data to several key theories of VPC function. We review
             evidence from five methodological domains in cognitive
             neuroscience: neuropsychological lesion evidence, univariate
             activation studies, multivoxel pattern analyses, functional
             connectivity studies, and brain stimulation experiments. We
             discuss how the body of empirical work bears on putative
             mnemonic functions of VPC related to attention and stimulus
             representation, and detail the strengths and weaknesses of
             related theories. Lastly, we identify several broad
             conceptual questions raised by recent investigations, and
             outline directions for future research.},
   Doi = {10.1016/b978-0-444-63622-5.00027-9},
   Key = {fds333223}
}

@misc{fds333678,
   Author = {Doshi, A and Cabeza, R and Berger, M},
   Title = {Geriatric Anesthesia: Age-Dependent Changes in the Central
             and Peripheral Nervous Systems},
   Pages = {145-160},
   Booktitle = {Geriatric Anesthesiology},
   Publisher = {Springer International Publishing},
   Year = {2018},
   ISBN = {9783319668772},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-66878-9_10},
   Doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-66878-9_10},
   Key = {fds333678}
}


%% Caspi, Avshalom   
@article{fds336495,
   Author = {Matthews, T and Danese, A and Caspi, A and Fisher, HL and Goldman-Mellor, S and Kepa, A and Moffitt, TE and Odgers, CL and Arseneault, L},
   Title = {Lonely young adults in modern Britain: findings from an
             epidemiological cohort study.},
   Journal = {Psychological Medicine},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {268-277},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0033291718000788},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:The aim of this study was to build a detailed,
             integrative profile of the correlates of young adults'
             feelings of loneliness, in terms of their current health and
             functioning and their childhood experiences and
             circumstances. METHODS:Data were drawn from the
             Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, a birth cohort
             of 2232 individuals born in England and Wales in 1994 and
             1995. Loneliness was measured when participants were aged
             18. Regression analyses were used to test concurrent
             associations between loneliness and health and functioning
             in young adulthood. Longitudinal analyses were conducted to
             examine childhood factors associated with young adult
             loneliness. RESULTS:Lonelier young adults were more likely
             to experience mental health problems, to engage in physical
             health risk behaviours, and to use more negative strategies
             to cope with stress. They were less confident in their
             employment prospects and were more likely to be out of work.
             Lonelier young adults were, as children, more likely to have
             had mental health difficulties and to have experienced
             bullying and social isolation. Loneliness was evenly
             distributed across genders and socioeconomic backgrounds.
             CONCLUSIONS:Young adults' experience of loneliness co-occurs
             with a diverse range of problems, with potential
             implications for health in later life. The findings
             underscore the importance of early intervention to prevent
             lonely young adults from being trapped in loneliness as they
             age.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0033291718000788},
   Key = {fds336495}
}

@article{fds339246,
   Author = {Selzam, S and Coleman, JRI and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Plomin,
             R},
   Title = {A polygenic p factor for major psychiatric
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Translational Psychiatry},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {205},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41398-018-0217-4},
   Abstract = {It has recently been proposed that a single dimension,
             called the p factor, can capture a person's liability to
             mental disorder. Relevant to the p hypothesis, recent
             genetic research has found surprisingly high genetic
             correlations between pairs of psychiatric disorders. Here,
             for the first time, we compare genetic correlations from
             different methods and examine their support for a genetic p
             factor. We tested the hypothesis of a genetic p factor by
             applying principal component analysis to matrices of genetic
             correlations between major psychiatric disorders estimated
             by three methods-family study, genome-wide complex trait
             analysis, and linkage-disequilibrium score regression-and on
             a matrix of polygenic score correlations constructed for
             each individual in a UK-representative sample of 7 026
             unrelated individuals. All disorders loaded positively on a
             first unrotated principal component, which accounted for 57,
             43, 35, and 22% of the variance respectively for the four
             methods. Our results showed that all four methods provided
             strong support for a genetic p factor that represents the
             pinnacle of the hierarchical genetic architecture of
             psychopathology.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41398-018-0217-4},
   Key = {fds339246}
}

@article{fds336491,
   Author = {Crush, E and Arseneault, L and Moffitt, TE and Danese, A and Caspi, A and Jaffee, SR and Matthews, T and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {Protective factors for psychotic experiences amongst
             adolescents exposed to multiple forms of
             victimization.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychiatric Research},
   Volume = {104},
   Pages = {32-38},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.06.011},
   Abstract = {Experiencing multiple types of victimization
             (poly-victimization) during adolescence is associated with
             the onset of psychotic experiences (such as hearing voices,
             having visions, or being extremely paranoid). However, many
             poly-victimized adolescents will not develop such
             subclinical phenomena and the factors that protect them are
             unknown. This study investigated whether individual, family,
             or community-level characteristics were associated with an
             absence of psychotic experiences amongst poly-victimized
             adolescents. Participants were from the Environmental Risk
             (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally-representative
             cohort of 2232 UK-born twins. Exposure to seven different
             types of victimization between ages 12-18 was ascertained
             using a modified version of the Juvenile Victimization
             Questionnaire at age 18. Adolescents were also interviewed
             about psychotic experiences at age 18. Protective factors
             were measured at ages 12 and 18. We found that exposure to
             poly-victimization during adolescence was associated with
             age-18 psychotic experiences (OR = 4.62, 95% CI
             3.59-5.94, P < 0.001), but more than a third of the
             poly-victimized adolescents reported having no psychotic
             experiences (40.1%). Greater social support was found to be
             protective against adolescent psychotic experiences even
             amongst those exposed to poly-victimization. Engaging in
             physical activity and greater neighborhood social cohesion
             were also associated with a reduced likelihood of age-18
             psychotic experiences in the whole sample, with
             non-significant trends in the poly-victimized group.
             Increasing social support and promoting physical activity
             appear to be important areas for future research into the
             development of preventive interventions targeting adolescent
             psychotic experiences. This adds further weight to calls to
             increase the promotion of these factors on a public health
             scale.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.06.011},
   Key = {fds336491}
}

@article{fds336496,
   Author = {Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {All for One and One for All: Mental Disorders in One
             Dimension.},
   Journal = {The American Journal of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {175},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {831-844},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.17121383},
   Abstract = {In both child and adult psychiatry, empirical evidence has
             now accrued to suggest that a single dimension is able to
             measure a person's liability to mental disorder, comorbidity
             among disorders, persistence of disorders over time, and
             severity of symptoms. This single dimension of general
             psychopathology has been termed "p," because it conceptually
             parallels a dimension already familiar to behavioral
             scientists and clinicians: the "g" factor of general
             intelligence. As the g dimension reflects low to high mental
             ability, the p dimension represents low to high
             psychopathology severity, with thought disorder at the
             extreme. The dimension of p unites all disorders. It
             influences present/absent status on hundreds of psychiatric
             symptoms, which modern nosological systems typically
             aggregate into dozens of distinct diagnoses, which in turn
             aggregate into three overarching domains, namely, the
             externalizing, internalizing, and psychotic experience
             domains, which finally aggregate into one dimension of
             psychopathology from low to high: p. Studies show that the
             higher a person scores on p, the worse that person fares on
             measures of family history of psychiatric illness, brain
             function, childhood developmental history, and adult life
             impairment. A dimension of p may help account for ubiquitous
             nonspecificity in psychiatry: multiple disorders share the
             same risk factors and biomarkers and often respond to the
             same therapies. Here, the authors summarize the history of
             the unidimensional idea, review modern research into p,
             demystify statistical models, articulate some implications
             of p for prevention and clinical practice, and outline a
             transdiagnostic research agenda. [AJP AT 175: Remembering
             Our Past As We Envision Our Future October 1910: A Study of
             Association in Insanity Grace Helen Kent and A.J. Rosanoff:
             "No sharp distinction can be drawn between mental health and
             mental disease; a large collection of material shows a
             gradual and not an abrupt transition from the normal state
             to pathological states."(Am J Psychiatry 1910; 67(2):317-390
             )].},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.17121383},
   Key = {fds336496}
}

@article{fds337341,
   Author = {Belsky, DW and Domingue, BW and Wedow, R and Arseneault, L and Boardman,
             JD and Caspi, A and Conley, D and Fletcher, JM and Freese, J and Herd, P and Moffitt, TE and Poulton, R and Sicinski, K and Wertz, J and Harris,
             KM},
   Title = {Genetic analysis of social-class mobility in five
             longitudinal studies.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the
             United States of America},
   Volume = {115},
   Number = {31},
   Pages = {E7275-E7284},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1801238115},
   Abstract = {A summary genetic measure, called a "polygenic score,"
             derived from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of
             education can modestly predict a person's educational and
             economic success. This prediction could signal a biological
             mechanism: Education-linked genetics could encode
             characteristics that help people get ahead in life.
             Alternatively, prediction could reflect social history:
             People from well-off families might stay well-off for social
             reasons, and these families might also look alike
             genetically. A key test to distinguish biological mechanism
             from social history is if people with higher education
             polygenic scores tend to climb the social ladder beyond
             their parents' position. Upward mobility would indicate
             education-linked genetics encodes characteristics that
             foster success. We tested if education-linked polygenic
             scores predicted social mobility in >20,000 individuals in
             five longitudinal studies in the United States, Britain, and
             New Zealand. Participants with higher polygenic scores
             achieved more education and career success and accumulated
             more wealth. However, they also tended to come from
             better-off families. In the key test, participants with
             higher polygenic scores tended to be upwardly mobile
             compared with their parents. Moreover, in sibling-difference
             analysis, the sibling with the higher polygenic score was
             more upwardly mobile. Thus, education GWAS discoveries are
             not mere correlates of privilege; they influence social
             mobility within a life. Additional analyses revealed that a
             mother's polygenic score predicted her child's attainment
             over and above the child's own polygenic score, suggesting
             parents' genetics can also affect their children's
             attainment through environmental pathways. Education GWAS
             discoveries affect socioeconomic attainment through
             influence on individuals' family-of-origin environments and
             their social mobility.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.1801238115},
   Key = {fds337341}
}

@article{fds336492,
   Author = {Belsky, DW and Moffitt, TE and Cohen, AA and Corcoran, DL and Levine,
             ME and Prinz, JA and Schaefer, J and Sugden, K and Williams, B and Poulton,
             R and Caspi, A},
   Title = {Eleven Telomere, Epigenetic Clock, and Biomarker-Composite
             Quantifications of Biological Aging: Do They Measure the
             Same Thing?},
   Journal = {American Journal of Epidemiology},
   Volume = {187},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1220-1230},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwx346},
   Abstract = {The geroscience hypothesis posits that therapies to slow
             biological processes of aging can prevent disease and extend
             healthy years of life. To test such "geroprotective"
             therapies in humans, outcome measures are needed that can
             assess extension of disease-free life span. This need has
             spurred development of different methods to quantify
             biological aging. But different methods have not been
             systematically compared in the same humans. We implemented 7
             methods to quantify biological aging using repeated-measures
             physiological and genomic data in 964 middle-aged humans in
             the Dunedin Study (New Zealand; persons born 1972-1973). We
             studied 11 measures in total: telomere-length and erosion, 3
             epigenetic-clocks and their ticking rates, and 3
             biomarker-composites. Contrary to expectation, we found low
             agreement between different measures of biological aging. We
             next compared associations between biological aging measures
             and outcomes that geroprotective therapies seek to modify:
             physical functioning, cognitive decline, and subjective
             signs of aging, including aged facial appearance. The
             71-cytosine-phosphate-guanine epigenetic clock and biomarker
             composites were consistently related to these aging-related
             outcomes. However, effect sizes were modest. Results
             suggested that various proposed approaches to quantifying
             biological aging may not measure the same aspects of the
             aging process. Further systematic evaluation and refinement
             of measures of biological aging is needed to furnish
             outcomes for geroprotector trials.},
   Doi = {10.1093/aje/kwx346},
   Key = {fds336492}
}

@article{fds336500,
   Author = {Marzi, SJ and Sugden, K and Arseneault, L and Belsky, DW and Burrage, J and Corcoran, DL and Danese, A and Fisher, HL and Hannon, E and Moffitt, TE and Odgers, CL and Pariante, C and Poulton, R and Williams, BS and Wong,
             CCY and Mill, J and Caspi, A},
   Title = {Analysis of DNA Methylation in Young People: Limited
             Evidence for an Association Between Victimization Stress and
             Epigenetic Variation in Blood.},
   Journal = {The American Journal of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {175},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {517-529},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17060693},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:DNA methylation has been proposed as an epigenetic
             mechanism by which early-life experiences become "embedded"
             in the genome and alter transcriptional processes to
             compromise health. The authors sought to investigate whether
             early-life victimization stress is associated with
             genome-wide DNA methylation. METHOD:The authors tested the
             hypothesis that victimization is associated with DNA
             methylation in the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal
             Study, a nationally representative 1994-1995 birth cohort of
             2,232 twins born in England and Wales and assessed at ages
             5, 7, 10, 12, and 18 years. Multiple forms of victimization
             were ascertained in childhood and adolescence (including
             physical, sexual, and emotional abuse; neglect; exposure to
             intimate-partner violence; bullying; cyber-victimization;
             and crime). RESULTS:Epigenome-wide analyses of
             polyvictimization across childhood and adolescence revealed
             few significant associations with DNA methylation in
             peripheral blood at age 18, but these analyses were
             confounded by tobacco smoking and/or did not survive co-twin
             control tests. Secondary analyses of specific forms of
             victimization revealed sparse associations with DNA
             methylation that did not replicate across different
             operationalizations of the same putative victimization
             experience. Hypothesis-driven analyses of six candidate
             genes in the stress response (NR3C1, FKBP5, BDNF, AVP,
             CRHR1, SLC6A4) did not reveal predicted associations with
             DNA methylation in probes annotated to these genes.
             CONCLUSIONS:Findings from this epidemiological analysis of
             the epigenetic effects of early-life stress do not support
             the hypothesis of robust changes in DNA methylation in
             victimized young people. We need to come to terms with the
             possibility that epigenetic epidemiology is not yet well
             matched to experimental, nonhuman models in uncovering the
             biological embedding of stress.},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17060693},
   Key = {fds336500}
}

@article{fds336493,
   Author = {Rasmussen, LJH and Moffitt, TE and Eugen-Olsen, J and Belsky, DW and Danese, A and Harrington, H and Houts, RM and Poulton, R and Sugden, K and Williams, B and Caspi, A},
   Title = {Cumulative childhood risk is associated with a new measure
             of chronic inflammation in adulthood.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12928},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Childhood risk factors are associated with
             elevated inflammatory biomarkers in adulthood, but it is
             unknown whether these risk factors are associated with
             increased adult levels of the chronic inflammation marker
             soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR). We
             aimed to test the hypothesis that childhood exposure to risk
             factors for adult disease is associated with elevated suPAR
             in adulthood and to compare suPAR with the oft-reported
             inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP).
             METHODS:Prospective study of a population-representative
             1972-1973 birth cohort; the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health
             and Development Study observed participants to age
             38 years. Main childhood predictors were poor health,
             socioeconomic disadvantage, adverse childhood experiences
             (ACEs), low IQ, and poor self-control. Main adult outcomes
             were adulthood inflammation measured as suPAR and
             high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP). RESULTS:Participants with
             available plasma samples at age 38 were included (N = 837,
             50.5% male). suPAR (mean 2.40 ng/ml; SD 0.91) was
             positively correlated with hsCRP (r 0.15, p < .001). After
             controlling for sex, body mass index (BMI), and smoking,
             children who experienced more ACEs, lower IQ, or had poorer
             self-control showed elevated adult suPAR. When the five
             childhood risks were aggregated into a Cumulative Childhood
             Risk index, and controlling for sex, BMI, and smoking,
             Cumulative Childhood Risk was associated with higher suPAR
             (b 0.10; SE 0.03; p = .002). Cumulative Childhood Risk
             predicted elevated suPAR, after controlling for hsCRP (b
             0.18; SE 0.03; p < .001). CONCLUSIONS:Exposure to more
             childhood risk factors was associated with higher suPAR
             levels, independent of CRP. suPAR is a useful addition to
             studies connecting childhood risk to adult inflammatory
             burden.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jcpp.12928},
   Key = {fds336493}
}

@article{fds336494,
   Author = {Schaefer, JD and Moffitt, TE and Arseneault, L and Danese, A and Fisher,
             HL and Houts, R and Sheridan, MA and Wertz, J and Caspi,
             A},
   Title = {Adolescent Victimization and Early-Adult Psychopathology:
             Approaching Causal Inference Using a Longitudinal Twin Study
             to Rule Out Noncausal Explanations.},
   Journal = {Clinical Psychological Science : a Journal of the
             Association for Psychological Science},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {352-371},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2167702617741381},
   Abstract = {Adolescence is the peak age for both victimization and
             mental disorder onset. Previous research has reported
             associations between victimization exposure and many
             psychiatric conditions. However, causality remains
             controversial. Within the Environmental Risk Longitudinal
             Twin Study, we tested whether seven types of adolescent
             victimization increased risk of multiple psychiatric
             conditions and approached causal inference by systematically
             ruling out noncausal explanations. Longitudinal
             within-individual analyses showed that victimization was
             followed by increased mental health problems over a
             childhood baseline of emotional/behavioral problems.
             Discordant-twin analyses showed that victimization increased
             risk of mental health problems independent of family
             background and genetic risk. Both childhood and adolescent
             victimization made unique contributions to risk.
             Victimization predicted heightened generalized liability
             (the "p factor") to multiple psychiatric spectra, including
             internalizing, externalizing, and thought disorders. Results
             recommend violence reduction and identification and
             treatment of adolescent victims to reduce psychiatric
             burden.},
   Doi = {10.1177/2167702617741381},
   Key = {fds336494}
}

@article{fds333704,
   Author = {Wertz, J and Caspi, A and Belsky, DW and Beckley, AL and Arseneault, L and Barnes, JC and Corcoran, DL and Hogan, S and Houts, RM and Morgan, N and Odgers, CL and Prinz, JA and Sugden, K and Williams, BS and Poulton, R and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Genetics and Crime: Integrating New Genomic Discoveries Into
             Psychological Research About Antisocial Behavior.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {791-803},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797617744542},
   Abstract = {Drawing on psychological and sociological theories of crime
             causation, we tested the hypothesis that genetic risk for
             low educational attainment (assessed via a genome-wide
             polygenic score) is associated with criminal offending. We
             further tested hypotheses of how polygenic risk relates to
             the development of antisocial behavior from childhood
             through adulthood. Across the Dunedin and Environmental Risk
             (E-Risk) birth cohorts of individuals growing up 20 years
             and 20,000 kilometers apart, education polygenic scores
             predicted risk of a criminal record with modest effects.
             Polygenic risk manifested during primary schooling in lower
             cognitive abilities, lower self-control, academic
             difficulties, and truancy, and it was associated with a
             life-course-persistent pattern of antisocial behavior that
             onsets in childhood and persists into adulthood. Crime is
             central in the nature-nurture debate, and findings reported
             here demonstrate how molecular-genetic discoveries can be
             incorporated into established theories of antisocial
             behavior. They also suggest that improving school
             experiences might prevent genetic influences on crime from
             unfolding.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0956797617744542},
   Key = {fds333704}
}

@article{fds326205,
   Author = {Romer, AL and Knodt, AR and Houts, R and Brigidi, BD and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {Structural alterations within cerebellar circuitry are
             associated with general liability for common mental
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1084-1090},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Abstract = {Accumulating mental-health research encourages a shift in
             focus toward transdiagnostic dimensional features that are
             shared across categorical disorders. In support of this
             shift, recent studies have identified a general liability
             factor for psychopathology-sometimes called the 'p factor'-
             that underlies shared risk for a wide range of mental
             disorders. Identifying neural correlates of this general
             liability would substantiate its importance in
             characterizing the shared origins of mental disorders and
             help us begin to understand the mechanisms through which the
             'p factor' contributes to risk. Here we believe we first
             replicate the 'p factor' using cross-sectional data from a
             volunteer sample of 1246 university students, and then using
             high-resolution multimodal structural neuroimaging, we
             demonstrate that individuals with higher 'p factor' scores
             show reduced structural integrity of white matter pathways,
             as indexed by lower fractional anisotropy values, uniquely
             within the pons. Whole-brain analyses further revealed that
             higher 'p factor' scores are associated with reduced gray
             matter volume in the occipital lobe and left cerebellar
             lobule VIIb, which is functionally connected with prefrontal
             regions supporting cognitive control. Consistent with the
             preponderance of cerebellar afferents within the pons, we
             observed a significant positive correlation between the
             white matter integrity of the pons and cerebellar gray
             matter volume associated with higher 'p factor' scores. The
             results of our analyses provide initial evidence that
             structural alterations in corticocerebellar circuitry
             supporting core functions related to the basic integration,
             coordination and monitoring of information may contribute to
             a general liability for common mental disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Key = {fds326205}
}

@article{fds336499,
   Author = {Beckley, AL and Caspi, A and Arseneault, L and Barnes, JC and Fisher,
             HL and Harrington, H and Houts, R and Morgan, N and Odgers, CL and Wertz,
             J and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {The Developmental Nature of the Victim-Offender
             Overlap.},
   Journal = {Journal of Developmental and Life Course
             Criminology},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {24-49},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40865-017-0068-3},
   Abstract = {Purpose:It is well-established that victims and offenders
             are often the same people, a phenomenon known as the
             victim-offender overlap, but the developmental nature of
             this overlap remains uncertain. In this study, we drew from
             a developmental theoretical framework to test effects of
             genetics, individual characteristics, and
             routine-activity-based risks. Drawing from developmental
             literature, we additionally tested the effect of an
             accumulation of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs).
             Methods:Data came from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk)
             Study, a representative UK birth cohort of 2232 twins born
             in 1994-1995 and followed to age 18 (with 93% retention).
             Crime victimization and offending were assessed through
             self-reports at age 18 (but findings replicated using crime
             records). We used the classical twin study method to
             decompose variance in the victim-offender overlap into
             genetic and environmental components. We used logistic
             regression to test the effects of childhood risk factors.
             Results:In contrast to past twin studies, we found that
             environment (as well as genes) contributed to the
             victim-offender overlap. Our logistic regression results
             showed that childhood low self-control and childhood
             antisocial behavior nearly doubled the odds of becoming a
             victim-offender, compared to a victim-only or an
             offender-only. Each additional ACE increased the odds of
             becoming a victim-offender, compared to a victim-only or an
             offender-only, by approximately 12%, pointing to the
             importance of cumulative childhood adversity.
             Conclusions:This study showed that the victim-offender
             overlap is, at least partially, developmental in nature and
             predictable from personal childhood characteristics and an
             accumulation of many adverse childhood experiences.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s40865-017-0068-3},
   Key = {fds336499}
}

@article{fds328904,
   Author = {Meier, MH and Caspi, A and Danese, A and Fisher, HL and Houts, R and Arseneault, L and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Associations between adolescent cannabis use and
             neuropsychological decline: a longitudinal co-twin control
             study.},
   Journal = {Addiction (Abingdon, England)},
   Volume = {113},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {257-265},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/add.13946},
   Abstract = {This study tested whether adolescents who used cannabis or
             met criteria for cannabis dependence showed
             neuropsychological impairment prior to cannabis initiation
             and neuropsychological decline from before to after cannabis
             initiation.A longitudinal co-twin control study.Participants
             were 1989 twins from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk)
             Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally representative birth
             cohort of twins born in England and Wales from 1994 to
             1995.Frequency of cannabis use and cannabis dependence were
             assessed at age 18. Intelligence quotient (IQ) was obtained
             at ages 5, 12 and 18. Executive functions were assessed at
             age 18.Compared with adolescents who did not use cannabis,
             adolescents who used cannabis had lower IQ in childhood
             prior to cannabis initiation and lower IQ at age 18, but
             there was little evidence that cannabis use was associated
             with IQ decline from ages 12-18. For example, adolescents
             with cannabis dependence had age 12 and age 18 IQ scores
             that were 5.61 (t = -3.11, P = 0.002) and 7.34 IQ points
             (t = -5.27, P < 0.001) lower than adolescents without
             cannabis dependence, but adolescents with cannabis
             dependence did not show greater IQ decline from age 12-18
             (t = -1.27, P = 0.20). Moreover, adolescents who used
             cannabis had poorer executive functions at age 18 than
             adolescents who did not use cannabis, but these associations
             were generally not apparent within twin pairs. For example,
             twins who used cannabis more frequently than their co-twin
             performed similarly to their co-twin on five of six
             executive function tests (Ps > 0.10). The one exception
             was that twins who used cannabis more frequently than their
             co-twin performed worse on one working memory test (Spatial
             Span reversed; β = -0.07, P = 0.036).Short-term
             cannabis use in adolescence does not appear to cause IQ
             decline or impair executive functions, even when cannabis
             use reaches the level of dependence. Family background
             factors explain why adolescent cannabis users perform worse
             on IQ and executive function tests.},
   Doi = {10.1111/add.13946},
   Key = {fds328904}
}

@article{fds331469,
   Author = {Newbury, J and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Odgers,
             CL and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {Cumulative Effects of Neighborhood Social Adversity and
             Personal Crime Victimization on Adolescent Psychotic
             Experiences.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {348-358},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbx060},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Little is known about the impact of urbanicity,
             adverse neighborhood conditions and violent crime
             victimization on the emergence of adolescent psychotic
             experiences. METHODS:Participants were from the
             Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a
             nationally-representative cohort of 2232 British twins who
             were interviewed about adolescent psychotic experiences at
             age 18. Urbanicity, neighborhood characteristics, and
             personal victimization by violent crime were measured during
             childhood and adolescence via geocoded census data, surveys
             of over 5000 immediate neighbors of the E-Risk participants,
             and interviews with participants themselves.
             RESULTS:Adolescents raised in urban vs rural neighborhoods
             were significantly more likely to have psychotic experiences
             (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.21-2.30, P = .002). This association
             remained significant after considering potential confounders
             including family socioeconomic status, family psychiatric
             history, and adolescent substance problems (OR = 1.43, 95%
             CI = 1.01-2.03, P = .042), but became nonsignificant after
             considering adverse social conditions in urban neighborhoods
             such as low social cohesion and high neighborhood disorder
             (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.94-1.92, P = .102). The combined
             association of adverse neighborhood social conditions and
             personal crime victimization with adolescent psychotic
             experiences (adjusted OR = 4.86, 95% CI = 3.28-7.20, P <
             .001) was substantially greater than for either exposure
             alone, highlighting a potential interaction between
             neighborhood conditions and crime victimization (interaction
             contrast ratio = 1.81, 95% CI = -0.03 to 3.65) that was
             significant at the P = .054 level. CONCLUSIONS:Cumulative
             effects of adverse neighborhood social conditions and
             personal victimization by violent crime during upbringing
             partly explain why adolescents in urban settings are more
             likely to report psychotic experiences. Early intervention
             efforts for psychosis could be targeted towards victimized
             youth living in urban and socially adverse
             neighborhoods.},
   Doi = {10.1093/schbul/sbx060},
   Key = {fds331469}
}

@article{fds332385,
   Author = {Beckley, AL and Caspi, A and Broadbent, J and Harrington, H and Houts,
             RM and Poulton, R and Ramrakha, S and Reuben, A and Moffitt,
             TE},
   Title = {Association of Childhood Blood Lead Levels With Criminal
             Offending.},
   Journal = {Jama Pediatrics},
   Volume = {172},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {166-173},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.4005},
   Abstract = {Importance:Lead is a neurotoxin with well-documented effects
             on health. Research suggests that lead may be associated
             with criminal behavior. This association is difficult to
             disentangle from low socioeconomic status, a factor in both
             lead exposure and criminal offending. Objective:To test the
             hypothesis that a higher childhood blood lead level (BLL) is
             associated with greater risk of criminal conviction,
             recidivism (repeat conviction), conviction for violent
             offenses, and variety of self-reported criminal offending in
             a setting where BLL was not associated with low
             socioeconomic status. Design, Setting, and Participants:A
             total of 553 individuals participated in a prospective study
             based on a population-representative cohort born between
             April 1, 1972, and March 31, 1973, from New Zealand; the
             Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study
             observed participants to age 38 years (December 2012).
             Statistical analysis was performed from November 10, 2016,
             to September 5, 2017. Exposures:Blood lead level measured at
             age 11 years. Main Outcomes and Measures:Official criminal
             conviction cumulative to age 38 years (data collected in
             2013), single conviction or recidivism, conviction for
             nonviolent or violent crime, and self-reported variety of
             crime types at ages 15, 18, 21, 26, 32, and 38 years.
             Results:Participants included 553 individuals (255 female
             and 298 male participants) who had their blood tested for
             lead at age 11 years. The mean (SD) BLL at age 11 years was
             11.01 (4.62) μg/dL. A total of 154 participants (27.8%) had
             a criminal conviction, 86 (15.6%) had recidivated, and 53
             (9.6%) had a violent offense conviction. Variety scores for
             self-reported offending ranged from 0 to 10 offense types at
             each assessment; higher numbers indicated greater crime
             involvement. Self-reported offending followed the
             well-established age-crime curve (ie, the mean [SD] variety
             of self-reported offending increased from 1.99 [2.82] at age
             15 years to its peak of 4.24 [3.15] at age 18 years and 4.22
             [3.02] at age 21 years and declined thereafter to 1.10
             [1.59] at age 38 years). Blood lead level was a poor
             discriminator between no conviction and conviction (area
             under the curve, 0.58). Overall, associations between BLL
             and conviction outcomes were weak. The estimated effect of
             BLL was lower for recidivism than for single convictions and
             lower for violent offending than for nonviolent offending.
             Sex-adjusted associations between BLL reached statistical
             significance for only 1 of the 6 self-reported offending
             outcomes at age 15 years (r = 0.10; 95% CI, 0.01-0.18;
             P = .02). Conclusions and Relevance:This study overcomes
             past limitations of studies of BLL and crime by studying the
             association in a place and time where the correlation was
             not confounded by childhood socioeconomic status. Findings
             failed to support a dose-response association between BLL
             and consequential criminal offending.},
   Doi = {10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.4005},
   Key = {fds332385}
}

@article{fds329541,
   Author = {Baldwin, JR and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Fisher, HL and Moffitt,
             TE and Odgers, CL and Pariante, C and Ambler, A and Dove, R and Kepa, A and Matthews, T and Menard, A and Sugden, K and Williams, B and Danese,
             A},
   Title = {Childhood victimization and inflammation in young adulthood:
             A genetically sensitive cohort study.},
   Journal = {Brain, Behavior, and Immunity},
   Volume = {67},
   Pages = {211-217},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2017.08.025},
   Abstract = {Childhood victimization is an important risk factor for
             later immune-related disorders. Previous evidence has
             demonstrated that childhood victimization is associated with
             elevated levels of inflammation biomarkers measured decades
             after exposure. However, it is unclear whether this
             association is (1) already detectable in young people, (2)
             different in males and females, and (3) confounded by
             genetic liability to inflammation. Here we sought to address
             these questions.Participants were 2232 children followed
             from birth to age 18years as part of the Environmental Risk
             (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study. Childhood victimization
             was measured prospectively from birth to age 12years.
             Inflammation was measured through C-reactive protein (CRP)
             levels in dried blood spots at age 18years. Latent genetic
             liability for high inflammation levels was assessed through
             a twin-based method.Greater exposure to childhood
             victimization was associated with higher CRP levels at age
             18 (serum-equivalent means were 0.65 in non-victimized Study
             members, 0.74 in those exposed to one victimization type,
             and 0.81 in those exposed to poly-victimization; p=0.018).
             However, this association was driven by a significant
             association in females (serum-equivalent means were 0.75 in
             non-victimized females, 0.87 in those exposed to one type of
             victimization, and 1.19 in those exposed to
             poly-victimization; p=0.010), while no significant
             association was observed in males (p=0.19). Victimized
             females showed elevated CRP levels independent of latent
             genetic influence, as well as childhood socioeconomic
             status, and waist-hip ratio and body temperature at the time
             of CRP assessment.Childhood victimization is associated with
             elevated CRP levels in young women, independent of latent
             genetic influences and other key risk factors. These results
             strengthen causal inference about the effects of childhood
             victimization on inflammation levels in females by
             accounting for potential genetic confounding.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bbi.2017.08.025},
   Key = {fds329541}
}

@article{fds329982,
   Author = {Newbury, JB and Arseneault, L and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Danese,
             A and Baldwin, JR and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {Measuring childhood maltreatment to predict early-adult
             psychopathology: Comparison of prospective informant-reports
             and retrospective self-reports.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychiatric Research},
   Volume = {96},
   Pages = {57-64},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.09.020},
   Abstract = {Both prospective informant-reports and retrospective
             self-reports may be used to measure childhood maltreatment,
             though both methods entail potential limitations such as
             underestimation and memory biases. The validity and utility
             of standard measures of childhood maltreatment requires
             clarification in order to inform the design of future
             studies investigating the mental health consequences of
             maltreatment. The present study assessed agreement between
             prospective informant-reports and retrospective self-reports
             of childhood maltreatment, as well as the comparative
             utility of both reports for predicting a range of
             psychiatric problems at age 18. Data were obtained from the
             Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a
             nationally-representative birth cohort of 2232 children
             followed to 18 years of age (with 93% retention). Childhood
             maltreatment was assessed in two ways: (i) prospective
             informant-reports from caregivers, researchers, and
             clinicians when children were aged 5, 7, 10 and 12; and (ii)
             retrospective self-reports of maltreatment experiences
             occurring up to age 12, obtained at age 18 using the
             Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Participants were privately
             interviewed at age 18 concerning several psychiatric
             problems including depression, anxiety, self-injury,
             alcohol/cannabis dependence, and conduct disorder. There was
             only slight to fair agreement between prospective and
             retrospective reports of childhood maltreatment (all
             Kappa's ≤ 0.31). Both prospective and retrospective
             reports of maltreatment were associated with age-18
             psychiatric problems, though the strongest associations were
             found when maltreatment was retrospectively self-reported.
             These findings indicate that prospective and retrospective
             reports of childhood maltreatment capture largely
             non-overlapping groups of individuals. Young adults who
             recall being maltreated have a particularly elevated risk
             for psychopathology.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.09.020},
   Key = {fds329982}
}

@article{fds332035,
   Author = {Wertz, J and Agnew-Blais, J and Caspi, A and Danese, A and Fisher, HL and Goldman-Mellor, S and Moffitt, TE and Arseneault,
             L},
   Title = {From Childhood Conduct Problems to Poor Functioning at Age
             18 Years: Examining Explanations in a Longitudinal Cohort
             Study.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {57},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {54-60.e4},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.09.437},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:Childhood conduct problems are associated with
             poor functioning in early adulthood. We tested a series of
             hypotheses to understand the mechanisms underlying this
             association. METHOD:We used data from the Environmental Risk
             (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a birth cohort of 2,232
             twins born in England and Wales in 1994 and 1995, followed
             up to age 18 years with 93% retention. Severe conduct
             problems in childhood were assessed at ages 5, 7, and 10
             years using parent and teacher reports. Poor functioning at
             age 18 years, including cautions and convictions, daily
             cigarette smoking, heavy drinking, and psychosocial
             difficulties, was measured through interviews with
             participants and official crime record searches.
             RESULTS:Participants 18 years old with versus without a
             childhood history of severe conduct problems had greater
             rates of each poor functional outcome, and they were more
             likely to experience multiple poor outcomes. This
             association was partly accounted for by concurrent
             psychopathology in early adulthood, as well as by early
             familial risk factors, both genetic and environmental.
             Childhood conduct problems, however, continued to predict
             poor outcomes at age 18 years after accounting for these
             explanations. CONCLUSION:Children with severe conduct
             problems display poor functioning at age 18 years because of
             concurrent problems in early adulthood and familial risk
             factors originating in childhood. However, conduct problems
             also exert a lasting effect on young people's lives
             independent of these factors, pointing to early conduct
             problems as a target for early interventions aimed at
             preventing poor functional outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2017.09.437},
   Key = {fds332035}
}


%% Chartrand, Tanya L.   
@article{fds336936,
   Author = {Rim, S and Min, KE and Liu, PJ and Chartrand, TL and Trope,
             Y},
   Title = {The Gift of Psychological Closeness: How Feasible Versus
             Desirable Gifts Reduce Psychological Distance to the
             Giver.},
   Journal = {Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin},
   Pages = {146167218784899},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167218784899},
   Abstract = {Gift-giving is a common form of social exchange but little
             research has examined how different gift types affect the
             psychological distance between giver and recipient. We
             examined how two types of gifts influence recipients'
             perceived psychological distance to the giver. Specifically,
             we compared desirable gifts focused on the quality of the
             gift with feasible gifts focused on the gift's practicality
             or ease of use. We found that feasible (vs. desirable) gifts
             led recipients to feel psychologically closer to givers
             (Studies 1-4). Further clarifying the process by which
             receiving a desirable versus feasible gift affects perceived
             distance, when recipients were told that the giver focused
             on the gift's practicality or ease of use (vs. the gift's
             overall quality), while holding the specific features of the
             gifts constant, they felt closer to the gift-giver (Study
             5). These results shed light on how different gifts can
             influence interpersonal relationships.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0146167218784899},
   Key = {fds336936}
}

@article{fds332782,
   Title = {Erratum},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Research},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1174-1174},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucx095},
   Doi = {10.1093/jcr/ucx095},
   Key = {fds332782}
}

@article{fds336937,
   Author = {Duffy, KA and Helzer, EG and Hoyle, RH and Fukukura Helzer and J and Chartrand, TL},
   Title = {Pessimistic expectations and poorer experiences: The role of
             (low) extraversion in anticipated and experienced enjoyment
             of social interaction.},
   Journal = {Plos One},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {e0199146},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0199146},
   Abstract = {Given research suggesting that social interactions are
             beneficial, it is unclear why individuals lower in
             extraversion engage less in social interactions. In this
             study, we test whether individuals lower in extraversion
             reap fewer hedonic rewards from social interactions and
             explore social psychological processes that explain their
             experiences. Before participants socialized, we measured
             extraversion, state positive affect, cognitive capacity, and
             expectations about the social interactions. After
             participants socialized with one another, we measured state
             positive affect and cognitive capacity again as well as fear
             of negative evaluation and belief in limited cognitive
             capacity. Participants also rated the social skillfulness of
             each interaction partner. We found that less extraverted
             individuals expect to feel worse after socializing. However,
             all but those extremely low in extraversion (17% of sample)
             actually experience an increase in positive affect after
             socializing. Surprisingly, those low in extraversion did not
             show reduced cognitive capacity after socializing. Although
             they are more likely to believe that cognitive capacity is
             limited and to be fearful of negative evaluation, these
             characteristics did not explain the social experience of
             those low in extraversion.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0199146},
   Key = {fds336937}
}


%% Coie, John D.   
@article{fds339299,
   Author = {Kassing, F and Godwin, J and Lochman, JE and Coie, JD and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Using Early Childhood Behavior Problems to Predict Adult
             Convictions.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-018-0478-7},
   Abstract = {The current study examined whether teacher and parent
             ratings of externalizing behavior during kindergarten and
             1st grade accurately predicted the presence of adult
             convictions by age 25. Data were collected as part of the
             Fast Track Project. Schools were identified based on poverty
             and crime rates in four locations: Durham, NC, Nashville,
             TN, Seattle, WA, and rural, central PA. Teacher and parent
             screening measures of externalizing behavior were collected
             at the end of kindergarten and 1st grade. ROC curves were
             used to visually depict the tradeoff between sensitivity and
             specificity and best model fit was determined. Five of the
             six combinations of screen scores across time points and
             raters met both the specificity and sensitivity cutoffs for
             a well-performing screening tool. When data were examined
             within each site separately, screen scores performed better
             in sites with high base rates and models including single
             teacher screens accurately predicted convictions. Similarly,
             screen scores performed better and could be used more
             parsimoniously for males, but not females (whose base rates
             were lower in this sample). Overall, results indicated that
             early elementary screens for conduct problems perform
             remarkably well when predicting criminal convictions
             20 years later. However, because of variations in base
             rates, screens operated differently by gender and location.
             The results indicated that for populations with high base
             rates, convictions can be accurately predicted with as
             little as one teacher screen taken during kindergarten or
             1st grade, increasing the cost-effectiveness of preventative
             interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-018-0478-7},
   Key = {fds339299}
}

@article{fds334888,
   Author = {Zheng, Y and Albert, D and McMahon, RJ and Dodge, K and Dick, D and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1) Gene Polymorphism Moderate
             Intervention Effects on the Developmental Trajectory of
             African-American Adolescent Alcohol Abuse.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science : the Official Journal of the Society for
             Prevention Research},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {79-89},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-016-0726-4},
   Abstract = {Accumulative evidence from recent genotype × intervention
             studies suggests that individuals carrying susceptible
             genotypes benefit more from intervention and provides one
             avenue to identify subgroups that respond differentially to
             intervention. This study examined the moderation by
             glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) gene variants of
             intervention effects on the developmental trajectories of
             alcohol abuse through adolescence. Participants were
             randomized into Fast Track intervention and control groups
             self-reported past-year alcohol abuse annually from grade 7
             through 2 years post-high school and provided genotype data
             at age 21 (69% males; European Americans [EAs] = 270,
             African-Americans [AAs] = 282). Latent growth curve
             models were fit to examine developmental trajectories of
             alcohol abuse. The interactions of 10 single nucleotide
             polymorphisms (SNPs) in NR3C1 with intervention were
             examined separately. Both EAs and AAs showed significant
             increases in past-year alcohol abuse with substantial
             inter-individual differences in rates of linear growth. AAs
             showed lower general levels and slower rates of linear
             growth than EAs. Adjusting for multiple tests, one NR3C1 SNP
             (rs12655166) significantly moderated intervention effects on
             the developmental trajectories of alcohol abuse among AAs.
             Intervention effects on the rates of linear growth were
             stronger among AAs carrying minor alleles than those not
             carrying minor alleles. The findings highlight the
             importance of taking a developmental perspective on
             adolescent alcohol use and have implications for future
             intervention design and evaluation by identifying subgroups
             that could disproportionally benefit from
             intervention.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-016-0726-4},
   Key = {fds334888}
}


%% Compton, Scott N.   
@article{fds340611,
   Author = {Carpenter, KLH and Baranek, GT and Copeland, WE and Compton, S and Zucker, N and Dawson, G and Egger, HL},
   Title = {Sensory Over-Responsivity: An Early Risk Factor for Anxiety
             and Behavioral Challenges in Young Children.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-018-0502-y},
   Abstract = {Anxiety disorders are prevalent and significantly impact
             young children and their families. One hypothesized risk
             factor for anxiety is heightened responses to sensory input.
             Few studies have explored this hypothesis prospectively.
             This study had two goals: (1) examine whether sensory
             over-responsivity is predictive of the development of
             anxiety in a large prospective sample of children, and (2)
             identify whether anxiety mediates the relationship between
             sensory over-responsivity and behavioral challenges.
             Children's sensory and anxiety symptoms were assessed in a
             community sample of 917 at 2-5 and again in 191 of these
             children at 6 years old. Parents also reported on a number
             of additional behavioral challenges previously found to be
             associated with both sensory over-responsivity and anxiety
             separately: irritability, food selectivity, sleep problems,
             and gastrointestinal problems. Forty three percent of
             preschool children with sensory over-responsivity also had a
             concurrent impairing anxiety disorder. Preschool sensory
             over-responsivity symptoms significantly and positively
             predicted anxiety symptoms at age six. This relationship was
             both specific and unidirectional. Finally, school-age
             anxiety symptoms mediated the relationship between preschool
             sensory over-responsivity symptoms and both irritability and
             sleep problems at school-age. These results suggest sensory
             over-responsivity is a risk factor for anxiety disorders.
             Furthermore, children who have symptoms of sensory
             over-responsivity as preschoolers have higher levels of
             anxiety symptoms at school-age, which in turn is associated
             with increased levels of school-age behavioral
             challenges.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-018-0502-y},
   Key = {fds340611}
}

@article{fds339604,
   Author = {Bushnell, GA and Gaynes, BN and Compton, SN and Dusetzina, SB and Brookhart, MA and Stürmer, T},
   Title = {Incidence of mental health hospitalizations, treated
             self-harm, and emergency room visits following new anxiety
             disorder diagnoses in privately insured U.S.
             children.},
   Journal = {Depression and Anxiety},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/da.22849},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Anxiety disorders are one of the most common
             mental illnesses in children and associated with high
             healthcare utilization. We aimed to estimate 2-year
             cumulative incidence of mental health-related
             hospitalizations, treated self-harm, and emergency room (ER)
             visits in children newly diagnosed with anxiety disorders
             and, for context, in children without anxiety disorders.
             METHODS:We identified commercially insured treatment naïve
             children (3-17 years) with a new office-based anxiety
             disorder diagnosis (ICD-9-CM) from 2005-2014 in the
             MarketScan claims database. We followed children for up to 2
             years after diagnosis for the first of each event: mental
             health-related hospitalization, inpatient, treated
             self-harm, and ER visits (any, anxiety-related,
             injury-related). Children without anxiety diagnoses were
             included as comparators, matched on age, sex, date, and
             region. We estimated cumulative incidence of each event
             using Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS:From 2005-2014, we
             identified 198,450 children with a new anxiety diagnosis.
             One-year after anxiety diagnosis, 2.0% of children had a
             mental health-related hospitalization, 0.08% inpatient,
             treated self-harm, 1.4% anxiety-related ER visit, and 20%
             any ER visit; incidence was highest in older children with
             baseline comorbid depression. One-year cumulative incidence
             of each event was lower in the comparison cohort without
             anxiety (e.g., mental health-related hospitalizations = 0.5%,
             treated self-harm = 0.01%, and ER visits = 13%).
             CONCLUSIONS:Given the prevalence of anxiety disorders,
             2-year incidence estimates translate to a significant number
             of children experiencing each event. Our findings offer
             caregivers, providers, and patients information to better
             understand the burden of anxiety disorders and can help
             anticipate healthcare utilization and inform efforts to
             prevent these serious events.},
   Doi = {10.1002/da.22849},
   Key = {fds339604}
}

@article{fds339514,
   Author = {Gonzalez, A and Rozenman, M and Langley, AK and Kendall, PC and Ginsburg, GS and Compton, S and Walkup, JT and Birmaher, B and Albano,
             AM and Piacentini, J},
   Title = {Correction to: Social Interpretation Bias in Children and
             Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders: Psychometric Examination
             of the Self-report of Ambiguous Social Situations for Youth
             (SASSY) Scale},
   Journal = {Child & Youth Care Forum},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {769-770},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature America, Inc},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10566-018-9466-x},
   Abstract = {© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of
             Springer Nature. The original version of this article
             unfortunately contains the following errors. This has been
             corrected with this erratum.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10566-018-9466-x},
   Key = {fds339514}
}

@article{fds337698,
   Author = {Swan, AJ and Kendall, PC and Olino, T and Ginsburg, G and Keeton, C and Compton, S and Piacentini, J and Peris, T and Sakolsky, D and Birmaher,
             B and Albano, AM},
   Title = {Results from the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal
             Longitudinal Study (CAMELS): Functional outcomes.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {86},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {738-750},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000334},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:To report functional outcomes from the multisite
             Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Extended Long-term Study
             (CAMELS), which examined the impact of youth anxiety
             treatment (cognitive-behavioral therapy [CBT], coping cat;
             Sertraline, SRT; COMB [CBT + SRT]; pill placebo) on (a)
             global and (b) domain-specific functioning assessed an
             average of 3.1 times, 3- to 12-years postrandomization
             (first assessment = mean 6.5 years postrandomization).
             METHOD:Three-hundred and 19 of 488 families from the
             Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS; Walkup et
             al., 2008) participated. Growth curve modeling examined the
             impact of treatment condition and acute treatment outcomes
             (i.e., response, remission) on global functioning, global
             and domain-specific impairment, and life satisfaction across
             follow-up visits. Logistic regressions explored the impact
             of treatment remission and condition on low frequency events
             (arrests/convictions) and education. RESULTS:Treatment
             responders and remitters demonstrated better global
             functioning, decreased overall impairment, and increased
             life satisfaction at follow-up. Treatment remission, but not
             response, predicted decreased domain-specific impairment
             (social relationships, self-care/independence, academic
             functioning), and maintenance of increased life satisfaction
             across follow-ups. Participants in the CBT condition,
             compared with pill placebo, demonstrated improved
             trajectories pertaining to life satisfaction, overall
             impairment, and impairment in academic functioning.
             Randomization to CBT or COMB treatment was associated with
             increasing employment rates. Trajectories for participants
             randomized to SRT was not significantly different from
             placebo. Treatment outcome and condition did not predict
             legal outcomes, school/work variables, or family life.
             CONCLUSION:Positive early intervention outcomes are
             associated with improved overall functioning, life
             satisfaction, and functioning within specific domains 6.5
             years posttreatment. Treatment type differentially predicted
             trajectories of functioning. Findings support the positive
             impact of pediatric anxiety treatment into adolescence and
             early adulthood. (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/ccp0000334},
   Key = {fds337698}
}

@article{fds337699,
   Author = {Villabø, MA and Narayanan, M and Compton, SN and Kendall, PC and Neumer, S-P},
   Title = {Cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth anxiety: An
             effectiveness evaluation in community practice.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {86},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {751-764},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000326},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:To compare the effectiveness of individual
             cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT) and group CBT (GCBT) for
             referred children with anxiety disorders within community
             mental health clinics. METHOD:Children (N = 165; ages 7-13
             years) referred to 5 clinics in Norway because of primary
             separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social anxiety disorder
             (SOC), or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) based on
             Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th
             ed., text rev.) criteria participated in a randomized
             clinical trial. Participants were randomized to ICBT, GCBT,
             or wait list (WL). WL participants were randomized to 1 of
             the 2 active treatment conditions following the wait period.
             Primary outcome was loss of principal anxiety disorder over
             12 weeks and 2-year follow-up. RESULTS:Both ICBT and GCBT
             were superior to WL on all outcomes. In the intent-to-treat
             analysis, 52% in ICBT, 65% in GCBT, and 14% in WL were
             treatment responders. Planned pairwise comparisons found no
             significant differences between ICBT and GCBT. GCBT was
             superior to ICBT for children diagnosed with SOC.
             Improvement continued during 2-year follow-up with no
             significant between-groups differences. CONCLUSIONS:Among
             anxiety disordered children, both individual and group CBT
             can be effectively delivered in community clinics. Response
             rates were similar to those reported in efficacy trials.
             Although GCBT was more effective than ICBT for children with
             SOC following treatment, both treatments were comparable at
             2-year follow-up. Dropout rates were lower in GCBT than in
             ICBT, suggesting that GCBT may be better tolerated. Response
             rates continued to improve over the follow-up period, with
             low rates of relapse. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/ccp0000326},
   Key = {fds337699}
}

@article{fds336055,
   Author = {Ginsburg, GS and Becker-Haimes, EM and Keeton, C and Kendall, PC and Iyengar, S and Sakolsky, D and Albano, AM and Peris, T and Compton, SN and Piacentini, J},
   Title = {Results From the Child/Adolescent Anxiety
             Multimodal Extended Long-Term Study (CAMELS): Primary
             Anxiety Outcomes.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {57},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {471-480},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2018.03.017},
   Abstract = {To report anxiety outcomes from the multisite
             Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Extended Long-term Study
             (CAMELS). Rates of stable anxiety remission (defined
             rigorously as the absence of all DSM-IV TR anxiety disorders
             across all follow-up years) and predictors of anxiety
             remission across a 4-year period, beginning 4 to 12 years
             after randomization to 12 weeks of medication,
             cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), their combination, or
             pill placebo were examined. Examined predictors of remission
             included acute treatment response, treatment assignment,
             baseline child and family variables, and interim negative
             life events.Data were from 319 youths (age range 10.9-25.2
             years; mean age 17.12 years) originally diagnosed with
             separation, social, and/or generalized anxiety disorders and
             enrolled in the multi-site Child/Adolescent Anxiety
             Multimodal Study (CAMS). Participants were assessed annually
             by independent evaluators using the age-appropriate version
             of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule and completed
             questionnaires (eg, about family functioning, life events,
             and mental health service use).Almost 22% of youth were in
             stable remission, 30% were chronically ill, and 48% were
             relapsers. Acute treatment responders were less likely to be
             in the chronically ill group (odds ratio = 2.73; confidence
             interval = 1.14-6.54; p < .02); treatment type was not
             associated with remission status across the follow-up.
             Several variables (eg, male gender) predicted stable
             remission from anxiety disorders.Findings suggest that acute
             positive response to anxiety treatment may reduce risk for
             chronic anxiety disability; identified predictors can help
             tailor treatments to youth at greatest risk for chronic
             illness.Child and Adolescent Anxiety Disorders (CAMS).
             http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT00052078.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2018.03.017},
   Key = {fds336055}
}

@article{fds336056,
   Author = {Kiff, CJ and Ernestus, S and Gonzalez, A and Kendall, PC and Albano, AM and Compton, SN and Birmaher, B and Ginsburg, GS and Rynn, M and Walkup, JT and McCracken, J and Piacentini, J},
   Title = {The Interplay of Familial and Individual Risk in Predicting
             Clinical Improvements in Pediatric Anxiety
             Disorders.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the
             Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and
             Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association,
             Division 53},
   Pages = {1-13},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2018.1460848},
   Abstract = {Bioecological models of developmental psychopathology
             underscore the role of familial experiences of adversity and
             children's individual-level characteristics in heightening
             risk for pediatric anxiety through direct, combined, and
             interactive effects. To date, much of the existing research
             dedicated to pediatric anxiety disorders has largely been
             examined in bioecological models of diathesis-stress using
             community samples. This study extends our understanding of
             children's differential responsiveness to familial adversity
             by examining the diathesis-stress interaction of cumulative
             risk and children's individual-level vulnerabilities
             (negative affectivity and coping efficacy) within a
             clinic-referred treatment study for pediatric anxiety
             disorders. A cumulative risk index assessing exposure to
             familial adversity (e.g., socioeconomic status [SES], parent
             psychiatric illness) and self-reported measures of
             children's negative affectivity and coping efficacy were
             each measured at the intake of a randomized controlled
             clinical trial for the treatment of pediatric anxiety
             disorders (N = 488; 7-17 years of age). Trajectories of
             interviewer-rated anxiety symptoms were assessed across 12
             weeks of treatment at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and
             12 weeks. Consistent with models of temperamental risk for
             mental health problems, negative affectivity predicted
             higher anxiety symptoms at intake. A significant
             diathesis-stress interaction between cumulative risk and
             coping efficacy emerged, as high risk and perceptions of
             lower coping efficacy attenuated declines in anxiety across
             12 weeks. These patterns did not differ across treatment
             conditions. The results indicate that for youth experiencing
             high levels of stress, additional treatment efforts
             targeting familial stressors and coping efficacy may be
             important in maximizing treatment outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374416.2018.1460848},
   Key = {fds336056}
}

@article{fds336057,
   Author = {Bushnell, GA and Brookhart, MA and Gaynes, BN and Compton, SN and Dusetzina, SB and Stürmer, T},
   Title = {Examining Parental Medication Adherence as a Predictor of
             Child Medication Adherence in Pediatric Anxiety
             Disorders.},
   Journal = {Medical Care},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {510-519},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/mlr.0000000000000911},
   Abstract = {Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the
             recommended first-line pharmacotherapy for pediatric anxiety
             disorders but adherence remains difficult to predict.To
             estimate SSRI adherence in children with anxiety disorders
             and determine if prior parental medication adherence is
             predictive of child high SSRI adherence.We identified
             children (3-17 y) initiating SSRI treatment after an
             anxiety disorder diagnosis in a commercial claims database
             (2005-2014). We evaluated parent SSRI, statin, and
             antihypertensive adherence [6-mo proportion days covered
             (PDC), high adherence=PDC≥0.80] in the year before child
             SSRI initiation. We estimated risk differences (RD) of child
             high SSRI adherence (6-mo PDC) stratified by parent
             adherence and multivariable risk ratios using modified
             Poisson regression. We estimated change in c-statistic and
             risk reclassification when adding parent-level covariates
             with child-level covariates to predict child adherence.In
             70,979 children with an anxiety disorder (59%=female,
             14=median age), the mean 6-month SSRI PDC was 0.72, with
             variation by anxiety disorder. Overall 64% of children had
             high adherence if their parent had high SSRI adherence
             versus 53% of children with parents with low SSRI adherence
             (RD, 12%; multivariable risk ratios, 1.17; 95% confidence
             interval, 1.14-1.20). Findings were similar for parent
             statin (RD=10%) and antihypertensive adherence (RD=8%) and
             when stratified by child age and parent sex. There was minor
             improvement in risk reclassification and the c-statistic
             after adding parent adherence and parent-level
             covariates.Parental medication adherence could help
             providers identify children at risk of nonadherence to
             inform the treatment decision, reduce unnecessary medication
             switches, and lead to broader effective interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1097/mlr.0000000000000911},
   Key = {fds336057}
}

@article{fds336058,
   Author = {Palitz, SA and Caporino, NE and McGuire, JF and Piacentini, J and Albano, AM and Birmaher, B and Walkup, JT and Compton, SN and Ginsburg,
             GS and Kendall, PC},
   Title = {Defining Treatment Response and Remission in Youth Anxiety:
             A Signal Detection Analysis With the Multidimensional
             Anxiety Scale for Children.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {57},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {418-427},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2018.03.013},
   Abstract = {To determine the percent reduction cutoffs on the
             Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC) that
             optimally predict treatment response and remission in youth
             with anxiety disorders.Youths and their parents completed
             the MASC-C/P before and after treatment, and the Anxiety
             Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV-Child and Parent
             Versions (ADIS-IV-C/P) and the Clinical Global
             Impression-Improvement Scale (CGI-I) were administered by
             independent evaluators. Treatment response and remission
             were defined by post-treatment ratings on the CGI-I and the
             ADIS-IV-C/P, respectively. Quality receiver operating
             characteristic methods determined the optimal cutoff on the
             MASC-P for predicting overall remission (loss of all study
             entry diagnoses) and optimal percent reductions on the
             MASC-P for predicting treatment response and remission of
             separation anxiety, social anxiety, and generalized
             anxiety.A post-treatment raw score of 42 optimally predicted
             remission. A reduction of 35% on the total MASC-P predicted
             treatment response. A reduction of 30% on the Separation
             Anxiety/Panic subscale of the MASC-P predicted separation
             anxiety remission. A reduction of 35% on the Social Anxiety
             subscale of the MASC-P predicted social anxiety remission.
             The MASC did not evidence a cutoff for remission of
             generalized anxiety disorder.MASC cutoffs can facilitate
             comparison across studies and guide practice, aiding
             clinicians in assessing progress and informing treatment
             plans.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2018.03.013},
   Key = {fds336058}
}

@article{fds328085,
   Author = {Selles, RR and Franklin, M and Sapyta, J and Compton, SN and Tommet, D and Jones, RN and Garcia, A and Freeman, J},
   Title = {Children's and Parents' Ability to Tolerate Child Distress:
             Impact on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric
             Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.},
   Journal = {Child Psychiatry and Human Development},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {308-316},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10578-017-0748-6},
   Abstract = {The present study explored the concept of tolerance for
             child distress in 46 children (ages 5-8), along with their
             mothers and fathers, who received family-based CBT for OCD.
             The study sought to describe baseline tolerance, changes in
             tolerance with treatment, and the predictive impact of
             tolerance on symptom improvement. Tolerance was rated by
             clinicians on a single item and the CY-BOCS was used to
             measure OCD severity. Descriptive results suggested that all
             participants had some difficulty tolerating the child's
             distress at baseline while paired t tests indicated large
             improvements were made over treatment (d = 1.2-2.0).
             Fathers' initial tolerance was significantly related to
             symptom improvement in a multivariate regression as were
             fathers' and children's changes in distress tolerance over
             the course of treatment. Overall, results provide support
             for examining tolerance of child distress including its
             predictive impact and potential as a supplemental
             intervention target.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10578-017-0748-6},
   Key = {fds328085}
}

@article{fds336059,
   Author = {Bushnell, GA and Compton, SN and Dusetzina, SB and Gaynes, BN and Brookhart, MA and Walkup, JT and Rynn, MA and Stürmer,
             T},
   Title = {Treating Pediatric Anxiety: Initial Use of SSRIs and Other
             Antianxiety Prescription Medications.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/jcp.16m11415},
   Abstract = {Multiple pharmacotherapies for treating anxiety disorders
             exist, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors
             (SSRIs), the recommended first-line pharmacotherapy for
             pediatric anxiety. We sought to describe initial antianxiety
             medication use in children and estimate how long antianxiety
             medications were continued.In a large commercial claims
             database, we identified children (3-17 years) initiating
             prescription antianxiety medication from 2004 to 2014 with a
             recent anxiety diagnosis (ICD-9-CM = 293.84, 300.0x, 300.2x,
             300.3x, 309.21, 309.81, 313.23). We estimated the proportion
             of children initiating each medication class across the
             study period and used multivariable regression to evaluate
             factors associated with initiation with an SSRI. We
             evaluated treatment length for each initial medication
             class.Of 84,500 children initiating antianxiety medication,
             70% initiated with an SSRI (63% [95% CI, 62%-63%] SSRI
             alone, 7% [95% CI, 7%-7%] SSRI + another antianxiety
             medication). Non-SSRI medications initiated included
             benzodiazepines (8%), non-SSRI antidepressants (7%),
             hydroxyzine (4%), and atypical antipsychotics (3%). Anxiety
             disorder, age, provider type, and comorbid diagnoses were
             associated with initial medication class. The proportion of
             children refilling their initial medication ranged from 19%
             (95% CI, 18%-20%) of hydroxyzine initiators and 25% (95% CI,
             24%-26%) of benzodiazepine initiators to 81% (95% CI,
             80%-81%) of SSRI initiators. Over half (55%, 95% CI,
             55%-56%) of SSRI initiators continued SSRI treatment for 6
             months.SSRIs are the most commonly used first-line
             medication for pediatric anxiety disorders, with about half
             of SSRI initiators continuing treatment for 6 months. Still,
             a third began therapy on a non-SSRI medication, for which
             there is limited evidence of effectiveness for pediatric
             anxiety, and a notable proportion of children initiated with
             2 antianxiety medication classes.},
   Doi = {10.4088/jcp.16m11415},
   Key = {fds336059}
}

@article{fds327202,
   Author = {Hale, AE and Ginsburg, GS and Chan, G and Kendall, PC and McCracken, JT and Sakolsky, D and Birmaher, B and Compton, SN and Albano, AM and Walkup,
             JT},
   Title = {Mediators of Treatment Outcomes for Anxious Children and
             Adolescents: The Role of Somatic Symptoms.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the
             Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and
             Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association,
             Division 53},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {94-104},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2017.1280804},
   Abstract = {Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and selective serotonin
             reuptake inhibitors are effective treatments for pediatric
             anxiety disorders. However, the mechanisms of these
             treatments are unknown. Previous research indicated that
             somatic symptoms are reduced following treatment, but it is
             unclear if their reductions are merely a consequence of
             treatment gains. This study examined reductions in somatic
             symptoms as a potential mediator of the relationship between
             treatment and anxiety outcomes. Participants were 488
             anxious youth ages 7-17 (M = 10.7), 50.4% male, 78.9%
             Caucasian, enrolled in Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal
             Study, a large randomized control trial comparing 12-week
             treatments of CBT, sertraline, a combination of CBT and
             sertraline, and a pill placebo. Causal mediation models were
             tested in R using data from baseline, 8-, and 12-week
             evaluations. Somatic symptoms were assessed using the
             Panic/Somatic subscale from the Screen for Child Anxiety
             Related Emotional Disorders. Youth outcomes were assessed
             using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale and Children's
             Global Assessment Scale. Reductions in somatic symptoms
             mediated improvement in anxiety symptoms and global
             functioning for those in the sertraline-only condition based
             on parent report. Conditions involving CBT and data based on
             child reported somatic symptoms did not show a mediation
             effect. Findings indicate that reductions in somatic
             symptoms may be a mediator of improvements for treatments
             including pharmacotherapy and not CBT. Although the overall
             efficacy of sertraline and CBT for anxiety may be similar,
             the treatments appear to function via different
             mechanisms.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374416.2017.1280804},
   Key = {fds327202}
}


%% Cooper, Harris M.   
@article{fds338424,
   Author = {Appelbaum, M and Cooper, H and Kline, RB and Mayo-Wilson, E and Nezu,
             AM and Rao, SM},
   Title = {Intent of reporting standards: Reply to Rossiter
             (2018).},
   Journal = {American Psychologist},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {932},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000370},
   Abstract = {In this reply to Rossiter (2018), we note that the goal of
             developing Journal Article Reporting Standards has been to
             specify the kinds of information that should be provided to
             the readers of scientific articles in order to allow maximal
             understanding of the work being reported-in the case of
             psychometrics, information that demonstrates the underlying
             adequacy of the measures used in the research being
             reported. Although we illustrate some kinds of items that
             might be utilized to make these demonstrations, the
             illustrations are not proscriptive. (PsycINFO Database
             Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).},
   Doi = {10.1037/amp0000370},
   Key = {fds338424}
}

@article{fds332043,
   Author = {Appelbaum, M and Cooper, H and Kline, RB and Mayo-Wilson, E and Nezu,
             AM and Rao, SM},
   Title = {Journal article reporting standards for quantitative
             research in psychology: The APA Publications and
             Communications Board task force report.},
   Journal = {American Psychologist},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3-25},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000191},
   Abstract = {Following a review of extant reporting standards for
             scientific publication, and reviewing 10 years of experience
             since publication of the first set of reporting standards by
             the American Psychological Association (APA; APA
             Publications and Communications Board Working Group on
             Journal Article Reporting Standards, 2008), the APA Working
             Group on Quantitative Research Reporting Standards
             recommended some modifications to the original standards.
             Examples of modifications include division of hypotheses,
             analyses, and conclusions into 3 groupings (primary,
             secondary, and exploratory) and some changes to the section
             on meta-analysis. Several new modules are included that
             report standards for observational studies, clinical trials,
             longitudinal studies, replication studies, and N-of-1
             studies. In addition, standards for analytic methods with
             unique characteristics and output (structural equation
             modeling and Bayesian analysis) are included. These
             proposals were accepted by the Publications and
             Communications Board of APA and supersede the standards
             included in the 6th edition of the Publication Manual of the
             American Psychological Association (APA, 2010). (PsycINFO
             Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/amp0000191},
   Key = {fds332043}
}


%% Costanzo, Philip R.   
@article{fds335642,
   Author = {Hussong, AM and Langley, HA and Rothenberg, WA and Coffman, JL and Halberstadt, AG and Costanzo, PR and Mokrova, I},
   Title = {Raising grateful children one day at a time},
   Journal = {Applied Developmental Science},
   Pages = {1-14},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2018.1441713},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Taylor & Francis We examined micro developmental
             processes related to the socialization of children's
             gratitude by testing whether parents who engage in more
             frequent daily socialization practices targeting children's
             gratitude reported more frequent gratitude displays by their
             children after controlling for potential confounds. 101
             parent-child dyads completed a baseline lab visit followed
             by a seven-day diary study. Using multi-level modeling, we
             found that parents who engaged in more frequent gratitude
             socialization acts reported more frequent displays of
             gratitude by their children across the seven-days
             (between-dyad effect) and that on days when a parent engaged
             in more socialization acts than usual parents reported
             relative increases in gratitude displays by their children
             (within-dyad effect). These findings show that parent
             socialization acts are associated with children’s
             displayed gratitude and point to the need for future work to
             explore reactive and proactive parent-child interactions
             that may underlie these associations as well as associations
             between micro-developmental and macro-developmental
             processes.},
   Doi = {10.1080/10888691.2018.1441713},
   Key = {fds335642}
}

@article{fds337726,
   Author = {Hussong, AM and Langley, HA and Thomas, TE and Coffman, JL and Halberstadt, AG and Costanzo, PR and Rothenberg,
             WA},
   Title = {Measuring gratitude in children},
   Journal = {The Journal of Positive Psychology},
   Pages = {1-13},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17439760.2018.1497692},
   Abstract = {© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &
             Francis Group. Gratitude is a rich socioemotional construct
             that emerges over development beginning in early childhood.
             Existing measures of children’s gratitude as a trait or
             behavior may be limited because they do not capture
             different aspects of gratitude moments (i.e. awareness,
             thoughts, feelings, and actions) and the way that these
             facets appear in children. The current study evaluates a
             battery of new measures assessing children’s gratitude to
             address these limitations. Parent-child dyads (N = 101;
             children aged 6–9) completed a lab-based assessment
             followed by a 7-day online parental diary and 18-month
             follow-up survey. In addition to newly developed measures of
             children’s gratitude, the battery included indicators of
             convergent, concurrent, divergent, and predictive validity.
             Results demonstrate the complexity of gratitude as a
             construct and the relative benefits and limits of various
             assessment modalities. Implications for the measurement of
             children’s gratitude and suggestions for future research
             on the development of gratitude are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1080/17439760.2018.1497692},
   Key = {fds337726}
}


%% Costello, Elizabeth J.   
@article{fds337359,
   Author = {Eg, J and Bilenberg, N and Costello, EJ and Wesselhoeft,
             R},
   Title = {Self- and parent-reported depressive symptoms rated by the
             mood and feelings questionnaire.},
   Journal = {Psychiatry Research},
   Volume = {268},
   Pages = {419-425},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2018.07.016},
   Abstract = {The Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ) was developed to
             measure depressive symptoms in children and adolescents. It
             includes a self-report and a parent-report part. This study
             set out to test the psychometric properties of the MFQ in a
             Danish population of children and adolescents.The study
             included a population-based sample of n = 992
             individuals aged 9-17 years and n = 703 parents from
             five schools. The internal consistencies of both MFQ
             versions were excellent with high alpha coefficients. With
             few exceptions, correlation between items and the total
             score was moderate to high. Vegetative symptoms were among
             the lowest correlating items while cognitive symptoms were
             among the highest. Girls reported more depressive symptoms
             than boys, and reports from offspring indicated more
             depressive symptoms than reports from parents. There was no
             difference in depressive symptoms by respondents aged 9 to
             11 compared to respondents aged 12 to 17 in schools where
             all pupils participated. However, in schools where pupils
             participated by choice, an increase in depressive symptoms
             by age was found. This study suggests that MFQ is reliable
             for evaluating depressive symptoms in a population of
             children and adolescents. Furthermore, it is of clinical
             relevance that parents tend to underreport depressive
             symptoms of their offspring.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psychres.2018.07.016},
   Key = {fds337359}
}

@article{fds333242,
   Author = {Akee, R and Copeland, W and Costello, EJ and Simeonova,
             E},
   Title = {How Does Household Income Affect Child Personality Traits
             and Behaviors?},
   Journal = {American Economic Review},
   Volume = {108},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {775-827},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1257/aer.20160133},
   Abstract = {We examine the effects of a quasi-experimental unconditional
             household income transfer on child emotional and behavioral
             health and personality traits. Using longitudinal data, we
             find that there are large beneficial effects on children's
             emotional and behavioral health and personality traits
             during adolescence. We find evidence that these effects are
             most pronounced for children who start out with the lowest
             initial endowments. The income intervention also results in
             improvements in parental relationships which we interpret as
             a potential mechanism behind our findings.},
   Doi = {10.1257/aer.20160133},
   Key = {fds333242}
}


%% Curry, John F.   
@article{fds337454,
   Author = {Donoho, CJ and LeardMann, C and O'Malley, CA and Walter, KH and Riviere,
             LA and Curry, JF and Adler, AB},
   Title = {Depression among military spouses: Demographic, military,
             and service member psychological health risk
             factors.},
   Journal = {Depression and Anxiety},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1137-1144},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/da.22820},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:More than a decade of war has strained service
             members and their families and the psychological health of
             military spouses is a concern. This study uses data from the
             largest study of military families in the United States to
             examine the demographic, military-specific, and service
             member mental health correlates of probable diagnosis of
             major depressive disorder (MDD) among military spouses.
             METHODS:Data were from service member-spouse dyads from all
             branches of the U.S. military. Demographic and
             military-specific factors were assessed using administrative
             personnel records and survey data. RESULTS:Of the 9,038
             spouses, 4.9% had a probable diagnosis of MDD. In unadjusted
             models, spouses of service members who deployed and
             experiencecd combat-related events, were enlisted, had a
             probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis, or
             screened positive for alcohol misuse were more likely to
             screen positive for MDD. In adjusted models, only spouses
             married to enlisted service members or those with PTSD had
             increased risk for MDD. Other demographic and
             military-related factors associated with MDD in spouses
             included less educational attainment, unemployment, having
             four or more children, and having prior military service
             (although not currently serving in the military) in the
             adjusted models. CONCLUSIONS:Findings characterize
             demographic, military, and service member psychological
             health factors that are associated with depression among
             military spouses. These findings imply that deployment alone
             may not negatively affect military spouses, but rather it
             may be the mental health impact on the service member,
             especially PTSD that increases the odds for MDD among
             military spouses.},
   Doi = {10.1002/da.22820},
   Key = {fds337454}
}

@article{fds336065,
   Author = {Curry, JF and Kiser, LJ and Fernandez, PE and Elliott, AV and Dowling,
             LM},
   Title = {Development and initial piloting of a measure of
             post-deployment parenting reintegration experiences.},
   Journal = {Professional Psychology: Research and Practice},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {159-166},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pro0000185},
   Doi = {10.1037/pro0000185},
   Key = {fds336065}
}


%% Dawson, Geraldine   
@article{fds339307,
   Author = {Manfredonia, J and Bangerter, A and Manyakov, NV and Ness, S and Lewin,
             D and Skalkin, A and Boice, M and Goodwin, MS and Dawson, G and Hendren, R and Leventhal, B and Shic, F and Pandina, G},
   Title = {Automatic Recognition of Posed Facial Expression of Emotion
             in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder.},
   Journal = {Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {279-293},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-018-3757-9},
   Abstract = {Facial expression is impaired in autism spectrum disorder
             (ASD), but rarely systematically studied. We focus on the
             ability of individuals with ASD to produce facial
             expressions of emotions in response to a verbal prompt. We
             used the Janssen Autism Knowledge Engine (JAKE®), including
             automated facial expression analysis software (FACET) to
             measure facial expressions in individuals with ASD
             (n = 144) and a typically developing (TD) comparison
             group (n = 41). Differences in ability to produce facial
             expressions were observed between ASD and TD groups,
             demonstrated by activation of facial action units (happy,
             scared, surprised, disgusted, but not angry or sad).
             Activation of facial action units correlated with
             parent-reported social communication skills. This approach
             has potential for diagnostic and response to intervention
             measures.Trial Registration NCT02299700.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10803-018-3757-9},
   Key = {fds339307}
}

@article{fds340776,
   Author = {Bovery, MDMJ and Dawson, G and Hashemi, J and Sapiro,
             G},
   Title = {A Scalable Off-the-Shelf Framework for Measuring Patterns of
             Attention in Young Children and its Application in Autism
             Spectrum Disorder},
   Journal = {Ieee Transactions on Affective Computing},
   Pages = {1-1},
   Publisher = {Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
             (IEEE)},
   Year = {2019},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/taffc.2018.2890610},
   Doi = {10.1109/taffc.2018.2890610},
   Key = {fds340776}
}

@article{fds340500,
   Author = {Yerys, BE and Bertollo, JR and Kenworthy, L and Dawson, G and Marco, EJ and Schultz, RT and Sikich, L},
   Title = {Brief Report: Pilot Study of a Novel Interactive Digital
             Treatment to Improve Cognitive Control in Children with
             Autism Spectrum Disorder and Co-occurring ADHD
             Symptoms.},
   Journal = {Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-018-3856-7},
   Abstract = {The presence of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder
             (ADHD) symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorder
             (ASD) is associated with worse cognitive control. Children
             with ASD and ADHD often respond poorly to medications, thus
             we need alternative treatments. We examined the feasibility,
             acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of Project Evo-a
             digital treatment. Nineteen children with ASD and
             co-occurring ADHD symptoms completed this app-based
             treatment that targets multi-tasking through gameplay versus
             a comparison educational treatment. Children had a high
             engagement with both treatments, and parents and children
             reported high acceptability. Within-group analyses suggest
             the multi-tasking but not the educational treatment may
             improve cognitive control. This multi-tasking treatment is
             feasible, acceptable, and possibly efficacious for cognitive
             control impairments in children with ASD and
             ADHD.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10803-018-3856-7},
   Key = {fds340500}
}

@article{fds340569,
   Author = {Carpenter, KLH and Baranek, GT and Copeland, WE and Compton, S and Zucker, N and Dawson, G and Egger, HL},
   Title = {Sensory Over-Responsivity: An Early Risk Factor for Anxiety
             and Behavioral Challenges in Young Children.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-018-0502-y},
   Abstract = {Anxiety disorders are prevalent and significantly impact
             young children and their families. One hypothesized risk
             factor for anxiety is heightened responses to sensory input.
             Few studies have explored this hypothesis prospectively.
             This study had two goals: (1) examine whether sensory
             over-responsivity is predictive of the development of
             anxiety in a large prospective sample of children, and (2)
             identify whether anxiety mediates the relationship between
             sensory over-responsivity and behavioral challenges.
             Children's sensory and anxiety symptoms were assessed in a
             community sample of 917 at 2-5 and again in 191 of these
             children at 6 years old. Parents also reported on a number
             of additional behavioral challenges previously found to be
             associated with both sensory over-responsivity and anxiety
             separately: irritability, food selectivity, sleep problems,
             and gastrointestinal problems. Forty three percent of
             preschool children with sensory over-responsivity also had a
             concurrent impairing anxiety disorder. Preschool sensory
             over-responsivity symptoms significantly and positively
             predicted anxiety symptoms at age six. This relationship was
             both specific and unidirectional. Finally, school-age
             anxiety symptoms mediated the relationship between preschool
             sensory over-responsivity symptoms and both irritability and
             sleep problems at school-age. These results suggest sensory
             over-responsivity is a risk factor for anxiety disorders.
             Furthermore, children who have symptoms of sensory
             over-responsivity as preschoolers have higher levels of
             anxiety symptoms at school-age, which in turn is associated
             with increased levels of school-age behavioral
             challenges.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-018-0502-y},
   Key = {fds340569}
}

@article{fds340605,
   Author = {Egger, HL and Dawson, G and Hashemi, J and Carpenter, KLH and Espinosa,
             S and Campbell, K and Brotkin, S and Schaich-Borg, J and Qiu, Q and Tepper,
             M and Baker, JP and Bloomfield, RA and Sapiro, G},
   Title = {Automatic emotion and attention analysis of young children
             at home: a ResearchKit autism feasibility
             study},
   Journal = {Npj Digital Medicine},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {1},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41746-018-0024-6},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41746-018-0024-6},
   Key = {fds340605}
}

@article{fds339756,
   Author = {Dawson, G and Campbell, K and Hashemi, J and Lippmann, SJ and Smith, V and Carpenter, K and Egger, H and Espinosa, S and Vermeer, S and Baker, J and Sapiro, G},
   Title = {Atypical postural control can be detected via computer
             vision analysis in toddlers with autism spectrum
             disorder.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {17008},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-35215-8},
   Abstract = {Evidence suggests that differences in motor function are an
             early feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). One aspect
             of motor ability that develops during childhood is postural
             control, reflected in the ability to maintain a steady head
             and body position without excessive sway. Observational
             studies have documented differences in postural control in
             older children with ASD. The present study used computer
             vision analysis to assess midline head postural control, as
             reflected in the rate of spontaneous head movements during
             states of active attention, in 104 toddlers between 16-31
             months of age (Mean = 22 months), 22 of whom were
             diagnosed with ASD. Time-series data revealed robust group
             differences in the rate of head movements while the toddlers
             watched movies depicting social and nonsocial stimuli.
             Toddlers with ASD exhibited a significantly higher rate of
             head movement as compared to non-ASD toddlers, suggesting
             difficulties in maintaining midline position of the head
             while engaging attentional systems. The use of digital
             phenotyping approaches, such as computer vision analysis, to
             quantify variation in early motor behaviors will allow for
             more precise, objective, and quantitative characterization
             of early motor signatures and potentially provide new
             automated methods for early autism risk identification.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-35215-8},
   Key = {fds339756}
}

@article{fds338548,
   Author = {Manyakov, NV and Bangerter, A and Chatterjee, M and Mason, L and Ness,
             S and Lewin, D and Skalkin, A and Boice, M and Goodwin, MS and Dawson, G and Hendren, R and Leventhal, B and Shic, F and Pandina,
             G},
   Title = {Visual Exploration in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Exploring
             Age Differences and Dynamic Features Using Recurrence
             Quantification Analysis.},
   Journal = {Autism Research},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1554-1566},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aur.2021},
   Abstract = {Eye-tracking studies have demonstrated that individuals with
             autism spectrum disorder sometimes show differences in
             attention and gaze patterns. This includes preference for
             certain nonsocial objects, heightened attention to detail,
             and more difficulty with attention shifting and
             disengagement, which may be associated with restricted and
             repetitive behaviors. This study utilized a visual
             exploration task and replicates findings of reduced number
             of objects explored and increased fixation duration on high
             autism interest objects in a large sample of individuals
             with autism spectrum disorder (n = 129, age 6-54 years) in
             comparison with a typically developing group. These findings
             correlated with parent-reported repetitive behaviors.
             Additionally, we applied recurrent quantification analysis
             to enable identification of new eye-tracking features, which
             accounted for temporal and spatial differences in viewing
             patterns. These new features were found to discriminate
             between autism spectrum disorder and typically developing
             groups and were correlated with parent-reported repetitive
             behaviors. Original and novel eye-tracking features
             identified by recurrent quantification analysis differed in
             their relationships to reported behaviors and were dependent
             on age. Trial Registration: NCT02299700. Autism Research
             2018, 11: 1554-1566. © 2018 International Society for
             Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. LAY SUMMARY: Using
             eye-tracking technology and a visual exploration task, we
             showed that people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) spend
             more time looking at particular kinds of objects, like
             trains and clocks, and look at fewer objects overall than
             people without ASD. Where people look and the order in which
             they look at objects were related to the restricted and
             repetitive behaviors reported by parents. Eye-tracking may
             be a useful addition to parent reports for measuring changes
             in behavior in individuals with ASD.},
   Doi = {10.1002/aur.2021},
   Key = {fds338548}
}

@article{fds335827,
   Author = {Frazier, TW and Dawson, G and Murray, D and Shih, A and Sachs, JS and Geiger, A},
   Title = {Brief Report: A Survey of Autism Research Priorities Across
             a Diverse Community of Stakeholders.},
   Journal = {Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {3965-3971},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-018-3642-6},
   Abstract = {Inclusion of stakeholder voices in the allocation of
             research funding can increase the relevance of results and
             improve community engagement in research. We describe the
             results of an online survey that gathered input from
             community stakeholders regarding autism research priorities.
             A demographically diverse sample of respondents
             (N = 6004; 79.1% female; 72.5% ages 30-59; 86.4% USA)
             completed the survey. Results indicated a preference for
             applied relative to basic science topics, though both basic
             and applied science areas were rated as important.
             Respondents gave their highest ratings to research focused
             on co-occurring conditions, health and well-being, adult
             transition, and lifespan issues. These results can guide
             decision-making by public and private funders when
             developing science funding priorities and engaging in
             science dissemination activities.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10803-018-3642-6},
   Key = {fds335827}
}

@article{fds337473,
   Author = {Murias, M and Major, S and Compton, S and Buttinger, J and Sun, JM and Kurtzberg, J and Dawson, G},
   Title = {Electrophysiological Biomarkers Predict Clinical Improvement
             in an Open-Label Trial Assessing Efficacy of Autologous
             Umbilical Cord Blood for Treatment of Autism.},
   Journal = {Stem Cells Translational Medicine},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {783-791},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sctm.18-0090},
   Abstract = {This study was a phase I, single-center, and open-label
             trial of a single intravenous infusion of autologous
             umbilical cord blood in young children with autism spectrum
             disorder (ASD). Twenty-five children between the ages of 2
             and 6 with a confirmed diagnosis of ASD and a qualified
             banked autologous umbilical cord blood unit were enrolled.
             Safety results and clinical outcomes measured at 6 and 12
             months post-infusion have been previously published. The
             purpose of the present analysis was to explore whether
             measures of electroencephalography (EEG) theta, alpha, and
             beta power showed evidence of change after treatment and
             whether baseline EEG characteristics were predictive of
             clinical improvement. The primary endpoint was the
             parent-reported Vineland adaptive behavior scales-II
             socialization subscale score, collected at baseline, 6- and
             12-month visits. In addition, the expressive one word
             picture vocabulary test 4 and the clinical global
             impression-improvement scale were administered.
             Electrophysiological recordings were taken during viewing of
             dynamic social and nonsocial stimuli at 6 and 12 months
             post-treatment. Significant changes in EEG spectral
             characteristics were found by 12 months post-infusion, which
             were characterized by increased alpha and beta power and
             decreased EEG theta power. Furthermore, higher baseline
             posterior EEG beta power was associated with a greater
             degree of improvement in social communication symptoms,
             highlighting the potential for an EEG biomarker to predict
             variation in outcome. Taken together, the results suggest
             that EEG measures may be useful endpoints for future ASD
             clinical trials. Stem Cells Translational Medicine
             2018;7:783-791.},
   Doi = {10.1002/sctm.18-0090},
   Key = {fds337473}
}

@article{fds338340,
   Author = {Rogers, SJ and Estes, A and Vismara, L and Munson, J and Zierhut, C and Greenson, J and Dawson, G and Rocha, M and Sugar, C and Senturk, D and Whelan, F and Talbott, M},
   Title = {Enhancing Low-Intensity Coaching in Parent Implemented Early
             Start Denver Model Intervention for Early Autism: A
             Randomized Comparison Treatment Trial.},
   Journal = {Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-018-3740-5},
   Abstract = {Short-term low intensity parent implemented intervention
             studies for toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
             have found it difficult to demonstrate significantly
             improved developmental scores or autism severity compared to
             community treatment. We conducted a randomized comparative
             intent-to-treat study of a parent implemented intervention
             to (1) test the effects of an enhanced version on parent and
             child learning, and (2) evaluate the sensitivity to change
             of proximal versus distal measures of child behavior. We
             randomized 45 children with ASD, 12-30 months of age, into
             one of two versions of parent-implemented Early Start Denver
             Model (P-ESDM), the basic model, in which we delivered
             1.5 h of clinic-based parent coaching weekly, and an
             enhanced version that contained three additions:
             motivational interviewing, multimodal learning tools, and a
             weekly 1.5-h home visit. We delivered the intervention for
             12 weeks and measured child and parent change frequently in
             multiple settings. We found a time-by-group interaction:
             parents in the enhanced group demonstrated significantly
             greater gains in interaction skills than did parents in the
             non-enhanced group. Both interventions were associated with
             significant developmental acceleration; however, child
             outcomes did not differ by group. We found a significant
             relationship between degree of change in parental
             interaction skill and rate of children's improvement on our
             proximal measure. Parents in both groups reported
             satisfaction with the intervention. These findings suggest
             that parent skills improved more in the enhanced group than
             the comparison group. Children in the two groups showed
             similar improvements. Rate of individual parent learning was
             associated with greater individual child progress on a
             measure quite proximal to the treatment, though not on
             standardized assessments.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10803-018-3740-5},
   Key = {fds338340}
}

@article{fds335828,
   Author = {Brainstorm Consortium, and Anttila, V and Bulik-Sullivan, B and Finucane, HK and Walters, RK and Bras, J and Duncan, L and Escott-Price,
             V and Falcone, GJ and Gormley, P and Malik, R and Patsopoulos, NA and Ripke, S and Wei, Z and Yu, D and Lee, PH and Turley, P and Grenier-Boley,
             B and Chouraki, V and Kamatani, Y and Berr, C and Letenneur, L and Hannequin, D and Amouyel, P and Boland, A and Deleuze, J-F and Duron, E and Vardarajan, BN and Reitz, C and Goate, AM and Huentelman, MJ and Kamboh,
             MI and Larson, EB and Rogaeva, E and St George-Hyslop and P and Hakonarson,
             H and Kukull, WA and Farrer, LA and Barnes, LL and Beach, TG and Demirci,
             FY and Head, E and Hulette, CM and Jicha, GA and Kauwe, JSK and Kaye, JA and Leverenz, JB and Levey, AI and Lieberman, AP and Pankratz, VS and Poon,
             WW and Quinn, JF and Saykin, AJ and Schneider, LS and Smith, AG and Sonnen,
             JA and Stern, RA and Van Deerlin and VM and Van Eldik and LJ and Harold, D and Russo, G and Rubinsztein, DC and Bayer, A and Tsolaki, M and Proitsi, P and Fox, NC and Hampel, H and Owen, MJ and Mead, S and Passmore, P and Morgan,
             K and Nöthen, MM and Rossor, M and Lupton, MK and Hoffmann, P and Kornhuber, J and Lawlor, B and McQuillin, A and Al-Chalabi, A and Bis,
             JC and Ruiz, A and Boada, M and Seshadri, S and Beiser, A and Rice, K and van
             der Lee, SJ and De Jager and PL and Geschwind, DH and Riemenschneider,
             M and Riedel-Heller, S and Rotter, JI and Ransmayr, G and Hyman, BT and Cruchaga, C and Alegret, M and Winsvold, B and Palta, P and Farh, K-H and Cuenca-Leon, E and Furlotte, N and Kurth, T and Ligthart, L and Terwindt, GM and Freilinger, T and Ran, C and Gordon, SD and Borck, G and Adams, HHH and Lehtimäki, T and Wedenoja, J and Buring, JE and Schürks, M and Hrafnsdottir, M and Hottenga, J-J and Penninx, B and Artto, V and Kaunisto, M and Vepsäläinen, S and Martin, NG and Montgomery, GW and Kurki, MI and Hämäläinen, E and Huang, H and Huang, J and Sandor, C and Webber, C and Muller-Myhsok, B and Schreiber,
             S and Salomaa, V and Loehrer, E and Göbel, H and Macaya, A and Pozo-Rosich, P and Hansen, T and Werge, T and Kaprio, J and Metspalu, A and Kubisch, C and Ferrari, MD and Belin, AC and van den Maagdenberg,
             AMJM and Zwart, J-A and Boomsma, D and Eriksson, N and Olesen, J and Chasman, DI and Nyholt, DR and Avbersek, A and Baum, L and Berkovic, S and Bradfield, J and Buono, R and Catarino, CB and Cossette, P and De
             Jonghe, P and Depondt, C and Dlugos, D and Ferraro, TN and French, J and Hjalgrim, H and Jamnadas-Khoda, J and Kälviäinen, R and Kunz, WS and Lerche, H and Leu, C and Lindhout, D and Lo, W and Lowenstein, D and McCormack, M and Møller, RS and Molloy, A and Ng, P-W and Oliver, K and Privitera, M and Radtke, R and Ruppert, A-K and Sander, T and Schachter,
             S and Schankin, C and Scheffer, I and Schoch, S and Sisodiya, SM and Smith,
             P and Sperling, M and Striano, P and Surges, R and Thomas, GN and Visscher,
             F and Whelan, CD and Zara, F and Heinzen, EL and Marson, A and Becker, F and Stroink, H and Zimprich, F and Gasser, T and Gibbs, R and Heutink, P and Martinez, M and Morris, HR and Sharma, M and Ryten, M and Mok, KY and Pulit, S and Bevan, S and Holliday, E and Attia, J and Battey, T and Boncoraglio, G and Thijs, V and Chen, W-M and Mitchell, B and Rothwell,
             P and Sharma, P and Sudlow, C and Vicente, A and Markus, H and Kourkoulis,
             C and Pera, J and Raffeld, M and Silliman, S and Boraska Perica and V and Thornton, LM and Huckins, LM and William Rayner and N and Lewis, CM and Gratacos, M and Rybakowski, F and Keski-Rahkonen, A and Raevuori, A and Hudson, JI and Reichborn-Kjennerud, T and Monteleone, P and Karwautz,
             A and Mannik, K and Baker, JH and O'Toole, JK and Trace, SE and Davis, OSP and Helder, SG and Ehrlich, S and Herpertz-Dahlmann, B and Danner, UN and van Elburg, AA and Clementi, M and Forzan, M and Docampo, E and Lissowska, J and Hauser, J and Tortorella, A and Maj, M and Gonidakis,
             F and Tziouvas, K and Papezova, H and Yilmaz, Z and Wagner, G and Cohen-Woods, S and Herms, S and Julià, A and Rabionet, R and Dick, DM and Ripatti, S and Andreassen, OA and Espeseth, T and Lundervold, AJ and Steen, VM and Pinto, D and Scherer, SW and Aschauer, H and Schosser, A and Alfredsson, L and Padyukov, L and Halmi, KA and Mitchell, J and Strober,
             M and Bergen, AW and Kaye, W and Szatkiewicz, JP and Cormand, B and Ramos-Quiroga, JA and Sánchez-Mora, C and Ribasés, M and Casas, M and Hervas, A and Arranz, MJ and Haavik, J and Zayats, T and Johansson, S and Williams, N and Dempfle, A and Rothenberger, A and Kuntsi, J and Oades,
             RD and Banaschewski, T and Franke, B and Buitelaar, JK and Arias
             Vasquez, A and Doyle, AE and Reif, A and Lesch, K-P and Freitag, C and Rivero, O and Palmason, H and Romanos, M and Langley, K and Rietschel,
             M and Witt, SH and Dalsgaard, S and Børglum, AD and Waldman, I and Wilmot,
             B and Molly, N and Bau, CHD and Crosbie, J and Schachar, R and Loo, SK and McGough, JJ and Grevet, EH and Medland, SE and Robinson, E and Weiss,
             LA and Bacchelli, E and Bailey, A and Bal, V and Battaglia, A and Betancur,
             C and Bolton, P and Cantor, R and Celestino-Soper, P and Dawson, G and De
             Rubeis, S and Duque, F and Green, A and Klauck, SM and Leboyer, M and Levitt, P and Maestrini, E and Mane, S and De-Luca, DM and Parr, J and Regan, R and Reichenberg, A and Sandin, S and Vorstman, J and Wassink,
             T and Wijsman, E and Cook, E and Santangelo, S and Delorme, R and Rogé, B and Magalhaes, T and Arking, D and Schulze, TG and Thompson, RC and Strohmaier, J and Matthews, K and Melle, I and Morris, D and Blackwood,
             D and McIntosh, A and Bergen, SE and Schalling, M and Jamain, S and Maaser,
             A and Fischer, SB and Reinbold, CS and Fullerton, JM and Guzman-Parra,
             J and Mayoral, F and Schofield, PR and Cichon, S and Mühleisen, TW and Degenhardt, F and Schumacher, J and Bauer, M and Mitchell, PB and Gershon, ES and Rice, J and Potash, JB and Zandi, PP and Craddock, N and Ferrier, IN and Alda, M and Rouleau, GA and Turecki, G and Ophoff, R and Pato, C and Anjorin, A and Stahl, E and Leber, M and Czerski, PM and Cruceanu, C and Jones, IR and Posthuma, D and Andlauer, TFM and Forstner, AJ and Streit, F and Baune, BT and Air, T and Sinnamon, G and Wray, NR and MacIntyre, DJ and Porteous, D and Homuth, G and Rivera, M and Grove, J and Middeldorp, CM and Hickie, I and Pergadia, M and Mehta, D and Smit, JH and Jansen, R and de Geus, E and Dunn, E and Li, QS and Nauck, M and Schoevers, RA and Beekman, AT and Knowles, JA and Viktorin, A and Arnold, P and Barr, CL and Bedoya-Berrio, G and Bienvenu, OJ and Brentani, H and Burton, C and Camarena, B and Cappi, C and Cath, D and Cavallini, M and Cusi, D and Darrow, S and Denys, D and Derks, EM and Dietrich, A and Fernandez, T and Figee, M and Freimer, N and Gerber, G and Grados, M and Greenberg, E and Hanna, GL and Hartmann, A and Hirschtritt, ME and Hoekstra, PJ and Huang, A and Huyser, C and Illmann,
             C and Jenike, M and Kuperman, S and Leventhal, B and Lochner, C and Lyon,
             GJ and Macciardi, F and Madruga-Garrido, M and Malaty, IA and Maras, A and McGrath, L and Miguel, EC and Mir, P and Nestadt, G and Nicolini, H and Okun, MS and Pakstis, A and Paschou, P and Piacentini, J and Pittenger,
             C and Plessen, K and Ramensky, V and Ramos, EM and Reus, V and Richter, MA and Riddle, MA and Robertson, MM and Roessner, V and Rosário, M and Samuels, JF and Sandor, P and Stein, DJ and Tsetsos, F and Van
             Nieuwerburgh, F and Weatherall, S and Wendland, JR and Wolanczyk, T and Worbe, Y and Zai, G and Goes, FS and McLaughlin, N and Nestadt, PS and Grabe, H-J and Depienne, C and Konkashbaev, A and Lanzagorta, N and Valencia-Duarte, A and Bramon, E and Buccola, N and Cahn, W and Cairns,
             M and Chong, SA and Cohen, D et al.},
   Title = {Analysis of shared heritability in common disorders of the
             brain.},
   Journal = {Science (New York, N.Y.)},
   Volume = {360},
   Number = {6395},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aap8757},
   Abstract = {Disorders of the brain can exhibit considerable
             epidemiological comorbidity and often share symptoms,
             provoking debate about their etiologic overlap. We
             quantified the genetic sharing of 25 brain disorders from
             genome-wide association studies of 265,218 patients and
             784,643 control participants and assessed their relationship
             to 17 phenotypes from 1,191,588 individuals. Psychiatric
             disorders share common variant risk, whereas neurological
             disorders appear more distinct from one another and from the
             psychiatric disorders. We also identified significant
             sharing between disorders and a number of brain phenotypes,
             including cognitive measures. Further, we conducted
             simulations to explore how statistical power, diagnostic
             misclassification, and phenotypic heterogeneity affect
             genetic correlations. These results highlight the importance
             of common genetic variation as a risk factor for brain
             disorders and the value of heritability-based methods in
             understanding their etiology.},
   Doi = {10.1126/science.aap8757},
   Key = {fds335828}
}

@misc{fds335829,
   Author = {Kurtzberg, J and Sun, J and Prasad, VK and Meadows, N and Rudisill, A and Noldner, P and Parrott, R and Lillich, M and Cheatham, L and Lew, J and Page, K and Filiano, AJ and Dawson, G},
   Title = {MANUFACTURING OF ALLOGENEIC HUMAN CORD TISSUE MESENCHYMAL
             STROMAL CELLS: INITIAL RESULTS OF A PHASE I CLINICAL TRIAL
             IN CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER},
   Journal = {Cytotherapy},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {S44-S44},
   Publisher = {ELSEVIER SCI LTD},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {fds335829}
}

@article{fds333739,
   Author = {Campbell, K and Carpenter, KL and Hashemi, J and Espinosa, S and Marsan,
             S and Borg, JS and Chang, Z and Qiu, Q and Vermeer, S and Adler, E and Tepper,
             M and Egger, HL and Baker, JP and Sapiro, G and Dawson,
             G},
   Title = {Computer vision analysis captures atypical attention in
             toddlers with autism.},
   Journal = {Autism},
   Pages = {1362361318766247},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1362361318766247},
   Abstract = {To demonstrate the capability of computer vision analysis to
             detect atypical orienting and attention behaviors in
             toddlers with autism spectrum disorder. One hundered and
             four toddlers of 16-31 months old (mean = 22)
             participated in this study. Twenty-two of the toddlers had
             autism spectrum disorder and 82 had typical development or
             developmental delay. Toddlers watched video stimuli on a
             tablet while the built-in camera recorded their head
             movement. Computer vision analysis measured participants'
             attention and orienting in response to name calls.
             Reliability of the computer vision analysis algorithm was
             tested against a human rater. Differences in behavior were
             analyzed between the autism spectrum disorder group and the
             comparison group. Reliability between computer vision
             analysis and human coding for orienting to name was
             excellent (intra-class coefficient 0.84, 95% confidence
             interval 0.67-0.91). Only 8% of toddlers with autism
             spectrum disorder oriented to name calling on >1 trial,
             compared to 63% of toddlers in the comparison group
             (p = 0.002). Mean latency to orient was significantly
             longer for toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (2.02 vs
             1.06 s, p = 0.04). Sensitivity for autism spectrum
             disorder of atypical orienting was 96% and specificity was
             38%. Older toddlers with autism spectrum disorder showed
             less attention to the videos overall (p = 0.03).
             Automated coding offers a reliable, quantitative method for
             detecting atypical social orienting and reduced sustained
             attention in toddlers with autism spectrum
             disorder.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1362361318766247},
   Key = {fds333739}
}

@article{fds331234,
   Author = {Murias, M and Major, S and Davlantis, K and Franz, L and Harris, A and Rardin, B and Sabatos-DeVito, M and Dawson, G},
   Title = {Validation of eye-tracking measures of social attention as a
             potential biomarker for autism clinical trials.},
   Journal = {Autism Research},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {166-174},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aur.1894},
   Abstract = {Social communication impairments are a core feature of
             autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and this class of symptoms
             is a target for treatments for the disorder. Measures of
             social attention, assessed via eye-gaze tracking (EGT), have
             been proposed as an early efficacy biomarker for clinical
             trials targeting social communication skills. EGT measures
             have been shown to differentiate children with ASD from
             typical children; however, there is less known about their
             relationships with social communication outcome measures
             that are typically used in ASD clinical trials. In the
             present study, an EGT task involving viewing a videotape of
             an actor making bids for a child's attention was evaluated
             in 25 children with ASD aged 24-72 months. Children's
             attention to the actor during the dyadic bid condition
             measured via EGT was found to be strongly associated with
             five well-validated caregiver-reported outcome measures that
             are commonly used to assess social communication in clinical
             trials. These results highlight the convergent validity of
             EGT measures of social attention in relation to
             caregiver-reported clinical measures. EGT holds promise as a
             non-invasive, quantitative, and objective biomarker that is
             associated with social communication abilities in children
             with ASD. Autism Res 2018, 11: 166-174. © 2017
             International Society for Autism Research, Wiley
             Periodicals, Inc.Eye-gaze tracking (EGT), an automated tool
             that tracks eye-gaze patterns, might help measure outcomes
             in clinical trials investigating interventions to treat
             autism spectrum disorders. In this study, an EGT task was
             evaluated in children with ASD, who watched a video with an
             actor talking directly to them. Patterns of eye-gaze were
             associated with caregiver-reported measures of social
             communication that are used in clinical trials. We show EGT
             may be a promising objective tool measuring
             outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1002/aur.1894},
   Key = {fds331234}
}

@article{fds326271,
   Author = {Jones, EJH and Dawson, G and Webb, SJ},
   Title = {Sensory hypersensitivity predicts enhanced attention capture
             by faces in the early development of ASD.},
   Journal = {Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience},
   Volume = {29},
   Pages = {11-20},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2017.04.001},
   Abstract = {Sensory sensitivity is prevalent among young children with
             ASD, but its relation to social communication impairment is
             unclear. Recently, increased sensory hypersensitivity has
             been linked to greater activity of the neural salience
             network (Green et al., 2016). Increased neural sensitivity
             to stimuli, especially social stimuli, could provide greater
             opportunity for social learning and improved outcomes.
             Consistent with this framework, in Experiment 1 we found
             that parent report of greater sensory hypersensitivity at 2
             years in toddlers with ASD (N=27) was predictive of
             increased neural responsiveness to social stimuli (larger
             amplitude event-related potential/ERP responses to faces at
             P1, P400 and Nc) at 4 years, and this in turn was related to
             parent report of increased social approach at 4 years. In
             Experiment 2, parent report of increased perceptual
             sensitivity at 6 months in infants at low and high familial
             risk for ASD (N=35) predicted larger ERP P1 amplitude to
             faces at 18 months. Increased sensory hypersensitivity in
             early development thus predicted greater attention capture
             by faces in later development, and this related to more
             optimal social behavioral development. Sensory
             hypersensitivity may index a child's ability to benefit from
             supportive environments during development. Early sensory
             symptoms may not always be developmentally problematic for
             individuals with ASD.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.dcn.2017.04.001},
   Key = {fds326271}
}

@article{fds329121,
   Author = {St John and T and Dawson, G and Estes, A},
   Title = {Brief Report: Executive Function as a Predictor of Academic
             Achievement in School-Aged Children with
             ASD.},
   Journal = {Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {276-283},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-017-3296-9},
   Abstract = {The contributions of Executive Function (EF) to academic
             achievement in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
             are not well understood. Academic achievement and its
             association with EF is described in 32, 9-year-old children
             with ASD. EF at age 6 and 9, and academic achievement at age
             9 were assessed as part of a larger longitudinal study.
             Better performance on a Spatial Reversal task but not
             A-not-B with Invisible Displacement at age 6 was associated
             with better math achievement at age 9. No relationship was
             found between these EF measures at age 6 and reading or
             spelling achievement at age 9. Future studies are needed to
             explore whether improving early EF skills can increase math
             achievement in children with ASD.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10803-017-3296-9},
   Key = {fds329121}
}

@article{fds338008,
   Author = {Hashemi, J and Dawson, G and Carpenter, KLH and Campbell, K and Qiu, Q and Espinosa, S and Marsan, S and Baker, JP and Egger, HL and Sapiro,
             G},
   Title = {Computer Vision Analysis for Quantification of Autism Risk
             Behaviors},
   Journal = {Ieee Transactions on Affective Computing},
   Pages = {1-1},
   Publisher = {Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
             (IEEE)},
   Year = {2018},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/taffc.2018.2868196},
   Abstract = {IEEE Observational behavior analysis plays a key role for
             the discovery and evaluation of risk markers for many
             neurodevelopmental disorders. Research on autism spectrum
             disorder (ASD) suggests that behavioral risk markers can be
             observed at 12 months of age, with diagnosis possible at 18
             months. To date, studies and evaluations involving
             observational analysis tend to rely heavily on clinical
             practitioners and specialists who have undergone intensive
             training to be able to reliably administer carefully
             designed behavioral-eliciting tasks, code the resulting
             behaviors, and interpret them. These methods are therefore
             extremely expensive, time-intensive, and are not easily
             scalable for large or longitudinal observational analysis.
             We developed a self-contained, closed-loop, mobile
             application with movie stimuli designed to engage the
             child&#x0027;s attention and elicit specific behavioral and
             social responses, which are recorded with the mobile
             device&#x0027;s camera and analyzed via computer vision
             algorithms. Here, in addition to presenting this paradigm,
             we validate the system to measure engagement, name-call, and
             emotional responses of toddlers with and without ASD who
             were presented with the application. Additionally, we
             demonstrate how the proposed framework can further risk
             marker research with fine-grained quantification of
             behaviors. The results suggest these objective and automatic
             methods can be considered to aid behavioral
             analysis.},
   Doi = {10.1109/taffc.2018.2868196},
   Key = {fds338008}
}


%% De Bellis, Michael D.   
@article{fds340153,
   Author = {Peterson, ET and Kwon, D and Luna, B and Larsen, B and Prouty, D and De
             Bellis, MD and Voyvodic, J and Liu, C and Li, W and Pohl, KM and Sullivan,
             EV and Pfefferbaum, A},
   Title = {Distribution of brain iron accrual in adolescence: Evidence
             from cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis.},
   Journal = {Human Brain Mapping},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.24461},
   Abstract = {To track iron accumulation and location in the brain across
             adolescence, we repurposed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)
             and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data
             acquired in 513 adolescents and validated iron estimates
             with quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) in 104 of
             these subjects. DTI and fMRI data were acquired
             longitudinally over 1 year in 245 male and 268 female,
             no-to-low alcohol-consuming adolescents (12-21 years at
             baseline) from the National Consortium on Alcohol and
             NeuroDevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA) study. Brain region
             average signal values were calculated for susceptibility to
             nonheme iron deposition: pallidum, putamen, dentate nucleus,
             red nucleus, and substantia nigra. To estimate nonheme iron,
             the corpus callosum signal (robust to iron effects) was
             divided by regional signals to generate estimated R2 (edwR2
             for DTI) and R2 * (eR2 * for fMRI). Longitudinal iron
             deposition was measured using the normalized signal change
             across time for each subject. Validation using baseline QSM,
             derived from susceptibility-weighted imaging, was performed
             on 46 male and 58 female participants. Normalized iron
             deposition estimates from DTI and fMRI correlated with age
             in most regions; both estimates indicated less iron in boys
             than girls. QSM results correlated highly with DTI and fMRI
             results (adjusted R2 = 0.643 for DTI, 0.578 for fMRI).
             Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses indicated an
             initial rapid increase in iron, notably in the putamen and
             red nucleus, that slowed with age. DTI and fMRI data can be
             repurposed for identifying regional brain iron deposition in
             developing adolescents as validated with high correspondence
             with QSM.},
   Doi = {10.1002/hbm.24461},
   Key = {fds340153}
}

@article{fds331438,
   Author = {Nooner, KB and Hooper, SR and De Bellis, MD},
   Title = {An examination of sex differences on neurocognitive
             functioning and behavior problems in maltreated
             youth.},
   Journal = {Psychological Trauma : Theory, Research, Practice and
             Policy},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {435-443},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/tra0000356},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:In the developmental traumatology model, the
             biological construct of sex is considered a moderator that
             may negatively influence child maltreatment sequelae
             including those pertaining to neurocognitive function.
             METHOD:This study examined sex-differences in neurocognitive
             function and behavior problems in maltreated boys (n = 42),
             maltreated girls (n = 56) versus nonmaltreated boys (n = 45)
             and girls (n = 59). Maltreated boys were hypothesized to
             have poorer neurocognitive functioning than maltreated
             girls, and nonmaltreated boys and girls, in all
             neurocognitive domains, particularly pertaining to executive
             function and attention. We also examined correlations
             between cognitive function and parent report of child
             behavior problems for maltreated and nonmaltreated children.
             RESULTS:Maltreated boys performed more poorly on measures of
             intelligence, attention, language, memory, executive
             function, and academic achievement in both reading and math
             than nonmaltreated boys. Maltreated boys did not perform
             more poorly on these cognitive measures or behavioral
             measures than maltreated girls, except for one memory
             measure. Maltreated girls performed more poorly on measures
             of intelligence, language, memory, executive function, and
             academic achievement than nonmaltreated girls. Maltreated
             girls with better visual-spatial skills had more
             internalizing and externalizing problems. Effect sizes for
             these sex differences ranged from small to large.
             CONCLUSIONS:Both maltreated boys and girls showed poorer
             cognitive function than their nonmaltreated sex-matched
             controls. Maltreated girls had subtle sparing of attention
             and short-term memory (STM). Understanding sex differences
             in neurocognitive functioning may have implications for
             designing large population studies of maltreated youth.
             (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/tra0000356},
   Key = {fds331438}
}

@article{fds336066,
   Author = {Sun, D and Haswell, CC and Morey, RA and De Bellis,
             MD},
   Title = {Brain structural covariance network centrality in maltreated
             youth with PTSD and in maltreated youth resilient to
             PTSD.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Pages = {1-15},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579418000093},
   Abstract = {Child maltreatment is a major cause of pediatric
             posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Previous studies have
             not investigated potential differences in network
             architecture in maltreated youth with PTSD and those
             resilient to PTSD. High-resolution magnetic resonance
             imaging brain scans at 3 T were completed in maltreated
             youth with PTSD (n = 31), without PTSD (n = 32), and
             nonmaltreated controls (n = 57). Structural covariance
             network architecture was derived from between-subject
             intraregional correlations in measures of cortical thickness
             in 148 cortical regions (nodes). Interregional positive
             partial correlations controlling for demographic variables
             were assessed, and those correlations that exceeded
             specified thresholds constituted connections in cortical
             brain networks. Four measures of network centrality
             characterized topology, and the importance of cortical
             regions (nodes) within the network architecture were
             calculated for each group. Permutation testing and principle
             component analysis method were employed to calculate
             between-group differences. Principle component analysis is a
             methodological improvement to methods used in previous brain
             structural covariance network studies. Differences in
             centrality were observed between groups. Larger centrality
             was found in maltreated youth with PTSD in the right
             posterior cingulate cortex; smaller centrality was detected
             in the right inferior frontal cortex compared to youth
             resilient to PTSD and controls, demonstrating network
             characteristics unique to pediatric maltreatment-related
             PTSD. Larger centrality was detected in right frontal pole
             in maltreated youth resilient to PTSD compared to youth with
             PTSD and controls, demonstrating structural covariance
             network differences in youth resilience to PTSD following
             maltreatment. Smaller centrality was found in the left
             posterior cingulate cortex and in the right inferior frontal
             cortex in maltreated youth compared to controls,
             demonstrating attributes of structural covariance network
             topology that is unique to experiencing maltreatment. This
             work is the first to identify cortical thickness-based
             structural covariance network differences between maltreated
             youth with and without PTSD. We demonstrated network
             differences in both networks unique to maltreated youth with
             PTSD and those resilient to PTSD. The networks identified
             are important for the successful attainment of
             age-appropriate social cognition, attention, emotional
             processing, and inhibitory control. Our findings in
             maltreated youth with PTSD versus those without PTSD suggest
             vulnerability mechanisms for developing PTSD.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579418000093},
   Key = {fds336066}
}

@article{fds333815,
   Author = {Pfefferbaum, A and Kwon, D and Brumback, T and Thompson, WK and Cummins,
             K and Tapert, SF and Brown, SA and Colrain, IM and Baker, FC and Prouty, D and De Bellis, MD and Clark, DB and Nagel, BJ and Chu, W and Park, SH and Pohl,
             KM and Sullivan, EV},
   Title = {Altered Brain Developmental Trajectories in Adolescents
             After Initiating Drinking.},
   Journal = {The American Journal of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {175},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {370-380},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17040469},
   Abstract = {The authors sought evidence for altered adolescent brain
             growth trajectory associated with moderate and heavy alcohol
             use in a large national, multisite, prospective study of
             adolescents before and after initiation of appreciable
             alcohol use.This study examined 483 adolescents (ages 12-21)
             before initiation of drinking and 1 and 2 years later. At
             the 2-year assessment, 356 participants continued to meet
             the study's no/low alcohol consumption entry criteria, 65
             had initiated moderate drinking, and 62 had initiated heavy
             drinking. MRI was used to quantify regional cortical and
             white matter volumes. Percent change per year (slopes) in
             adolescents who continued to meet no/low criteria served as
             developmental control trajectories against which to compare
             those who initiated moderate or heavy drinking.In no/low
             drinkers, gray matter volume declined throughout adolescence
             and slowed in many regions in later adolescence.
             Complementing gray matter declines, white matter regions
             grew at faster rates at younger ages and slowed toward young
             adulthood. Youths who initiated heavy drinking exhibited an
             accelerated frontal cortical gray matter trajectory,
             divergent from the norm. Although significant effects on
             trajectories were not observed in moderate drinkers, their
             intermediate position between no/low and heavy drinkers
             suggests a dose effect. Neither marijuana co-use nor
             baseline volumes contributed significantly to the alcohol
             effect.Initiation of drinking during adolescence, with or
             without marijuana co-use, disordered normal brain growth
             trajectories. Factors possibly contributing to abnormal
             cortical volume trajectories include peak consumption in the
             past year and family history of alcoholism.},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17040469},
   Key = {fds333815}
}

@article{fds339770,
   Author = {Müller-Oehring, EM and Kwon, D and Nagel, BJ and Sullivan, EV and Chu,
             W and Rohlfing, T and Prouty, D and Nichols, BN and Poline, J-B and Tapert,
             SF and Brown, SA and Cummins, K and Brumback, T and Colrain, IM and Baker,
             FC and De Bellis, MD and Voyvodic, JT and Clark, DB and Pfefferbaum, A and Pohl, KM},
   Title = {Influences of Age, Sex, and Moderate Alcohol Drinking on the
             Intrinsic Functional Architecture of Adolescent
             Brains.},
   Journal = {Cerebral Cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {1049-1063},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhx014},
   Abstract = {The transition from adolescent to adult cognition and
             emotional control requires neurodevelopmental maturation
             likely involving intrinsic functional networks (IFNs).
             Normal neurodevelopment may be vulnerable to disruption from
             environmental insult such as alcohol consumption commonly
             initiated during adolescence. To test potential disruption
             to IFN maturation, we used resting-state functional magnetic
             resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) in 581 no-to-low
             alcohol-consuming and 117 moderate-to-high-drinking youth.
             Functional seed-to-voxel connectivity analysis assessed age,
             sex, and moderate alcohol drinking on default-mode,
             executive-control, salience, reward, and emotion networks
             and tested cognitive and motor coordination correlates of
             network connectivity. Among no-to-low alcohol-consuming
             adolescents, executive-control frontolimbicstriatal
             connectivity was stronger in older than younger adolescents,
             particularly boys, and predicted better ability in balance,
             memory, and impulse control. Connectivity patterns in
             moderate-to-high-drinking youth were tested mainly in late
             adolescence when drinking was initiated. Implicated was the
             emotion network with attenuated connectivity to default-mode
             network regions. Our cross-sectional rs-fMRI findings from
             this large cohort of adolescents show sexual dimorphism in
             connectivity and suggest neurodevelopmental rewiring toward
             stronger and spatially more distributed executive-control
             networking in older than younger adolescents. Functional
             network rewiring in moderate-to-high-drinking adolescents
             may impede maturation of affective and self-reflection
             systems and obscure maturation of complex social and
             emotional behaviors.},
   Doi = {10.1093/cercor/bhx014},
   Key = {fds339770}
}


%% De Brigard, Felipe   
@article{fds335558,
   Author = {Parikh, N and Ruzic, L and Stewart, GW and Spreng, RN and De Brigard,
             F},
   Title = {What if? Neural activity underlying semantic and episodic
             counterfactual thinking.},
   Journal = {Neuroimage},
   Volume = {178},
   Pages = {332-345},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.05.053},
   Abstract = {Counterfactual thinking (CFT) is the process of mentally
             simulating alternative versions of known facts. In the past
             decade, cognitive neuroscientists have begun to uncover the
             neural underpinnings of CFT, particularly episodic CFT
             (eCFT), which activates regions in the default network (DN)
             also activated by episodic memory (eM) recall. However, the
             engagement of DN regions is different for distinct kinds of
             eCFT. More plausible counterfactuals and counterfactuals
             about oneself show stronger activity in DN regions compared
             to implausible and other- or object-focused counterfactuals.
             The current study sought to identify a source for this
             difference in DN activity. Specifically, self-focused
             counterfactuals may also be more plausible, suggesting that
             DN core regions are sensitive to the plausibility of a
             simulation. On the other hand, plausible and self-focused
             counterfactuals may involve more episodic information than
             implausible and other-focused counterfactuals, which would
             imply DN sensitivity to episodic information. In the current
             study, we compared episodic and semantic counterfactuals
             generated to be plausible or implausible against episodic
             and semantic memory reactivation using fMRI. Taking
             multivariate and univariate approaches, we found that the DN
             is engaged more during episodic simulations, including eM
             and all eCFT, than during semantic simulations. Semantic
             simulations engaged more inferior temporal and lateral
             occipital regions. The only region that showed strong
             plausibility effects was the hippocampus, which was
             significantly engaged for implausible CFT but not for
             plausible CFT, suggestive of binding more disparate
             information. Consequences of these findings for the
             cognitive neuroscience of mental simulation are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.05.053},
   Key = {fds335558}
}

@article{fds336415,
   Author = {Stanley, ML and Yang, BW and De Brigard and F},
   Title = {No evidence for unethical amnesia for imagined actions: A
             failed replication and extension.},
   Journal = {Memory & Cognition},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {787-795},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-018-0803-y},
   Abstract = {In a recent study, Kouchaki and Gino (2016) suggest that
             memory for unethical actions is impaired, regardless of
             whether such actions are real or imagined. However, as we
             argue in the current study, their claim that people develop
             "unethical amnesia" confuses two distinct and dissociable
             memory deficits: one affecting the phenomenology of
             remembering and another affecting memory accuracy. To
             further investigate whether unethical amnesia affects memory
             accuracy, we conducted three studies exploring unethical
             amnesia for imagined ethical violations. The first study (N
             = 228) attempts to directly replicate the only study from
             Kouchaki and Gino (2016) that includes a measure of memory
             accuracy. The second study (N = 232) attempts again to
             replicate these accuracy effects from Kouchaki and Gino
             (2016), while including several additional variables meant
             to potentially help in finding the effect. The third study
             (N = 228) is an attempted conceptual replication using the
             same paradigm as Kouchaki and Gino (2016), but with a new
             vignette describing a different moral violation. We did not
             find an unethical amnesia effect involving memory accuracy
             in any of our three studies. These results cast doubt upon
             the claim that memory accuracy is impaired for imagined
             unethical actions. Suggestions for further ways to study
             memory for moral and immoral actions are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13421-018-0803-y},
   Key = {fds336415}
}

@article{fds329104,
   Author = {Stanley, ML and Dougherty, AM and Yang, BW and Henne, P and De Brigard,
             F},
   Title = {Reasons probably won't change your mind: The role of reasons
             in revising moral decisions.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology. General},
   Volume = {147},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {962-987},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xge0000368},
   Abstract = {Although many philosophers argue that making and revising
             moral decisions ought to be a matter of deliberating over
             reasons, the extent to which the consideration of reasons
             informs people's moral decisions and prompts them to change
             their decisions remains unclear. Here, after making an
             initial decision in 2-option moral dilemmas, participants
             examined reasons for only the option initially chosen
             (affirming reasons), reasons for only the option not
             initially chosen (opposing reasons), or reasons for both
             options. Although participants were more likely to change
             their initial decisions when presented with only opposing
             reasons compared with only affirming reasons, these effect
             sizes were consistently small. After evaluating reasons,
             participants were significantly more likely not to change
             their initial decisions than to change them, regardless of
             the set of reasons they considered. The initial decision
             accounted for most of the variance in predicting the final
             decision, whereas the reasons evaluated accounted for a
             relatively small proportion of the variance in predicting
             the final decision. This resistance to changing moral
             decisions is at least partly attributable to a biased,
             motivated evaluation of the available reasons: participants
             rated the reasons supporting their initial decisions more
             favorably than the reasons opposing their initial decisions,
             regardless of the reported strategy used to make the initial
             decision. Overall, our results suggest that the
             consideration of reasons rarely induces people to change
             their initial decisions in moral dilemmas. (PsycINFO
             Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/xge0000368},
   Key = {fds329104}
}

@article{fds335559,
   Author = {De Brigard and F and Hanna, E and St Jacques and PL and Schacter,
             DL},
   Title = {How thinking about what could have been affects how we feel
             about what was},
   Journal = {Cognition and Emotion},
   Pages = {1-14},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2018.1478280},
   Doi = {10.1080/02699931.2018.1478280},
   Key = {fds335559}
}

@article{fds335560,
   Author = {De Brigard and F and Brady, WJ},
   Title = {Correction to: The Effect of What We Think may Happen on our
             Judgments of Responsibility},
   Journal = {Review of Philosophy and Psychology},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {447-447},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13164-018-0389-0},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13164-018-0389-0},
   Key = {fds335560}
}

@article{fds335561,
   Author = {De Freitas and J and Sarkissian, H and Newman, GE and Grossmann, I and De
             Brigard, F and Luco, A and Knobe, J},
   Title = {Consistent Belief in a Good True Self in Misanthropes and
             Three Interdependent Cultures.},
   Journal = {Cognitive Science},
   Volume = {42 Suppl 1},
   Pages = {134-160},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cogs.12505},
   Abstract = {People sometimes explain behavior by appealing to an
             essentialist concept of the self, often referred to as the
             true self. Existing studies suggest that people tend to
             believe that the true self is morally virtuous; that is deep
             inside, every person is motivated to behave in morally good
             ways. Is this belief particular to individuals with
             optimistic beliefs or people from Western cultures, or does
             it reflect a widely held cognitive bias in how people
             understand the self? To address this question, we tested the
             good true self theory against two potential boundary
             conditions that are known to elicit different beliefs about
             the self as a whole. Study 1 tested whether individual
             differences in misanthropy-the tendency to view humans
             negatively-predict beliefs about the good true self in an
             American sample. The results indicate a consistent belief in
             a good true self, even among individuals who have an
             explicitly pessimistic view of others. Study 2 compared true
             self-attributions across cultural groups, by comparing
             samples from an independent country (USA) and a diverse set
             of interdependent countries (Russia, Singapore, and
             Colombia). Results indicated that the direction and
             magnitude of the effect are comparable across all groups we
             tested. The belief in a good true self appears robust across
             groups varying in cultural orientation or misanthropy,
             suggesting a consistent psychological tendency to view the
             true self as morally good.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cogs.12505},
   Key = {fds335561}
}

@article{fds332864,
   Author = {Murray, S and Murray, ED and Stewart, G and Sinnott-Armstrong, W and De
             Brigard, F},
   Title = {Responsibility for forgetting},
   Journal = {Philosophical Studies},
   Pages = {1-25},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11098-018-1053-3},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of
             Springer Nature In this paper, we focus on whether and to
             what extent we judge that people are responsible for the
             consequences of their forgetfulness. We ran a series of
             behavioral studies to measure judgments of responsibility
             for the consequences of forgetfulness. Our results show that
             we are disposed to hold others responsible for some of their
             forgetfulness. The level of stress that the forgetful agent
             is under modulates judgments of responsibility, though the
             level of care that the agent exhibits toward performing the
             forgotten action does not. We argue that this result has
             important implications for a long-running debate about the
             nature of responsible agency.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11098-018-1053-3},
   Key = {fds332864}
}

@article{fds337053,
   Author = {Brigard, FD},
   Title = {Memory and the Intentional Stance},
   Pages = {62-91},
   Booktitle = {The Philosophy of Daniel Dennett},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   ISBN = {9780199367511},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780199367511.003.0005},
   Abstract = {<p>Despite Dennett’s vast scholarship, he seemed to only
             have directly addressed the topic of memory in a relatively
             unknown coauthored article published in a somewhat obscure
             volume. The current chapter attempts to reconstruct the
             ideas from this old article, and argues that it offers a
             viable and coherent view of episodic memory with substantial
             empirical support. Specifically, the chapter uncovers three
             empirically supported theses. A <italic>functional</italic>
             thesis, according to which our memory system not only
             processes information about past events but also uses this
             information to construct useful anticipations of possible
             future events. A <italic>computational</italic> thesis,
             according to which statistical regularities, along with
             individual limitations and goals, probabilistically
             constrain the search space examined during memory retrieval.
             And a <italic>metaphysical</italic> thesis, according to
             which memories do not exist as subpersonal-level brain
             structures encoding particular intentional contents but
             rather as personal-level psychological phenomena only
             accessible from the intentional stance.</p>},
   Doi = {10.1093/oso/9780199367511.003.0005},
   Key = {fds337053}
}

@article{fds335563,
   Author = {De Brigard and F and Gessell, B},
   Title = {Why episodic memory may not be for communication.},
   Journal = {Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
   Volume = {41},
   Pages = {e8},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0140525x17001303},
   Abstract = {Three serious challenges to Mahr & Csibra's (M&C's) proposal
             are presented. First, we argue that the epistemic attitude
             that they claim is unique to remembering also applies to
             some forms of imaginative simulations that aren't memories.
             Second, we argue that their account cannot accommodate
             critical neuropsychological evidence. Finally, we argue that
             their proposal looks unconvincing when compared to more
             parsimonious evolutionary accounts.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0140525x17001303},
   Key = {fds335563}
}

@article{fds340469,
   Author = {Gessell, B and De Brigard and F},
   Title = {The discontinuity of levels in cognitive
             science},
   Journal = {Teorema},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {151-165},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   Abstract = {© 2018; KRK Ediciones. All rights reserved. We begin by
             characterizing Dennett’s “homuncular functionalist”
             view of the mind, as described in his early work. We then
             contrast that view with the one outlined in From Bacteria to
             Bach and Back. We argue that recent changes in Dennett’s
             view have produced tension in the way he conceives of
             functional decompositions. Functional decompositions based
             on the intentional stance are supposed to reach a bottom,
             “dumb” level which can be explained mechanically;
             however, since Dennett now believes that neurons may need to
             be described intentionally, it is not clear whether our
             explanations of cognitive functions can ever align with our
             explanations of neuronal and network behaviors. We explore
             the consequences of this tension for Dennett’s view, and
             for cognitive neuroscience in general.},
   Key = {fds340469}
}

@article{fds335562,
   Author = {Michaelian, K},
   Title = {New Directions in the Philosophy of Memory},
   Pages = {200-220},
   Booktitle = {New Directions in the Philosophy of Memory},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781351660020},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315159591},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Taylor & Francis. When people jointly reminisce,
             they often talk about past objects, which may or may no
             longer exist. How can two or more people jointly refer to an
             object that is long gone-or at least, that is not present in
             their surrounding? In this chapter, I offer a three-part
             answer to this question. First, I suggest that our capacity
             to remember intentional objects during memory retrieval
             depends on our capacity to direct our attention inwardly
             toward the relevant component of a memorial content-a mental
             act I call mental ostension. Second, I argue that, for us to
             refer to remembered intentional objects, we must possess the
             ability to refer to them indirectly or “deferredly” by
             way of mentally ostending toward a present mental content;
             in short, we must be capable of deferred mental ostension.
             Finally, I claim that to jointly reminisce, we must have the
             capacity to guide someone else’s attention inwardly toward
             the relevant aspect of the mental content we want them to
             focus on so that they become aware of the past object we are
             deferredly ostending; that is, we need concerted deferred
             mental ostension.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9781315159591},
   Key = {fds335562}
}


%% Dodge, Kenneth A.   
@article{fds340852,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Pettit, GS and Rauer, A and Vandenberg, CE and Schulenberg, JE and Staff, J and Jager, J and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Intergenerational Continuity and Stability in Early Family
             Formation},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000497},
   Abstract = {© 2019 American Psychological Association. This study
             examines intergenerational continuity (mean level
             similarity) and stability (maintenance of rank ordering of
             individuals) in age and marital status at the time of
             becoming a young parent using prospective data from 3
             generations of 585 families. G2 participants were recruited
             at the age of 5 years and followed until the age of 28, by
             which time 227 had become parents themselves. The findings
             suggest that despite dramatic intergenerational
             discontinuities with young adults, on average, now being
             more likely to be unmarried and older at the time of
             becoming parents than in previous generations,
             intergenerational stability in age and marital status at the
             time of becoming a young parent is still substantial. This
             intergenerational stability was, for the most part, not
             moderated by demographic, familial, or behavioral factors,
             suggesting that a developmental, multigenerational
             perspective is necessary to understand what has previously
             been considered a largely demographic issue.},
   Doi = {10.1037/fam0000497},
   Key = {fds340852}
}

@article{fds337501,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Tapanya, S and Tirado, LMU and Zelli, A and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM and Bacchini, D and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Giunta, LD and Dodge, KA and Oburu,
             P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Steinberg,
             L},
   Title = {Household income predicts trajectories of child
             internalizing and externalizing behavior in high-, middle-,
             and low-income countries},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Development},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {74-79},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165025418783272},
   Doi = {10.1177/0165025418783272},
   Key = {fds337501}
}

@article{fds340097,
   Author = {Chang, L and Lu, HJ and Lansford, JE and Skinner, AT and Bornstein, MH and Steinberg, L and Dodge, KA and Chen, BB and Tian, Q and Bacchini, D and Deater-Deckard, K and Pastorelli, C and Alampay, LP and Sorbring, E and Al-Hassan, SM and Oburu, P and Malone, PS and Di Giunta and L and Tirado,
             LMU and Tapanya, S},
   Title = {Environmental harshness and unpredictability, life history,
             and social and academic behavior of adolescents in nine
             countries.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000655},
   Abstract = {Safety is essential for life. To survive, humans and other
             animals have developed sets of psychological and
             physiological adaptations known as life history (LH)
             tradeoff strategies in response to various safety
             constraints. Evolutionarily selected LH strategies in turn
             regulate development and behavior to optimize survival under
             prevailing safety conditions. The present study tested LH
             hypotheses concerning safety based on a 6-year longitudinal
             sample of 1,245 adolescents and their parents from 9
             countries. The results revealed that, invariant across
             countries, environmental harshness, and unpredictability
             (lack of safety) was negatively associated with slow LH
             behavioral profile, measured 2 years later, and slow LH
             behavioral profile was negatively and positively associated
             with externalizing behavior and academic performance,
             respectively, as measured an additional 2 years later. These
             results support the evolutionary conception that human
             development responds to environmental safety cues through LH
             regulation of social and learning behaviors. (PsycINFO
             Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights
             reserved).},
   Doi = {10.1037/dev0000655},
   Key = {fds340097}
}

@article{fds337500,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Godwin, J and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Steinberg, L and Tapanya, S and Uribe Tirado and LM and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM and Bacchini, D},
   Title = {Parenting, culture, and the development of externalizing
             behaviors from age 7 to 14 in nine countries.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1937-1958},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579418000925},
   Abstract = {Using multilevel models, we examined mother-, father-, and
             child-reported (N = 1,336 families) externalizing behavior
             problem trajectories from age 7 to 14 in nine countries
             (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines,
             Sweden, Thailand, and the United States). The intercept and
             slope of children's externalizing behavior trajectories
             varied both across individuals within culture and across
             cultures, and the variance was larger at the individual
             level than at the culture level. Mothers' and children's
             endorsement of aggression as well as mothers' authoritarian
             attitudes predicted higher age 8 intercepts of child
             externalizing behaviors. Furthermore, prediction from
             individual-level endorsement of aggression and authoritarian
             attitudes to more child externalizing behaviors was
             augmented by prediction from cultural-level endorsement of
             aggression and authoritarian attitudes, respectively.
             Cultures in which father-reported endorsement of aggression
             was higher and both mother- and father-reported
             authoritarian attitudes were higher also reported more child
             externalizing behavior problems at age 8. Among fathers,
             greater attributions regarding uncontrollable success in
             caregiving situations were associated with steeper declines
             in externalizing over time. Understanding cultural-level as
             well as individual-level correlates of children's
             externalizing behavior offers potential insights into
             prevention and intervention efforts that can be more
             effectively targeted at individual children and parents as
             well as targeted at changing cultural norms that increase
             the risk of children's and adolescents' externalizing
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579418000925},
   Key = {fds337500}
}

@article{fds340426,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Toward population impact from early childhood psychological
             interventions.},
   Journal = {American Psychologist},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1117-1129},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000393},
   Abstract = {Acting alone, psychologists rarely achieve population impact
             on important mental health and well-being outcomes for
             families and young children. The traditional Institute of
             Medicine model of moving from efficacy trials to
             effectiveness trials to scaling up has not succeeded, partly
             due to degradation of program quality and impact during
             scale-up and partly due to a failure to consider
             system-context issues at the outset. Analysis of barriers to
             population impact leads to the proposal of a new
             comprehensive system of care that includes both top-down
             coordination among community agencies providing services and
             bottom-up outreach to every family to connect them with
             services. The North Carolina Smart Start Initiative is a
             top-down approach to improving the community-level quality
             of early childcare and education services. A natural
             experiment demonstrates that it improves population
             indicators of children's education outcomes. Family Connects
             is a bottom-up approach that reaches all families giving
             birth in a community through brief home visits to assess
             needs and connect families with community resources. A
             randomized controlled trial reveals increased community
             connectedness, lower maternal anxiety, reduced emergency
             health episodes, and lower rates of investigations for child
             abuse. These initiatives point toward the promise of
             population impact through psychological interventions in
             early life that are delivered in a collaborative system of
             care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights
             reserved).},
   Doi = {10.1037/amp0000393},
   Key = {fds340426}
}

@article{fds335169,
   Author = {Thartori, E and Zuffianò, A and Pastorelli, C and Di Giunta and L and Lunetti, C and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Favini, A and Gómez
             Plata, M and Caprara, GV},
   Title = {The interactive effects of maternal personality and
             adolescent temperament on externalizing behavior problem
             trajectories from age 12 to 14},
   Journal = {Personality and Individual Differences},
   Volume = {134},
   Pages = {301-307},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2018.06.021},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.paid.2018.06.021},
   Key = {fds335169}
}

@article{fds339380,
   Author = {Kassing, F and Godwin, J and Lochman, JE and Coie, JD and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Using Early Childhood Behavior Problems to Predict Adult
             Convictions.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-018-0478-7},
   Abstract = {The current study examined whether teacher and parent
             ratings of externalizing behavior during kindergarten and
             1st grade accurately predicted the presence of adult
             convictions by age 25. Data were collected as part of the
             Fast Track Project. Schools were identified based on poverty
             and crime rates in four locations: Durham, NC, Nashville,
             TN, Seattle, WA, and rural, central PA. Teacher and parent
             screening measures of externalizing behavior were collected
             at the end of kindergarten and 1st grade. ROC curves were
             used to visually depict the tradeoff between sensitivity and
             specificity and best model fit was determined. Five of the
             six combinations of screen scores across time points and
             raters met both the specificity and sensitivity cutoffs for
             a well-performing screening tool. When data were examined
             within each site separately, screen scores performed better
             in sites with high base rates and models including single
             teacher screens accurately predicted convictions. Similarly,
             screen scores performed better and could be used more
             parsimoniously for males, but not females (whose base rates
             were lower in this sample). Overall, results indicated that
             early elementary screens for conduct problems perform
             remarkably well when predicting criminal convictions
             20 years later. However, because of variations in base
             rates, screens operated differently by gender and location.
             The results indicated that for populations with high base
             rates, convictions can be accurately predicted with as
             little as one teacher screen taken during kindergarten or
             1st grade, increasing the cost-effectiveness of preventative
             interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-018-0478-7},
   Key = {fds339380}
}

@article{fds338327,
   Author = {Putnick, DL and Bornstein, MH and Lansford, JE and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya,
             S and Uribe Tirado and LM and Zelli, A and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS},
   Title = {Parental acceptance-rejection and child prosocial behavior:
             Developmental transactions across the transition to
             adolescence in nine countries, mothers and fathers, and
             girls and boys.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1881-1890},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000565},
   Abstract = {Promoting children's prosocial behavior is a goal for
             parents, healthcare professionals, and nations. Does
             positive parenting promote later child prosocial behavior,
             or do children who are more prosocial elicit more positive
             parenting later, or both? Relations between parenting and
             prosocial behavior have to date been studied only in a
             narrow band of countries, mostly with mothers and not
             fathers, and child gender has infrequently been explored as
             a moderator of parenting-prosocial relations. This
             cross-national study uses 1,178 families (mothers, fathers,
             and children) from 9 countries to explore developmental
             transactions between parental acceptance-rejection and
             girls' and boys' prosocial behavior across 3 waves (child
             ages 9 to 12). Controlling for stability across waves,
             within-wave relations, and parental age and education,
             higher parental acceptance predicted increased child
             prosocial behavior from age 9 to 10 and from age 10 to 12.
             Higher age 9 child prosocial behavior also predicted
             increased parental acceptance from age 9 to 10. These
             transactional paths were invariant across 9 countries,
             mothers and fathers, and girls and boys. Parental acceptance
             increases child prosocial behaviors later, but child
             prosocial behaviors are not effective at increasing parental
             acceptance in the transition to adolescence. This study
             identifies widely applicable socialization processes across
             countries, mothers and fathers, and girls and boys.
             (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/dev0000565},
   Key = {fds338327}
}

@article{fds339381,
   Author = {Schenck-Fontaine, A and Lansford, JE and Skinner, AT and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Sorbring, E and Steinberg, L and Malone, PS and Tapanya, S and Uribe Tirado and LM and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM and Bacchini, D and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L},
   Title = {Associations Between Perceived Material Deprivation,
             Parents' Discipline Practices, and Children's Behavior
             Problems: An International Perspective.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.13151},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the association between perceived
             material deprivation, children's behavior problems, and
             parents' disciplinary practices. The sample included 1,418
             8- to 12-year-old children and their parents in China,
             Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden,
             Thailand, and the United States. Multilevel mixed- and
             fixed-effects regression models found that, even when income
             remained stable, perceived material deprivation was
             associated with children's externalizing behavior problems
             and parents' psychological aggression. Parents' disciplinary
             practices mediated a small share of the association between
             perceived material deprivation and children's behavior
             problems. There were no differences in these associations
             between mothers and fathers or between high- and low- and
             middle-income countries. These results suggest that material
             deprivation likely influences children's outcomes at any
             income level.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.13151},
   Key = {fds339381}
}

@article{fds337498,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Rothenberg, WA and Jensen, TM and Lippold, MA and Bacchini, D and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di
             Giunta, L and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Steinberg, L and Tapanya, S and Uribe
             Tirado, LM and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM},
   Title = {Bidirectional Relations Between Parenting and Behavior
             Problems From Age 8 to 13 in Nine Countries.},
   Journal = {Journal of Research on Adolescence},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {571-590},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jora.12381},
   Abstract = {This study used data from 12 cultural groups in nine
             countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya,
             Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States;
             N = 1,298) to understand the cross-cultural
             generalizability of how parental warmth and control are
             bidirectionally related to externalizing and internalizing
             behaviors from childhood to early adolescence. Mothers,
             fathers, and children completed measures when children were
             ages 8-13. Multiple-group autoregressive, cross-lagged
             structural equation models revealed that child effects
             rather than parent effects may better characterize how
             warmth and control are related to child externalizing and
             internalizing behaviors over time, and that parent effects
             may be more characteristic of relations between parental
             warmth and control and child externalizing and internalizing
             behavior during childhood than early adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jora.12381},
   Key = {fds337498}
}

@article{fds337499,
   Author = {Saint-Eloi Cadely and H and Pittman, JF and Pettit, GS and Lansford, JE and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Holtzworth-Munroe,
             A},
   Title = {Predicting Patterns of Intimate Partner Violence
             Perpetration From Late Adolescence to Young
             Adulthood.},
   Journal = {Journal of Interpersonal Violence},
   Pages = {886260518795173},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0886260518795173},
   Abstract = {Saint-Eloi Cadely et al. found longitudinal patterns for the
             perpetration of both psychological and physical intimate
             partner violence (IPV), including actively and minimally
             aggressive patterns. The current study builds on these
             findings by examining four theory-derived variables
             (interparental aggression, social-information processing
             [SIP] biases, relationship insecurities [preoccupied and
             fearful], and discontinuity in relationship partner over
             time) as predictors of membership within these patterns,
             using multinomial logistic regression. The analysis sample
             consisted of 484 participants who were romantically involved
             at least once during the eight waves of data collection from
             the ages of 18 to 25. In predicting psychological IPV, more
             SIP biases, higher levels of a preoccupied insecurity, and
             less discontinuity in relationship partners over time
             differentiated the actively aggressive patterns from the
             minimally aggressive pattern. In addition, two actively
             aggressive patterns of psychological IPV differed in terms
             of SIP biases and discontinuity in romantic partners.
             Specifically, more SIP biases and less discontinuity in
             romantic partnerships distinguished the extensively
             aggressive pattern from the pattern that mainly consisted of
             minor types of aggression. In predicting physical IPV, the
             aggressive pattern differed from the nonaggressive pattern
             in terms of more interparental aggression, more SIP biases,
             and more relationship insecurities. The findings that
             developmental patterns of IPV can be predicted by social and
             psychological factors may aid both developmental theory and
             practice.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0886260518795173},
   Key = {fds337499}
}

@article{fds335170,
   Author = {Bushman, BJ and Coyne, SM and Anderson, CA and Björkqvist, K and Boxer,
             P and Dodge, KA and Dubow, EF and Farrington, DP and Gentile, DA and Huesmann, LR and Lansford, JE and Novaco, RW and Ostrov, JM and Underwood, MK and Warburton, WA and Ybarra, ML},
   Title = {Risk factors for youth violence: Youth violence commission,
             International Society For Research On Aggression
             (ISRA).},
   Journal = {Aggressive Behavior},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {331-336},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ab.21766},
   Doi = {10.1002/ab.21766},
   Key = {fds335170}
}

@article{fds333727,
   Author = {Olson, SL and Davis-Kean, P and Chen, M and Lansford, JE and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Mapping the Growth of Heterogeneous Forms of Externalizing
             Problem Behavior Between Early Childhood and
             Adolescence:A Comparison of Parent and Teacher
             Ratings.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {935-950},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-018-0407-9},
   Abstract = {We compared long-term growth patterns in teachers' and
             mothers' ratings of Overt Aggression, Covert Aggression,
             Oppositional Defiance, Impulsivity/inattention, and Emotion
             Dysregulation across developmental periods spanning
             kindergarten through grade 8 (ages 5 to 13 years). We also
             determined whether salient background characteristics and
             measures of child temperament and parenting risk
             differentially predicted growth in discrete categories of
             child externalizing symptoms across development.
             Participants were 549 kindergarten-age children (51% male;
             83% European American; 17% African American) whose problem
             behaviors were rated by teachers and parents each successive
             year of development through 8th grade. Latent growth curve
             analyses were performed for each component scale,
             contrasting with an overall index of externalizing, in a
             piecewise fashion encompassing two periods of development:
             K-1and grades 1-8. Our findings showed that there were
             meaningful differences and similarities between informants
             in their levels of concern about specific forms of
             externalizing problems, patterns of change in problem
             behavior reports across development, and in the extent to
             which their ratings of specific problems were associated
             with distal and proximal covariates. Thus, these data
             provided novel information about issues that have received
             scant empirical attention and have important implications
             for understanding the development and prevention of
             children's long-term externalizing problems.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-018-0407-9},
   Key = {fds333727}
}

@article{fds333726,
   Author = {Duell, N and Icenogle, G and Silva, K and Chein, J and Steinberg, L and Banich, MT and Di Guinta and L and Dodge, KA and Fanti, KA and Lansford,
             JE and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya, S and Uribe Tirado and LM and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM and Takash, HMS and Bacchini, D and Chang, L and Chaudhary,
             N},
   Title = {A cross-sectional examination of response inhibition and
             working memory on the Stroop task},
   Journal = {Cognitive Development},
   Volume = {47},
   Pages = {19-31},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2018.02.003},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Elsevier Inc. The authors examined the association
             between working memory and response inhibition on the Stroop
             task using a cross-sectional, international sample of 5099
             individuals (49.3% male) ages 10–30 (M = 17.04 years; SD =
             5.9). Response inhibition was measured using a Stroop task
             that included “equal” and “unequal” blocks, during
             which the relative frequency of neutral and incongruent
             trials was manipulated. Competing stimuli in incongruent
             trials evinced inhibitory functioning, and having a lower
             proportion of incongruent trials (as in unequal blocks)
             placed higher demands on working memory. Results for
             accuracy indicated that age and working memory were
             independently associated with response inhibition. Age
             differences in response inhibition followed a curvilinear
             trajectory, with performance improving into early adulthood.
             Response inhibition was greatest among individuals with high
             working memory. For response time, age uniquely predicted
             response inhibition in unequal blocks. In equal blocks, age
             differences in response inhibition varied as a function of
             working memory, with age differences being least pronounced
             among individuals with high working memory. The implications
             of considering the association between response inhibition
             and working memory in the context of development are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cogdev.2018.02.003},
   Key = {fds333726}
}

@article{fds335171,
   Author = {Muschkin, CG and Ladd, HF and Dodge, KA and Bai, Y},
   Title = {Gender Differences in the Impact of North Carolina’s Early
             Care and Education Initiatives on Student Outcomes in
             Elementary School},
   Journal = {Educational Policy},
   Pages = {089590481877390-089590481877390},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0895904818773901},
   Doi = {10.1177/0895904818773901},
   Key = {fds335171}
}

@article{fds330212,
   Author = {McQuillan, ME and Kultur, EC and Bates, JE and O'Reilly, LM and Dodge,
             KA and Lansford, JE and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Dysregulation in children: Origins and implications from age
             5 to age 28.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {695-713},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579417001572},
   Abstract = {Research shows that childhood dysregulation is associated
             with later psychiatric disorders. It does not yet resolve
             discrepancies in the operationalization of dysregulation. It
             is also far from settled on the origins and implications of
             individual differences in dysregulation. This study tested
             several operational definitions of dysregulation using
             Achenbach attention, anxious/depressed, and aggression
             subscales. Individual growth curves of dysregulation were
             computed, and predictors of growth differences were
             considered. The study also compared the predictive utility
             of the dysregulation indexes to standard externalizing and
             internalizing indexes. Dysregulation was indexed annually
             for 24 years in a community sample (n = 585). Hierarchical
             linear models considered changes in dysregulation in
             relation to possible influences from parenting, family
             stress, child temperament, language, and peer relations. In
             a test of the meaning of dysregulation, it was related to
             functional and psychiatric outcomes in adulthood.
             Dysregulation predictions were further compared to those of
             the more standard internalizing and externalizing indexes.
             Growth curve analyses showed strong stability of
             dysregulation. Initial levels of dysregulation were
             predicted by temperamental resistance to control, and change
             in dysregulation was predicted by poor language ability and
             peer relations. Dysregulation and externalizing problems
             were associated with negative adult outcomes to a similar
             extent.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579417001572},
   Key = {fds330212}
}

@article{fds329395,
   Author = {Duell, N and Steinberg, L and Icenogle, G and Chein, J and Chaudhary, N and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Fanti, KA and Lansford, JE and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya, S and Uribe
             Tirado, LM and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM and Takash, HMS and Bacchini, D and Chang, L},
   Title = {Age Patterns in Risk Taking Across the World.},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1052-1072},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-017-0752-y},
   Abstract = {Epidemiological data indicate that risk behaviors are among
             the leading causes of adolescent morbidity and mortality
             worldwide. Consistent with this, laboratory-based studies of
             age differences in risk behavior allude to a peak in
             adolescence, suggesting that adolescents demonstrate a
             heightened propensity, or inherent inclination, to take
             risks. Unlike epidemiological reports, studies of risk
             taking propensity have been limited to Western samples,
             leaving questions about the extent to which heightened risk
             taking propensity is an inherent or culturally constructed
             aspect of adolescence. In the present study, age patterns in
             risk-taking propensity (using two laboratory tasks: the
             Stoplight and the BART) and real-world risk taking (using
             self-reports of health and antisocial risk taking) were
             examined in a sample of 5227 individuals (50.7% female) ages
             10-30 (M = 17.05 years, SD = 5.91) from 11 Western
             and non-Western countries (China, Colombia, Cyprus, India,
             Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and
             the US). Two hypotheses were tested: (1) risk taking follows
             an inverted-U pattern across age groups, peaking earlier on
             measures of risk taking propensity than on measures of
             real-world risk taking, and (2) age patterns in risk taking
             propensity are more consistent across countries than age
             patterns in real-world risk taking. Overall, risk taking
             followed the hypothesized inverted-U pattern across age
             groups, with health risk taking evincing the latest peak.
             Age patterns in risk taking propensity were more consistent
             across countries than age patterns in real-world risk
             taking. Results suggest that although the association
             between age and risk taking is sensitive to measurement and
             culture, around the world, risk taking is generally highest
             among late adolescents.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10964-017-0752-y},
   Key = {fds329395}
}

@article{fds332672,
   Author = {Crowley, DM and Dodge, KA and Barnett, WS and Corso, P and Duffy, S and Graham, P and Greenberg, M and Haskins, R and Hill, L and Jones, DE and Karoly, LA and Kuklinski, MR and Plotnick, R},
   Title = {Standards of Evidence for Conducting and Reporting Economic
             Evaluations in Prevention Science.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science : the Official Journal of the Society for
             Prevention Research},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {366-390},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-017-0858-1},
   Abstract = {Over a decade ago, the Society for Prevention Research
             endorsed the first standards of evidence for research in
             preventive interventions. The growing recognition of the
             need to use limited resources to make sound investments in
             prevention led the Board of Directors to charge a new task
             force to set standards for research in analysis of the
             economic impact of preventive interventions. This article
             reports the findings of this group's deliberations, proposes
             standards for economic analyses, and identifies
             opportunities for future prevention science. Through
             examples, policymakers' need and use of economic analysis
             are described. Standards are proposed for framing economic
             analysis, estimating costs of prevention programs,
             estimating benefits of prevention programs, implementing
             summary metrics, handling uncertainty in estimates, and
             reporting findings. Topics for research in economic analysis
             are identified. The SPR Board of Directors endorses the
             "Standards of Evidence for Conducting and Reporting Economic
             Evaluations in Prevention Science."},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-017-0858-1},
   Key = {fds332672}
}

@article{fds323764,
   Author = {Steinberg, L and Icenogle, G and Shulman, EP and Breiner, K and Chein,
             J and Bacchini, D and Chang, L and Chaudhary, N and Giunta, LD and Dodge,
             KA and Fanti, KA and Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya, S and Tirado,
             LMU and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM and Takash,
             HMS},
   Title = {Around the world, adolescence is a time of heightened
             sensation seeking and immature self-regulation.},
   Journal = {Developmental Science},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {2},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/desc.12532},
   Abstract = {The dual systems model of adolescent risk-taking portrays
             the period as one characterized by a combination of
             heightened sensation seeking and still-maturing
             self-regulation, but most tests of this model have been
             conducted in the United States or Western Europe. In the
             present study, these propositions are tested in an
             international sample of more than 5000 individuals between
             ages 10 and 30 years from 11 countries in Africa, Asia,
             Europe and the Americas, using a multi-method test battery
             that includes both self-report and performance-based
             measures of both constructs. Consistent with the dual
             systems model, sensation seeking increased between
             preadolescence and late adolescence, peaked at age 19, and
             declined thereafter, whereas self-regulation increased
             steadily from preadolescence into young adulthood, reaching
             a plateau between ages 23 and 26. Although there were some
             variations in the magnitude of the observed age trends, the
             developmental patterns were largely similar across
             countries.},
   Doi = {10.1111/desc.12532},
   Key = {fds323764}
}

@article{fds330823,
   Author = {Petersen, IT and Lindhiem, O and LeBeau, B and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Development of internalizing problems from adolescence to
             emerging adulthood: Accounting for heterotypic continuity
             with vertical scaling.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {586-599},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000449},
   Abstract = {Manifestations of internalizing problems, such as specific
             symptoms of anxiety and depression, can change across
             development, even if individuals show strong continuity in
             rank-order levels of internalizing problems. This
             illustrates the concept of heterotypic continuity, and
             raises the question of whether common measures might be
             construct-valid for one age but not another. This study
             examines mean-level changes in internalizing problems across
             a long span of development at the same time as accounting
             for heterotypic continuity by using age-appropriate,
             changing measures. Internalizing problems from age 14-24
             were studied longitudinally in a community sample (N = 585),
             using Achenbach's Youth Self-Report (YSR) and Young Adult
             Self-Report (YASR). Heterotypic continuity was evaluated
             with an item response theory (IRT) approach to vertical
             scaling, linking different measures over time to be on the
             same scale, as well as with a Thurstone scaling approach.
             With vertical scaling, internalizing problems peaked in
             mid-to-late adolescence and showed a group-level decrease
             from adolescence to early adulthood, a change that would not
             have been seen with the approach of using only age-common
             items. Individuals' trajectories were sometimes different
             than would have been seen with the common-items approach.
             Findings support the importance of considering heterotypic
             continuity when examining development and vertical scaling
             to account for heterotypic continuity with changing
             measures. (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/dev0000449},
   Key = {fds330823}
}

@article{fds330822,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Godwin, J and Al-Hassan, SM and Bacchini, D and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Chen, B-B and Deater-Deckard, K and Di
             Giunta, L and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Steinberg, L and Tapanya, S and Alampay,
             LP and Uribe Tirado and LM and Zelli, A},
   Title = {Longitudinal associations between parenting and youth
             adjustment in twelve cultural groups: Cultural normativeness
             of parenting as a moderator.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {362-377},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000416},
   Abstract = {To examine whether the cultural normativeness of parents'
             beliefs and behaviors moderates the links between those
             beliefs and behaviors and youths' adjustment, mothers,
             fathers, and children (N = 1,298 families) from 12 cultural
             groups in 9 countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan,
             Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States)
             were interviewed when children were, on average, 10 years
             old and again when children were 12 years old. Multilevel
             models examined 5 aspects of parenting (expectations
             regarding family obligations, monitoring, psychological
             control, behavioral control, warmth/affection) in relation
             to 5 aspects of youth adjustment (social competence,
             prosocial behavior, academic achievement, externalizing
             behavior, internalizing behavior). Interactions between
             family level and culture-level predictors were tested to
             examine whether cultural normativeness of parenting
             behaviors moderated the link between those behaviors and
             children's adjustment. More evidence was found for within-
             than between-culture differences in parenting predictors of
             youth adjustment. In 7 of the 8 instances in which cultural
             normativeness was found to moderate the link between
             parenting and youth adjustment, the link between a
             particular parenting behavior and youth adjustment was
             magnified in cultural contexts in which the parenting
             behavior was more normative. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/dev0000416},
   Key = {fds330822}
}

@article{fds333728,
   Author = {Miller, AB and Sheridan, MA and Hanson, JL and McLaughlin, KA and Bates,
             JE and Lansford, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Dimensions of deprivation and threat, psychopathology, and
             potential mediators: A multi-year longitudinal
             analysis.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {127},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {160-170},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/abn0000331},
   Abstract = {Prior research demonstrates a link between exposure to
             childhood adversity and psychopathology later in
             development. However, work on mechanisms linking adversity
             to psychopathology fails to account for specificity in these
             pathways across different types of adversity. Here, we test
             a conceptual model that distinguishes deprivation and threat
             as distinct forms of childhood adversity with different
             pathways to psychopathology. Deprivation involves an absence
             of inputs from the environment, such as cognitive and social
             stimulation, that influence psychopathology by altering
             cognitive development, such as verbal abilities. Threat
             includes experiences involving harm or threat of harm that
             increase risk for psychopathology through disruptions in
             social-emotional processing. We test the prediction that
             deprivation, but not threat, increases risk for
             psychopathology through altered verbal abilities. Data were
             drawn from the Child Development Project (N = 585), which
             followed children for over a decade. We analyze data from
             assessment points at age 5, 6, 14, and 17 years. Mothers
             completed interviews at age 5 and 6 on exposure to threat
             and deprivation experiences. Youth verbal abilities were
             assessed at age 14. At age 17, mothers reported on child
             psychopathology. A path analysis model tested longitudinal
             paths to internalizing and externalizing problems from
             experiences of deprivation and threat. Consistent with
             predictions, deprivation was associated with risk for
             externalizing problems via effects on verbal abilities at
             age 14. Threat was associated longitudinally with both
             internalizing and externalizing problems, but these effects
             were not mediated by verbal abilities. Results suggest that
             unique developmental mechanisms link different forms of
             adversity with psychopathology. (PsycINFO Database
             Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/abn0000331},
   Key = {fds333728}
}

@article{fds326573,
   Author = {Wang, FL and Chassin, L and Bates, JE and Dick, D and Lansford, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Serotonin functioning and adolescents' alcohol use: A
             genetically informed study examining mechanisms of
             risk.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {213-233},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s095457941700058x},
   Abstract = {The current study used data from two longitudinal samples to
             test whether self-regulation, depressive symptoms, and
             aggression/antisociality were mediators in the relation
             between a polygenic score indexing serotonin (5-HT)
             functioning and alcohol use in adolescence. The results from
             an independent genome-wide association study of
             5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the cerebrospinal fluid were
             used to create 5-HT polygenic risk scores. Adolescents
             and/or parents reported on adolescents' self-regulation
             (Time 1), depressive symptoms (Time 2), aggression/antisociality
             (Time 2), and alcohol use (Time 3). The results showed that
             5-HT polygenic risk did not predict self-regulation.
             However, adolescents with higher levels of 5-HT polygenic
             risk showed greater depression and aggression/antisociality.
             Adolescents' aggression/antisociality mediated the relation
             between 5-HT polygenic risk and later alcohol use. Deficits
             in self-regulation also predicted depression and
             aggression/antisociality, and indirectly predicted alcohol
             use through aggression/antisociality. Pathways to alcohol
             use were especially salient for males from families with low
             parental education in one of the two samples. The results
             provide insights into the longitudinal mechanisms underlying
             the relation between 5-HT functioning and alcohol use (i.e.,
             earlier aggression/antisociality). There was no evidence
             that genetically based variation in 5-HT functioning
             predisposed individuals to deficits in self-regulation.
             Genetically based variation in 5-HT functioning and
             self-regulation might be separate, transdiagnostic risk
             factors for several types of psychopathology.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s095457941700058x},
   Key = {fds326573}
}

@article{fds330213,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Peer Victimization during Middle Childhood as a Marker of
             Attenuated Risk for Adult Arrest.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {57-65},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-017-0354-x},
   Abstract = {This longitudinal investigation examined interactions
             between aggression and peer victimization during middle
             childhood in the prediction of arrest through the adult
             years for 388 (198 boys, 190 girls) study participants. As
             part of an ongoing multisite study (i.e., Child Development
             Project), peer victimization and aggression were assessed
             via a peer nomination inventory in middle childhood, and
             juvenile and adult arrest histories were assessed via a
             self-report questionnaire as well as review of court
             records. Early aggression was linked to later arrest but
             only for those youths who were rarely victimized by peers.
             Although past investigators have viewed youths who are both
             aggressive and victimized as a high-risk subgroup, our
             findings suggest that the psychological and behavioral
             attributes of these children may mitigate trajectories
             toward antisocial problems.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-017-0354-x},
   Key = {fds330213}
}

@article{fds332381,
   Author = {Zheng, Y and Albert, D and McMahon, RJ and Dodge, K and Dick, D and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1) Gene Polymorphism Moderate
             Intervention Effects on the Developmental Trajectory of
             African-American Adolescent Alcohol Abuse.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science : the Official Journal of the Society for
             Prevention Research},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {79-89},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-016-0726-4},
   Abstract = {Accumulative evidence from recent genotype × intervention
             studies suggests that individuals carrying susceptible
             genotypes benefit more from intervention and provides one
             avenue to identify subgroups that respond differentially to
             intervention. This study examined the moderation by
             glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) gene variants of
             intervention effects on the developmental trajectories of
             alcohol abuse through adolescence. Participants were
             randomized into Fast Track intervention and control groups
             self-reported past-year alcohol abuse annually from grade 7
             through 2 years post-high school and provided genotype data
             at age 21 (69% males; European Americans [EAs] = 270,
             African-Americans [AAs] = 282). Latent growth curve
             models were fit to examine developmental trajectories of
             alcohol abuse. The interactions of 10 single nucleotide
             polymorphisms (SNPs) in NR3C1 with intervention were
             examined separately. Both EAs and AAs showed significant
             increases in past-year alcohol abuse with substantial
             inter-individual differences in rates of linear growth. AAs
             showed lower general levels and slower rates of linear
             growth than EAs. Adjusting for multiple tests, one NR3C1 SNP
             (rs12655166) significantly moderated intervention effects on
             the developmental trajectories of alcohol abuse among AAs.
             Intervention effects on the rates of linear growth were
             stronger among AAs carrying minor alleles than those not
             carrying minor alleles. The findings highlight the
             importance of taking a developmental perspective on
             adolescent alcohol use and have implications for future
             intervention design and evaluation by identifying subgroups
             that could disproportionally benefit from
             intervention.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-016-0726-4},
   Key = {fds332381}
}

@article{fds327155,
   Author = {Deater-Deckard, K and Godwin, J and Lansford, JE and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring,
             E and Steinberg, L and Tapanya, S and Alampay, LP and Uribe Tirado and LM and Zelli, A and Al-Hassan, SM},
   Title = {Within- and between-person and group variance in behavior
             and beliefs in cross-cultural longitudinal
             data.},
   Journal = {Journal of Adolescence},
   Volume = {62},
   Pages = {207-217},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.06.002},
   Abstract = {This study grapples with what it means to be part of a
             cultural group, from a statistical modeling perspective. The
             method we present compares within- and between-cultural
             group variability, in behaviors in families. We demonstrate
             the method using a cross-cultural study of adolescent
             development and parenting, involving three biennial waves of
             longitudinal data from 1296 eight-year-olds and their
             parents (multiple cultures in nine countries). Family
             members completed surveys about parental negativity and
             positivity, child academic and social-emotional adjustment,
             and attitudes about parenting and adolescent behavior.
             Variance estimates were computed at the cultural group,
             person, and within-person level using multilevel models. Of
             the longitudinally consistent variance, most was within and
             not between cultural groups-although there was a wide range
             of between-group differences. This approach to quantifying
             cultural group variability may prove valuable when applied
             to quantitative studies of acculturation.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.06.002},
   Key = {fds327155}
}

@article{fds339931,
   Author = {Goodman, WB and O'Donnell, K and Murphy, RA and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Moving Beyond Program to Population Impact: Toward a
             Universal Early Childhood System of Care},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Theory and Review},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jftr.12302},
   Abstract = {© 2018 National Council on Family Relations Families have
             clearly benefited from increased availability of
             evidence-based intervention, including home-visiting models
             and increased federal funding for programs benefiting
             parents and children. The goal of population-level impact on
             the health and well-being of infants and young children
             across entire communities, however, remains elusive. New
             approaches are needed to move beyond scaling of individual
             programs toward an integrated system of care in early
             childhood. To advance this goal, the current article
             provides a framework for developing an early childhood
             system of care that pairs a top-down goal for the alignment
             of services with a bottom-up goal of identifying and
             addressing needs of all families throughout early childhood.
             Further, we describe how universal newborn home visiting can
             be utilized to both support alignment of, and family entry
             into, an early childhood system of care with broad reach,
             high quality, and evidence of population impact for families
             and children.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jftr.12302},
   Key = {fds339931}
}


%% Egger, Helen L.   
@article{fds340612,
   Author = {Carpenter, KLH and Baranek, GT and Copeland, WE and Compton, S and Zucker, N and Dawson, G and Egger, HL},
   Title = {Sensory Over-Responsivity: An Early Risk Factor for Anxiety
             and Behavioral Challenges in Young Children.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-018-0502-y},
   Abstract = {Anxiety disorders are prevalent and significantly impact
             young children and their families. One hypothesized risk
             factor for anxiety is heightened responses to sensory input.
             Few studies have explored this hypothesis prospectively.
             This study had two goals: (1) examine whether sensory
             over-responsivity is predictive of the development of
             anxiety in a large prospective sample of children, and (2)
             identify whether anxiety mediates the relationship between
             sensory over-responsivity and behavioral challenges.
             Children's sensory and anxiety symptoms were assessed in a
             community sample of 917 at 2-5 and again in 191 of these
             children at 6 years old. Parents also reported on a number
             of additional behavioral challenges previously found to be
             associated with both sensory over-responsivity and anxiety
             separately: irritability, food selectivity, sleep problems,
             and gastrointestinal problems. Forty three percent of
             preschool children with sensory over-responsivity also had a
             concurrent impairing anxiety disorder. Preschool sensory
             over-responsivity symptoms significantly and positively
             predicted anxiety symptoms at age six. This relationship was
             both specific and unidirectional. Finally, school-age
             anxiety symptoms mediated the relationship between preschool
             sensory over-responsivity symptoms and both irritability and
             sleep problems at school-age. These results suggest sensory
             over-responsivity is a risk factor for anxiety disorders.
             Furthermore, children who have symptoms of sensory
             over-responsivity as preschoolers have higher levels of
             anxiety symptoms at school-age, which in turn is associated
             with increased levels of school-age behavioral
             challenges.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-018-0502-y},
   Key = {fds340612}
}

@article{fds339771,
   Author = {Dawson, G and Campbell, K and Hashemi, J and Lippmann, SJ and Smith, V and Carpenter, K and Egger, H and Espinosa, S and Vermeer, S and Baker, J and Sapiro, G},
   Title = {Atypical postural control can be detected via computer
             vision analysis in toddlers with autism spectrum
             disorder.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {17008},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-35215-8},
   Abstract = {Evidence suggests that differences in motor function are an
             early feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). One aspect
             of motor ability that develops during childhood is postural
             control, reflected in the ability to maintain a steady head
             and body position without excessive sway. Observational
             studies have documented differences in postural control in
             older children with ASD. The present study used computer
             vision analysis to assess midline head postural control, as
             reflected in the rate of spontaneous head movements during
             states of active attention, in 104 toddlers between 16-31
             months of age (Mean = 22 months), 22 of whom were
             diagnosed with ASD. Time-series data revealed robust group
             differences in the rate of head movements while the toddlers
             watched movies depicting social and nonsocial stimuli.
             Toddlers with ASD exhibited a significantly higher rate of
             head movement as compared to non-ASD toddlers, suggesting
             difficulties in maintaining midline position of the head
             while engaging attentional systems. The use of digital
             phenotyping approaches, such as computer vision analysis, to
             quantify variation in early motor behaviors will allow for
             more precise, objective, and quantitative characterization
             of early motor signatures and potentially provide new
             automated methods for early autism risk identification.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-35215-8},
   Key = {fds339771}
}

@article{fds336938,
   Author = {Campbell, K and Carpenter, KL and Hashemi, J and Espinosa, S and Marsan,
             S and Borg, JS and Chang, Z and Qiu, Q and Vermeer, S and Adler, E and Tepper,
             M and Egger, HL and Baker, JP and Sapiro, G and Dawson,
             G},
   Title = {Computer vision analysis captures atypical attention in
             toddlers with autism.},
   Journal = {Autism},
   Pages = {1362361318766247},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1362361318766247},
   Abstract = {To demonstrate the capability of computer vision analysis to
             detect atypical orienting and attention behaviors in
             toddlers with autism spectrum disorder. One hundered and
             four toddlers of 16-31 months old (mean = 22)
             participated in this study. Twenty-two of the toddlers had
             autism spectrum disorder and 82 had typical development or
             developmental delay. Toddlers watched video stimuli on a
             tablet while the built-in camera recorded their head
             movement. Computer vision analysis measured participants'
             attention and orienting in response to name calls.
             Reliability of the computer vision analysis algorithm was
             tested against a human rater. Differences in behavior were
             analyzed between the autism spectrum disorder group and the
             comparison group. Reliability between computer vision
             analysis and human coding for orienting to name was
             excellent (intra-class coefficient 0.84, 95% confidence
             interval 0.67-0.91). Only 8% of toddlers with autism
             spectrum disorder oriented to name calling on >1 trial,
             compared to 63% of toddlers in the comparison group
             (p = 0.002). Mean latency to orient was significantly
             longer for toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (2.02 vs
             1.06 s, p = 0.04). Sensitivity for autism spectrum
             disorder of atypical orienting was 96% and specificity was
             38%. Older toddlers with autism spectrum disorder showed
             less attention to the videos overall (p = 0.03).
             Automated coding offers a reliable, quantitative method for
             detecting atypical social orienting and reduced sustained
             attention in toddlers with autism spectrum
             disorder.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1362361318766247},
   Key = {fds336938}
}

@article{fds338017,
   Author = {Hashemi, J and Dawson, G and Carpenter, KLH and Campbell, K and Qiu, Q and Espinosa, S and Marsan, S and Baker, JP and Egger, HL and Sapiro,
             G},
   Title = {Computer Vision Analysis for Quantification of Autism Risk
             Behaviors},
   Journal = {Ieee Transactions on Affective Computing},
   Pages = {1-1},
   Publisher = {Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
             (IEEE)},
   Year = {2018},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/taffc.2018.2868196},
   Abstract = {IEEE Observational behavior analysis plays a key role for
             the discovery and evaluation of risk markers for many
             neurodevelopmental disorders. Research on autism spectrum
             disorder (ASD) suggests that behavioral risk markers can be
             observed at 12 months of age, with diagnosis possible at 18
             months. To date, studies and evaluations involving
             observational analysis tend to rely heavily on clinical
             practitioners and specialists who have undergone intensive
             training to be able to reliably administer carefully
             designed behavioral-eliciting tasks, code the resulting
             behaviors, and interpret them. These methods are therefore
             extremely expensive, time-intensive, and are not easily
             scalable for large or longitudinal observational analysis.
             We developed a self-contained, closed-loop, mobile
             application with movie stimuli designed to engage the
             child&#x0027;s attention and elicit specific behavioral and
             social responses, which are recorded with the mobile
             device&#x0027;s camera and analyzed via computer vision
             algorithms. Here, in addition to presenting this paradigm,
             we validate the system to measure engagement, name-call, and
             emotional responses of toddlers with and without ASD who
             were presented with the application. Additionally, we
             demonstrate how the proposed framework can further risk
             marker research with fine-grained quantification of
             behaviors. The results suggest these objective and automatic
             methods can be considered to aid behavioral
             analysis.},
   Doi = {10.1109/taffc.2018.2868196},
   Key = {fds338017}
}


%% Egner, Tobias   
@article{fds338533,
   Author = {Whitehead, PS and Egner, T},
   Title = {Frequency of prospective use modulates instructed task-set
             interference.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and
             Performance},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1970-1980},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xhp0000586},
   Abstract = {Recent studies have demonstrated that keeping an instructed
             task set in working memory (WM) for prospective use can
             interfere with behavior on an intervening task that employs
             shared stimuli-the prospective task-set-interference effect.
             One open question is whether people have strategic control
             over prospective task-set interference based on their
             expectations of whether task instructions will have to be
             implemented or recalled. To answer this question, we
             conducted two experiments that varied the likelihood with
             which a set of prospective task instructions would have to
             be implemented or recalled. Based on the hypothesis that
             participants are able to strategically modulate the manner
             in which a prospective task set is encoded in WM, we
             predicted that, as the frequency of implementing task
             instructions increased, so too would the magnitude of the
             prospective task-set-interference effect. We found that task
             instructions held in WM caused significant task-set
             interference, even in mostly recall conditions,
             but-crucially-that this interference effect scaled
             positively with the likelihood of having to implement the
             prospective set. These data suggest that task instructions
             are obligatorily encoded as a procedural task set, but that
             the degree to which this set impinges on ongoing stimulus
             processing is subject to some strategic control, possibly
             via modulation of the associations between declarative and
             procedural WM contents. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018
             APA, all rights reserved).},
   Doi = {10.1037/xhp0000586},
   Key = {fds338533}
}

@article{fds340596,
   Author = {Braem, S and Egner, T},
   Title = {Getting a grip on cognitive flexibility.},
   Journal = {Current Directions in Psychological Science},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {470-476},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0963721418787475},
   Abstract = {Cognitive flexibility refers to the ability to quickly
             reconfigure our mind, like when we switch between different
             tasks. This review highlights recent evidence showing that
             cognitive flexibility can be conditioned by simple
             incentives typically known to drive lower-level learning,
             such as stimulus-response associations. Cognitive
             flexibility can also become associated with, and triggered
             by, bottom-up contextual cues in our environment, including
             subliminal cues. Therefore, we suggest that the control
             functions that mediate cognitive flexibility are grounded
             in, and guided by, basic associative learning mechanisms,
             and abide by the same learning principles as more low-level
             forms of behavior. Such a learning perspective on cognitive
             flexibility offers new directions and important implications
             for further research, theory, and applications.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0963721418787475},
   Key = {fds340596}
}

@article{fds335644,
   Author = {Tan, J and Yin, S and Wang, L and Chen, A and Egner,
             T},
   Title = {Processing overlap-dependent distractor dilution rather than
             perceptual target load determines attentional
             selectivity.},
   Journal = {Attention, Perception & Psychophysics},
   Volume = {80},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {2048-2059},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13414-018-1545-4},
   Abstract = {The perceptual load theory of attentional selection argues
             that the degree to which distractors interfere with target
             processing is determined by the "perceptual load" (or
             discrimination difficulty) of target processing: when
             perceptual load is low, distractors interfere to a greater
             extent than when it is high. A well-known exception is
             load-independent interference effects from face distractors
             during processing of name targets. This finding was
             reconciled with load theory by proposing distinct processing
             resources for faces versus names. In the present study, we
             revisit this effect to test (a) whether increasing the
             processing overlap (perceptual, lexical, conceptual) between
             potential targets and distractors would reinstate the
             classic load effect, and (b) whether this data pattern could
             be better explained by load theory or by a rival account
             that argues that distractor dilution rather than target load
             determines the degree of distractor interference. Over four
             experiments, we first replicate the original finding and
             then show that load effects grow with increasing processing
             overlap between potential targets and distractors. However,
             by adding dilution conditions, we also show that these
             processing overlap dependent modulations of distractor
             interference can be explained by the distractor dilution
             perspective but not by perceptual load theory. Thus, our
             findings support a processing overlap dilution account of
             attentional selection.},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13414-018-1545-4},
   Key = {fds335644}
}

@article{fds337438,
   Author = {Jiang, J and Wagner, AD and Egner, T},
   Title = {Integrated externally and internally generated task
             predictions jointly guide cognitive control in prefrontal
             cortex.},
   Journal = {Elife},
   Volume = {7},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/elife.39497},
   Abstract = {Cognitive control proactively configures information
             processing to suit expected task demands. Predictions of
             forthcoming demand can be driven by explicit external cues
             or be generated internally, based on past experience
             (cognitive history). However, it is not known whether and
             how the brain reconciles these two sources of information to
             guide control. Pairing a probabilistic task-switching
             paradigm with computational modeling, we found that external
             and internally generated predictions jointly guide task
             preparation, with a bias for internal predictions. Using
             model-based neuroimaging, we then show that the two sources
             of task prediction are integrated in dorsolateral prefrontal
             cortex, and jointly inform a representation of the
             likelihood of a change in task demand, encoded in
             frontoparietal cortex. Upon task-stimulus onset, dorsomedial
             prefrontal cortex encoded the need for reactive task-set
             adjustment. These data reveal how the human brain integrates
             external cues and cognitive history to prepare for an
             upcoming task.},
   Doi = {10.7554/elife.39497},
   Key = {fds337438}
}

@article{fds332979,
   Author = {Bejjani, C and Zhang, Z and Egner, T},
   Title = {Control by association: Transfer of implicitly primed
             attentional states across linked stimuli.},
   Journal = {Psychonomic Bulletin & Review},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {617-626},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13423-018-1445-6},
   Abstract = {Although cognitive control has traditionally been viewed in
             opposition to associative learning, recent studies show that
             people can learn to link particular stimuli with specific
             cognitive control states (e.g., high attentional
             selectivity). Here, we tested whether such learned
             stimulus-control associations can transfer across
             paired-associates. In the Stimulus-Stimulus (S-S)
             Association phase, specific face or house images repeatedly
             preceded the presentation of particular scene stimuli,
             creating paired face/house-scene associates in memory. The
             Stimulus-Control (S-C) Association phase then associated
             these scenes with different attentional control states by
             probabilistically biasing specific scenes to mostly precede
             either congruent or incongruent trials in a Stroop task.
             Finally, in the Stimulus-Control Transfer (S-CT) phase, the
             faces and houses from the S-S phase preceded Stroop trials
             but were not predictive of congruency, testing whether
             stimulus-control associations would transfer from scenes to
             their associated face/house stimuli. In Experiments 1 and 3,
             we found that learned implicit stimulus-control associations
             could transfer across closely linked cues, and in Experiment
             2, we showed that this transfer depended on the memory
             associations formed in the S-S phase. While this form of
             transfer learning has previously been demonstrated for
             stimulus-reward associations, the present study provides the
             first evidence for the associative transfer of
             stimulus-control associations across arbitrarily linked
             stimuli. This work demonstrates how people can learn to
             implicitly adapt their processing strategies in a flexible
             context-dependent manner and establishes a novel learning
             mechanism supporting the generalization of cognitive
             control.},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13423-018-1445-6},
   Key = {fds332979}
}

@article{fds331649,
   Author = {Muhle-Karbe, PS and Jiang, J and Egner, T},
   Title = {Causal Evidence for Learning-Dependent Frontal Lobe
             Contributions to Cognitive Control.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the
             Society for Neuroscience},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {962-973},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1467-17.2017},
   Abstract = {The lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) plays a central role in
             the prioritization of sensory input based on task relevance.
             Such top-down control of perception is of fundamental
             importance in goal-directed behavior, but can also be costly
             when deployed excessively, necessitating a mechanism that
             regulates control engagement to align it with changing
             environmental demands. We have recently introduced the
             "flexible control model" (FCM), which explains this
             regulation as resulting from a self-adjusting
             reinforcement-learning mechanism that infers latent
             statistical structure in dynamic task environments to
             predict forthcoming states. From this perspective,
             LPFC-based control is engaged as a function of anticipated
             cognitive demand, a notion for which we previously obtained
             correlative neuroimaging evidence. Here, we put this
             hypothesis to a rigorous, causal test by combining the FCM
             with a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) intervention
             that transiently perturbed the LPFC. Human participants
             (male and female) completed a nonstationary version of the
             Stroop task with dynamically changing probabilities of
             conflict between task-relevant and task-irrelevant stimulus
             features. TMS was given on each trial before stimulus onset
             either over the LPFC or over a control site. In the control
             condition, we observed adaptive performance fluctuations
             consistent with demand predictions that were inferred from
             recent and remote trial history and effectively captured by
             our model. Critically, TMS over the LPFC eliminated these
             fluctuations while leaving basic cognitive and motor
             functions intact. These results provide causal evidence for
             a learning-based account of cognitive control and delineate
             the nature of the signals that regulate top-down biases over
             stimulus processing.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A core function
             of the human prefrontal cortex is to control the signal flow
             in sensory brain regions to prioritize processing of
             task-relevant information. Abundant work suggests that such
             control is flexibly recruited to accommodate dynamically
             changing environmental demands, yet the nature of the
             signals that serve to engage control remains unknown. Here,
             we combined computational modeling with noninvasive brain
             stimulation to show that changes in control engagement are
             captured by a self-adjusting reinforcement-learning
             mechanism that tracks changing environmental statistics to
             predict forthcoming processing demands and that transient
             perturbation of the prefrontal cortex abolishes these
             adjustments. These findings delineate the learning signals
             that underpin adaptive engagement of prefrontal control
             functions and provide causal evidence for their relevance in
             behavioral control.},
   Doi = {10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1467-17.2017},
   Key = {fds331649}
}


%% Fairbank, John A.   
@article{fds337455,
   Author = {Fairbank, JA and Briggs, EC and Lee, RC and Corry, NH and Pflieger, JC and Gerrity, ET and Amaya-Jackson, LM and Stander, VA and Murphy,
             RA},
   Title = {Mental Health of Children of Deployed and Nondeployed US
             Military Service Members: The Millennium Cohort Family
             Study.},
   Journal = {Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics :
             Jdbp},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {683-692},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/dbp.0000000000000606},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:Families experience multiple stressors as a result
             of military service. The purpose of this study was to
             investigate the associations among service member deployment
             experiences, family and military factors, and children's
             mental health using baseline data from the Millennium Cohort
             Family Study, a study designed to evaluate the health and
             mental health effects of military service on families,
             including children. METHOD:This study examined
             administrative data on deployment status (combat, noncombat,
             and no deployments), as well as service member- and
             spouse-reported data on deployment experiences and family
             functioning in relation to the mental health of children in
             the family who were aged 9 to 17 years. RESULTS:Most
             children were not reported to have mental health, emotional,
             or behavioral difficulties regardless of parental deployment
             status. For an important minority of children, however,
             parental deployments with combat, compared with those with
             no deployment, were associated with a parental report of
             attention-deficit disorder/attention-deficit hyperactivity
             disorder and depression as diagnosed by a clinical provider,
             after accounting for demographics, psychosocial context, and
             military factors. Children's odds of a parental report of
             depression were significantly higher in both the combat and
             the noncombat deployment groups than in the no deployment
             group. CONCLUSION:These findings extend our understanding of
             the association between parental deployments and children's
             mental health, with implications for services and training
             mental health providers serving military
             families.},
   Doi = {10.1097/dbp.0000000000000606},
   Key = {fds337455}
}

@article{fds336069,
   Author = {Martindale, SL and Epstein, EL and Taber, KH and VA Mid-Atlantic
             MIRECC Workgroup, and Rowland, JA},
   Title = {Behavioral and Health Outcomes Associated With Deployment
             and Nondeployment Acquisition of Traumatic Brain Injury in
             Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans.},
   Journal = {Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation},
   Volume = {99},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {2485-2495},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2018.04.029},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:To characterize behavioral and health outcomes in
             veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI) acquired in
             nondeployment and deployment settings. DESIGN:Cross-sectional
             assessment evaluating TBI acquired during and outside of
             deployment, mental and behavioral health symptoms, and
             diagnoses. SETTING:Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.
             PARTICIPANTS:Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who were deployed
             to a warzone (N=1399). INTERVENTIONS:Not applicable. MAIN
             OUTCOME MEASURES:Comprehensive lifetime TBI interview,
             Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders, Combat
             Exposure Scale, and behavioral and health measures.
             RESULTS:There was a main effect of deployment TBI on
             depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress symptoms, poor
             sleep quality, substance use, and pain. Veterans with
             deployment TBI were also more likely to have a diagnosis of
             bipolar, major depressive, alcohol use, and posttraumatic
             stress disorders than those who did not have a deployment
             TBI. CONCLUSIONS:TBIs acquired during deployment are
             associated with different behavioral and health outcomes
             than TBI acquired in nondeployment environments. The
             presence of TBI during deployment is associated with poorer
             behavioral outcomes, as well as a greater lifetime
             prevalence of behavioral and health problems in contrast to
             veterans without deployment TBI. These results indicate that
             problems may persist chronically after a deployment TBI and
             should be considered when providing care for veterans.
             Veterans with deployment TBI may require treatment
             alterations to improve engagement and outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.apmr.2018.04.029},
   Key = {fds336069}
}

@article{fds336068,
   Author = {Steenkamp, MM and Corry, NH and Qian, M and Li, M and McMaster, HS and Fairbank, JA and Stander, VA and Hollahan, L and Marmar,
             CR},
   Title = {Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in United States
             military spouses: The Millennium Cohort Family
             Study.},
   Journal = {Depression and Anxiety},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {815-829},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/da.22768},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Approximately half of US service members are
             married, equating to 1.1 million military spouses, yet the
             prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among military spouses
             remains understudied. We assessed the prevalence and
             correlates of eight mental health conditions in spouses of
             service members with 2-5 years of service. METHOD:We
             employed baseline data from the Millennium Cohort Family
             Study, a 21-year longitudinal survey following 9,872
             military-affiliated married couples representing all US
             service branches and active duty, Reserve, and National
             Guard components. Couples were surveyed between 2011 and
             2013, a period of high military operational activity
             associated with Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation
             Enduring Freedom. Primary outcomes included depression,
             anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic,
             alcohol misuse, insomnia, somatization, and binge eating,
             all assessed with validated self-report questionnaires.
             RESULTS:A total of 35.90% of military spouses met criteria
             for at least one psychiatric condition. The most commonly
             endorsed conditions were moderate-to-severe somatization
             symptoms (17.63%) and moderate-to-severe insomnia (15.65%).
             PTSD, anxiety, depression, panic, alcohol misuse, and binge
             eating were endorsed by 9.20%, 6.65%, 6.05%, 7.07%, 8.16%,
             and 5.23% of spouses, respectively. Having a partner who
             deployed with combat resulted in higher prevalence of
             anxiety, insomnia, and somatization. Spouses had lower
             prevalence of PTSD, alcohol misuse, and insomnia but higher
             rates of panic and binge eating than service members. Both
             members of a couple rarely endorsed having the same
             psychiatric problem. CONCLUSIONS:One third of junior
             military spouses screened positive for one or more
             psychiatric conditions, underscoring the need for
             high-quality prevention and treatment services.},
   Doi = {10.1002/da.22768},
   Key = {fds336068}
}

@article{fds339605,
   Author = {Wilson, SM and Burroughs, TK and Newins, AR and Dedert, EA and Medenblik, AM and McDonald, SD and Beckham, JC and VA Mid-Atlantic
             MIRECC Workgroup, and Calhoun, PS},
   Title = {The Association Between Alcohol Consumption, Lifetime
             Alcohol Use Disorder, and Psychiatric Distress Among Male
             and Female Veterans.},
   Journal = {Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {591-600},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   Abstract = {This study aimed to examine among veterans (a) whether
             alcohol consumption patterns are associated with probability
             of psychiatric symptoms and (b) whether an alcohol use
             disorder (AUD) history explains psychiatric symptoms among
             nondrinkers.Data were collected from 3,003 veterans (20.5%
             women). Gender-stratified logistic models examined the
             association between alcohol consumption pattern and the odds
             of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD),
             depression, and suicidality. Two types of models were
             tested: four-group models comparing moderate drinkers to
             nondrinkers, light, and heavy drinkers; and five-group
             models separating nondrinkers by AUD history.In four-group
             models for both genders, compared with moderate drinkers,
             hazardous drinkers were more likely to have psychiatric
             symptoms. Among men, nondrinkers were more likely to have
             symptoms of depression and suicidality but not PTSD. Among
             women, nondrinkers and light drinkers were more likely to
             have PTSD symptoms. In the five-group model for men, odds of
             symptoms were higher for nondrinkers with an AUD history and
             hazardous drinkers. Compared to nondrinkers without an AUD
             history and light drinkers, male nondrinkers with an AUD
             history had higher odds of psychiatric symptoms. In the
             five-group model for women, the odds of symptoms were higher
             for hazardous drinkers. Female nondrinkers with an AUD
             history had higher odds of a positive depression screen.
             Odds of a positive PTSD screen were higher for female
             nondrinkers (with and without an AUD history) and light
             drinkers.For male veterans, there was a protective effect of
             moderate drinking (compared with abstinence) that
             disappeared when nondrinkers without an AUD history were
             separated. However, results for women showed a protective
             effect of moderate drinking with regard to PTSD that
             persisted even when an AUD history was taken into
             account.},
   Key = {fds339605}
}

@article{fds336067,
   Author = {Swanson, J and Easter, M and Brancu, M and VA Mid-Atlantic MIRECC
             Workgroup, and Fairbank, JA},
   Title = {Informing Federal Policy on Firearm Restrictions for
             Veterans with Fiduciaries: Risk Indicators in the
             Post-Deployment Mental Health Study.},
   Journal = {Administration and Policy in Mental Health},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10488-018-0881-y},
   Abstract = {This article examines the public safety rationale for a
             federal policy of prohibiting gun sales to veterans with
             psychiatric disabilities who are assigned a fiduciary to
             manage their benefits from the Department of Veterans
             Affairs. The policy was evaluated using data on 3200
             post-deployment veterans from the Iraq and Afghanistan war
             era. Three proxy measures of fiduciary need-based on
             intellectual disability, drug abuse, or acute
             psychopathology-were associated in bivariate analysis with
             interpersonal violence and suicidality. In multivariate
             analysis, statistical significance remained only for the
             measure based on acute psychopathology. Implications for
             reforms to the fiduciary firearm restriction policy are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10488-018-0881-y},
   Key = {fds336067}
}

@article{fds336070,
   Author = {Elbogen, EB and Wagner, HR and Brancu, M and Kimbrel, NA and Naylor, JC and Swinkels, CM and VA Mid-Atlantic MIRECC Workgroup, and Fairbank,
             JA},
   Title = {Psychosocial Risk Factors and Other Than Honorable Military
             Discharge: Providing Healthcare to Previously Ineligible
             Veterans.},
   Journal = {Military Medicine},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/milmed/usx128},
   Abstract = {In response to a strong focus on suicide prevention for all
             veterans, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) recently
             revised policy to provide emergency mental healthcare for
             veterans who received Other Than Honorable (OTH) discharges
             from the military. This current study takes a preliminary
             step toward identifying demographic, historic, military,
             clinical, and social characteristics of veterans with OTH
             discharges.N = 1,172 Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans were
             evaluated between 2005 and 2016 in the multi-site VA
             Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness, Research, Education and
             Clinical Center (MIRECC) Study of Post-Deployment Mental
             Health (PDMH Study).Veterans with OTH discharges constituted
             2.7% of our sample, approximating the estimated rate in the
             overall U.S. veteran population. Compared to veterans
             discharged under honorable conditions, veterans with OTH
             discharges were more likely to be younger and have greater
             odds of reporting family history of drug abuse and
             depression. Further, veterans with OTH discharges reported a
             lower level of social support and were more likely to be
             single, endorse more sleep problems, score higher on
             measures of drug misuse, have a history of incarceration,
             and meet diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder.
             A subsequent matching analysis provided further evidence of
             the association between OTH discharge and two risk factors:
             drug misuse and incarceration.These findings elucidate
             potential factors associated with veterans with OTH
             discharges, particularly substance abuse and criminal
             justice involvement. Results also indicate higher incidence
             of risk factors that often accompany suicidal ideation and
             should be a highlighted component of healthcare delivery to
             this vulnerable cohort of veterans.},
   Doi = {10.1093/milmed/usx128},
   Key = {fds336070}
}

@article{fds336071,
   Author = {Sun, D and Davis, SL and Haswell, CC and Swanson, CA and Mid-Atlantic
             MIRECC Workgroup, and LaBar, KS and Fairbank, JA and Morey,
             RA},
   Title = {Brain Structural Covariance Network Topology in Remitted
             Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Psychiatry},
   Volume = {9},
   Pages = {90},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00090},
   Abstract = {Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, chronic
             disorder with high psychiatric morbidity; however, a
             substantial portion of affected individuals experience
             remission after onset. Alterations in brain network topology
             derived from cortical thickness correlations are associated
             with PTSD, but the effects of remitted symptoms on network
             topology remain essentially unexplored. In this
             cross-sectional study, US military veterans (N = 317)
             were partitioned into three diagnostic groups, current PTSD
             (CURR-PTSD, N = 101), remitted PTSD with lifetime but no
             current PTSD (REMIT-PTSD, N = 35), and trauma-exposed
             controls (CONTROL, n = 181). Cortical thickness was
             assessed for 148 cortical regions (nodes) and suprathreshold
             interregional partial correlations across subjects
             constituted connections (edges) in each group. Four
             centrality measures were compared with characterize
             between-group differences. The REMIT-PTSD and CONTROL groups
             showed greater centrality in left frontal pole than the
             CURR-PTSD group. The REMIT-PTSD group showed greater
             centrality in right subcallosal gyrus than the other two
             groups. Both REMIT-PTSD and CURR-PTSD groups showed greater
             centrality in right superior frontal sulcus than CONTROL
             group. The centrality in right subcallosal gyrus, left
             frontal pole, and right superior frontal sulcus may play a
             role in remission, current symptoms, and PTSD history,
             respectively. The network centrality changes in critical
             brain regions and structural networks are associated with
             remitted PTSD, which typically coincides with enhanced
             functional behaviors, better emotion regulation, and
             improved cognitive processing. These brain regions and
             associated networks may be candidates for developing novel
             therapies for PTSD. Longitudinal work is needed to
             characterize vulnerability to chronic PTSD, and resilience
             to unremitting PTSD.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00090},
   Key = {fds336071}
}


%% Fitzsimons, Gavan J.   
@article{fds337739,
   Author = {Gaustad, T and Samuelsen, BM and Warlop, L and Fitzsimons,
             GJ},
   Title = {The perils of self-brand connections: Consumer response to
             changes in brand meaning},
   Journal = {Psychology and Marketing},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {818-829},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mar.21137},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Companies commit
             considerable resources to building brand associations that
             resonate with consumers’ identities and facilitate strong
             consumer–brand bonds. The current research investigates a
             potential disadvantage of this popular strategy. The results
             from three studies show that consumers with a high degree of
             self-brand connection respond negatively to brand
             developments (e.g., brand acquisitions and repositioning)
             that change brand meaning. The authors show that this effect
             is due to a change in the identity signaled by the brand.
             The results contrast with existing research, which has
             consistently found that brand connections promote probrand
             behavior and serve as a buffer against negative brand
             information.},
   Doi = {10.1002/mar.21137},
   Key = {fds337739}
}

@article{fds339665,
   Author = {Gaustad, T and Utgård, J and Fitzsimons, GJ},
   Title = {When accidents are good for a brand},
   Journal = {Journal of Business Research},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2018.10.040},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Elsevier Inc. In this research we demonstrate that
             negative press about accidents caused by users can
             counterintuitively improve brand evaluations. In two
             studies, we find an interaction between the brand
             diagnosticity of the user accident and the degree to which
             consumers identify with the brand. Following negative press
             about a user accident, low brand identifiers decrease their
             brand liking and high brand identifiers increase their brand
             liking, but only when the accident is brand diagnostic
             (e.g., a fast car brand in a speed-related
             accident).},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jbusres.2018.10.040},
   Key = {fds339665}
}

@article{fds332784,
   Title = {Erratum},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Research},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1174-1174},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucx095},
   Doi = {10.1093/jcr/ucx095},
   Key = {fds332784}
}

@article{fds333551,
   Author = {Acikalin, MY and Watson, KK and Fitzsimons, GJ and Platt,
             ML},
   Title = {Rhesus macaques form preferences for brand logos through sex
             and social status based advertising.},
   Journal = {Plos One},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {e0193055},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0193055},
   Abstract = {Like humans, monkeys value information about sex and status,
             inviting the hypothesis that our susceptibility to these
             factors in advertising arises from shared, ancestral
             biological mechanisms that prioritize social information. To
             test this idea, we asked whether rhesus macaques (Macaca
             mulatta) show choice behavior that is similar to humans in
             response to sex and social status in advertising. Our
             results show that monkeys form preferences for brand logos
             repeatedly paired with images of macaque genitals and high
             status monkeys. Moreover, monkeys sustain preferences for
             these brand logos even though choosing them provided no
             tangible rewards, a finding that cannot be explained by a
             decision mechanism operating solely on material outcomes.
             Together, our results endorse the hypothesis that the power
             of sex and status in advertising emerges from the
             spontaneous engagement of shared, ancestral neural circuits
             that prioritize information useful for navigating the social
             environment. Finally, our results show that simple
             associative conditioning is sufficient to explain the
             formation of preferences for brand logos paired with sexual
             or status-based images.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0193055},
   Key = {fds333551}
}


%% Fitzsimons, Gráinne M   
@article{fds340575,
   Author = {Kim, JY and Fitzsimons, GM and Kay, AC},
   Title = {Lean in messages increase attributions of women's
             responsibility for gender inequality.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {115},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {974-1001},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pspa0000129},
   Abstract = {Although women's underrepresentation in senior-level
             positions in the workplace has multiple causes, women's
             self-improvement or "empowerment" at work has recently
             attracted cultural attention as a solution. For example, the
             bestselling book Lean In states that women can tackle gender
             inequality themselves by overcoming the "internal barriers"
             (e.g., lack of confidence and ambition) that prevent
             success. We sought to explore the consequences of this type
             of women's empowerment ideology. Study 1 found that
             perceptions of women's ability to solve inequality were
             associated with attributions of women's responsibility to do
             so. Studies 2, 3, 5a, and 5b experimentally manipulated
             exposure to women's empowerment messages, finding that while
             such messages increase perceptions that women are empowered
             to solve workplace gender inequality, they also lead to
             attributions that women are more responsible both for
             creating and solving the problem. Study 4 found a similar
             pattern in the context of a specific workplace problem, and
             found that such messages also lead to a preference for
             interventions focused on changing women rather than changing
             the system. Studies 5a and 5b sought to replicate prior
             studies and document the weakened effects of messages that
             explicitly explain that women's "internal barriers" are the
             products of "external barriers" obstructing women's
             progress. This research suggests that self-improvement
             messages intended to empower women to take charge of gender
             inequality may also yield potentially harmful societal
             beliefs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights
             reserved).},
   Doi = {10.1037/pspa0000129},
   Key = {fds340575}
}

@article{fds337738,
   Author = {Fitzsimons, GM and Finkel, EJ},
   Title = {Transactive-Goal-Dynamics Theory: A Discipline-Wide
             Perspective},
   Journal = {Current Directions in Psychological Science},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {332-338},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0963721417754199},
   Abstract = {© The Author(s) 2018. Theories of goal pursuit typically
             conceptualize goal pursuers as isolated actors; in contrast,
             empirical research from diverse areas of psychology has
             demonstrated that goal setting, pursuit, and achievement are
             deeply embedded within social relationships. Because much of
             this emerging literature is developing within subfields with
             minimal cross talk, the potential for integration and
             advances to basic theory has not been realized. The present
             article leverages transactive-goal-dynamics theory in an
             effort to bring these literatures together. In doing so, it
             distills a common set of primary research questions toward
             the goal of promoting a cumulative, integrative,
             interdisciplinary field of research on the ways in which
             goal pursuit is socially embedded.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0963721417754199},
   Key = {fds337738}
}

@article{fds336939,
   Title = {Erratum},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Research},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1174-1174},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucx095},
   Doi = {10.1093/jcr/ucx095},
   Key = {fds336939}
}


%% Flanagan, Owen   
@article{fds335565,
   Author = {Flanagan, O and Caruso, GD},
   Title = {Neuroexistentialism},
   Pages = {1-22},
   Booktitle = {Neuroexistentialism: Meaning, Morals, and Purpose in the Age
             of Neuroscience},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   ISBN = {9780190460723},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190460723.003.0001},
   Abstract = {<p><italic>Neuroexistentialism</italic> is a recent
             expression of existential anxiety over the nature of
             persons. Unlike previous existentialisms,
             neuroexistentialism is not caused by a problem with
             ecclesiastical authority, as was the existentialism
             represented by Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, and Nietzsche, nor
             by the shock of coming face to face with the moral horror of
             nation state actors and their citizens, as in the
             mid-century existentialism of Sartre and Camus. Rather,
             neuroexistentialism is caused by the rise of the scientific
             authority of the human sciences and a resultant clash
             between the scientific and the humanistic image of persons.
             Flanagan and Caruso explain what neuroexistentialism is and
             how it is related to two earlier existentialisms and they
             spell out how neuroexistentialism makes particularly vivid
             the clash between the humanistic and the scientific image of
             persons. They conclude by providing a brief summary of the
             chapters to follow.</p>},
   Doi = {10.1093/oso/9780190460723.003.0001},
   Key = {fds335565}
}

@book{fds335566,
   Author = {Caruso, G and Flanagan, O},
   Title = {Neuroexistentialism: Meaning, morals, and purpose in the age
             of neuroscience},
   Pages = {1-374},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780190460723},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190460723.001.0001},
   Abstract = {© Oxford University Press 2018. Existentialism is a concern
             about the foundation of meaning, morals, and purpose.
             Existentialisms arise when some foundation for these
             elements of being is under assault. In the past, first-wave
             existentialism concerned the increasingly apparent inability
             of religion and religious tradition to provide such a
             foundation, as typified in the writings of Kierkegaard,
             Dostoevsky, and Nietzsche. Second-wave existentialism,
             personified philosophically by Sartre, Camus, and de
             Beauvoir, developed in response to the inability of an
             overly optimistic Enlightenment vision of reason and the
             common good to provide such a foundation. There is a
             third-wave existentialism, a new existentialism, developing
             in response to advances in the neurosciences that threaten
             the last vestiges of an immaterial soul or self. With the
             increasing explanatory and therapeutic power of
             neuroscience, the mind no longer stands apart from the world
             to serve as a foundation of meaning. This produces
             foundational anxiety. This collection of new essays explores
             the anxiety caused by this third-wave existentialism and
             some responses to it. It brings together some of the
             world℉s leading philosophers, neuroscientists, cognitive
             scientists, and legal scholars to tackle our
             neuroexistentialist predicament and explore what the mind
             sciences can tell us about morality, love, emotion,
             autonomy, consciousness, selfhood, free will, moral
             responsibility, law, the nature of criminal punishment,
             meaning in life, and purpose.},
   Doi = {10.1093/oso/9780190460723.001.0001},
   Key = {fds335566}
}

@article{fds339638,
   Author = {Tononi, G and Flanagan, O},
   Title = {Philosophy and Science Dialogue: Consciousness},
   Journal = {Frontiers of Philosophy in China},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {332-348},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3868/s030-007-018-0026-1},
   Abstract = {© 2018 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.
             This is a dialogue between a philosopher and a scientist
             about the scientific explanation of consciousness. What is
             consciousness? Does it admit of scientific explanation? If
             so, what must a scientific theory of consciousness be like
             in order to provide us with a satisfying explanation of its
             explanandum? And what types of entities might such a theory
             acknowledge as being conscious? Philosopher Owen Flanagan
             and scientist Giulio Tononi weigh in on these issues during
             an exchange about the nature and scientific explanation of
             consciousness.},
   Doi = {10.3868/s030-007-018-0026-1},
   Key = {fds339638}
}


%% Fuemmeler, Bernard F.   
@article{fds339667,
   Author = {Do, EK and Haberstick, BC and Williams, RB and Lessem, JM and Smolen, A and Siegler, IC and Fuemmeler, BF},
   Title = {The role of genetic and environmental influences on the
             association between childhood ADHD symptoms and
             BMI.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Obesity (2005)},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {33-42},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41366-018-0236-5},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:Although childhood attention deficit
             hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been previously associated
             with concurrent and later obesity in adulthood, the etiology
             of this association remains unclear. The objective of this
             study is to determine the shared genetic effects of ADHD
             symptoms and BMI in a large sample of sibling pairs,
             consider how these shared effects may vary over time, and
             examine potential sex differences. SUBJECT/METHODS:Sibling
             pair data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Study
             of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health); childhood ADHD
             symptoms were reported retrospectively during young
             adulthood, while three prospective measurements of BMI were
             available from young adulthood to later adulthood. Cholesky
             decomposition models were fit to this data using Mx and
             maximum-likelihood estimation. The twin and sibling sample
             for these analyses included: 221 monozygotic (MZ) pairs (92
             male-male, 139 female-female), 228 dizygotic (DZ) pairs (123
             male-male, 105 female-female), 471 full-sibling (FS) pairs
             (289 male-male, 182 female-female), 106 male-female DZ twin
             pairs, and 234 male-female FS pairs. RESULTS:The magnitude
             of the association between childhood ADHD symptoms and BMI
             changed over time and by sex. The etiological relationship
             between childhood ADHD symptoms and the three prospective
             measurements of BMI differed for males and females, such
             that unique or non-shared environmental influences
             contributed to the relationship within males and genetic
             factors contributed to the relationship within females.
             Specifically, among females, genetic influences on childhood
             ADHD symptoms were partially shared with those effecting BMI
             and increased from adolescence to later adulthood (genetic
             correlation = 0.20 (95% CI: 0.07-0.36) in adolescence
             and 0.24 (95% CI: 0.10, 0.41) in adulthood).
             CONCLUSION:Genetic influences on ADHD symptoms in childhood
             are partially shared with those effecting obesity. However,
             future research is needed to determine why this association
             is limited to females.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41366-018-0236-5},
   Key = {fds339667}
}

@article{fds336074,
   Author = {Do, EK and Prom-Wormley, EC and Fuemmeler, BF and Dick, DM and Kendler,
             KS and Maes, HH},
   Title = {Associations Between Initial Subjective Experiences with
             Tobacco and Self-Reported Recent Use in Young
             Adulthood.},
   Journal = {Substance Use & Misuse},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {14},
   Pages = {2291-2298},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2018.1473435},
   Abstract = {Youth tobacco use behaviors are predictive of patterns in
             adulthood and effect long-term health outcomes. Yet, few
             studies have examined the effect of initial subjective
             experiences (ISEs) during first tobacco use, which has been
             found to be an indicator of individuals. sensitivity to
             nicotine and vulnerability to dependence.The present study
             aimed to determine the prevalence of ISEs across a variety
             of tobacco products, evaluate the factor structure of ISEs
             by first tobacco product used, and examine the relationship
             between ISEs and recent (30-day) use of tobacco products
             across time, using a university sample.Exploratory factor
             analyses were conducted to identify latent factors present
             with respect to items measuring ISEs with tobacco,
             separately by tobacco product (e.g. cigarettes, cigars,
             hookah, e-cigarettes). Factor scores for positive and
             negative ISEs were calculated. Multiple logistic regression
             analyses were conducted to examine associations between ISEs
             and recent use of each tobacco product, adjusted for age at
             first use, sex, race/ethnicity, and cohort.ISEs differ by
             the first tobacco product used. Associations between factor
             scores for positive and negative ISEs and recent use were
             found across a variety of tobacco products. Overall,
             positive ISEs were more strongly associated with recent use,
             relative to negative ISEs.Further research is needed to
             identify genetic and biological pathways and social contexts
             influencing initial subjective experiences with tobacco use,
             in efforts to delay the initiation for tobacco use and
             reduce risk for continued use among young
             adults.},
   Doi = {10.1080/10826084.2018.1473435},
   Key = {fds336074}
}

@article{fds339666,
   Author = {Do, EK and Green, TL and Prom-Wormley, EC and Fuemmeler,
             BF},
   Title = {Social determinants of smoke exposure during pregnancy:
             Findings from waves 1 & 2 of the Population Assessment of
             Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study.},
   Journal = {Preventive Medicine Reports},
   Volume = {12},
   Pages = {312-320},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.10.020},
   Abstract = {Maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) and secondhand
             smoke (SHS) exposure are associated with a myriad of
             negative health effects for both mother and child. However,
             less is known regarding social determinants for SHS
             exposure, which may differ from those of maternal smoking
             during pregnancy (MSDP). To identify social determinants for
             SHS exposure only, MSDP only, and MSDP and SHS exposure,
             data were obtained from all pregnant women (18-54 years;
             N = 726) in waves 1 and 2 of the Population Assessment
             of Tobacco and Health Study (2014-2015). Multiple logistic
             regressions were conducted using SAS 9.4. Smoke exposure
             during pregnancy was common; 23.0% reported SHS exposure
             only, 6.1% reported MSDP only, and 11.8% reported both SHS
             exposure and MSDP. Results demonstrate that relationships
             between smoke exposure during pregnancy and social
             determinants vary by type of exposure. Women at risk for any
             smoke exposure during pregnancy include those who are
             unmarried and allow the use of combustible tobacco products
             within the home. Those who are at higher risk for SHS
             exposure include those who are younger in age, and those who
             are earlier in their pregnancy. Those who are at higher risk
             for maternal smoking include those with fair/poor mental
             health status and those who believe that others' view
             tobacco use more positively. These results suggest the need
             for implementing more comprehensive policies that promote
             smoke-free environments. Implementing these strategies have
             the potential to improve maternal and fetal health outcomes
             associated with tobacco smoke exposure.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.10.020},
   Key = {fds339666}
}

@article{fds339772,
   Author = {Oliver, JA and Hallyburton, MB and Pacek, LR and Mitchell, JT and Vilardaga, R and Fuemmeler, BF and McClernon, FJ},
   Title = {What Do Smokers Want in A Smartphone-Based Cessation
             Application?},
   Journal = {Nicotine & Tobacco Research : Official Journal of the
             Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1507-1514},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntx171},
   Abstract = {Background:Fueled by rapid technological advances over the
             past decade, there is growing interest in the use of
             smartphones to aid in smoking cessation. Hundreds of
             applications have been developed for this purpose, but
             little is known about how these applications are accessed
             and used by smokers or what features smokers believe would
             be most useful. Purpose:The present study sought to
             understand the prevalence of smartphone ownership and
             patterns of use among smokers as well as the perceived
             utility of various smartphone application features for
             smoking cessation that are currently in development or
             already available. Methods:Daily cigarette smokers (n = 224)
             reported on smartphone ownership, their patterns of
             smartphone usage, and perceived utility of features.
             Features were ranked according to perceived utility and
             differences in both perceived utility and general smartphone
             use patterns were examined as a function of demographic and
             smoking-related variables. Results:Most smokers (80.4%) own
             a smartphone, but experience with smoking cessation
             applications is extremely rare (6.1%). Ownership and
             patterns of usage differed as a function of demographic and
             smoking-related variables. Overall, gain-framed features
             were rated as most useful, while loss-framed and
             interpersonal features were rated as least useful.
             Conclusions:Mobile health interventions have the potential
             to reach a large number of smokers but are currently
             underutilized. Additional effort is needed to ensure parity
             in treatment access. Gain-framed messages may be especially
             useful for engaging smokers, even if other features
             ultimately drive treatment effects. Implications:This study
             describes patterns of smartphone usage among smokers and
             identifies the smartphone application features smokers
             believe would be most useful during a quit attempt. Findings
             indicate which subgroups of smokers are most likely to be
             reached with mobile health interventions and suggests that
             inclusion of specific features may be helpful for engaging
             smokers in the smoking cessation process.},
   Doi = {10.1093/ntr/ntx171},
   Key = {fds339772}
}

@article{fds338436,
   Author = {Do, EK and Zucker, NL and Huang, ZY and Schechter, JC and Kollins, SH and Maguire, RL and Murphy, SK and Hoyo, C and Fuemmeler,
             BF},
   Title = {Associations between imprinted gene differentially
             methylated regions, appetitive traits and body mass index in
             children.},
   Journal = {Pediatric Obesity},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijpo.12454},
   Abstract = {Knowledge regarding genetic influences on eating behaviours
             is expanding; yet less is known regarding contributions of
             epigenetic variation to appetitive traits and body mass
             index (BMI) in children.The purpose of this study was to
             explore relationships between methylation at differentially
             methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes (insulin-like
             growth factor 2/H19 and Delta-like, Drosophila, homolog
             1/maternally expressed gene 3) using DNA extracted from
             umbilical cord blood leucocytes, two genetically influenced
             appetitive traits (food responsiveness and satiety
             responsiveness) and BMI.Data were obtained from participants
             (N = 317; mean age = 3.6 years; SD = 1.8 years) from
             the Newborn Epigenetic STudy. Conditional process models
             were implemented to investigate the associations between
             DMRs of imprinted genes and BMI, and test whether this
             association was mediated by appetitive traits and
             birthweight and moderated by sex.Appetitive traits and
             birthweight did not mediate the relationship between
             methylation at DMRs. Increased insulin-like growth factor 2
             DMR methylation was associated with higher satiety
             responsiveness. Higher satiety responsiveness was associated
             with lower BMI. Associations between methylation at DMRs,
             appetitive traits and BMI differed by sex.This is one of the
             first studies to demonstrate associations between epigenetic
             variation established prior to birth with appetitive traits
             and BMI in children, providing support for the need to
             uncover genetic and epigenetic mechanisms for appetitive
             traits predisposing some individuals to obesity.},
   Doi = {10.1111/ijpo.12454},
   Key = {fds338436}
}

@article{fds337133,
   Author = {Gao, L and Liu, X and Millstein, J and Siegmund, KD and Dubeau, L and Maguire, RL and Jim Zhang and J and Fuemmeler, BF and Kollins, SH and Hoyo,
             C and Murphy, SK and Breton, CV},
   Title = {Self-reported prenatal tobacco smoke exposure, AXL gene-body
             methylation, and childhood asthma phenotypes.},
   Journal = {Clinical Epigenetics},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {98},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13148-018-0532-x},
   Abstract = {Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, act as
             one potential mechanism underlying the detrimental effects
             associated with prenatal tobacco smoke (PTS) exposure.
             Methylation in a gene called AXL was previously reported to
             differ in response to PTS.We investigated the association
             between PTS and epigenetic changes in AXL and how this was
             related to childhood asthma phenotypes. We tested the
             association between PTS and DNA methylation at multiple CpG
             loci of AXL at birth using Pyrosequencing in two separate
             study populations, the Children's Health Study (CHS, n =
             799) and the Newborn Epigenetic Study (NEST, n = 592).
             Plasma cotinine concentration was used to validate findings
             with self-reported smoking status. The inter-relationships
             among AXL mRNA and miR-199a1 expression, PTS, and AXL
             methylation were examined. Lastly, we evaluated the joint
             effects of AXL methylation and PTS on the risk of asthma and
             related symptoms at age 10 years old.PTS was associated with
             higher methylation level in the AXL gene body in both CHS
             and NEST subjects. In the pooled analysis, exposed subjects
             had a 0.51% higher methylation level in this region compared
             to unexposed subjects (95% CI 0.29, 0.74; p < 0.0001).
             PTS was also associated with 21.2% lower expression of
             miR-199a1 (95% CI - 37.9, - 0.1; p = 0.05), a
             microRNA known to regulate AXL expression. Furthermore, the
             combination of higher AXL methylation and PTS exposure at
             birth increased the risk of recent episodes of bronchitic
             symptoms in childhood.PTS was associated with methylation
             level of AXL and the combination altered the risk of
             childhood bronchitic symptoms.},
   Doi = {10.1186/s13148-018-0532-x},
   Key = {fds337133}
}

@article{fds330367,
   Author = {Sanchez, CE and Barry, C and Sabhlok, A and Russell, K and Majors, A and Kollins, SH and Fuemmeler, BF},
   Title = {Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and child neurodevelopmental
             outcomes: a meta-analysis.},
   Journal = {Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International
             Association for the Study of Obesity},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {464-484},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/obr.12643},
   Abstract = {This review examined evidence of the association between
             maternal pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity status and child
             neurodevelopmental outcomes. PubMed and PsycINFO databases
             were systematically searched for empirical studies published
             before April 2017 using keywords related to prenatal obesity
             and children's neurodevelopment. Of 1483 identified papers,
             41 were included in the systematic review, and 32 articles
             representing 36 cohorts were included in the meta-analysis.
             Findings indicated that compared with children of normal
             weight mothers, children whose mothers were overweight or
             obese prior to pregnancy were at increased risk for
             compromised neurodevelopmental outcomes (overweight:
             OR = 1.17, 95% CI [1.11, 1.24], I2  = 65.51; obese:
             OR = 1.51; 95% CI [1.35, 1.69], I2  = 79.63).
             Pre-pregnancy obesity increased the risk of attention
             deficit-hyperactivity disorder (OR = 1.62; 95% CI [1.23,
             2.14], I2  = 70.15), autism spectrum disorder
             (OR = 1.36; 95% CI [1.08, 1.70], I2  = 60.52),
             developmental delay (OR = 1.58; 95% CI [1.39, 1.79], I2
              = 75.77) and emotional/behavioural problems (OR = 1.42;
             95% CI [1.26, 1.59], I2  = 87.74). Given the current
             obesity prevalence among young adults and women of
             childbearing age, this association between maternal obesity
             during pregnancy and atypical child neurodevelopment
             represents a potentially high public health
             burden.},
   Doi = {10.1111/obr.12643},
   Key = {fds330367}
}

@article{fds336075,
   Author = {Dozmorov, MG and Bilbo, SD and Kollins, SH and Zucker, N and Do, EK and Schechter, JC and Zhang, JJ and Murphy, SK and Hoyo, C and Fuemmeler,
             BF},
   Title = {Associations between maternal cytokine levels during
             gestation and measures of child cognitive abilities and
             executive functioning.},
   Journal = {Brain, Behavior, and Immunity},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2018.03.029},
   Abstract = {Preclinical studies demonstrate that environmentally-induced
             alterations in inflammatory cytokines generated by the
             maternal and fetal immune system can significantly impact
             fetal brain development. Yet, the relationship between
             maternal cytokines during gestation and later cognitive
             ability and executive function remains understudied.
             Children (n = 246) were born of mothers enrolled in the
             Newborn Epigenetic Study - a prospective pre-birth cohort in
             the Southeastern US. We characterized seven cytokines
             [IL-1β, IL-4,IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-17A, tumor necrosis
             factor-α (TNFα), and interferon-γ (IFNγ)] and one
             chemokine (IL-8) from maternal plasma collected during
             pregnancy. We assessed children's cognitive abilities and
             executive functioning at a mean age of 4.5 (SD = 1.1)
             years. Children's DAS-II and NIH toolbox scores were
             regressed on cytokines and the chemokine, controlling for
             maternal age, race, education, body mass index, IQ, parity,
             smoking status, delivery type, gestational weeks, and child
             birth weight and sex. Higher IL-12p70 (βIL-12p70 = 4.26,
             p = 0.023) and IL-17A (βIL-17A = 3.70, p = 0.042)
             levels were related to higher DAS-II GCA score, whereas
             higher IL-1β (βIL-1B = -6.07, p = 0.003) was related
             to lower GCA score. Higher IL-12p70 was related to higher
             performance on NIH toolbox measures of executive functions
             related to inhibitory control and attention (βIL-12p70 =
             5.20, p = 0.046) and cognitive flexibility (βIL-12p70 =
             5.10, p = 0.047). Results suggest that dysregulation in
             gestational immune activity are associated with child
             cognitive ability and executive functioning.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bbi.2018.03.029},
   Key = {fds336075}
}

@article{fds336076,
   Author = {Lee, C-T and McClernon, FJ and Kollins, SH and Fuemmeler,
             BF},
   Title = {Childhood ADHD Symptoms and Future Illicit Drug Use: The
             Role of Adolescent Cigarette Use.},
   Journal = {Journal of Pediatric Psychology},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {162-171},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsx098},
   Abstract = {The aim of this study is to understand how early cigarette
             use might predict subsequent illicit drug use, especially
             among individuals with attention-deficit hyperactivity
             disorder (ADHD) symptoms during childhood.Data were drawn
             from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
             (Waves I-IV). The analysis sample involves participants who
             had not used illicit drugs at Wave I, with no missing
             responses for studied predictors (N = 7,332).Smoking
             status at Wave I (ever regular vs. never regular) and
             childhood ADHD symptoms predicted subsequent illicit drug
             use at Waves II to IV. No interaction effect of smoking
             status at Wave I and childhood ADHD symptoms was found.
             However, an indirect effect from childhood ADHD symptoms on
             illicit drug use was identified, through smoking status at
             Wave I. Similar results were observed for predicting illicit
             drug dependence.The findings support the notion that smoking
             status during early adolescence may mediate the association
             between childhood ADHD symptoms and risk of later adult drug
             use. Interventions to prevent smoking among adolescents may
             be particularly effective at decreasing subsequent drug use,
             especially among children with ADHD symptoms.},
   Doi = {10.1093/jpepsy/jsx098},
   Key = {fds336076}
}

@article{fds333723,
   Author = {Van Voorhees and EE and Dennis, PA and Elbogen, EB and Fuemmeler, B and Neal, LC and Calhoun, PS and Beckham, JC},
   Title = {Characterizing anger-related affect in individuals with
             posttraumatic stress disorder using ecological momentary
             assessment.},
   Journal = {Psychiatry Research},
   Volume = {261},
   Pages = {274-280},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2017.12.080},
   Abstract = {This study employed secondary analyses of existing
             ecological momentary assessment (EMA) data to characterize
             hostile and irritable affect in the day-to-day experience of
             52 smokers with, and 65 smokers without, posttraumatic
             stress disorder (PTSD). EMA monitoring occurred over a mean
             of 8.2 days, and participants responded to an average of 2.8
             random prompts/day. Analyses included Wilcoxon rank sum
             tests of group differences, and path analyses of
             cross-lagged multilevel models. Participants with PTSD
             endorsed a significantly higher proportion of total EMA
             entries indicating hostile affect and irritable affect than
             did individuals without PTSD. Cross-lagged analyses
             indicated that over a period of hours, PTSD symptoms
             significantly predicted subsequent hostile and irritable
             affect, but hostile and irritable affect did not predict
             subsequent PTSD symptoms. Findings suggest that day-to-day
             exposure to PTSD-related trauma cues may contribute to
             chronically elevated levels of anger-related affect. Such
             heightened affective arousal may, in turn, underlie an
             increased risk for verbal or physical aggression, as well as
             other health and quality-of-life related impairments
             associated with PTSD. Clinical implications include
             conceptualizing anger treatment in the broader context of
             trauma history and symptoms, and specifically targeting
             physiological arousal and maladaptive hostile cognitions
             triggered by trauma reminders in patients with
             PTSD.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psychres.2017.12.080},
   Key = {fds333723}
}

@article{fds333243,
   Author = {Cates, JR and Fuemmeler, BF and Diehl, SJ and Stockton, LL and Porter,
             J and Ihekweazu, C and Gurbani, AS and Coyne-Beasley,
             T},
   Title = {Developing a Serious Videogame for Preteens to Motivate HPV
             Vaccination Decision Making: Land of Secret
             Gardens.},
   Journal = {Games for Health Journal},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {51-66},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/g4h.2017.0002},
   Abstract = {<label>INTRODUCTION</label>Vaccination against human
             papillomavirus (HPV) is routinely recommended for ages
             11-12, yet in 2016 only 49.5% of women and 37.5% of men had
             completed the three-dose series in the United States.
             Offering information and cues to action through a serious
             videogame for preteens may foster HPV vaccination awareness,
             information seeking, and communication.<label>MATERIALS AND
             METHODS</label>An iterative process was used to develop an
             interactive videogame, Land of Secret Gardens. Three focus
             groups were conducted with 16 boys and girls, ages 11-12,
             for input on game design, acceptability, and functioning.
             Two parallel focus groups explored parents' (n = 9)
             perspectives on the game concept. Three researchers
             identified key themes.<label>RESULTS</label>Preteens wanted
             a game that is both entertaining and instructional. Some
             parents were skeptical that games could be motivational. A
             back-story about a secret garden was developed as a metaphor
             for a preteen's body and keeping it healthy. The goal is to
             plant a lush secret garden and protect the seedlings by
             treating them with a potion when they sprout to keep them
             healthy as they mature. Points to buy seeds and create the
             potion are earned by playing mini-games. Throughout play,
             players are exposed to messaging about HPV and the benefits
             of the vaccine. Both boys and girls liked the garden concept
             and getting facts about HPV. Parents were encouraged to
             discuss the game with their preteens.<label>CONCLUSION</label>Within
             a larger communication strategy, serious games could be
             useful for engaging preteens in health decision making about
             HPV vaccination.},
   Doi = {10.1089/g4h.2017.0002},
   Key = {fds333243}
}

@article{fds331558,
   Author = {Schechter, JC and Fuemmeler, BF and Hoyo, C and Murphy, SK and Zhang,
             JJ and Kollins, SH},
   Title = {Impact of Smoking Ban on Passive Smoke Exposure in Pregnant
             Non-Smokers in the Southeastern United States.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Environmental Research and Public
             Health},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010083},
   Abstract = {Prenatal passive smoke exposure raises risk for negative
             birth outcomes. Legislation regulating public smoking has
             been shown to impact exposure levels, though fewer studies
             involving pregnant women have been conducted within the U.S.
             where bans are inconsistent across regions. This study
             examined the effect of a ban enacted in the southeastern
             U.S. on pregnant women's cotinine levels. Additional
             analyses compared self-reported exposure to cotinine and
             identified characteristics associated with passive exposure.
             Pregnant women (N = 851) were recruited prospectively
             between 2005 and 2011 in North Carolina. Sociodemographic
             and health data were collected via surveys; maternal blood
             samples were assayed for cotinine. Among non-active smokers
             who provided self-report data regarding passive exposure (N
             = 503), 20% were inconsistent with corresponding cotinine.
             Among all non-smokers (N = 668), being unmarried, African
             American, and less educated were each associated with
             greater passive exposure. Controlling for covariates, mean
             cotinine was higher prior to the ban compared to after, F(1,
             640) = 24.65, p < 0.001. Results suggest that banning
             smoking in public spaces may reduce passive smoke exposure
             for non-smoking pregnant women. These data are some of the
             first to examine the impact of legislation on passive smoke
             exposure in pregnant women within the U.S. using a biomarker
             and can inform policy in regions lacking comprehensive
             smoke-free legislation.},
   Doi = {10.3390/ijerph15010083},
   Key = {fds331558}
}

@article{fds338573,
   Author = {House, JS and Mendez, M and Maguire, RL and Gonzalez-Nahm, S and Huang,
             Z and Daniels, J and Murphy, SK and Fuemmeler, BF and Wright, FA and Hoyo,
             C},
   Title = {Periconceptional Maternal Mediterranean Diet Is Associated
             With Favorable Offspring Behaviors and Altered CpG
             Methylation of Imprinted Genes.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology},
   Volume = {6},
   Pages = {107},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2018.00107},
   Abstract = {Background: Maternal diet during pregnancy has been shown to
             influence the child neuro-developmental outcomes. Studies
             examining effects of dietary patterns on offspring behavior
             are sparse. Objective: Determine if maternal adherence to a
             Mediterranean diet is associated with child behavioral
             outcomes assessed early in life, and to evaluate the role of
             differentially methylated regions (DMRs) regulating
             genomically imprinted genes in these associations. Methods:
             Among 325 mother/infant pairs, we used regression models to
             evaluate the association between tertiles of maternal
             periconceptional Mediterranean diet adherence (MDA) scores
             derived from a Food Frequency Questionnaire, and social and
             emotional scores derived from the Infant Toddler Social and
             Emotional Assessment (ITSEA) questionnaire in the second
             year of life. Methylation of nine genomically imprinted
             genes was measured to determine if MDA was associated with
             CpG methylation. Results: Child depression was inversely
             associated with maternal MDA (Bonferroni-corrected p =
             0.041). While controlling for false-discovery, compared to
             offspring of women with the lowest MDA tertile, those with
             MDA scores in middle and high MDA tertiles had decreased
             odds for atypical behaviors [OR (95% CI) = 0.40 (0.20, 0.78)
             for middle and 0.40 (0.17, 0.92) for highest tertile], for
             maladaptive behaviors [0.37 (0.18, 0.72) for middle tertile
             and 0.42 (0.18, 0.95) for highest tertile] and for an index
             of autism spectrum disorder behaviors [0.46 (0.23, 0.90) for
             middle and 0.35 (0.15, 0.80) for highest tertile]. Offspring
             of women with the highest MDA tertile were less likely to
             exhibit depressive [OR = 0.28 (0.12, 0.64)] and anxiety
             [0.42 (0.18, 0.97)] behaviors and increased odds of social
             relatedness [2.31 (1.04, 5.19)] behaviors when compared to
             low MDA mothers. Some associations varied by sex. Perinatal
             MDA score was associated with methylation differences for
             imprinted control regions of PEG10/SGCE [females: Beta (95%
             CI) = 1.66 (0.52, 2.80) - Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.048;
             males: -0.56 (-1.13, -0.00)], as well as both MEG3 and IGF2
             in males [0.97 (0.00, 1.94)] and -0.92 (-1.65, -0.19)
             respectively. Conclusion: In this ethnically diverse cohort,
             maternal adherence to a Mediterranean diet in early
             pregnancy was associated with favorable neurobehavioral
             outcomes in early childhood and with sex-dependent
             methylation differences of MEG3, IGF2, and SGCE/PEG10
             DMRs.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fcell.2018.00107},
   Key = {fds338573}
}

@article{fds72465,
   Title = {Fuemmeler BF, Agurs-Collins T, McClernon FJ, Kollins SH,
             Kail ME, Bergen AW, Ashley-Koch AE.  Genes implicated in
             serotonergic and dopamine functioning interact with gender
             to predict BMI categories: Findings from a nationally
             representative sample of young adults.  Obesity (in
             press) },
   Key = {fds72465}
}

@article{fds72466,
   Title = {McClernon FJ, Fuemmeler BF, Kollins SH, Kail ME, Ashley-Koch
             AE. Interactions between genotype and retrospective ADHD
             symptoms predict lifetime smoking risk in a sample of young
             adults. Nicotine & Tobacco Research (in press)
               },
   Key = {fds72466}
}

@article{fds202522,
   Title = {Fuemmeler, B. F., Yang, C., Costanzo, P., Hoyle, R.H.,
             Siegler, I.C., Williams, R.B., Ostbye, T. (in press).
             Parenting styles and BMI trajectories from adolescence into
             adulthood: A longitudinal study of the Add Health cohort.
             Health Psychology},
   Key = {fds202522}
}

@article{fds202523,
   Title = {Ranby, K.W., Boynton, M.H., Kollins, S. H., McClernon, J.,
             Yang, C., & Fuemmeler, B.F. (in press). Understanding the
             phenotypic structure of ADHD in a US population-based
             sample. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.
              },
   Key = {fds202523}
}

@article{fds211227,
   Title = {Fuemmeler, B.F., Lovelady, C.A., Zucker, N.L., Ostbye, T.
             (in press). Parental obesity moderates relationship between
             childhood appetitive traits and weight. Obesity},
   Key = {fds211227}
}

@article{fds211230,
   Title = {Fuemmeler, B.F., Pendzich, M.K., Clark, K., Rossoff, P.,
             Blatt, J., Lovelady , C., Demark-Wahnefried, W. (in press).
             Changes in weight, body composition, diet, and physical
             activity during the first year of treatment for childhood
             acute leukemia and lymphoma. Journal of Pediatric Hematology
             and Oncology },
   Key = {fds211230}
}

@article{fds215514,
   Title = {Fuemmeler, B.F., Lovelady, C.A., Zucker, N.L., Ostbye, T.
             (in press). Parental obesity moderates relationship between
             childhood eating behaviors and weight. Obesity },
   Key = {fds215514}
}


%% Gaffrey, Michael S.   
@article{fds337475,
   Author = {Somerville, LH and Bookheimer, SY and Buckner, RL and Burgess, GC and Curtiss, SW and Dapretto, M and Elam, JS and Gaffrey, MS and Harms, MP and Hodge, C and Kandala, S and Kastman, EK and Nichols, TE and Schlaggar,
             BL and Smith, SM and Thomas, KM and Yacoub, E and Van Essen and DC and Barch,
             DM},
   Title = {The Lifespan Human Connectome Project in Development: A
             large-scale study of brain connectivity development in 5-21
             year olds.},
   Journal = {Neuroimage},
   Volume = {183},
   Pages = {456-468},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.08.050},
   Abstract = {Recent technological and analytical progress in brain
             imaging has enabled the examination of brain organization
             and connectivity at unprecedented levels of detail. The
             Human Connectome Project in Development (HCP-D) is
             exploiting these tools to chart developmental changes in
             brain connectivity. When complete, the HCP-D will comprise
             approximately ∼1750 open access datasets from
             1300 + healthy human participants, ages 5-21 years,
             acquired at four sites across the USA. The participants are
             from diverse geographical, ethnic, and socioeconomic
             backgrounds. While most participants are tested once, others
             take part in a three-wave longitudinal component focused on
             the pubertal period (ages 9-17 years). Brain imaging
             sessions are acquired on a 3 T Siemens Prisma platform and
             include structural, functional (resting state and
             task-based), diffusion, and perfusion imaging, physiological
             monitoring, and a battery of cognitive tasks and
             self-reports. For minors, parents additionally complete a
             battery of instruments to characterize cognitive and
             emotional development, and environmental variables relevant
             to development. Participants provide biological samples of
             blood, saliva, and hair, enabling assays of pubertal
             hormones, health markers, and banked DNA samples. This paper
             outlines the overarching aims of the project, the approach
             taken to acquire maximally informative data while minimizing
             participant burden, preliminary analyses, and discussion of
             the intended uses and limitations of the
             dataset.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.08.050},
   Key = {fds337475}
}

@article{fds337154,
   Author = {Gaffrey, MS and Tillman, R and Barch, DM and Luby,
             JL},
   Title = {Continuity and stability of preschool depression from
             childhood through adolescence and following the onset of
             puberty.},
   Journal = {Comprehensive Psychiatry},
   Volume = {86},
   Pages = {39-46},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2018.07.010},
   Abstract = {A growing body of research now supports the validity,
             clinical significance, and long-term negative impact of
             depression occurring during the preschool period. However,
             the prospective continuity of depressive symptoms and risk
             for major depressive disorder (MDD) from childhood through
             adolescence for preschoolers experiencing this highly
             impairing disorder remains unexplored. Such information is
             likely to be critical for understanding the developmental
             continuity of preschool depression and whether it continues
             to be a salient risk factor for an MDD diagnosis following
             the transition into adolescence and the onset of biological
             changes associated with it (i.e., puberty).Subjects were
             participants in the Preschool Depression Study conducted at
             the Early Emotional Development Program at Washington
             University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Subjects and
             their parents completed baseline assessments that included
             comprehensive measures of psychopathology and development at
             baseline and up to 9 follow-up assessments between 2003 and
             2017. N = 279 subjects had diagnostic and clinical data
             available for the preschool period and the early pubertal
             and/or later pubertal periods and were included in the
             analyses. There were N = 275 subjects assessed during
             the early pubertal period and N = 184 subjects assessed
             during the later pubertal period.Preschool depression was a
             highly salient predictor of prepubertal and mid-to-post
             pubertal MDD. Across all modeled time points children with a
             history of preschool depression continued to demonstrate
             elevated levels of depressive symptoms from childhood
             through adolescence, suggesting a heightened trajectory of
             depressive symptoms relative to their same age
             peers.Findings from the current study suggest that children
             with a history of preschool depression follow a trajectory
             of depression severity elevated relative to their same age
             peers from childhood through adolescence but with a similar
             shape over time. They also support the homotypic continuity
             of preschool depression into adolescence and the onset of
             puberty.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.comppsych.2018.07.010},
   Key = {fds337154}
}

@article{fds335645,
   Author = {Gaffrey, MS and Barch, DM and Bogdan, R and Farris, K and Petersen, SE and Luby, JL},
   Title = {Amygdala Reward Reactivity Mediates the Association Between
             Preschool Stress Response and Depression
             Severity.},
   Journal = {Biological Psychiatry},
   Volume = {83},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {128-136},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2017.08.020},
   Abstract = {Research in adolescents and adults has suggested that
             altered neural processing of reward following early life
             adversity is a highly promising depressive intermediate
             phenotype. However, very little is known about how stress
             response, neural processing of reward, and depression are
             related in very young children. The present study examined
             the concurrent associations between cortisol response
             following a stressor, functional brain activity to reward,
             and depression severity in children 4 to 6 years
             old.Medication-naïve children 4 to 6 years old (N = 52)
             participated in a study using functional magnetic resonance
             imaging to assess neural reactivity to reward, including
             gain, loss, and neutral outcomes. Parent-reported child
             depression severity and child cortisol response following
             stress were also measured.Greater caudate and medial
             prefrontal cortex reactivity to gain outcomes and increased
             amygdala reactivity to salient (i.e., both gain and loss)
             outcomes were observed. Higher total cortisol output
             following a stressor was associated with increased
             depression severity and reduced amygdala reactivity to
             salient outcomes. Amygdala reactivity was also inversely
             associated with depression severity and was found to mediate
             the relationship between cortisol output and depression
             severity.Results suggest that altered neural processing of
             reward is already related to increased cortisol output and
             depression severity in preschoolers. These results also
             demonstrate an important role for amygdala function as a
             mediator of this relationship at a very early age. Our
             results further underscore early childhood as an important
             developmental period for understanding the neurobiological
             correlates of early stress and increased risk for
             depression.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.biopsych.2017.08.020},
   Key = {fds335645}
}


%% Gaither, Sarah E.   
@article{fds335677,
   Author = {Gaither, SE and Toosi, NR and Babbitt, LG and Sommers,
             SR},
   Title = {Exposure to Biracial Faces Reduces Colorblindness.},
   Journal = {Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {54-66},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167218778012},
   Abstract = {Across six studies, we demonstrate that exposure to biracial
             individuals significantly reduces endorsement of
             colorblindness as a racial ideology among White individuals.
             Real-world exposure to biracial individuals predicts lower
             levels of colorblindness compared with White and Black
             exposure (Study 1). Brief manipulated exposure to images of
             biracial faces reduces colorblindness compared with exposure
             to White faces, Black faces, a set of diverse monoracial
             faces, or abstract images (Studies 2-5). In addition, these
             effects occur only when a biracial label is paired with the
             face rather than resulting from the novelty of the
             mixed-race faces themselves (Study 4). Finally, we show that
             the shift in White participants' colorblindness attitudes is
             driven by social tuning, based on participants' expectations
             that biracial individuals are lower in colorblindness than
             monoracial individuals (Studies 5-6). These studies suggest
             that the multiracial population's increasing size and
             visibility has the potential to positively shift racial
             attitudes.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0146167218778012},
   Key = {fds335677}
}

@article{fds335680,
   Author = {Chen, EE and Corriveau, KH and Lai, VKW and Poon, SL and Gaither,
             SE},
   Title = {Learning and Socializing Preferences in Hong Kong Chinese
             Children.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {2109-2117},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.13083},
   Abstract = {The impact of social group information on the learning and
             socializing preferences of Hong Kong Chinese children were
             examined. Specifically, the degree to which variability in
             racial out-group exposure affects children's use of race to
             make decisions about unfamiliar individuals (Chinese, White,
             Southeast Asian) was investigated. Participants (N = 212;
             Mage  = 60.51 months) chose functions for novel objects
             after informants demonstrated their use; indicated with
             which peer group member to socialize; and were measured on
             racial group recognition, preference, and identification.
             Overall, children preferred in-group members, though
             out-group exposure and the relative social status of
             out-groups mattered as well. At a young age, children's
             specific experiences with different races influence how they
             learn and befriend others across racial group
             lines.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.13083},
   Key = {fds335680}
}

@article{fds335681,
   Author = {Loyd, AB and Gaither, SE},
   Title = {Racial/ethnic socialization for White youth: What we know
             and future directions},
   Journal = {Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {59},
   Pages = {54-64},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2018.05.004},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Elsevier Inc. Teaching and talking about race and
             ethnicity with children and adults is especially important
             in racially diverse societies. This process has been coined
             racial/ethnic socialization (RES). Despite the importance of
             RES, we still know very little about how this process
             unfolds in the lives of White youth. Thus, from a social,
             cognitive, and developmental perspective, the authors
             summarize findings from empirical research and theory on RES
             for White youth across stages of development—early
             childhood through young adulthood. Since RES is linked with
             cross-group attitudes (e.g., less bias, prejudice,
             stereotyping) and behaviors (e.g., inclusion), we highlight
             future directions for research and discuss applications for
             existing findings for an increasingly diverse
             society.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.appdev.2018.05.004},
   Key = {fds335681}
}

@article{fds339585,
   Author = {Gaither, SE and Chen, JM and Pauker, K and Sommers,
             SR},
   Title = {At face value: Psychological outcomes differ for real vs.
             computer-generated multiracial faces.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Social Psychology},
   Pages = {1-19},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00224545.2018.1538929},
   Abstract = {Multiracial research emphasizes hypodescent categorizations
             and relies on computer-generated stimuli. Four experiments
             showed that real biracial faces in a 2-Choice categorization
             task (White, Black) elicited hypodescent more than
             computer-generated faces. Additionally, Experiment 2 showed
             a 2-Choice categorization task with real biracial faces
             increased racial essentialism more than a 3-Choice
             categorization task. Experiment 3 showed that mere exposure
             to real biracial faces did not increase essentialism.
             Finally, Experiments 4a and 4b replicated hypodescent
             outcomes when comparing real biracial faces to
             computer-generated versions of those same faces. In sum,
             these findings initiate a discussion surrounding the
             methodology of multiracial categorizations.},
   Doi = {10.1080/00224545.2018.1538929},
   Key = {fds339585}
}

@article{fds339521,
   Author = {Babbitt, LG and Gaither, SE and Toosi, NR and Sommers,
             SR},
   Title = {The Role of Gender in Racial Meta-Stereotypes and
             Stereotypes},
   Journal = {Social Cognition},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {589-601},
   Publisher = {Guilford Publications},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1521/soco.2018.36.5.589},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Guilford Publications, Inc. Stereotypes often guide
             interracial interactions-both the stereotypes we hold about
             others, and the stereotypes we believe others hold about us
             (i.e., meta-stereotypes). In Black-White interactions, the
             stereotype that Whites are prejudiced is one of the most
             salient, but does this stereotype vary by gender? White
             women tend to express more positive racial attitudes than
             White men, and stereotypes of Whites overlap more with
             stereotypes about men than with stereotypes about women.
             Thus, we hypothesized that both prejudice-related
             meta-stereotypes and stereotypes differ by gender. In Study
             1, Whites reported that White men are seen as more
             prejudiced than White women. Studies 2a and 2b measured
             Blacks' perspectives, finding that Blacks also reported that
             White men are seen as more prejudiced than White women.
             Together, these findings highlight the importance of
             considering gender to develop a more nuanced understanding
             of race-related stereotypes, meta-stereotypes, and
             interracial interactions.},
   Doi = {10.1521/soco.2018.36.5.589},
   Key = {fds339521}
}

@article{fds335674,
   Author = {Chen, JM and Pauker, K and Gaither, SE and Hamilton, DL and Sherman,
             JW},
   Title = {Black + White = Not White: A minority bias in
             categorizations of Black-White multiracials},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {78},
   Pages = {43-54},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2018.05.002},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2018.05.002},
   Key = {fds335674}
}

@article{fds337470,
   Author = {Albuja, AF and Sanchez, DT and Gaither, SE},
   Title = {Identity Denied: Comparing American or White Identity Denial
             and Psychological Health Outcomes Among Bicultural and
             Biracial People.},
   Journal = {Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin},
   Pages = {146167218788553},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167218788553},
   Abstract = {Because bicultural and biracial people have two identities
             within one social domain (culture or race), their
             identification is often challenged by others. Although it is
             established that identity denial is associated with poor
             psychological health, the processes through which this
             occurs are less understood. Across two high-powered studies,
             we tested identity autonomy, the perceived compatibility of
             identities, and social belonging as mediators of the
             relationship between identity denial and well-being among
             bicultural and biracial individuals. Bicultural and biracial
             participants who experienced challenges to their American or
             White identities felt less freedom in choosing an identity
             and perceived their identities as less compatible, which was
             ultimately associated with greater reports of depressive
             symptoms and stress. Study 2 replicated these results and
             measured social belonging, which also accounted for
             significant variance in well-being. The results suggest the
             processes were similar across populations, highlighting
             important implications for the generalizability to other
             dual-identity populations.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0146167218788553},
   Key = {fds337470}
}

@article{fds335675,
   Author = {Gaither, SE},
   Title = {The multiplicity of belonging: Pushing identity research
             beyond binary thinking},
   Journal = {Self and Identity},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {443-454},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15298868.2017.1412343},
   Doi = {10.1080/15298868.2017.1412343},
   Key = {fds335675}
}

@article{fds335676,
   Author = {Albuja, AF and Sanchez, DT and Gaither, SE},
   Title = {Fluid racial presentation: Perceptions of contextual
             “passing” among biracial people},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {77},
   Pages = {132-142},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2018.04.010},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2018.04.010},
   Key = {fds335676}
}

@article{fds335678,
   Author = {Pauker, K and Meyers, C and Sanchez, DT and Gaither, SE and Young,
             DM},
   Title = {A review of multiracial malleability: Identity,
             categorization, and shifting racial attitudes},
   Journal = {Social and Personality Psychology Compass},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {e12392-e12392},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/spc3.12392},
   Doi = {10.1111/spc3.12392},
   Key = {fds335678}
}

@article{fds335679,
   Author = {Gaither, SE and Babbitt, LG and Sommers, SR},
   Title = {Resolving racial ambiguity in social interactions},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {76},
   Pages = {259-269},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2018.03.003},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2018.03.003},
   Key = {fds335679}
}

@article{fds332755,
   Author = {Gaither, SE and Apfelbaum, EP and Birnbaum, HJ and Babbitt, LG and Sommers, SR},
   Title = {Mere Membership in Racially Diverse Groups Reduces
             Conformity},
   Journal = {Social Psychological and Personality Science},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {402-410},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1948550617708013},
   Doi = {10.1177/1948550617708013},
   Key = {fds332755}
}


%% Gassman-Pines, Anna   
@article{fds339452,
   Author = {Gibson-Davis, C and Gassman-Pines, A and Lehrman,
             R},
   Title = {"His" and "Hers": Meeting the Economic Bar to
             Marriage.},
   Journal = {Demography},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {2321-2343},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0726-z},
   Abstract = {Scholars have suggested that low-income parents avoid
             marriage because they have not met the so-called economic
             bar to marriage. The economic bar is multidimensional,
             referring to a bundle of financial achievements that
             determine whether couples feel ready to wed. Using the
             Building Strong Families data set of low-income parents (n =
             4,444), we operationalized this qualitative concept into a
             seven-item index and examined whether couples who met the
             economic bar by achieving the majority of the items were
             more likely to marry than couples who did not. Meeting the
             bar was associated with a two-thirds increase in marriage
             likelihood. The bar was not positively associated with
             cohabitation, suggesting that it applies specifically to
             marriage. When we examined different definitions of the bar
             based on whether the mother, father, or both parents
             contributed items, all variants were associated with
             marriage, even if the bar was based on the mother's economic
             accomplishments alone. When mothers contributed to the
             economic bar, they reported significantly higher
             relationship quality. Our results reinforce the importance
             of the multidimensional economic bar for marriage entry,
             highlighting the role of maternal economic contributions in
             low-income relationships.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13524-018-0726-z},
   Key = {fds339452}
}

@article{fds337288,
   Author = {Gassman-Pines, A and Bellows, L},
   Title = {Food Instability and Academic Achievement: A
             Quasi-Experiment Using SNAP Benefit Timing},
   Journal = {American Educational Research Journal},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {897-927},
   Publisher = {American Educational Research Association
             (AERA)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/0002831218761337},
   Doi = {10.3102/0002831218761337},
   Key = {fds337288}
}

@article{fds333175,
   Author = {Gassman-Pines, A and Skinner, AT},
   Title = {Psychological Acculturation and Parenting Behaviors in
             Mexican Immigrant Families.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Issues},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1139-1164},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0192513X16687001},
   Abstract = {This study examined the relation between mothers' and
             fathers' psychological acculturation and parenting behaviors
             in two samples of Mexican immigrant families. The middle
             childhood sample included 47 mothers, 38 fathers and 46
             children in families with children age 9 - 12, and the early
             childhood sample included 185 mothers and 155 fathers in
             families with children age 2 - 6. In both samples, compared
             to families in which fathers reported feeling connected only
             to Latino culture, fathers who reported feeling connected to
             both Latinos and Americans engaged in fewer aversive and
             withdrawn interactions and more warm interactions with
             children. In families where fathers reported feeling
             connected to both Latinos and Americans, mothers also
             engaged in fewer aversive and withdrawn interactions and
             more warm interactions with children. Results were
             consistent across the two samples and across different
             family member reports of parent-child interactions.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0192513X16687001},
   Key = {fds333175}
}


%% Gibson-Davis, Christina M.   
@article{fds339346,
   Author = {Gibson-Davis, C and Gassman-Pines, A and Lehrman,
             R},
   Title = {"His" and "Hers": Meeting the Economic Bar to
             Marriage.},
   Journal = {Demography},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {2321-2343},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0726-z},
   Abstract = {Scholars have suggested that low-income parents avoid
             marriage because they have not met the so-called economic
             bar to marriage. The economic bar is multidimensional,
             referring to a bundle of financial achievements that
             determine whether couples feel ready to wed. Using the
             Building Strong Families data set of low-income parents (n =
             4,444), we operationalized this qualitative concept into a
             seven-item index and examined whether couples who met the
             economic bar by achieving the majority of the items were
             more likely to marry than couples who did not. Meeting the
             bar was associated with a two-thirds increase in marriage
             likelihood. The bar was not positively associated with
             cohabitation, suggesting that it applies specifically to
             marriage. When we examined different definitions of the bar
             based on whether the mother, father, or both parents
             contributed items, all variants were associated with
             marriage, even if the bar was based on the mother's economic
             accomplishments alone. When mothers contributed to the
             economic bar, they reported significantly higher
             relationship quality. Our results reinforce the importance
             of the multidimensional economic bar for marriage entry,
             highlighting the role of maternal economic contributions in
             low-income relationships.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13524-018-0726-z},
   Key = {fds339346}
}

@article{fds337711,
   Author = {Rackin, HM and Gibson-Davis, CM},
   Title = {Social Class Divergence in Family Transitions: The
             Importance of Cohabitation},
   Journal = {Journal of Marriage and the Family},
   Volume = {80},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1271-1286},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jomf.12522},
   Abstract = {© 2018 National Council on Family Relations Objective: This
             study examined trends in familial transitions by maternal
             education and whether transitions rose because of changes in
             prevalence (the share of children exposed to a relationship
             state, either marriage or cohabitation) or churning (the
             number of entrances and exits conditional on being exposed
             to a relationship state). Background: Children's experiences
             of transitions, an important predictor of well-being, have
             leveled off in recent decades. Plateauing in transitions may
             reflect heterogeneity by socioeconomic status. Method: Data
             came from the National Survey of Family Growth on firstborn
             children observed from ages 0 to 5 among mothers aged 15 to
             34 at the time of the child's birth (N = 7,265). Kitagawa
             methods decomposed changes in transitions into those
             attributable to changes in prevalence and churning. Analyses
             were conducted separately by maternal education. Results:
             Children born to lower and moderately educated women
             experienced an increase in transitions because cohabitation
             increased in prevalence rather than a change in the number
             of exits and entrances from cohabiting unions. Among this
             disadvantaged group, children exposed to cohabitation
             experienced much more churning than children exposed to
             marriage. Children born to mothers with a 4-year degree did
             not experience an increase in transitions and predominantly
             experienced stable parental marriages. Conclusion:
             Transitions only plateaued for children born to highly
             educated mothers, whereas transitions rose for
             less-advantaged children. Transitions appear to be another
             aspect of early family life experiences that contributes to
             diverging destinies.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jomf.12522},
   Key = {fds337711}
}

@article{fds335175,
   Author = {Gibson-Davis, CM and Percheski, C},
   Title = {Children and the Elderly: Wealth Inequality Among America's
             Dependents.},
   Journal = {Demography},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0676-5},
   Abstract = {Life cycle theory predicts that elderly households have
             higher levels of wealth than households with children, but
             these wealth gaps are likely dynamic, responding to changes
             in labor market conditions, patterns of debt accumulation,
             and the overall economic context. Using Survey of Consumer
             Finances data from 1989 through 2013, we compare wealth
             levels between and within the two groups that make up
             America's dependents: the elderly and child households
             (households with a resident child aged 18 or younger). Over
             the observed period, the absolute wealth gap between elderly
             and child households in the United States increased
             substantially, and diverging trends in wealth accumulation
             exacerbated preexisting between-group disparities. Widening
             gaps were particularly pronounced among the least-wealthy
             elderly and child households. Differential demographic
             change in marital status and racial composition by subgroup
             do not explain the widening gap. We also find increasing
             wealth inequality within child households and the rise of a
             "parental 1 %." During a time of overall economic growth,
             the elderly have been able to maintain or increase their
             wealth, whereas many of the least-wealthy child households
             saw precipitous declines. Our findings suggest that many
             child households may lack sufficient assets to promote the
             successful flourishing of the next generation.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13524-018-0676-5},
   Key = {fds335175}
}

@article{fds324192,
   Author = {Holbein, JB and Hillygus, DS and Lenard, MA and Gibson-Davis, C and Hill, DV},
   Title = {The Development of Students’ Engagement in School,
             Community and Democracy},
   Journal = {British Journal of Political Science},
   Pages = {1-19},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s000712341800025x},
   Abstract = {<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>This article
             explores the origins of youth engagement in school,
             community and democracy. Specifically, it considers the role
             of psychosocial or non-cognitive abilities, like grit or
             perseverance. Using a novel original large-scale
             longitudinal survey of students linked to school
             administrative records and a variety of modeling techniques
             – including sibling, twin and individual fixed effects –
             the study finds that psychosocial abilities are a strong
             predictor of youth civic engagement. Gritty students miss
             less class time and are more engaged in their schools, are
             more politically efficacious, are more likely to intend to
             vote when they become eligible, and volunteer more. Our work
             highlights the value of psychosocial attributes in the
             political socialization of young people.</jats:p>},
   Doi = {10.1017/s000712341800025x},
   Key = {fds324192}
}


%% Gold, Deborah T.   
@article{fds337474,
   Author = {Silverman, SL and Siris, E and Belazi, D and Recknor, C and Papaioannou,
             A and Brown, JP and Gold, DT and Lewiecki, EM and Quinn, G and Balasubramanian, A and Yue, S and Stolshek, B and Kendler,
             DL},
   Title = {Persistence at 24 months with denosumab among
             postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: results of a
             prospective cohort study.},
   Journal = {Archives of Osteoporosis},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {85},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11657-018-0491-z},
   Abstract = {Persistence with prescribed medications for chronic diseases
             is important; however, persistence with osteoporosis
             treatments is historically poor. In this prospective cohort
             study of postmenopausal women treated for osteoporosis in
             real-world clinical practice settings in the USA and Canada,
             24-month persistence with denosumab was 58%.Patients who
             persist with their prescribed osteoporosis treatment have
             increased bone mineral density (BMD) and reduced risk of
             fracture. Twelve-month persistence with denosumab in routine
             clinical practice is as high as 95%, but there are limited
             data on longer-term persistence with denosumab in this
             setting.This single-arm, prospective, cohort study evaluated
             24-month persistence with denosumab administered every
             6 months in postmenopausal women receiving treatment for
             osteoporosis in real-world clinical practice in the USA and
             Canada. Endpoints and analyses included the percentage of
             patients who persist with denosumab at 24 months (greater
             than or equal to four injections with a gap between
             injections of no more than 6 months plus 8 weeks), the
             total number of injections received by each patient, changes
             in BMD in persistent patients, and the incidence of serious
             adverse events (SAEs) and fractures.Among 935 enrolled
             patients, 24-month persistence was 58% (50% in US patients
             and 75% in Canadian patients). A majority of patients
             received at least four injections over the observation
             period (62% of US patients and 81% of Canadian patients).
             Among patients who were persistent at 24 months and who had
             a baseline, 12-month, and 24-month DXA scan, mean BMD
             increased from baseline to 24 months by 7.8% at the lumbar
             spine and 2.1% at the femoral neck. SAEs and fractures were
             reported for 122 (13.0%) patients and 54 (5.8%) patients,
             respectively.Persistence with denosumab for 24 months
             yields improvement in BMD among postmenopausal women with
             osteoporosis treated in routine clinical practice in the USA
             and Canada.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11657-018-0491-z},
   Key = {fds337474}
}


%% Goldston, David B.   
@article{fds337179,
   Author = {Ribeiro, SP and LaCroix, JM and De Oliveira and F and Novak, LA and Lee-Tauler, SY and Darmour, CA and Perera, KU and Goldston, DB and Weaver, J and Soumoff, A and Ghahramanlou-Holloway,
             M},
   Title = {The Link between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and
             Functionality among United States Military Service Members
             Psychiatrically Hospitalized Following a Suicide
             Crisis.},
   Journal = {Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland)},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {3},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6030095},
   Abstract = {Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most
             commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorders in the United
             States and has been linked to suicidal thoughts and
             behaviors, yet the role of a PTSD diagnosis on functional
             impairment among suicidal individuals remains unknown. This
             study examined the association between PTSD status and
             functional impairment among military psychiatric inpatients
             admitted for acute suicide risk (N = 166) with a lifetime
             history of at least one suicide attempt. Measures of
             functionality included: (1) alcohol use; (2) sleep quality;
             (3) social problem-solving; and (4) work and social
             adjustment. Thirty-eight percent of the sample met criteria
             for PTSD. Women were more likely than men to meet criteria
             for PTSD (p = 0.007), and participants who met PTSD criteria
             had significantly more psychiatric diagnoses (p < 0.001).
             Service members who met PTSD criteria reported more
             disturbed sleep (p = 0.003) and greater difficulties with
             work and social adjustment (p = 0.004) than those who did
             not meet PTSD criteria. However, functionality measures were
             not significantly associated with PTSD status after
             controlling for gender and psychiatric comorbidity. Gender
             and number of psychiatric comorbidities other than PTSD were
             significant predictors of PTSD in logistic regression models
             across four functionality measures. Future studies should
             assess the additive or mediating effect of psychiatric
             comorbidities in the association between impaired
             functioning and PTSD. Clinicians are encouraged to assess
             and address functionality during treatment with suicidal
             individuals, paying particular attention to individuals with
             multiple psychiatric diagnoses.},
   Doi = {10.3390/healthcare6030095},
   Key = {fds337179}
}

@article{fds322757,
   Author = {Godoy Garraza and L and Peart Boyce and S and Walrath, C and Goldston, DB and McKeon, R},
   Title = {An Economic Evaluation of the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial
             Suicide Prevention Program.},
   Journal = {Suicide & Life Threatening Behavior},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3-11},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sltb.12321},
   Abstract = {For more than a decade, the Garrett Lee Smith Youth Suicide
             Prevention Program has provided funding for community-based
             suicide prevention programs to states, tribes, and colleges
             across the United States. Recent studies provided evidence
             of the program's effectiveness in reducing suicide mortality
             and suicide attempts among youth. This study compares the
             cost of implementing the program with the estimated savings
             resulting from avoided hospitalization and emergency
             department visits associated with the averted suicide
             attempts. The findings suggest that the cost of implementing
             multifaceted community-based suicide prevention strategies
             may be more than outweighed by savings in the health
             sector.},
   Doi = {10.1111/sltb.12321},
   Key = {fds322757}
}


%% Groh, Jennifer M.   
@article{fds336520,
   Author = {Caruso, VC and Mohl, JT and Glynn, C and Lee, J and Willett, SM and Zaman,
             A and Ebihara, AF and Estrada, R and Freiwald, WA and Tokdar, ST and Groh,
             JM},
   Title = {Single neurons may encode simultaneous stimuli by switching
             between activity patterns.},
   Journal = {Nature Communications},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {2715},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-05121-8},
   Abstract = {How the brain preserves information about multiple
             simultaneous items is poorly understood. We report that
             single neurons can represent multiple stimuli by
             interleaving signals across time. We record single units in
             an auditory region, the inferior colliculus, while monkeys
             localize 1 or 2 simultaneous sounds. During dual-sound
             trials, we find that some neurons fluctuate between firing
             rates observed for each single sound, either on a
             whole-trial or on a sub-trial timescale. These fluctuations
             are correlated in pairs of neurons, can be predicted by the
             state of local field potentials prior to sound onset, and,
             in one monkey, can predict which sound will be reported
             first. We find corroborating evidence of fluctuating
             activity patterns in a separate dataset involving responses
             of inferotemporal cortex neurons to multiple visual stimuli.
             Alternation between activity patterns corresponding to each
             of multiple items may therefore be a general strategy to
             enhance the brain processing capacity, potentially linking
             such disparate phenomena as variable neural firing, neural
             oscillations, and limits in attentional/memory
             capacity.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41467-018-05121-8},
   Key = {fds336520}
}

@article{fds332221,
   Author = {Caruso, VC and Pages, DS and Sommer, MA and Groh,
             JM},
   Title = {Beyond the labeled line: variation in visual reference
             frames from intraparietal cortex to frontal eye fields and
             the superior colliculus.},
   Journal = {Journal of Neurophysiology},
   Volume = {119},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1411-1421},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/jn.00584.2017},
   Abstract = {We accurately perceive the visual scene despite moving our
             eyes ~3 times per second, an ability that requires
             incorporation of eye position and retinal information. In
             this study, we assessed how this neural computation unfolds
             across three interconnected structures: frontal eye fields
             (FEF), intraparietal cortex (LIP/MIP), and the superior
             colliculus (SC). Single-unit activity was assessed in
             head-restrained monkeys performing visually guided saccades
             from different initial fixations. As previously shown, the
             receptive fields of most LIP/MIP neurons shifted to novel
             positions on the retina for each eye position, and these
             locations were not clearly related to each other in either
             eye- or head-centered coordinates (defined as hybrid
             coordinates). In contrast, the receptive fields of most SC
             neurons were stable in eye-centered coordinates. In FEF,
             visual signals were intermediate between those patterns:
             around 60% were eye-centered, whereas the remainder showed
             changes in receptive field location, boundaries, or
             responsiveness that rendered the response patterns hybrid or
             occasionally head-centered. These results suggest that FEF
             may act as a transitional step in an evolution of
             coordinates between LIP/MIP and SC. The persistence across
             cortical areas of mixed representations that do not provide
             unequivocal location labels in a consistent reference frame
             has implications for how these representations must be read
             out. NEW & NOTEWORTHY How we perceive the world as stable
             using mobile retinas is poorly understood. We compared the
             stability of visual receptive fields across different
             fixation positions in three visuomotor regions. Irregular
             changes in receptive field position were ubiquitous in
             intraparietal cortex, evident but less common in the frontal
             eye fields, and negligible in the superior colliculus (SC),
             where receptive fields shifted reliably across fixations.
             Only the SC provides a stable labeled-line code for stimuli
             across saccades.},
   Doi = {10.1152/jn.00584.2017},
   Key = {fds332221}
}

@article{fds332360,
   Author = {Gruters, KG and Murphy, DLK and Jenson, CD and Smith, DW and Shera, CA and Groh, JM},
   Title = {The eardrums move when the eyes move: A multisensory effect
             on the mechanics of hearing.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the
             United States of America},
   Volume = {115},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {E1309-E1318},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1717948115},
   Abstract = {Interactions between sensory pathways such as the visual and
             auditory systems are known to occur in the brain, but where
             they first occur is uncertain. Here, we show a multimodal
             interaction evident at the eardrum. Ear canal microphone
             measurements in humans (n = 19 ears in 16 subjects) and
             monkeys (n = 5 ears in three subjects) performing a saccadic
             eye movement task to visual targets indicated that the
             eardrum moves in conjunction with the eye movement. The
             eardrum motion was oscillatory and began as early as 10 ms
             before saccade onset in humans or with saccade onset in
             monkeys. These eardrum movements, which we dub eye
             movement-related eardrum oscillations (EMREOs), occurred in
             the absence of a sound stimulus. The amplitude and phase of
             the EMREOs depended on the direction and horizontal
             amplitude of the saccade. They lasted throughout the saccade
             and well into subsequent periods of steady fixation. We
             discuss the possibility that the mechanisms underlying
             EMREOs create eye movement-related binaural cues that may
             aid the brain in evaluating the relationship between visual
             and auditory stimulus locations as the eyes
             move.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.1717948115},
   Key = {fds332360}
}


%% Hard, Bridgette M.   
@article{fds336521,
   Author = {Brady, ST and Hard, BM and Gross, JJ},
   Title = {Reappraising test anxiety increases academic performance of
             first-year college students.},
   Journal = {Journal of Educational Psychology},
   Volume = {110},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {395-406},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/edu0000219},
   Abstract = {© 2017 American Psychological Association. The idea that
             test anxiety hurts performance is deeply ingrained in
             American culture and schools. However, researchers have
             found that it is actually worry about performance and
             anxiety-not bodily feelings of anxiety (emotionality)-that
             impairs performance. Drawing on this insight, anxiety
             reappraisal interventions encourage the view that anxiety
             can be neutral or even helpful. Initial evidence-largely
             from laboratory studies-suggests that these kinds of
             reappraisal interventions can improve student performance in
             mathematics. But can they do so in other domains and within
             the constraints of everyday classroom activities? If so, for
             whom and how? In an intervention study, we tested whether a
             minimal reappraisal message embedded in an email from course
             instructors could improve students' academic experience and
             performance in an introductory college course. The night
             before their first exam, students received an e-mail that
             either did or did not include a paragraph designed to lead
             them to interpret exam anxiety as beneficial or at least
             neutral. First-year students, who experience greater test
             anxiety and are less certain about how to perform well,
             benefited from the reappraisal message, showing decreased
             worry and increased performance on the exam the next day as
             well as increased performance in the course overall.
             Mediation analyses revealed that the effect on overall
             course performance for first-year students was partially
             mediated by reduced exam worry and enhanced performance on
             the first exam. The message did not affect the performance
             of upper year students.},
   Doi = {10.1037/edu0000219},
   Key = {fds336521}
}

@article{fds338050,
   Author = {Hard, BM and Meyer, M and Baldwin, D},
   Title = {Attention reorganizes as structure is detected in dynamic
             action},
   Journal = {Memory & Cognition},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature America, Inc},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-018-0847-z},
   Abstract = {© 2018, Psychonomic Society, Inc. Once one sees a pattern,
             it is challenging to “unsee” it; discovering structure
             alters processing. Precisely what changes as this happens is
             unclear, however. We probed this question by tracking
             changes in attention as viewers discovered statistical
             patterns within unfolding event sequences. We measured
             viewers’ “dwell times” (e.g., Hard, Recchia, &
             Tversky, 2011) as they advanced at their own pace through a
             series of still-frame images depicting a sequence of event
             segments (“actions”) that were discoverable only via
             sensitivity to statistical regularities among the component
             motion elements. “Knowledgeable” adults, who had had the
             opportunity to learn these statistical regularities prior to
             the slideshow viewing, displayed dwell-time patterns
             indicative of sensitivity to the statistically defined
             higher-level segmental structure; “naïve” adults, who
             lacked the opportunity for prior viewing, did not. These
             findings clarify that attention reorganizes in conjunction
             with statistically guided discovery of segmental structure
             within continuous human activity sequences. As patterns
             emerge in the mind, attention redistributes selectively to
             target boundary regions, perhaps because they represent
             highly informative junctures of “predictable
             unpredictability.”},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13421-018-0847-z},
   Key = {fds338050}
}


%% Hare, Brian   
@article{fds340823,
   Author = {Horschler, DJ and Hare, B and Call, J and Kaminski, J and Miklósi, Á and MacLean, EL},
   Title = {Absolute brain size predicts dog breed differences in
             executive function.},
   Journal = {Animal Cognition},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-018-01234-1},
   Abstract = {Large-scale phylogenetic studies of animal cognition have
             revealed robust links between absolute brain volume and
             species differences in executive function. However, past
             comparative samples have been composed largely of primates,
             which are characterized by evolutionarily derived neural
             scaling rules. Therefore, it is currently unknown whether
             positive associations between brain volume and executive
             function reflect a broad-scale evolutionary phenomenon, or
             alternatively, a unique consequence of primate brain
             evolution. Domestic dogs provide a powerful opportunity for
             investigating this question due to their close genetic
             relatedness, but vast intraspecific variation. Using citizen
             science data on more than 7000 purebred dogs from 74 breeds,
             and controlling for genetic relatedness between breeds, we
             identify strong relationships between estimated absolute
             brain weight and breed differences in cognition.
             Specifically, larger-brained breeds performed significantly
             better on measures of short-term memory and self-control.
             However, the relationships between estimated brain weight
             and other cognitive measures varied widely, supporting
             domain-specific accounts of cognitive evolution. Our results
             suggest that evolutionary increases in brain size are
             positively associated with taxonomic differences in
             executive function, even in the absence of primate-like
             neuroanatomy. These findings also suggest that variation
             between dog breeds may present a powerful model for
             investigating correlated changes in neuroanatomy and
             cognition among closely related taxa.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10071-018-01234-1},
   Key = {fds340823}
}

@article{fds338473,
   Author = {Krupenye, C and Tan, J and Hare, B},
   Title = {Bonobos voluntarily hand food to others but not toys or
             tools.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological
             Sciences},
   Volume = {285},
   Number = {1886},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2018.1536},
   Abstract = {A key feature of human prosociality is direct transfers, the
             most active form of sharing in which donors voluntarily hand
             over resources in their possession Direct transfers buffer
             hunter-gatherers against foraging shortfalls. The emergence
             and elaboration of this behaviour thus likely played a key
             role in human evolution by promoting cooperative
             interdependence and ensuring that humans' growing energetic
             needs (e.g. for increasing brain size) were more reliably
             met. According to the strong prosociality hypothesis, among
             great apes only humans exhibit sufficiently strong prosocial
             motivations to directly transfer food. The versatile
             prosociality hypothesis suggests instead that while other
             apes may make transfers in constrained settings, only humans
             share flexibly across food and non-food contexts. In
             controlled experiments, chimpanzees typically transfer
             objects but not food, supporting both hypotheses. In this
             paper, we show in two experiments that bonobos directly
             transfer food but not non-food items. These findings show
             that, in some contexts, bonobos exhibit a human-like
             motivation for direct food transfer. However, humans share
             across a far wider range of contexts, lending support to the
             versatile prosociality hypothesis. Our species' unusual
             prosocial flexibility is likely built on a prosocial
             foundation we share through common descent with the other
             apes.},
   Doi = {10.1098/rspb.2018.1536},
   Key = {fds338473}
}

@article{fds335476,
   Author = {Lucca, K and MacLean, EL and Hare, B},
   Title = {The development and flexibility of gaze alternations in
             bonobos and chimpanzees.},
   Journal = {Developmental Science},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {e12598},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/desc.12598},
   Abstract = {Infants' early gaze alternations are one of their first
             steps towards a sophisticated understanding of the social
             world. This ability, to gaze alternate between an object of
             interest and another individual also attending to that
             object, has been considered foundational to the development
             of many complex social-cognitive abilities, such as theory
             of mind and language. However, to understand the evolution
             of these abilities, it is important to identify whether and
             how gaze alternations are used and develop in our closest
             living relatives, bonobos (Pan paniscus) and chimpanzees
             (Pan troglodytes). Here, we evaluated the development of
             gaze alternations in a large, developmental sample of
             bonobos (N = 17) and chimpanzees (N = 35). To assess the
             flexibility of ape gaze alternations, we tested whether they
             produced gaze alternations when requesting food from a human
             who was either visually attentive or visually inattentive.
             Similarly to human infants, both bonobos and chimpanzees
             produced gaze alternations, and did so more frequently when
             a human communicative partner was visually attentive.
             However, unlike humans, who gaze alternate frequently from
             early in development, chimpanzees did not begin to gaze
             alternate frequently until adulthood. Bonobos produced very
             few gaze alternations, regardless of age. Thus, it may be
             the early emergence of gaze alternations, as opposed gaze
             alternations themselves, that is derived in the human
             lineage. The distinctively early emergence of gaze
             alternations in humans may be a critical underpinning for
             the development of complex human social-cognitive
             abilities.},
   Doi = {10.1111/desc.12598},
   Key = {fds335476}
}

@article{fds331591,
   Author = {Hare, B},
   Title = {Domestication experiments reveal developmental link between
             friendliness and cognition},
   Journal = {Journal of Bioeconomics},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {159-163},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10818-017-9264-9},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of
             Springer Nature The goal of economics is to understand human
             preferences. Most research focuses on adult humans and does
             not take an evolutionary approach. In biology experimental
             evolution has been able to shift the preferences of animals.
             As an example, artificial selection for friendly behavior
             toward humans results in a syndrome of changes that strongly
             resembles differences between wild and domestic animals.
             These domestication experiments have revealed precise
             genetic and neurobiological systems that are altered by the
             selection and linked through expanded windows of
             development. Similar evolutionary experiments selecting for
             a range of social, risk or discounting preferences could
             push economics toward consilience with biology. Prospects
             for a unified theory of economic behavior would be
             drastically improved.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10818-017-9264-9},
   Key = {fds331591}
}

@book{fds335480,
   Author = {Hare, B and Yamamoto, S},
   Title = {Bonobos},
   Pages = {1-290},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780198728511},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198728511.001.0001},
   Abstract = {<p>This is a comprehensive, illustrated catalogue of the
             200+ marine chronometers in the collections of Royal Museums
             Greenwich. Every chronometer has been completely dismantled,
             studied and recorded, and illustrations include especially
             commissioned line drawings as well as photographs. The
             collection is also used to illustrate a newly researched and
             up-to-date chapter describing the history of the marine
             chronometer, so the book is much more than simply a
             catalogue. The history chapter naturally includes the story
             of John Harrison’s pioneering work in creating the first
             practical marine timekeepers, all four of which are included
             in the catalogue, newly photographed and described in minute
             detail for the first time. In fact full technical and
             historical data are provided for all of the marine
             chronometers in the collection, to an extent never before
             attempted, including biographical details of every maker
             represented. A chapter describes how the 19th century
             English chronometer was manufactured, and another provides
             comprehensive and logically arranged information on how to
             assess and date a given marine chronometer, something
             collectors and dealers find particularly difficult. For
             further help in identification of chronometers, appendices
             include a pictorial record of the number punches used by
             specific makers to number their movements, and the maker’s
             punches used by the rough movement makers. There is also a
             close-up pictorial guide to the various compensation
             balances used in chronometers in the collection, a technical
             Glossary of terms used in the catalogue text and a
             concordance of the various inventory numbers used in the
             collection over the years.</p>},
   Doi = {10.1093/oso/9780198728511.001.0001},
   Key = {fds335480}
}

@misc{fds335477,
   Author = {Hare, B and Yamamoto, S},
   Title = {Minding the bonobo mind},
   Pages = {1-14},
   Booktitle = {Bonobos: Unique in Mind, Brain, and Behavior},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780198728511},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0001},
   Abstract = {<p>We illustrate the central role the bonobo plays in
             testing evolutionary hypotheses regarding ape minds
             (including our own). The importance of bonobos has become
             apparent only recently with sustained fieldwork at multiple
             sites in the Congo Basin as well as the first direct
             quantitative comparisons between bonobos, chimpanzees and
             humans. This recent work has revealed a number of traits in
             which bonobos and chimpanzees are more similar to humans
             than they are to each other. This means that bonobos are
             crucial to determining the evolutionary processes by which
             cognitive traits evolved in our own lineage. Based on the
             evidence within, it becomes clear that one can no longer
             know chimpanzees or humans without also knowing bonobos. We
             argue this makes investing in bonobo research and improved
             protection for bonobos in captivity and the wild an even
             higher priority. Nous illustrons le rôle central joué par
             le bonobo pour tester les hypothèses relatives à
             l’évolution de l’esprit des grands singes (y compris le
             nôtre). L’importance des bonobos n’est apparue que
             récemment grâce à un travail de terrain soutenu sur de
             multiples sites dans le bassin du Congo ainsi qu’aux
             premières comparaisons quantitatives directes entre les
             bonobos, les chimpanzés et les humains. Ces récents
             travaux ont révélé un certain nombre de caractéristiques
             pour lesquelles les bonobos et les chimpanzés présentent
             plus de similarités avec les humains que l’un envers
             l’autre. Cela signifie que les bonobos sont essentiels
             pour déterminer les processus d’évolution par lesquels
             les caractéristiques cognitives ont évolué dans notre
             propre lignée. Sur la base des preuves contenues dans ce
             document, il devient clair que l’on ne peut plus
             connaître les chimpanzés ou les humains sans connaître
             les bonobos. Cela rend donc d’autant plus primordiaux
             l’investissement dans la recherche sur les bonobos et
             l’amélioration de la protection des bonobos en captivité
             comme à l’état sauvage.</p>},
   Doi = {10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0001},
   Key = {fds335477}
}

@misc{fds335478,
   Author = {Krupenye, C and MacLean, EL and Hare, B},
   Title = {Does the bonobo have a (chimpanzee-like) theory of
             mind?},
   Pages = {81-94},
   Booktitle = {Bonobos: Unique in Mind, Brain, and Behavior},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780198728511},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0006},
   Abstract = {<p>Theory of mind—the ability to reason about the thoughts
             and emotions of others—is central to what makes us human.
             Chimpanzees too appear to understand some psychological
             states. While less is known about bonobos, several lines of
             evidence suggest that the social-cognitive abilities of the
             two sister taxa may differ in key respects. This chapter
             outlines a framework to guide future research on bonobo
             social cognition based on the predictions of two potentially
             complementary hypotheses. The self-domestication hypothesis
             suggests that selection against aggression and for
             prosociality in bonobos may have impacted the ontogeny of
             their social-cognitive skills relative to chimpanzees. The
             empathizing–systemizing hypothesis links degree of
             prenatal brain masculinization, a potential result of
             self-domestication, to adult cognition. Specifically,
             relative feminization may yield more flexible theory of mind
             skills in bonobos than chimpanzees. Finally, directions for
             future study, including development of new paradigms that
             maximize ecological validity for bonobos, are discussed. La
             théorie de l’esprit—le pouvoir de raisonner les
             pensées et émotions des autres—est centrale à notre
             nature humaine. Il parait que les chimpanzés peuvent
             comprendre quelques états psychologiques. Tandis que nous
             savons moins des bonobos, plusieurs témoignages suggèrent
             que les capacités socio-cognitives des deux taxons soeur
             peuvent différer dans des aspects clefs. Nous traçons un
             cadre pour guider les prochaines recherches sur la cognition
             sociale des bonobos, basé sur les prédictions de deux
             hypothèses potentiellement complémentaires. L’hypothèse
             d’auto-domestication suggère que l’anti-agression et la
             prosocialité des bonobos a influé leur ontogenèse et leur
             capacités socio-cognitives relativement aux chimpanzés.
             L’hypothèse d’empathie systématique
             (Empathizing–Systemizing) forme un lien entre le degré de
             masculinisation prénatale du cerveau, le résultat
             potentiel d’auto-domestication, et la cognition adulte.
             Spécifiquement, la féminisation relative génère des
             théories de l’esprit plus flexibles chez les bonobos que
             chez les chimpanzés. Enfin, nous discutons le directions
             pour les prochaines études, inclut le développement de
             nouveaux paradigmes qui maximisent la validité écologique
             des bonobos.</p>},
   Doi = {10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0006},
   Key = {fds335478}
}

@misc{fds335479,
   Author = {Tan, J and Hare, B},
   Title = {Prosociality among non-kin in bonobos and chimpanzees
             compared},
   Pages = {140-154},
   Booktitle = {Bonobos: Unique in Mind, Brain, and Behavior},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780198728511},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0010},
   Abstract = {<p>Models of the origin of human prosociality towards
             non-kin have been primarily developed from chimpanzee
             studies. Substantially less effort has been made to consider
             the prosociality of bonobos. Like chimpanzees, bonobos
             cooperate with non-kin extensively but, unlike chimpanzees,
             immigrating members are central to bonobo cooperation. In
             experiments bonobos are tolerant during encounters with
             strangers and during co-feeding. They help strangers without
             immediate tangible reward, and forfeit monopolizable food to
             facilitate a physical interaction with them. Such
             prosociality seems proactive as it is not elicited by
             solicitation. Bonobos also seem to prefer sharing food over
             non-food objects, while chimpanzees reliably transfer
             non-food objects rather than food. These findings highlight
             the possibility that human sharing with strangers might have
             also evolved as a mutualistic endeavour to initiate a
             long-term partnership. Future models of human prosociality
             will need to incorporate findings from both
             <italic>Pan</italic> species. Les modèles de l’origine de
             la prosocialité humaine entre non-parents ont été
             développées en majorité à partir d’études de
             chimpanzé. Beaucoup moins d’efforts ont été faits pour
             considérer la prosocialité des bonobos. Comme les
             chimpanzés, les bonobos coopèrent extensivement avec
             non-parents mais, contrairement au chimpanzés, les membres
             immigrants sont au centre de la coopération bonobo. Les
             bonobos sont tolérants, en expérimentation, durant les
             rencontres avec des étrangers et durant la co-alimentation.
             Ils aident les étrangers sans récompense immédiate, et
             abandonnent la nourriture monopolisable pour faciliter une
             interaction physique avec eux. Une prosocialité pareille
             paraît proactive vu qu’elle n’est pas sollicitée. Les
             bonobos, il paraît, préfèrent partager la nourriture que
             d’autres objets, alors que les chimpanzés préfèrent
             partager les objets non-aliments que la nourriture. Ces
             résultats soulignent la possibilité que le partage humain
             avec les étrangers a pu évoluer comme une enquête
             mutuelle pour initier un partenariat à longue durée. Les
             modèles futurs de la prosocialité humaine doivent inclure
             les résultats des deux espèces Pan.</p>},
   Doi = {10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0010},
   Key = {fds335479}
}

@misc{fds335481,
   Author = {Faust, LJ and André, C and Belais, R and Minesi, F and Pereboom, Z and Rodriguez, K and Hare, B},
   Title = {Bonobo population dynamics: Past patterns and future
             predictions for the Lola ya Bonobo population using
             demographic modelling},
   Pages = {266-274},
   Booktitle = {Bonobos: Unique in Mind, Brain, and Behavior},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780198728511},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0018},
   Abstract = {<p>Wildlife sanctuaries rescue, rehabilitate, reintroduce
             and provide life-long care for orphaned and injured animals.
             Understanding a sanctuary’s population dynamics—patterns
             in arrival, mortality and projected changes in population
             size—allows careful planning for future needs. Building on
             previous work on the population dynamics of chimpanzees
             (<italic>Pan troglodytes</italic>) in sanctuaries of the Pan
             African Sanctuary Alliance (PASA; Faust <italic>et
             al.</italic> 2011), this chapter extends analyses to the
             only PASA bonobo sanctuary. Its authors analysed historic
             demographic patterns and projected future population
             dynamics using an individual-based demographic model. The
             population has been growing at 6.7 per cent per year, driven
             by arrivals of new individuals (mean = 5.5 arrivals per
             year). Several model scenarios projecting varying arrival
             rates, releases and breeding scenarios clarify potential
             future growth trajectories for the sanctuary. This research
             illustrates how data on historic dynamics can be modelled to
             inform future sanctuary capacity and management needs. Les
             sanctuaires de faune secourent, réhabilitent,
             réintroduisent, et fournissent des soins pour toute la vie
             aux animaux orphelins et blessés. Comprendre les dynamiques
             de la population d’un sanctuaire—les motifs
             d’arrivée, mortalité, et de changements projetés de la
             taille de la population—permet une planification prudente
             pour les nécessités du futur. En se basant sur le travail
             déjà fait sur les dynamiques de la population chimpanzé
             (<italic>Pan troglodytes</italic>) dans les sanctuaires du
             Pan African Sanctuary Alliance (PASA; Faust et al. 2011),
             nous étendons notre analyse au seul sanctuaire bonobo par
             PASA. Nous avons analysé les motifs démographiques
             historiques et avons projeté les futures dynamiques de la
             population en utilisant un modèle démographique basé sur
             l’individu. La population augmente de 6.7 per cent par an,
             poussée par l’arrivée de nouveaux individus (moyenne =
             5.5 arrivées par an). Plusieurs scénarios modèles
             montrent une trajectoire de potentielle croissance pour le
             sanctuaire. Cette recherche illustre comment modeler les
             données sur les dynamiques historiques pour informer la
             capacité future du sanctuaire et les besoins
             gestionnaires.</p>},
   Doi = {10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0018},
   Key = {fds335481}
}

@misc{fds335482,
   Author = {Walker, K and Hare, B},
   Title = {Bonobo baby dominance: Did female defense of offspring lead
             to reduced male aggression?},
   Pages = {49-64},
   Booktitle = {Bonobos: Unique in Mind, Brain, and Behavior},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780198728511},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0004},
   Abstract = {<p>The dominance style of bonobos presents an evolutionary
             puzzle. Bonobos are not male dominant but female bonobos do
             not show traits typical of female-dominant species. This
             chapter proposes the offspring dominance hypothesis (ODH) as
             a potential solution. ODH suggests the social system of
             bonobos evolved as a defence against infanticide and is not
             due to pressure to monopolize resources. Females that
             prevented aggression towards offspring and preferred mating
             with less aggressive males were most successful. Supporting
             ODH, during observations at Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary it was
             found that: 1) adult male bonobos are rarely aggressive
             towards offspring with mothers, 2) some mother-reared
             juvenile bonobos attain rank higher than adult males and 3)
             mother-reared offspring often socially interact with adult
             males without their mothers nearby. These preliminary
             findings provide initial support that the bonobo social
             system evolved due to fitness advantages of effectively
             protecting offspring against consequences of male
             aggression. Le style de dominance des bonobos présente un
             puzzle évolutionnaire. Les bonobos ne sont pas dominés par
             les mâles mais les bonobos femelles ne montrent pas les
             traits caractéristiques d’une espèce dominée par
             femelles. On propose l’hypothèse de dominance de
             progéniture (ODH) comme une solution potentielle. La ODH
             suggère que le système social des bonobos a évolué en
             défense contre l’infanticide et pas sous pression pour la
             monopolisation des ressources. Les femelles qui préviennent
             l’agression vers leur progéniture et leur préférence
             d’accouplement avec des mâles moins agressives étaient
             très efficaces. À l’appui de la ODH on a trouvé pendant
             nos observations à Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary que: 1) les
             mâles adultes bonobos agressent rarement vers les bébés
             avec mères, 2) quelques adolescents bonobos qui furent
             élevés par leurs mères atteignent un rang plus haut que
             les mâles adultes et 3) la progéniture élevée par la
             mère interagissent avec avec d’adultes mâles sans la
             présence de leur mère. Ces trouvailles préliminaires
             donnent appuie à l’hypothèse que le système social des
             bonobos a évolué par les avantages corporelles de la
             protection de la progéniture contre les conséquences de
             l’agression mâle.</p>},
   Doi = {10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0004},
   Key = {fds335482}
}

@misc{fds335483,
   Author = {Hare, B and Woods, V},
   Title = {Cognitive comparisons of genus Pan support bonobo
             self-domestication},
   Pages = {214-232},
   Booktitle = {Bonobos: Unique in Mind, Brain, and Behavior},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780198728511},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0015},
   Abstract = {<p>The self-domestication hypothesis (SDH) suggests bonobo
             psychology evolved due to selection against aggression and
             in favour of prosociality. This hypothesis was formulated
             based on similarities between bonobos and domesticated
             animals. This chapter reviews the first generation of
             quantitative research that supports the predictions of the
             SDH. Similar to domestic animals, bonobos are prosocial
             towards strangers, more flexible with cooperative problems,
             more responsive to social cues and show expanded windows of
             development relative to their closest relatives,
             chimpanzees. A preliminary comparison of bonobo and
             chimpanzee infants is presented that suggests that when
             hearing a stranger, bonobos have a xenophilic response while
             chimpanzees have a xenophobic response. The chapter explores
             why the work with bonobos has implications for theories of
             both human and animal cognitive evolution, and why bonobos
             will be central in studying evolutionary processes leading
             to cognitive change. L’hypothèse d’auto-domestication
             (SDH) suggère que la psychologie bonobo a évolué grâce
             à la sélection contre l’agression et en faveur de la
             prosocialité. Cette hypothèse fut formulée à partir de
             similarités entres les bonobos et les animaux domestiqués.
             Nous révisons la première génération de recherche
             quantitative qui soutient les prédictions du SDH. Comme les
             animaux domestiques, les bonobos sont prosociaux envers les
             étrangers, plus flexibles avec les problèmes de
             coopération, plus sensibles aux signaux sociaux, et
             montrent des fenêtres étendues de développement
             relativement à leur plus proche parent, le chimpanzé. Nous
             présentons une comparaison préliminaire des bébés
             bonobos et chimpanzés. Quand ils entendent un étranger,
             les bonobos ont une réaction xénophilique alors que les
             chimpanzés ont une réaction xénophobique. Nous expliquons
             pourquoi le travail des bonobos est impliqué dans les
             théories d’évolution cognitive humaine et animale, et
             pourquoi les bonobos seront au centre des études
             évolutionnaires des procès menants aux changements
             cognitives.</p>},
   Doi = {10.1093/oso/9780198728511.003.0015},
   Key = {fds335483}
}

@article{fds331590,
   Author = {Krupenye, C and Hare, B},
   Title = {Bonobos Prefer Individuals that Hinder Others over Those
             that Help.},
   Journal = {Current Biology : Cb},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {280-286.e5},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2017.11.061},
   Abstract = {Humans closely monitor others' cooperative relationships [1,
             2]. Children and adults willingly incur costs to reward
             helpers and punish non-helpers-even as bystanders [3-5].
             Already by 3 months, infants favor individuals that they
             observe helping others [6-8]. This early-emerging prosocial
             preference may be a derived motivation that accounts
             for many human forms of cooperation that occur beyond
             dyadic interactions and are not exhibited by other animals
             [9, 10]. As the most socially tolerant nonhuman ape [11-17]
             (but see [18]), bonobos (Pan paniscus) provide a powerful
             phylogenetic test of whether this trait is derived in
             humans. Bonobos are more tolerant than chimpanzees, can
             flexibly obtain food through cooperation, and voluntarily
             share food in captivity and the wild, even with strangers
             [11-17] (but see [18]). Their neural architecture exhibits a
             suite of characteristics associated with greater sensitivity
             to others [19, 20], and their sociality is hypothesized to
             have evolved due to selection against male aggression
             [21-23]. Here we show in four experiments that bonobos
             discriminated agents based on third-party interactions.
             However, they did not exhibit the human preference for
             helpers. Instead, they reliably favored a hinderer that
             obstructed another agent's goal (experiments 1-3). In a
             final study (experiment 4), bonobos also chose a dominant
             individual over a subordinate. Bonobos' interest in
             hinderers may reflect attraction to dominant individuals
             [24]. A preference for helpers over hinderers may therefore
             be derived in humans, supporting the hypothesis that
             prosocial preferences played a central role in the evolution
             of human development and cooperation.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cub.2017.11.061},
   Key = {fds331590}
}

@article{fds339286,
   Author = {MacLean, EL and Hare, B},
   Title = {Enhanced Selection of Assistance and Explosive Detection
             Dogs Using Cognitive Measures.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Veterinary Science},
   Volume = {5},
   Pages = {236},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2018.00236},
   Abstract = {Working dogs play a variety of important roles, ranging from
             assisting individuals with disabilities, to explosive and
             medical detection work. Despite widespread demand, only a
             subset of dogs bred and trained for these roles ultimately
             succeed, creating a need for objective measures that can
             predict working dog aptitude. Most previous research has
             focused on temperamental characteristics of successful dogs.
             However, working dogs also face diverse cognitive challenges
             both in training, and throughout their working lives. We
             conducted a series of studies investigating the
             relationships between individual differences in dog
             cognition, and success as an assistance or detection dog.
             Assistance dogs (N = 164) and detection dogs (N = 222) were
             tested in the Dog Cognition Test Battery, a 25-item
             instrument probing diverse aspects of dog cognition. Through
             exploratory analyses we identified a subset of tasks
             associated with success in each training program, and
             developed shorter test batteries including only these
             measures. We then used predictive modeling in a prospective
             study with an independent sample of assistance dogs (N =
             180), and conducted a replication study with an independent
             sample of detection dogs (N = 90). In assistance dogs,
             models using data on individual differences in cognition
             predicted higher probabilities of success for dogs that
             ultimately succeeded in the program, than for those who did
             not. For the subset of dogs with predicted probabilities of
             success in the 4th quartile (highest predicted probability
             of success), model predictions were 86% accurate, on
             average. In both the exploratory and prospective studies,
             successful dogs were more likely to engage in eye contact
             with a human experimenter when faced with an unsolvable
             task, or when a joint social activity was disrupted. In
             detection dogs, we replicated our exploratory findings that
             the most successful dogs scored higher on measures of
             sensitivity to human communicative intentions, and two
             measures of short term memory. These findings suggest that
             that (1) individual differences in cognition contribute to
             variance in working dog success, and (2) that objective
             measures of dog cognition can be used to improve the
             processes through which working dogs are evaluated and
             selected.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fvets.2018.00236},
   Key = {fds339286}
}


%% Hariri, Ahmad   
@article{fds335689,
   Author = {Sethi, A and McCrory, E and Puetz, V and Hoffmann, F and Knodt, AR and Radtke, SR and Brigidi, BD and Hariri, AR and Viding,
             E},
   Title = {Primary and Secondary Variants of Psychopathy in a Volunteer
             Sample Are Associated With Different Neurocognitive
             Mechanisms.},
   Journal = {Biological Psychiatry. Cognitive Neuroscience and
             Neuroimaging},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1013-1021},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpsc.2018.04.002},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Recent work has indicated that there at least two
             distinct subtypes of psychopathy. Primary psychopathy is
             characterized by low anxiety and thought to result from a
             genetic predisposition, whereas secondary psychopathy is
             characterized by high anxiety and thought to develop in
             response to environmental adversity. Primary psychopathy is
             robustly associated with reduced neural activation to
             others' emotions and, in particular, distress. However, it
             has been proposed that the secondary presentation has
             different neurocognitive correlates. METHODS:Primary (n =
             50), secondary (n = 100), and comparison (n = 82) groups
             were drawn from a large volunteer sample (N = 1444) using a
             quartile-split approach across psychopathic trait
             (affective-interpersonal) and anxiety measures. Participants
             performed a widely utilized emotional face processing task
             during functional magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS:The
             primary group showed reduced amygdala and insula activity in
             response to fear. The secondary group did not differ from
             the comparison group in these regions. Instead, the
             secondary group showed reduced activity compared with the
             comparison group in other areas, including the superior
             temporal sulcus/inferior parietal lobe, thalamus, pallidum,
             and substantia nigra. Both psychopathy groups also showed
             reduced activity in response to fear in the anterior
             cingulate cortex. During anger processing, the secondary
             group exhibited reduced activity in the anterior cingulate
             cortex compared with the primary group. CONCLUSIONS:Distinct
             neural correlates of fear processing characterize
             individuals with primary and secondary psychopathy. The
             reduced neural response to fear that characterizes
             individuals with the primary variant of psychopathic traits
             is not observed in individuals with the secondary
             presentation. The neurocognitive mechanisms underpinning
             secondary psychopathy warrant further systematic
             investigation.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bpsc.2018.04.002},
   Key = {fds335689}
}

@article{fds335682,
   Author = {Lam, M and Trampush, JW and Yu, J and Knowles, E and Djurovic, S and Melle,
             I and Sundet, K and Christoforou, A and Reinvang, I and DeRosse, P and Lundervold, AJ and Steen, VM and Espeseth, T and Räikkönen, K and Widen, E and Palotie, A and Eriksson, JG and Giegling, I and Konte, B and Roussos, P and Giakoumaki, S and Burdick, KE and Payton, A and Ollier,
             W and Chiba-Falek, O and Attix, DK and Need, AC and Cirulli, ET and Voineskos, AN and Stefanis, NC and Avramopoulos, D and Hatzimanolis,
             A and Arking, DE and Smyrnis, N and Bilder, RM and Freimer, NA and Cannon,
             TD and London, E and Poldrack, RA and Sabb, FW and Congdon, E and Conley,
             ED and Scult, MA and Dickinson, D and Straub, RE and Donohoe, G and Morris,
             D and Corvin, A and Gill, M and Hariri, AR and Weinberger, DR and Pendleton, N and Bitsios, P and Rujescu, D and Lahti, J and Hellard, SL and Keller, MC and Andreassen, OA and Glahn, DC and Malhotra, AK and Lencz,
             T},
   Title = {Multi-Trait Analysis of GWAS and Biological Insights Into
             Cognition: A Response to Hill (2018).},
   Journal = {Twin Research and Human Genetics : the Official Journal of
             the International Society for Twin Studies},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {394-397},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/thg.2018.46},
   Abstract = {Hill (Twin Research and Human Genetics, Vol. 21, 2018,
             84-88) presented a critique of our recently published paper
             in Cell Reports entitled 'Large-Scale Cognitive GWAS
             Meta-Analysis Reveals Tissue-Specific Neural Expression and
             Potential Nootropic Drug Targets' (Lam et al., Cell Reports,
             Vol. 21, 2017, 2597-2613). Specifically, Hill offered
             several interrelated comments suggesting potential problems
             with our use of a new analytic method called Multi-Trait
             Analysis of GWAS (MTAG) (Turley et al., Nature Genetics,
             Vol. 50, 2018, 229-237). In this brief article, we respond
             to each of these concerns. Using empirical data, we conclude
             that our MTAG results do not suffer from 'inflation in the
             FDR [false discovery rate]', as suggested by Hill (Twin
             Research and Human Genetics, Vol. 21, 2018, 84-88), and are
             not 'more relevant to the genetic contributions to education
             than they are to the genetic contributions to
             intelligence'.},
   Doi = {10.1017/thg.2018.46},
   Key = {fds335682}
}

@article{fds335686,
   Author = {d'Arbeloff, TC and Kim, MJ and Knodt, AR and Radtke, SR and Brigidi, BD and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {Microstructural integrity of a pathway connecting the
             prefrontal cortex and amygdala moderates the association
             between cognitive reappraisal and negative
             emotions.},
   Journal = {Emotion},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {912-915},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/emo0000447},
   Abstract = {Cognitive reappraisal is a commonly used form of emotion
             regulation that utilizes frontal-executive control to
             reframe an approaching emotional event to moderate its
             potential psychological impact. Use of cognitive reappraisal
             has been associated with diminished experience of anxiety
             and depressive symptoms, as well as greater overall
             well-being. Using data from a study of 647 healthy young
             adults, we provide initial evidence that an association
             between typical use of cognitive reappraisal in daily life
             and the experience of anxiety and depressive symptoms is
             moderated by the microstructural integrity of the uncinate
             fasciculus, which provides a major anatomical link between
             the amygdala and prefrontal cortex. Our findings are
             consistent with the nature of top-down regulation of
             bottom-up negative emotions and suggest the uncinate
             fasciculus may be a useful target in the search for
             biomarkers predicting not only disorder risk but also
             response to psychotherapy utilizing cognitive reappraisal.
             (PsycINFO Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/emo0000447},
   Key = {fds335686}
}

@article{fds335690,
   Author = {Elliott, ML and Romer, A and Knodt, AR and Hariri,
             AR},
   Title = {A Connectome-wide Functional Signature of Transdiagnostic
             Risk for Mental Illness.},
   Journal = {Biological Psychiatry},
   Volume = {84},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {452-459},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.03.012},
   Abstract = {High rates of comorbidity, shared risk, and overlapping
             therapeutic mechanisms have led psychopathology research
             toward transdiagnostic dimensional investigations of
             clustered symptoms. One influential framework accounts for
             these transdiagnostic phenomena through a single general
             factor, sometimes referred to as the p factor, associated
             with risk for all common forms of mental illness.We build on
             previous research identifying unique structural neural
             correlates of the p factor by conducting a data-driven
             analysis of connectome-wide intrinsic functional
             connectivity (n = 605).We demonstrate that higher p factor
             scores and associated risk for common mental illness maps
             onto hyperconnectivity between visual association cortex and
             both frontoparietal and default mode networks.These results
             provide initial evidence that the transdiagnostic risk for
             common forms of mental illness is associated with patterns
             of inefficient connectome-wide intrinsic connectivity
             between visual association cortex and networks supporting
             executive control and self-referential processes, networks
             that are often impaired across categorical
             disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.03.012},
   Key = {fds335690}
}

@article{fds332980,
   Author = {Hanson, JL and Knodt, AR and Brigidi, BD and Hariri,
             AR},
   Title = {Heightened connectivity between the ventral striatum and
             medial prefrontal cortex as a biomarker for stress-related
             psychopathology: understanding interactive effects of early
             and more recent stress.},
   Journal = {Psychological Medicine},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1835-1843},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291717003348},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:The experience of childhood maltreatment is a
             significant risk factor for the development of depression.
             This risk is particularly heightened after exposure to
             additional, more contemporaneous stress. While behavioral
             evidence exists for this relation, little is known about
             biological correlates of these stress interactions.
             Identifying such correlates may provide biomarkers of risk
             for later depression. METHODS:Here, we leverage behavioral,
             experiential, and neuroimaging data from the Duke
             Neurogenetics Study to identify potential biomarkers of
             stress exposure. Based on the past research, we were
             specifically interested in reward-related connectivity and
             the interaction of early and more recent stress. We examined
             psychophysiological interactions between the ventral
             striatum and other brain regions in relation to these stress
             variables, as well as measures of internalizing
             symptomatology (n = 926, participant age range = 18-22 years
             of age). RESULTS:We found relatively increased
             reward-related functional connectivity between the left
             ventral striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex in
             individuals exposed to greater levels of childhood
             maltreatment who also experienced greater levels of recent
             life stress (β = 0.199, p < 0.005). This pattern of
             functional connectivity was further associated with elevated
             symptoms of depression (β = 0.089, p = 0.006). Furthermore,
             using a moderated mediation framework, we demonstrate that
             this functional connectivity provides a biological link
             between cumulative stress exposure and internalizing
             symptomatology. CONCLUSIONS:These findings suggest a novel
             biomarker linking cumulative stress exposure with the later
             experience of depressive symptoms. Our results are discussed
             in the context of past research examining stress exposure in
             relation to depression.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0033291717003348},
   Key = {fds332980}
}

@article{fds335683,
   Author = {Kim, MJ and Scult, MA and Knodt, AR and Radtke, SR and d'Arbeloff, TC and Brigidi, BD and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {A Link Between Childhood Adversity and Trait Anger Reflects
             Relative Activity of the Amygdala and Dorsolateral
             Prefrontal Cortex.},
   Journal = {Biological Psychiatry. Cognitive Neuroscience and
             Neuroimaging},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {644-649},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpsc.2018.03.006},
   Abstract = {Trait anger, or the dispositional tendency to experience a
             wide range of situations as annoying or frustrating, is
             associated with negative mental and physical health
             outcomes. The experience of adversity during childhood is
             one risk factor for the later emergence of high trait anger.
             This association has been hypothesized to reflect
             alterations in neural circuits supporting bottom-up threat
             processing and top-down executive control.Here, using
             functional magnetic resonance imaging and self-report
             questionnaire data from 220 volunteers, we examined how
             individual differences in top-down prefrontal executive
             control and bottom-up amygdala threat activity modulate the
             association between childhood adversity and trait anger
             during young adulthood.We report that the association
             between childhood adversity and trait anger is attenuated
             specifically in young adults who have both relatively low
             threat-related amygdala activity and high executive
             control-related dorsolateral prefrontal cortex
             activity.These brain activity patterns suggest that
             simultaneous consideration of their underlying cognitive
             processes-namely, threat processing and executive
             control-may be useful in strategies designed to mitigate the
             negative mental health consequences of childhood
             adversity.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bpsc.2018.03.006},
   Key = {fds335683}
}

@article{fds335684,
   Author = {Savage, JE and Jansen, PR and Stringer, S and Watanabe, K and Bryois, J and de Leeuw, CA and Nagel, M and Awasthi, S and Barr, PB and Coleman, JRI and Grasby, KL and Hammerschlag, AR and Kaminski, JA and Karlsson, R and Krapohl, E and Lam, M and Nygaard, M and Reynolds, CA and Trampush, JW and Young, H and Zabaneh, D and Hägg, S and Hansell, NK and Karlsson, IK and Linnarsson, S and Montgomery, GW and Muñoz-Manchado, AB and Quinlan,
             EB and Schumann, G and Skene, NG and Webb, BT and White, T and Arking, DE and Avramopoulos, D and Bilder, RM and Bitsios, P and Burdick, KE and Cannon, TD and Chiba-Falek, O and Christoforou, A and Cirulli, ET and Congdon, E and Corvin, A and Davies, G and Deary, IJ and DeRosse, P and Dickinson, D and Djurovic, S and Donohoe, G and Conley, ED and Eriksson,
             JG and Espeseth, T and Freimer, NA and Giakoumaki, S and Giegling, I and Gill, M and Glahn, DC and Hariri, AR and Hatzimanolis, A and Keller, MC and Knowles, E and Koltai, D and Konte, B and Lahti, J and Le Hellard and S and Lencz, T and Liewald, DC and London, E and Lundervold, AJ and Malhotra,
             AK and Melle, I and Morris, D and Need, AC and Ollier, W and Palotie, A and Payton, A and Pendleton, N and Poldrack, RA and Räikkönen, K and Reinvang, I and Roussos, P and Rujescu, D and Sabb, FW and Scult, MA and Smeland, OB and Smyrnis, N and Starr, JM and Steen, VM and Stefanis, NC and Straub, RE and Sundet, K and Tiemeier, H and Voineskos, AN and Weinberger, DR and Widen, E and Yu, J and Abecasis, G and Andreassen,
             OA and Breen, G and Christiansen, L and Debrabant, B and Dick, DM and Heinz, A and Hjerling-Leffler, J and Ikram, MA and Kendler, KS and Martin, NG and Medland, SE and Pedersen, NL and Plomin, R and Polderman,
             TJC and Ripke, S and van der Sluis, S and Sullivan, PF and Vrieze, SI and Wright, MJ and Posthuma, D},
   Title = {Genome-wide association meta-analysis in 269,867 individuals
             identifies new genetic and functional links to
             intelligence.},
   Journal = {Nature Genetics},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {912-919},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-018-0152-6},
   Abstract = {Intelligence is highly heritable1 and a major determinant of
             human health and well-being2. Recent genome-wide
             meta-analyses have identified 24 genomic loci linked to
             variation in intelligence3-7, but much about its genetic
             underpinnings remains to be discovered. Here, we present a
             large-scale genetic association study of intelligence
             (n = 269,867), identifying 205 associated genomic loci
             (190 new) and 1,016 genes (939 new) via positional mapping,
             expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping,
             chromatin interaction mapping, and gene-based association
             analysis. We find enrichment of genetic effects in conserved
             and coding regions and associations with 146 nonsynonymous
             exonic variants. Associated genes are strongly expressed in
             the brain, specifically in striatal medium spiny neurons and
             hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Gene set analyses implicate
             pathways related to nervous system development and synaptic
             structure. We confirm previous strong genetic correlations
             with multiple health-related outcomes, and Mendelian
             randomization analysis results suggest protective effects of
             intelligence for Alzheimer's disease and ADHD and
             bidirectional causation with pleiotropic effects for
             schizophrenia. These results are a major step forward in
             understanding the neurobiology of cognitive function as well
             as genetically related neurological and psychiatric
             disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41588-018-0152-6},
   Key = {fds335684}
}

@article{fds335691,
   Author = {Miller, JA and Scult, MA and Conley, ED and Chen, Q and Weinberger, DR and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {Effects of Schizophrenia Polygenic Risk Scores on Brain
             Activity and Performance During Working Memory Subprocesses
             in Healthy Young Adults.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {844-853},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbx140},
   Abstract = {Recent work has begun to shed light on the neural correlates
             and possible mechanisms of polygenic risk for schizophrenia.
             Here, we map a schizophrenia polygenic risk profile score
             (PRS) based on genome-wide association study significant
             loci onto variability in the activity and functional
             connectivity of a frontoparietal network supporting the
             manipulation versus maintenance of information during a
             numerical working memory (WM) task in healthy young adults
             (n = 99, mean age = 19.8). Our analyses revealed that higher
             PRS was associated with hypoactivity of the dorsolateral
             prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) during the manipulation but not
             maintenance of information in WM (r2 = .0576, P = .018).
             Post hoc analyses revealed that PRS-modulated dlPFC
             hypoactivity correlated with faster reaction times during WM
             manipulation (r2 = .0967, P = .002), and faster processing
             speed (r2 = .0967, P = .003) on a separate behavioral task.
             These PRS-associated patterns recapitulate dlPFC
             hypoactivity observed in patients with schizophrenia during
             central executive manipulation of information in WM on this
             task.},
   Doi = {10.1093/schbul/sbx140},
   Key = {fds335691}
}

@article{fds335685,
   Author = {Davies, G and Lam, M and Harris, SE and Trampush, JW and Luciano, M and Hill, WD and Hagenaars, SP and Ritchie, SJ and Marioni, RE and Fawns-Ritchie, C and Liewald, DCM and Okely, JA and Ahola-Olli, AV and Barnes, CLK and Bertram, L and Bis, JC and Burdick, KE and Christoforou,
             A and DeRosse, P and Djurovic, S and Espeseth, T and Giakoumaki, S and Giddaluru, S and Gustavson, DE and Hayward, C and Hofer, E and Ikram,
             MA and Karlsson, R and Knowles, E and Lahti, J and Leber, M and Li, S and Mather, KA and Melle, I and Morris, D and Oldmeadow, C and Palviainen,
             T and Payton, A and Pazoki, R and Petrovic, K and Reynolds, CA and Sargurupremraj, M and Scholz, M and Smith, JA and Smith, AV and Terzikhan, N and Thalamuthu, A and Trompet, S and van der Lee, SJ and Ware, EB and Windham, BG and Wright, MJ and Yang, J and Yu, J and Ames, D and Amin, N and Amouyel, P and Andreassen, OA and Armstrong, NJ and Assareh,
             AA and Attia, JR and Attix, D and Avramopoulos, D and Bennett, DA and Böhmer, AC and Boyle, PA and Brodaty, H and Campbell, H and Cannon, TD and Cirulli, ET and Congdon, E and Conley, ED and Corley, J and Cox, SR and Dale, AM and Dehghan, A and Dick, D and Dickinson, D and Eriksson, JG and Evangelou, E and Faul, JD and Ford, I and Freimer, NA and Gao, H and Giegling, I and Gillespie, NA and Gordon, SD and Gottesman, RF and Griswold, ME and Gudnason, V and Harris, TB and Hartmann, AM and Hatzimanolis, A and Heiss, G and Holliday, EG and Joshi, PK and Kähönen, M and Kardia, SLR and Karlsson, I and Kleineidam, L and Knopman, DS and Kochan, NA and Konte, B and Kwok, JB and Le Hellard and S and Lee, T and Lehtimäki, T and Li, S-C and Liu, T and Koini, M and London, E and Longstreth, WT and Lopez, OL and Loukola, A and Luck, T and Lundervold,
             AJ and Lundquist, A and Lyytikäinen, L-P and Martin, NG and Montgomery,
             GW and Murray, AD and Need, AC and Noordam, R and Nyberg, L and Ollier, W and Papenberg, G and Pattie, A and Polasek, O and Poldrack, RA and Psaty,
             BM and Reppermund, S and Riedel-Heller, SG and Rose, RJ and Rotter, JI and Roussos, P and Rovio, SP and Saba, Y and Sabb, FW and Sachdev, PS and Satizabal, CL and Schmid, M and Scott, RJ and Scult, MA and Simino, J and Slagboom, PE and Smyrnis, N and Soumaré, A and Stefanis, NC and Stott,
             DJ and Straub, RE and Sundet, K and Taylor, AM and Taylor, KD and Tzoulaki,
             I and Tzourio, C and Uitterlinden, A and Vitart, V and Voineskos, AN and Kaprio, J and Wagner, M and Wagner, H and Weinhold, L and Wen, KH and Widen, E and Yang, Q and Zhao, W and Adams, HHH and Arking, DE and Bilder,
             RM and Bitsios, P and Boerwinkle, E and Chiba-Falek, O and Corvin, A and De
             Jager, PL and Debette, S and Donohoe, G and Elliott, P and Fitzpatrick,
             AL and Gill, M and Glahn, DC and Hägg, S and Hansell, NK and Hariri, AR and Ikram, MK and Jukema, JW and Vuoksimaa, E and Keller, MC and Kremen, WS and Launer, L and Lindenberger, U and Palotie, A and Pedersen, NL and Pendleton, N and Porteous, DJ and Räikkönen, K and Raitakari, OT and Ramirez, A and Reinvang, I and Rudan, I and Dan Rujescu, and Schmidt,
             R and Schmidt, H and Schofield, PW and Schofield, PR and Starr, JM and Steen, VM and Trollor, JN and Turner, ST and Van Duijn and CM and Villringer, A and Weinberger, DR and Weir, DR and Wilson, JF and Malhotra, A and McIntosh, AM and Gale, CR and Seshadri, S and Mosley,
             TH and Bressler, J and Lencz, T and Deary, IJ},
   Title = {Study of 300,486 individuals identifies 148 independent
             genetic loci influencing general cognitive
             function.},
   Journal = {Nature Communications},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {2098},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-04362-x},
   Abstract = {General cognitive function is a prominent and relatively
             stable human trait that is associated with many important
             life outcomes. We combine cognitive and genetic data from
             the CHARGE and COGENT consortia, and UK Biobank (total
             N = 300,486; age 16-102) and find 148 genome-wide
             significant independent loci (P < 5 × 10-8)
             associated with general cognitive function. Within the novel
             genetic loci are variants associated with neurodegenerative
             and neurodevelopmental disorders, physical and psychiatric
             illnesses, and brain structure. Gene-based analyses find 709
             genes associated with general cognitive function. Expression
             levels across the cortex are associated with general
             cognitive function. Using polygenic scores, up to 4.3% of
             variance in general cognitive function is predicted in
             independent samples. We detect significant genetic overlap
             between general cognitive function, reaction time, and many
             health variables including eyesight, hypertension, and
             longevity. In conclusion we identify novel genetic loci and
             pathways contributing to the heritability of general
             cognitive function.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41467-018-04362-x},
   Key = {fds335685}
}

@article{fds335687,
   Author = {Agrawal, A and Chou, Y-L and Carey, CE and Baranger, DAA and Zhang, B and Sherva, R and Wetherill, L and Kapoor, M and Wang, J-C and Bertelsen, S and Anokhin, AP and Hesselbrock, V and Kramer, J and Lynskey, MT and Meyers,
             JL and Nurnberger, JI and Rice, JP and Tischfield, J and Bierut, LJ and Degenhardt, L and Farrer, LA and Gelernter, J and Hariri, AR and Heath,
             AC and Kranzler, HR and Madden, PAF and Martin, NG and Montgomery, GW and Porjesz, B and Wang, T and Whitfield, JB and Edenberg, HJ and Foroud, T and Goate, AM and Bogdan, R and Nelson, EC},
   Title = {Genome-wide association study identifies a novel locus for
             cannabis dependence.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1293-1302},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.200},
   Abstract = {Despite moderate heritability, only one study has identified
             genome-wide significant loci for cannabis-related
             phenotypes. We conducted meta-analyses of genome-wide
             association study data on 2080 cannabis-dependent cases and
             6435 cannabis-exposed controls of European descent. A
             cluster of correlated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)
             in a novel region on chromosome 10 was genome-wide
             significant (lowest P=1.3E-8). Among the SNPs, rs1409568
             showed enrichment for H3K4me1 and H3K427ac marks, suggesting
             its role as an enhancer in addiction-relevant brain regions,
             such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the angular
             and cingulate gyri. This SNP is also predicted to modify
             binding scores for several transcription factors. We found
             modest evidence for replication for rs1409568 in an
             independent cohort of African American (896 cases and 1591
             controls; P=0.03) but not European American (EA; 781 cases
             and 1905 controls) participants. The combined meta-analysis
             (3757 cases and 9931 controls) indicated trend-level
             significance for rs1409568 (P=2.85E-7). No genome-wide
             significant loci emerged for cannabis dependence criterion
             count (n=8050). There was also evidence that the minor
             allele of rs1409568 was associated with a 2.1% increase in
             right hippocampal volume in an independent sample of 430 EA
             college students (fwe-P=0.008). The identification and
             characterization of genome-wide significant loci for
             cannabis dependence is among the first steps toward
             understanding the biological contributions to the etiology
             of this psychiatric disorder, which appears to be rising in
             some developed nations.},
   Doi = {10.1038/mp.2017.200},
   Key = {fds335687}
}

@article{fds335688,
   Author = {Chen, Q and Ursini, G and Romer, AL and Knodt, AR and Mezeivtch, K and Xiao, E and Pergola, G and Blasi, G and Straub, RE and Callicott, JH and Berman, KF and Hariri, AR and Bertolino, A and Mattay, VS and Weinberger, DR},
   Title = {Schizophrenia polygenic risk score predicts mnemonic
             hippocampal activity.},
   Journal = {Brain},
   Volume = {141},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1218-1228},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awy004},
   Abstract = {The use of polygenic risk scores has become a practical
             translational approach to investigating the complex genetic
             architecture of schizophrenia, but the link between
             polygenic risk scores and pathophysiological components of
             this disorder has been the subject of limited research. We
             investigated in healthy volunteers whether schizophrenia
             polygenic risk score predicts hippocampal activity during
             simple memory encoding, which has been proposed as a
             risk-associated intermediate phenotype of schizophrenia. We
             analysed the relationship between polygenic risk scores and
             hippocampal activity in a discovery sample of 191 unrelated
             healthy volunteers from the USA and in two independent
             replication samples of 76 and 137 healthy unrelated
             participants from Europe and the USA, respectively.
             Polygenic risk scores for each individual were calculated as
             the sum of the imputation probability of reference alleles
             weighted by the natural log of odds ratio from the recent
             schizophrenia genome-wide association study. We examined
             hippocampal activity during simple memory encoding of novel
             visual stimuli assessed using blood oxygen level-dependent
             functional MRI. Polygenic risk scores were significantly
             associated with hippocampal activity in the discovery sample
             [P = 0.016, family-wise error (FWE) corrected within
             Anatomical Automatic Labeling (AAL) bilateral
             hippocampal-parahippocampal mask] and in both replication
             samples (P = 0.033, FWE corrected within AAL right posterior
             hippocampal-parahippocampal mask in Bari sample, and P =
             0.002 uncorrected in the Duke Neurogenetics Study sample).
             The relationship between polygenic risk scores and
             hippocampal activity was consistently negative, i.e. lower
             hippocampal activity in individuals with higher polygenic
             risk scores, consistent with previous studies reporting
             decreased hippocampal-parahippocampal activity during
             declarative memory tasks in patients with schizophrenia and
             in their healthy siblings. Polygenic risk scores accounted
             for more than 8% of variance in hippocampal activity during
             memory encoding in discovery sample. We conclude that
             polygenic risk scores derived from the most recent
             schizophrenia genome-wide association study predict
             significant variability in hippocampal activity during
             memory encoding in healthy participants. Our findings
             validate mnemonic hippocampal activity as a genetic risk
             associated intermediate phenotype of schizophrenia,
             indicating that the aggregate neurobiological effect of
             schizophrenia risk alleles converges on this pattern of
             neural activity.awy004media15749593779001.},
   Doi = {10.1093/brain/awy004},
   Key = {fds335688}
}

@article{fds326208,
   Author = {Romer, AL and Knodt, AR and Houts, R and Brigidi, BD and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {Structural alterations within cerebellar circuitry are
             associated with general liability for common mental
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1084-1090},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Abstract = {Accumulating mental-health research encourages a shift in
             focus toward transdiagnostic dimensional features that are
             shared across categorical disorders. In support of this
             shift, recent studies have identified a general liability
             factor for psychopathology-sometimes called the 'p factor'-
             that underlies shared risk for a wide range of mental
             disorders. Identifying neural correlates of this general
             liability would substantiate its importance in
             characterizing the shared origins of mental disorders and
             help us begin to understand the mechanisms through which the
             'p factor' contributes to risk. Here we believe we first
             replicate the 'p factor' using cross-sectional data from a
             volunteer sample of 1246 university students, and then using
             high-resolution multimodal structural neuroimaging, we
             demonstrate that individuals with higher 'p factor' scores
             show reduced structural integrity of white matter pathways,
             as indexed by lower fractional anisotropy values, uniquely
             within the pons. Whole-brain analyses further revealed that
             higher 'p factor' scores are associated with reduced gray
             matter volume in the occipital lobe and left cerebellar
             lobule VIIb, which is functionally connected with prefrontal
             regions supporting cognitive control. Consistent with the
             preponderance of cerebellar afferents within the pons, we
             observed a significant positive correlation between the
             white matter integrity of the pons and cerebellar gray
             matter volume associated with higher 'p factor' scores. The
             results of our analyses provide initial evidence that
             structural alterations in corticocerebellar circuitry
             supporting core functions related to the basic integration,
             coordination and monitoring of information may contribute to
             a general liability for common mental disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Key = {fds326208}
}

@article{fds332044,
   Author = {Scult, MA and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO THE NEUROGENETICS OF
             COGNITION-EMOTION INTERACTIONS.},
   Journal = {Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences},
   Volume = {19},
   Pages = {50-54},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cobeha.2017.09.014},
   Abstract = {Neuroscience research has demonstrated that cognition,
             emotion, and their dynamic interactions emerge from complex
             and flexible patterns of activity across distributed neural
             circuits. A parallel branch of research in genetics has
             begun to identify common variation in the human DNA sequence
             (i.e., genome) that may shape individual differences in
             cognition-emotion interactions by altering molecular and
             cellular pathways that modulate the activity of these neural
             circuits. Here we provide a brief introduction to such
             neurogenetics research and how it may usefully inform our
             understanding of the biological mechanisms through which
             dynamic cognition-emotion interactions emerge and,
             subsequently, help shape normal and abnormal
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cobeha.2017.09.014},
   Key = {fds332044}
}

@article{fds332756,
   Author = {Nikolova, YS and Misquitta, KA and Rocco, BR and Prevot, TD and Knodt,
             AR and Ellegood, J and Voineskos, AN and Lerch, JP and Hariri, AR and Sibille, E and Banasr, M},
   Title = {Shifting priorities: highly conserved behavioral and brain
             network adaptations to chronic stress across
             species.},
   Journal = {Translational Psychiatry},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {26},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41398-017-0083-5},
   Abstract = {Parallel clinical and preclinical research have begun to
             illuminate the biological basis of stress-related disorders,
             including major depression, but translational bridges
             informing discrete mechanistic targets for intervention are
             missing. To address this critical need, we used structural
             MRI in a mouse model and in a large human sample to examine
             stress effects on brain structure that may be conserved
             across species. Specifically, we focused on a previously
             unexplored approach, whole-brain structural covariance, as
             it reflects synchronized changes in neuroanatomy,
             potentially due to mutual trophic influences or shared
             plasticity across regions. Using the unpredictable chronic
             mild stress (UCMS) paradigm in mouse we first demonstrate
             that UCMS-induced elevated behavioral emotionality
             correlates with increased size of the amygdala and other
             corticolimbic regions. We further identify focal increases
             in the amygdala's 'hubness' (degree and strength) set
             against the background of a global stress-related loss of
             network clustering and modularity. These macroscopic changes
             are supported on the molecular level by increased
             postsynaptic density-95 protein in the amygdala, consistent
             with stress-induced plastic changes and synaptic
             strengthening. Finally, we provide clinical evidence that
             strikingly similar structural network reorganization
             patterns exist in young adults reporting high childhood
             trauma and increased mood symptoms. Collectively, we provide
             initial translational evidence for a conserved
             stress-related increase in amygdala-centered structural
             synchrony, as measured by enhanced structural covariance,
             which is paralleled by a decrease in global structural
             synchrony. This putative trade-off reflected in increased
             amygdala-centered plastic changes at the expense of global
             structural dedifferentiation may represent a mechanistic
             pathway for depression and related psychopathology.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41398-017-0083-5},
   Key = {fds332756}
}

@article{fds331564,
   Author = {Swartz, JR and Knodt, AR and Radtke, SR and Hariri,
             AR},
   Title = {Post-secondary maternal education buffers against neural
             risk for psychological vulnerability to future life
             stress.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychologia},
   Volume = {109},
   Pages = {134-139},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.12.019},
   Abstract = {We have previously reported that threat-related amygdala
             activity measured during a baseline fMRI scan predicts the
             experience of depression and anxiety associated with
             stressful life events years later. Here, we examine whether
             two broad measures of childhood environmental enrichment,
             namely parental educational achievement and subjective
             parental socioeconomic status, buffer against the effects of
             amygdala activity on future vulnerability to stress.
             Analyses of data available from 579 young adults revealed
             that maternal, but not paternal, educational achievement
             moderates the association between amygdala activity, recent
             life stress, and changes in mood and anxiety symptoms, even
             when controlling for participants' current subjective
             socioeconomic status. Specifically, only participants
             reporting lower maternal educational achievement exhibited
             our previously observed interaction between amygdala
             activity and future life stress predicting increases in
             depression and anxiety. These results suggest that higher
             maternal educational achievement may help buffer stress
             sensitivity associated with heightened threat-related
             amygdala activity.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.12.019},
   Key = {fds331564}
}


%% Hoyle, Rick   
@article{fds337342,
   Author = {Gehrt, TB and Berntsen, D and Hoyle, RH and Rubin,
             DC},
   Title = {Psychological and clinical correlates of the Centrality of
             Event Scale: A systematic review.},
   Journal = {Clinical Psychology Review},
   Volume = {65},
   Pages = {57-80},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2018.07.006},
   Abstract = {The Centrality of Event Scale (CES) was introduced to
             examine the extent to which a traumatic or stressful event
             is perceived as central to an individual's identity and life
             story, and how this relates to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
             (PTSD) symptoms. In addition, the CES has been examined in
             relation to a range of other conditions and dispositions. We
             present a systematic review of the correlates of the CES.
             Results from 92 publications resulted in 25 measurement
             categories in the six theoretical domains of trauma,
             negative affect and distress, autobiographical memory,
             personality, positive affect, and gender. The mean weighted
             correlations of the 25 measurement categories ranged from
             -.17 to .55, with standard errors from .01 to .02, allowing
             us to distinguish empirically among effects. Consistent with
             the theoretical motivation for the CES and predictions
             predating the review, the CES correlated positively with a
             range of measures, correlating most highly with measures
             related to trauma, PTSD, grief, and autobiographical memory.
             The findings show that the CES probes aspects of
             autobiographical memory of broad relevance to clinical
             disorders, and with specific implications for theories of
             PTSD.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cpr.2018.07.006},
   Key = {fds337342}
}

@article{fds339586,
   Author = {Bosworth, HB and Blalock, DV and Hoyle, RH and Czajkowski, SM and Voils,
             CI},
   Title = {The role of psychological science in efforts to improve
             cardiovascular medication adherence.},
   Journal = {American Psychologist},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {968-980},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/amp0000316},
   Abstract = {Poor adherence to cardiovascular disease medications carries
             significant psychological, physical, and economic costs,
             including failure to achieve therapeutic goals, high rates
             of hospitalization and health care costs, and incidence of
             death. Despite much effort to design and evaluate adherence
             interventions, rates of adherence to cardiovascular-related
             medications have remained relatively stagnant. We identify
             two major reasons for this: First, interventions have not
             addressed the time-varying reasons for nonadherence, and
             2nd, interventions have not explicitly targeted the
             self-regulatory processes involved in adherence behavior.
             Inclusion of basic and applied psychological science in
             intervention development may improve the efficacy and
             effectiveness of behavioral interventions to improve
             adherence. In this article, we use a taxonomy of time-based
             phases of adherence-including initiation, implementation,
             and discontinuation-as context within which to review
             illustrative studies of barriers to adherence, interventions
             to improve adherence, and self-regulatory processes involved
             in adherence. Finally, we suggest a framework to translate
             basic psychological science regarding self-regulation into
             multicomponent interventions that can address multiple and
             time-varying barriers to nonadherence across the three
             adherence phases. The field of psychology is essential to
             improving medication adherence and associated health
             outcomes, and concrete steps need to be taken to implement
             this knowledge in future interventions. (PsycINFO Database
             Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).},
   Doi = {10.1037/amp0000316},
   Key = {fds339586}
}

@article{fds332881,
   Author = {Arco-Tirado, JL and Fernández-Martín, FD and Hoyle,
             RH},
   Title = {Development and Validation of a Spanish Version of the
             Grit-S Scale},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Psychology},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {FEB},
   Publisher = {FRONTIERS MEDIA SA},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00096},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Arco-Tirado, Fernández-Martín and Hoyle. This
             paper describes the development and initial validation of a
             Spanish version of the Short Grit (Grit-S) Scale. The Grit-S
             Scale was adapted and translated into Spanish using the
             Translation, Review, Adjudication, Pre-testing, and
             Documentation model and responses to a preliminary set of
             items from a large sample of university students (N =
             1,129). The resultant measure was validated using data from
             a large stratified random sample of young adults (N =
             1,826). Initial validation involved evaluating the internal
             consistency of the adapted scale and its subscales and
             comparing the factor structure of the adapted version to
             that of the original scale. The results were comparable to
             results from similar analyses of the English version of the
             scale. Although the internal consistency of the subscales
             was low, the internal consistency of the full scale was
             well-within the acceptable range. A two-factor model offered
             an acceptable account of the data; however, when a single
             correlated error involving two highly similar items was
             included, a single factor model fit the data very well. The
             results support the use of overall scores from the Spanish
             Grit-S Scale in future research.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00096},
   Key = {fds332881}
}

@article{fds336522,
   Author = {Duffy, KA and Helzer, EG and Hoyle, RH and Fukukura Helzer and J and Chartrand, TL},
   Title = {Pessimistic expectations and poorer experiences: The role of
             (low) extraversion in anticipated and experienced enjoyment
             of social interaction.},
   Journal = {Plos One},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {e0199146},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0199146},
   Abstract = {Given research suggesting that social interactions are
             beneficial, it is unclear why individuals lower in
             extraversion engage less in social interactions. In this
             study, we test whether individuals lower in extraversion
             reap fewer hedonic rewards from social interactions and
             explore social psychological processes that explain their
             experiences. Before participants socialized, we measured
             extraversion, state positive affect, cognitive capacity, and
             expectations about the social interactions. After
             participants socialized with one another, we measured state
             positive affect and cognitive capacity again as well as fear
             of negative evaluation and belief in limited cognitive
             capacity. Participants also rated the social skillfulness of
             each interaction partner. We found that less extraverted
             individuals expect to feel worse after socializing. However,
             all but those extremely low in extraversion (17% of sample)
             actually experience an increase in positive affect after
             socializing. Surprisingly, those low in extraversion did not
             show reduced cognitive capacity after socializing. Although
             they are more likely to believe that cognitive capacity is
             limited and to be fearful of negative evaluation, these
             characteristics did not explain the social experience of
             those low in extraversion.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0199146},
   Key = {fds336522}
}


%% Huettel, Scott   
@article{fds339650,
   Author = {Hobkirk, AL and Bell, RP and Utevsky, AV and Huettel, S and Meade,
             CS},
   Title = {Reward and executive control network resting-state
             functional connectivity is associated with impulsivity
             during reward-based decision making for cocaine
             users.},
   Journal = {Drug and Alcohol Dependence},
   Volume = {194},
   Pages = {32-39},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.09.013},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Cocaine addiction is related to impulsive
             decision making that is mediated by brain circuitry involved
             in reward processing and executive functions, such as
             cognitive control and attentional salience. Resting-state
             functional connectivity between reward and executive control
             circuitry is altered among cocaine users, with concomitant
             deficits in impulsivity and learning. Prior research has
             examined how select brain regions interact to influence
             impulsive decision making for drug users; however, research
             examining interactions between large-scale brain networks
             and impulsive behavior is limited. METHODS:The current study
             compared reward and executive control network resting-state
             functional connectivity and its relationship to impulsive
             decision making between cocaine users (n = 37) and
             non-cocaine using control participants (n = 35).
             Participants completed computerized decision-making tasks
             and a separate resting-state functional magnetic resonance
             imaging scan. Data underwent independent component, dual
             regression, and linear regression moderation analyses.
             RESULTS:Higher impulsivity on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task
             (BART) was associated with inverse resting-state
             connectivity between the left cognitive control and
             subgenual anterior cingulate extended reward networks for
             cocaine users, while the opposite was found for controls.
             Less impulsivity on the monetary choice questionnaire was
             associated with stronger positive resting-state connectivity
             between the attentional salience and striatal core reward
             networks for controls, while cocaine users showed no
             association between impulsivity and resting-state
             connectivity of these networks. CONCLUSIONS:Cocaine users
             show aberrant associations between reward-executive control
             resting-state network coupling and impulsive decision
             making. The findings support the conclusion that an
             imbalance between reward and executive control circuitry
             contributes to impulsivity in drug use.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.09.013},
   Key = {fds339650}
}

@article{fds339750,
   Author = {Shelby, RA and Dorfman, CS and Bosworth, HB and Keefe, F and Sutton, L and Owen, L and Corsino, L and Erkanli, A and Reed, SD and Arthur, SS and Somers, T and Barrett, N and Huettel, S and Gonzalez, JM and Kimmick,
             G},
   Title = {Testing a behavioral intervention to improve adherence to
             adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET).},
   Journal = {Contemporary Clinical Trials},
   Volume = {76},
   Pages = {120-131},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2018.11.010},
   Abstract = {Adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) is used to prevent
             recurrence and reduce mortality for women with hormone
             receptor positive breast cancer. Poor adherence to AET is a
             significant problem and contributes to increased medical
             costs and mortality. A variety of problematic symptoms
             associated with AET are related to non-adherence and early
             discontinuation of treatment. The goal of this study is to
             test a novel, telephone-based coping skills training that
             teaches patients adherence skills and techniques for coping
             with problematic symptoms (CST-AET). Adherence to AET will
             be assessed in real-time for 18 months using wireless
             smart pill bottles. Symptom interference (i.e., pain,
             vasomotor symptoms, sleep problems, vaginal dryness) and
             cost-effectiveness of the intervention protocol will be
             examined as secondary outcomes. Participants (N = 400)
             will be recruited from a tertiary care medical center or
             community clinics in medically underserved or rural areas.
             Participants will be randomized to receive CST-AET or a
             general health education intervention (comparison
             condition). CST-AET includes ten nurse-delivered calls
             delivered over 6 months. CST-AET provides systematic
             training in coping skills for managing symptoms that
             interfere with adherence. Interactive voice messaging
             provides reinforcement for skills use and adherence that is
             tailored based on real-time adherence data from the wireless
             smart pill bottles. Given the high rates of non-adherence
             and recent recommendations that women remain on AET for
             10 years, we describe a timely trial. If effective, the
             CST-AET protocol may not only reduce the burden of AET use
             but also lead to cost-effective changes in clinical care and
             improve breast cancer outcomes. Trials registration:
             ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02707471, registered
             3/3/2016.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cct.2018.11.010},
   Key = {fds339750}
}

@article{fds338534,
   Author = {Meade, CS and Bell, RP and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Hobkirk, AL and Huettel, SA},
   Title = {Synergistic effects of marijuana abuse and HIV infection on
             neural activation during a cognitive interference
             task.},
   Journal = {Addiction Biology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adb.12678},
   Abstract = {Marijuana use, which is disproportionately prevalent among
             human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons, can
             alter activity in fronto-parietal regions during cognitively
             demanding tasks. While HIV is also associated with altered
             neural activation, it is not known how marijuana may further
             affect brain function in this population. Our study examined
             the independent and additive effects of HIV infection and
             regular marijuana use on neural activation during a
             cognitive interference task. The sample included 93 adults
             who differed on marijuana (MJ) and HIV statuses
             (20 MJ+/HIV+, 19 MJ+/HIV-, 29 MJ-/HIV+, 25 MJ-/HIV-).
             Participants completed a counting Stroop task during a
             functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Main and
             interactive effects on neural activation during interference
             versus neutral blocks were examined using a mixed-effects
             analysis. The sample showed the expected Stroop effect for
             both speed and accuracy. There were main effects of MJ in
             the right and left inferior parietal lobules, with the left
             cluster extending into the posterior middle temporal gyrus
             and a main effect of HIV in the dorsal anterior cingulate
             cortex. There was an interaction in the left fronto-insular
             cortex, such that the MJ+/HIV+ group had the largest
             increase in activation compared with other groups. Among
             MJ+, signal change in this cluster correlated positively
             with cumulative years of regular marijuana use. These
             results suggest that comorbid HIV and marijuana use is
             associated with complex neural alterations in multiple brain
             regions during cognitive interference. Follow-up research is
             needed to determine how marijuana-related characteristics
             may moderate HIV neurologic disease and impact real-world
             functioning.},
   Doi = {10.1111/adb.12678},
   Key = {fds338534}
}

@article{fds338425,
   Author = {Lighthall, NR and Pearson, JM and Huettel, SA and Cabeza,
             R},
   Title = {Feedback-Based Learning in Aging: Contributions and
             Trajectories of Change in Striatal and Hippocampal
             Systems.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the
             Society for Neuroscience},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {39},
   Pages = {8453-8462},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.0769-18.2018},
   Abstract = {The striatum supports learning from immediate feedback by
             coding prediction errors (PEs), whereas the hippocampus (HC)
             plays a parallel role in learning from delayed feedback.
             Both regions show evidence of decline in human aging, but
             behavioral research suggests greater decline in HC versus
             striatal functions. The present study included male and
             female humans and used fMRI to examine younger and older
             adults' brain activation patterns during a learning task
             with choice feedback presented immediately or after a brief
             delay. Participants then completed a surprise memory task
             that tested their recognition of trial-unique feedback
             stimuli, followed by assessments of postlearning cue
             preference, outcome probability awareness, and willingness
             to pay. The study yielded three main findings. First,
             behavioral measures indicated similar rates of learning in
             younger and older adults across conditions, but postlearning
             measures indicated impairment in older adults' ability to
             subsequently apply learning to discriminate between cues.
             Second, PE signals in the striatum were greater for
             immediate versus delayed feedback in both age groups, but PE
             signals in the HC were greater for delayed versus immediate
             feedback only in younger adults. Third, unlike younger
             adults, older adults failed to exhibit enhanced episodic
             memory for outcome stimuli in the delayed-feedback
             condition. Together, these findings indicate that HC
             circuits supporting learning and memory decline more than
             striatal circuits in healthy aging, which suggests that
             declines in HC learning signals may be an important
             predictor of deficits in learning-dependent economic
             decisions among older adults.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The
             hippocampus (HC) and striatum play distinct and critical
             roles in learning. Substantial research suggests that
             age-related decline in learning supported by the HC outpaces
             decline in learning supported by the striatum; however, such
             inferences have been drawn by comparing performance in tasks
             with fundamentally different structures. The present study
             overcomes this obstacle by implementing a single
             fMRI-learning paradigm with a subtle variation in feedback
             timing to examine differential age effects on memory
             supported by the HC and striatum. Our results provide
             converging behavioral and brain-imaging evidence showing
             that HC circuits supporting learning and memory decline more
             than striatal circuits in healthy aging and that declines in
             HC learning signals may predict early deficits in
             learning-dependent decisions among older
             adults.},
   Doi = {10.1523/jneurosci.0769-18.2018},
   Key = {fds338425}
}

@article{fds332798,
   Author = {Wing, EA and Iyengar, V and Hess, TM and LaBar, KS and Huettel, SA and Cabeza, R},
   Title = {Neural mechanisms underlying subsequent memory for personal
             beliefs:An fMRI study.},
   Journal = {Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {216-231},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13415-018-0563-y},
   Abstract = {Many fMRI studies have examined the neural mechanisms
             supporting emotional memory for stimuli that generate
             emotion rather automatically (e.g., a picture of a dangerous
             animal or of appetizing food). However, far fewer studies
             have examined how memory is influenced by emotion related to
             social and political issues (e.g., a proposal for large
             changes in taxation policy), which clearly vary across
             individuals. In order to investigate the neural substrates
             of affective and mnemonic processes associated with personal
             opinions, we employed an fMRI task wherein participants
             rated the intensity of agreement/disagreement to
             sociopolitical belief statements paired with neural face
             pictures. Following the rating phase, participants performed
             an associative recognition test in which they distinguished
             identical versus recombined face-statement pairs. The study
             yielded three main findings: behaviorally, the intensity of
             agreement ratings was linked to greater subjective emotional
             arousal as well as enhanced high-confidence subsequent
             memory. Neurally, statements that elicited strong (vs. weak)
             agreement or disagreement were associated with greater
             activation of the amygdala. Finally, a subsequent memory
             analysis showed that the behavioral memory advantage for
             statements generating stronger ratings was dependent on the
             medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Together, these results
             both underscore consistencies in neural systems supporting
             emotional arousal and suggest a modulation of
             arousal-related encoding mechanisms when emotion is
             contingent on referencing personal beliefs.},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13415-018-0563-y},
   Key = {fds332798}
}

@article{fds327384,
   Author = {Meade, CS and Addicott, M and Hobkirk, AL and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Sridharan, S and Huettel, SA},
   Title = {Cocaine and HIV are independently associated with neural
             activation in response to gain and loss valuation during
             economic risky choice.},
   Journal = {Addiction Biology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {796-809},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adb.12529},
   Abstract = {Stimulant abuse is disproportionately common in HIV-positive
             persons. Both HIV and stimulants are independently
             associated with deficits in reward-based decision making,
             but their interactive and/or additive effects are poorly
             understood despite their prevalent co-morbidity. Here, we
             examined the effects of cocaine dependence and HIV infection
             in 69 adults who underwent functional magnetic resonance
             imaging while completing an economic loss aversion task. We
             identified two neural networks that correlated with the
             evaluation of the favorable characteristics of the gamble
             (i.e. higher gains/lower losses: ventromedial prefrontal
             cortex, anterior cingulate, anterior and posterior precuneus
             and visual cortex) versus unfavorable characteristics of the
             gamble (i.e. lower gains/higher losses: dorsal prefrontal,
             lateral orbitofrontal, posterior parietal cortex, anterior
             insula and dorsal caudate). Behaviorally, cocaine and HIV
             had additive effects on loss aversion scores, with
             HIV-positive cocaine users being the least loss averse.
             Cocaine users had greater activation in brain regions that
             tracked the favorability of gamble characteristics (i.e.
             increased activation to gains, but decreased activation to
             losses). In contrast, HIV infection was independently
             associated with lesser activation in regions that tracked
             the unfavorability of gamble characteristics. These results
             suggest that cocaine is associated with an overactive
             reward-seeking system, while HIV is associated with an
             underactive cognitive control system. Together, these
             alterations may leave HIV-positive cocaine users
             particularly vulnerable to making unfavorable decisions when
             outcomes are uncertain.},
   Doi = {10.1111/adb.12529},
   Key = {fds327384}
}

@article{fds340129,
   Author = {Sweitzer, MM and Watson, KK and Erwin, SR and Winecoff, AA and Datta, N and Huettel, S and Platt, ML and Zucker, NL},
   Title = {Neurobiology of social reward valuation in adults with a
             history of anorexia nervosa.},
   Journal = {Plos One},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {e0205085},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0205085},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterized
             by atypical patterns of reward valuation (e.g. positive
             valuation of hunger). Atypical reward processing may extend
             into social domains. If so, such findings would be of
             prognostic significance as impaired social functioning
             predicts worse outcome. We explore neural circuits
             implicated in social reward processing in individuals with a
             history of AN who are weight-restored relative to controls
             and examine the effects of illness course on the experience
             of social value. METHOD:20 weight-restored individuals with
             a history of AN (AN-WR) and 24 healthy control (HC)
             participants were assessed using fMRI tasks that tapped
             social reward: smiling faces and full human figures that
             varied in attractiveness and weight. RESULTS:AN-WR differed
             from HC in attractiveness ratings by weight (negatively
             correlated in AN-WR). While there were no significant
             differences when viewing smiling faces, viewing full figures
             resulted in decreased activation in regions implicated in
             reward valuation (the right caudate) for AN-WR and this
             region was negatively correlated with a sustained course of
             the disorder. Exploratory whole brain analyses revealed
             reduced activation in regions associated with social reward,
             self-referential processing, and cognitive reappraisal
             (e.g., medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, and nucleus
             accumbens) with sustained disorder course. DISCUSSION:The
             rewarding value of full body images decreases with a
             sustained disorder course. This may reflect an extension of
             atypical reward processing documented in AN-WR, perhaps as a
             function of starvation dampening visceral motivational
             signals; the deployment of cognitive strategies that lessen
             the experience of reward; and/or the nature of the stimuli
             themselves as provocative of eating disorder symptoms (e.g.,
             thin bodies). These findings did not extend to smiling face
             stimuli. Advances in technology (e.g., virtual avatars, text
             messaging) may provide novel means to build relationships,
             including therapeutic relationships, to support improved
             social connections without threats to symptom
             provocation.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0205085},
   Key = {fds340129}
}

@article{fds330849,
   Author = {Kwak, Y and Huettel, S},
   Title = {The order of information processing alters economic
             gain-loss framing effects.},
   Journal = {Acta Psychologica},
   Volume = {182},
   Pages = {46-54},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2017.11.013},
   Abstract = {Adaptive decision making requires analysis of available
             information during the process of choice. In many decisions
             that information is presented visually - which means that
             variations in visual properties (e.g., salience, complexity)
             can potentially influence the process of choice. In the
             current study, we demonstrate that variation in the
             left-right positioning of risky and safe decision options
             can influence the canonical gain-loss framing effect. Two
             experiments were conducted using an economic framing task in
             which participants chose between gambles and certain
             outcomes. The first experiment demonstrated that the
             magnitude of the gain-loss framing effect was greater when
             the certain option signaling the current frame was presented
             on the left side of the visual display. Eye-tracking data
             during task performance showed a left-gaze bias for initial
             fixations, suggesting that the option presented on the left
             side was processed first. Combination of eye-tracking and
             choice data revealed that there was a significant effect of
             direction of first gaze (i.e. left vs. right) as well as an
             interaction between gaze direction and identity of the first
             fixated information (i.e. certain vs. gamble) regardless of
             frame. A second experiment presented the gamble and certain
             options in a random order, with a temporal delay between
             their presentations. We found that the magnitude of
             gain-loss framing was larger when the certain option was
             presented first, regardless of left and right positioning,
             only in individuals with lower risk-taking tendencies. The
             effect of presentation order on framing was not present in
             high risk-takers. These results suggest that the sequence of
             visual information processing as well as their left-right
             positioning can bias choices by changing the impact of the
             presented information during risky decision
             making.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.actpsy.2017.11.013},
   Key = {fds330849}
}


%% Kay, Aaron C.   
@article{fds340501,
   Author = {Kim, JY and Fitzsimons, GM and Kay, AC},
   Title = {Lean in messages increase attributions of women's
             responsibility for gender inequality.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {115},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {974-1001},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pspa0000129},
   Abstract = {Although women's underrepresentation in senior-level
             positions in the workplace has multiple causes, women's
             self-improvement or "empowerment" at work has recently
             attracted cultural attention as a solution. For example, the
             bestselling book Lean In states that women can tackle gender
             inequality themselves by overcoming the "internal barriers"
             (e.g., lack of confidence and ambition) that prevent
             success. We sought to explore the consequences of this type
             of women's empowerment ideology. Study 1 found that
             perceptions of women's ability to solve inequality were
             associated with attributions of women's responsibility to do
             so. Studies 2, 3, 5a, and 5b experimentally manipulated
             exposure to women's empowerment messages, finding that while
             such messages increase perceptions that women are empowered
             to solve workplace gender inequality, they also lead to
             attributions that women are more responsible both for
             creating and solving the problem. Study 4 found a similar
             pattern in the context of a specific workplace problem, and
             found that such messages also lead to a preference for
             interventions focused on changing women rather than changing
             the system. Studies 5a and 5b sought to replicate prior
             studies and document the weakened effects of messages that
             explicitly explain that women's "internal barriers" are the
             products of "external barriers" obstructing women's
             progress. This research suggests that self-improvement
             messages intended to empower women to take charge of gender
             inequality may also yield potentially harmful societal
             beliefs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights
             reserved).},
   Doi = {10.1037/pspa0000129},
   Key = {fds340501}
}

@article{fds339668,
   Author = {Fath, S and Kay, AC},
   Title = {“If hierarchical, then corrupt”: Exploring people’s
             tendency to associate hierarchy with corruption in
             organizations},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {149},
   Pages = {145-164},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2018.10.004},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Elsevier Inc. We propose that people associate
             organizational hierarchy with corruption. Nine studies (N =
             1896) provide triangulating evidence for this tendency and
             its underlying mechanism. We find that people expect more
             corruption to manifest among the employees of relatively
             more hierarchical organizations, and judge an organization
             with a history of corruption more likely to be hierarchical
             than one without. Furthermore, we show that the lay belief
             that hierarchy and corruption are connected is driven by two
             related assumptions: (i) that the more hierarchical an
             organization is, the more likely it is that its employees
             are competitive with each other, and (ii) that the more
             competitive employees are with each other, the more likely
             they are to be corrupt. Finally, we connect these lay
             beliefs to behavioral outcomes involved in trusting people
             who work for very hierarchical organizations and those
             organizations themselves. Implications, limitations, and
             future directions are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.obhdp.2018.10.004},
   Key = {fds339668}
}

@article{fds338574,
   Author = {Friesen, JP and Laurin, K and Shepherd, S and Gaucher, D and Kay,
             AC},
   Title = {System justification: Experimental evidence, its contextual
             nature, and implications for social change.},
   Journal = {The British Journal of Social Psychology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12278},
   Abstract = {We review conceptual and empirical contributions to system
             justification theory over the last fifteen years,
             emphasizing the importance of an experimental approach and
             consideration of context. First, we review the indirect
             evidence of the system justification motive via
             complimentary stereotyping. Second, we describe
             injunctification as direct evidence of a tendency to view
             the extant status quo (the way things are) as the way things
             should be. Third, we elaborate on system justification's
             contextual nature and the circumstances, such as threat,
             dependence, inescapability, and system confidence, which are
             likely to elicit defensive bolstering of the status quo and
             motivated ignorance of critical social issues. Fourth, we
             describe how system justification theory can increase our
             understanding of both resistance to and acceptance of social
             change, as a change moves from proposed, to imminent, to
             established. Finally, we discuss how threatened systems
             shore up their authority by co-opting legitimacy from other
             sources, such as governments that draw on religious
             concepts, and the role of institutional-level factors in
             perpetuating the status quo.},
   Doi = {10.1111/bjso.12278},
   Key = {fds338574}
}

@article{fds333552,
   Author = {Proudfoot, D and Kay, AC},
   Title = {How perceptions of one's organization can affect perceptions
             of the self: Membership in a stable organization can sustain
             individuals' sense of control},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {76},
   Pages = {104-115},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2018.01.004},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Elsevier Inc. Building on contemporary perspectives
             regarding the role that group identification can play in
             sustaining control motives, we propose that being a member
             of a stable organization—one experienced as predictable
             and consistent rather than changing and in flux—can
             maintain individuals' sense of control. Four studies test
             this prediction. We observe that higher social
             identification as an organizational member (as compared to
             lower identification) is associated with an increased
             generalized sense of personal efficacy in life specifically
             when one's organization is experienced as relatively stable
             (Study 1 and Study 2). Further, the perceived stability of
             one's organization moderates the extent to which those who
             recently experienced a threat to personal control—and are
             thereby motivated to reestablish feelings of control—seek
             increased social identification as an organizational member
             (Study 3 and Study 4). Results suggest that membership in a
             stable organization can provide a psychological buffer
             against threats to personal control encountered in daily
             life outside work. Contributions to understanding the ways
             in which people maintain feelings of personal control in the
             social world are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2018.01.004},
   Key = {fds333552}
}

@article{fds332999,
   Author = {Landau, MJ and Khenfer, J and Keefer, LA and Swanson, TJ and Kay,
             AC},
   Title = {When and why does belief in a controlling God strengthen
             goal commitment?},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {75},
   Pages = {71-82},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2017.11.012},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Elsevier Inc. The perception that God controls one's
             life can bolster motivation to pursue personal goals, but it
             can also have no impact and even squelch motivation. To
             better understand how religious beliefs impact
             self-regulation, the current research built on Compensatory
             Control Theory's claim that perceiving the environment as
             predictable (vs. unpredictable) strengthens commitment to
             long-term goals. Perceiving God's intervention as following
             an understandable logic, which implies a predictable
             environment, increased self-reported and behavioral
             commitment to save money (Studies 1–3), excel academically
             (Study 4), and improve physical health (Study 5). In
             contrast, perceiving God as intervening in mysterious ways,
             which implies that worldly affairs are under control yet
             unpredictable, did not increase goal commitment. Exploratory
             mediational analyses focused on self-efficacy, response
             efficacy, and confidence in God's control. A meta-analysis
             (Study 6) yielded a reliable effect whereby belief in divine
             control supports goal pursuit specifically when it signals
             the predictability of one's environment.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2017.11.012},
   Key = {fds332999}
}

@article{fds333000,
   Author = {Tang, S and King, M and Kay, AC},
   Title = {Fate as a motivated (and de-motivating) belief: Evidence for
             a link from task importance to belief in fate to
             effort},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {144},
   Pages = {74-84},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2017.08.003},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.obhdp.2017.08.003},
   Key = {fds333000}
}


%% Keefe, Francis J.   
@article{fds336942,
   Author = {Whitney, CA and Dorfman, CS and Shelby, RA and Keefe, FJ and Gandhi, V and Somers, TJ},
   Title = {Reminders of cancer risk and pain catastrophizing:
             relationships with cancer worry and perceived risk in women
             with a first-degree relative with breast
             cancer.},
   Journal = {Familial Cancer},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {9-18},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10689-018-0082-6},
   Abstract = {First-degree relatives of women with breast cancer may
             experience increased worry or perceived risk when faced with
             reminders of their own cancer risk. Worry and risk reminders
             may include physical symptoms (e.g., persistent breast pain)
             and caregiving experiences. Women who engage in pain
             catastrophizing may be particularly likely to experience
             increased distress when risk reminders are present. We
             examined the degree to which persistent breast pain and
             experience as a cancer caregiver were related to cancer
             worry and perceived risk in first-degree relatives of women
             with breast cancer (N = 85) and how catastrophic
             thoughts about breast pain could impact these relationships.
             There was a significant interaction between persistent
             breast pain and pain catastrophizing in predicting cancer
             worry (p = .03); among women who engaged in pain
             catastrophizing, cancer worry remained high even in the
             absence of breast pain. Pain catastrophizing also moderated
             the relationships between caregiving involvement and cancer
             worry (p = .003) and perceived risk (p = .03). As
             the degree of caregiving responsibility increased, cancer
             worry and perceived risk increased for women who engaged in
             pain catastrophizing; levels of cancer worry and perceived
             risk remained low and stable for women who did not engage in
             pain catastrophizing regardless of caregiving experience.
             The results suggest that first-degree relatives of breast
             cancer survivors who engage in pain catastrophizing may
             experience greater cancer worry and perceived risk and may
             benefit from interventions aimed at reducing catastrophic
             thoughts about pain.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10689-018-0082-6},
   Key = {fds336942}
}

@article{fds340442,
   Author = {Sitlinger, A and Shelby, RA and Van Denburg and AN and White, H and Edmond,
             SN and Marcom, PK and Bosworth, HB and Keefe, FJ and Kimmick,
             GG},
   Title = {Higher symptom burden is associated with lower function in
             women taking adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast
             cancer.},
   Journal = {Journal of Geriatric Oncology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jgo.2018.11.008},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:To explore the impact of symptoms on physical
             function in women on adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast
             cancer. METHODS:Eligible women were postmenopausal, had
             hormone receptor positive, stage I-IIIA breast cancer,
             completed surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and on adjuvant
             endocrine therapy. At a routine follow-up visit, women
             (N = 107) completed standardized symptom measures: Brief
             Fatigue Inventory, Brief Pain Inventory, Menopause Specific
             Quality of Life Questionnaire, Functional Assessment of
             Cancer Therapy Neurotoxicity scales. Two performance
             measures assessed function: grip strength (Jamar
             dynamometer; n = 71) and timed get-up-and-go (TUG;
             n = 103). Analyses were performed with an overall
             symptom composite score. Correlations and multiple linear
             regression analyses were performed to test adverse effects
             on physical function. RESULTS:The mean age was 64 years
             (range 45-84), 81% white, 84% on an aromatase inhibitor, and
             on endocrine therapy for mean 35 months (range
             1-130 months). Dominant hand grip strength was inversely
             correlated with symptom composite scores (r = -0.29,
             p = .02). Slower TUG was positively correlated with
             higher Charlson comorbidity level (r = 0.36,
             p < .001) and higher symptom composite scores
             (r = 0.24, p = .01). In multivariate analyses,
             weaker dominant and non-dominant hand grip strength were
             significantly associated with greater symptom composite
             scores (β = -0.27, t = 2.43, p = .02 and
             β = -0.36, t = 3.15, p = .003, respectively)
             and slower TUG was associated with higher symptom composite
             scores (β = 0.18, t = 1.97, p = .05).
             CONCLUSIONS:Higher symptom burden is associated with worse
             physical function, as measured by hand grip strength and
             TUG. Further study to determine the impact of endocrine
             therapy and its side effects on function is
             warranted.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jgo.2018.11.008},
   Key = {fds340442}
}

@article{fds337361,
   Author = {Burns, JW and Gerhart, J and Post, KM and Smith, DA and Porter, LS and Buvanendran, A and Fras, AM and Keefe, FJ},
   Title = {Spouse Criticism/Hostility Toward Partners With Chronic
             Pain: The Role of Spouse Attributions for Patient Control
             Over Pain Behaviors.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Pain : Official Journal of the American Pain
             Society},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1308-1317},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2018.05.007},
   Abstract = {Spouse attributions regarding displays of pain behaviors by
             their partners with chronic pain may account for subsequent
             increases in spouse critical/hostile responses toward their
             partners. People with chronic low back pain (n = 105)
             and their pain-free spouses (n = 105) completed
             electronic diary measures 5 times per day for 14 consecutive
             days. Key items assessed spouse observations of patient pain
             behavior, attributions regarding these behaviors, and spouse
             critical/hostile responses toward patients. Results were 1)
             spouse observations of patient pain behavior at time 1
             predicted high levels of spouse critical/hostile responses
             toward the patient at time 2. 2) "Internal" attributions
             (eg, the patient was attempting to influence spouse's
             feelings) at time 1 predicted high levels of spouse
             critical/hostile responses toward the patient at time 2. 3)
             Internal attributions mediated links between spouse-observed
             pain behaviors at time 1 and levels of spouse
             critical/hostile responses at time 2. Spouse observations of
             patient pain behavior was also related to an "external"
             attribution (ie, patient pain behavior was due to pain
             condition), but this attribution was not a significant
             mediator. A vital factor linking spouse scrutiny to spouse
             critical/hostile responses may be the spouse's ascribed
             reasons for the patient's grimacing, bracing, complaining,
             and so forth. Perspective: Results indicate that spouse
             internal and negative attributions for pain behaviors of
             their partners with chronic pain may influence subsequent
             spouse critical/hostile reactions to them. Findings suggest
             that replacing spouse internal and negative attributions
             with external, compassionate, and accepting explanations may
             be useful therapeutic targets for couples coping with
             chronic pain.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpain.2018.05.007},
   Key = {fds337361}
}

@article{fds339861,
   Author = {Cole, LJ and Bennell, KL and Ahamed, Y and Bryant, C and Keefe, F and Moseley, GL and Hodges, P and Farrell, MJ},
   Title = {Determining Brain Mechanisms that Underpin Analgesia Induced
             by the Use of Pain Coping Skills.},
   Journal = {Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {2177-2190},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnx301},
   Abstract = {Objective:Cognitive behavioral therapies decrease pain and
             improve mood and function in people with osteoarthritis.
             This study assessed the effects of coping strategies on the
             central processing of knee pain in people with
             osteoarthritis of the knees. Methods:Mechanical pressure was
             applied to exacerbate knee pain in 28 people with
             osteoarthritis of the knee. Reports of pain intensity and
             functional magnetic resonance imaging measures of
             pain-related brain activity were recorded with and without
             the concurrent use of pain coping skills. Results:Coping
             skills led to a significant reduction in pain report (Coping
             = 2.64 ± 0.17, Not Coping = 3.28 ± 0.15,
             P < 0.001). These strategies were associated with
             increased activation in pain modulatory regions of the brain
             (medial prefrontal and rostral anterior cingulate cortices,
             Pcorrected < 0.05) and decreased pain-related activation
             in regions that process noxious input (midcingulate cortex,
             supplementary motor area, secondary somatosensory cortex,
             and anterior parietal lobule, Pcorrected < 0.05). The
             magnitude of the decrease in pain report during the use of
             pain coping strategies was found to be proportional to the
             decrease in pain-related activation in brain regions that
             code the aversive/emotional dimension of pain (anterior
             insula, inferior frontal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex,
             Pcorrected < 0.05) but did not differ between groups
             with and without training in coping skills. However,
             training in coping skills reduced the extent to which brain
             responses to noxious input were influenced by anxiety.
             Conclusions:The results of this study support previous
             reports of pain modulation by cognitive pain coping
             strategies and contribute to the current understanding of
             how analgesia associated with the use of pain coping
             strategies is represented in the brain.},
   Doi = {10.1093/pm/pnx301},
   Key = {fds339861}
}

@article{fds338437,
   Author = {Allen, KD and Arbeeva, L and Cené, CW and Coffman, CJ and Grimm, KF and Haley, E and Keefe, FJ and Nagle, CT and Oddone, EZ and Somers, TJ and Watkins, Y and Campbell, LC},
   Title = {Pain coping skills training for African Americans with
             osteoarthritis study: baseline participant characteristics
             and comparison to prior studies.},
   Journal = {Bmc Musculoskeletal Disorders},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {337},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12891-018-2249-6},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:The Pain Coping Skills Training for African
             Americans with OsteoaRTthritis (STAART) trial is examining
             the effectiveness of a culturally enhanced pain coping
             skills training (CST) program for African Americans with
             osteoarthritis (OA). This disparities-focused trial aimed to
             reach a population with greater symptom severity and risk
             factors for poor pain-related outcomes than previous
             studies. This paper compares characteristics of STAART
             participants with prior studies of CST or cognitive
             behavioral therapy (CBT)-informed training in pain coping
             strategies for OA. METHODS:A literature search identified 10
             prior trials of pain CST or CBT-informed pain coping
             training among individuals with OA. We descriptively
             compared characteristics of STAART participants with other
             studies, in 3 domains of the National Institutes of Minority
             Health and Health Disparities' Research Framework:
             Sociocultural Environment (e.g., age, education, marital
             status), Biological Vulnerability and Mechanisms (e.g, pain
             and function, body mass index), and Health Behaviors and
             Coping (e.g., pain catastrophizing). Means and standard
             deviations (SDs) or proportions were calculated for STAART
             participants and extracted from published manuscripts for
             comparator studies. RESULTS:The mean age of STAART
             participants, 59 years (SD = 10.3), was lower than 9 of
             10 comparator studies; the proportion of individuals with
             some education beyond high school, 75%, was comparable to
             comparator studies (61-86%); and the proportion of
             individuals who are married or living with a partner, 42%,
             was lower than comparator studies (62-66%). Comparator
             studies had less than about 1/3 African American
             participants. Mean scores on the Western Ontario and
             McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index pain and function
             scales were higher (worse) for STAART participants than for
             other studies, and mean body mass index of STAART
             participants, 35.2 kg/m2 (SD = 8.2), was higher than
             all other studies (30-34 kg/m2). STAART participants' mean
             score on the Pain Catastrophizing scale, 19.8
             (SD = 12.3), was higher (worse) than other studies
             reporting this measure (7-17). CONCLUSIONS:Compared with
             prior studies with predominantly white samples, STAART
             participants have worse pain and function and more risk
             factors for negative pain-related outcomes across several
             domains. Given STAART participants' high mean pain
             catastrophizing scores, this sample may particularly benefit
             from the CST intervention approach. TRIAL
             REGISTRATION:NCT02560922.},
   Doi = {10.1186/s12891-018-2249-6},
   Key = {fds338437}
}

@article{fds336943,
   Author = {Van Denburg and AN and Shelby, RA and Caldwell, DS and O'Sullivan, ML and Keefe, FJ},
   Title = {Self-Efficacy for Pain Communication Moderates the Relation
             Between Ambivalence Over Emotional Expression and Pain
             Catastrophizing Among Patients With Osteoarthritis.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Pain : Official Journal of the American Pain
             Society},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1006-1014},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2018.04.001},
   Abstract = {Pain catastrophizing (ie, the tendency to focus on and
             magnify pain sensations and feel helpless in the face of
             pain) is one of the most important and consistent
             psychological predictors of the pain experience. The present
             study examined, in 60 patients with osteoarthritis pain who
             were married or partnered: 1) the degree to which
             ambivalence over emotional expression and negative network
             orientation were associated with pain catastrophizing, and
             2) whether self-efficacy for pain communication moderated
             these relations. Hierarchical multiple linear regression
             analyses revealed a significant main effect for the
             association between ambivalence over emotional expression
             and pain catastrophizing; as ambivalence over emotional
             expression increased, the degree of pain catastrophizing
             increased. In addition, the interaction between ambivalence
             over emotional expression and self-efficacy for pain
             communication was significant, such that as self-efficacy
             for pain communication increased, the association between
             ambivalence over emotional expression and pain
             catastrophizing became weaker. Negative network orientation
             was not significantly associated with pain catastrophizing.
             Findings suggest that higher levels of self-efficacy for
             pain communication may help weaken the effects of
             ambivalence over emotional expression on pain
             catastrophizing. In light of these results, patients may
             benefit from interventions that target pain communication
             processes and emotion regulation.This article examines
             interpersonal processes involved in pain catastrophizing.
             This study has the potential to lead to better understanding
             of maladaptive pain coping strategies and possibly better
             prevention and treatment strategies.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpain.2018.04.001},
   Key = {fds336943}
}

@article{fds336940,
   Author = {Cook, CE and George, SZ and Keefe, F},
   Title = {Different interventions, same outcomes? Here are four good
             reasons.},
   Journal = {British Journal of Sports Medicine},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {15},
   Pages = {951-952},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2017-098978},
   Doi = {10.1136/bjsports-2017-098978},
   Key = {fds336940}
}

@article{fds337107,
   Author = {Parmelee, PA and Scicolone, MA and Cox, BS and DeCaro, JA and Keefe, FJ and Smith, DM},
   Title = {Global Versus Momentary Osteoarthritis Pain and Emotional
             Distress: Emotional Intelligence as Moderator.},
   Journal = {Annals of Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {713-723},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/abm/kax044},
   Abstract = {Pain and emotional well-being are complexly associated both
             globally and in the moment. Emotional regulation strategies
             may contribute to that complexity by shaping the
             pain-well-being association.Using emotional intelligence
             (EI) as an integrative conceptual framework, this study
             probed the role of emotional regulation in the associations
             of osteoarthritis pain with emotional well-being in varying
             time frames. Perceived attention to, clarity, and regulation
             of emotions were examined as predictors of well-being, and
             as moderators of the well-being-pain association, at global
             and momentary (within-day) levels.In a microlongitudinal
             study, 218 older adults with physician-diagnosed knee
             osteoarthritis self-reported global pain, depressive
             symptoms, and EI (mood attention, clarity, and repair).
             Momentary pain and positive and negative affect were then
             assessed four times daily for 7 days. EI subscales were
             examined as moderators of the pain-well-being association at
             global and momentary levels, controlling demographics and
             general health.Global and momentary pain were positively
             associated with mood clarity and negatively with attention,
             but not with repair. Clarity and repair negatively predicted
             depression, and buffered effects of pain on depression.
             Momentary negative affect was negatively predicted by mood
             clarity and repair; again, clarity and mood repair buffered
             effects of momentary pain on negative affect. Only mood
             repair predicted positive affect, with no interactions
             emerging.Attention to mood states exacerbates the experience
             of pain in both short and long terms. In contrast, both mood
             clarity and ability to repair moods appear important to both
             momentary and longer-term emotional well-being.},
   Doi = {10.1093/abm/kax044},
   Key = {fds337107}
}

@article{fds331439,
   Author = {Porter, LS and Keefe, FJ},
   Title = {Couple-based communication interventions for cancer: moving
             beyond a 'one size fits all' approach.},
   Journal = {Acta Oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden)},
   Volume = {57},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {693-695},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0284186x.2017.1400687},
   Doi = {10.1080/0284186x.2017.1400687},
   Key = {fds331439}
}

@article{fds337030,
   Author = {Keefe, FJ and Main, CJ and George, SZ},
   Title = {Advancing Psychologically Informed Practice for Patients
             With Persistent Musculoskeletal Pain: Promise, Pitfalls, and
             Solutions.},
   Journal = {Physical Therapy},
   Volume = {98},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {398-407},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ptj/pzy024},
   Abstract = {There has been growing interest in psychologically oriented
             pain management over the past 3 to 4 decades, including a
             2011 description of psychologically informed practice (PIP)
             for low back pain. PIP requires a broader focus than
             traditional biomechanical and pathology-based approaches
             that have been traditionally used to manage musculoskeletal
             pain. A major focus of PIP is addressing the behavioral
             aspects of pain (ie, peoples' responses to pain) by
             identifying individual expectations, beliefs, and feelings
             as prognostic factors for clinical and occupational outcomes
             indicating progression to chronicity. Since 2011, the
             interest in PIP seems to be growing, as evidenced by its use
             in large trials, inclusion in scientific conferences,
             increasing evidence base, and expansion to other
             musculoskeletal pain conditions. Primary care physicians and
             physical therapists have delivered PIP as part of a
             stratified care approach involving screening and targeting
             of treatment for people at high risk for continued
             pain-associated disability. Furthermore, PIP is consistent
             with recent national priorities emphasizing
             nonpharmacological pain management options. In this
             perspective, PIP techniques that range in complexity are
             described, considerations for implementation in clinical
             practice are offered, and future directions that will
             advance the understanding of PIP are outlined.},
   Doi = {10.1093/ptj/pzy024},
   Key = {fds337030}
}

@article{fds336941,
   Author = {Jensen, MP and Thorn, BE and Carmody, J and Keefe, FJ and Burns,
             JW},
   Title = {The Role of Cognitive Content and Cognitive Processes in
             Chronic Pain: An Important Distinction?},
   Journal = {The Clinical Journal of Pain},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {391-401},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ajp.0000000000000559},
   Abstract = {Pain-related cognitive content (what people think about
             pain) and cognitive processes (how people think about pain;
             what they do with their pain-related thoughts) and their
             interaction are hypothesized to play distinct roles in
             patient function. However, questions have been raised
             regarding whether it is possible or practical to assess
             cognitive content and cognitive process as distinct domains.
             The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which
             measures that seem to assess mostly pain-related cognitive
             content, cognitive processes, and content and process, are
             relatively independent from each other and contribute unique
             variance to the prediction of patient function.Individuals
             with chronic low back pain (N=165) participating in an
             ongoing RCT were administered measures of cognitions, pain,
             and function (depressive symptoms and pain interference)
             pretreatment.Analyses provided support for the hypothesis
             that cognitive content and cognitive process, while related,
             can be assessed as distinct components. However, the measure
             assessing a cognitive process-mindfulness-evidenced
             relatively weak associations with function, especially
             compared with the stronger and more consistent findings for
             the measures of content (catastrophizing and
             self-efficacy).The results provide preliminary evidence for
             the possibility that mindfulness could have both benefits
             and costs. Research to evaluate this possibility is
             warranted.},
   Doi = {10.1097/ajp.0000000000000559},
   Key = {fds336941}
}

@article{fds330575,
   Author = {O'Sullivan, ML and Shelby, RA and Dorfman, CS and Kelleher, SA and Fisher, HM and Rowe Nichols and KA and Keefe, FJ and Sung, AD and Somers,
             TJ},
   Title = {The effect of pre-transplant pain and chronic disease
             self-efficacy on quality of life domains in the year
             following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.},
   Journal = {Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the
             Multinational Association of Supportive Care in
             Cancer},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1243-1252},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-017-3947-6},
   Abstract = {Pain is common for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT)
             patients and may be experienced pre-transplant, acutely
             post-transplant, and for months or years following
             transplant. HSCT patients with persistent pain may be at
             risk for poor quality of life following transplant; however,
             the impact of pre-transplant pain on quality of life
             post-transplant is not well understood. Self-efficacy for
             chronic disease management is associated with quality of
             life among cancer patients and may impact quality of life
             for HSCT patients. The primary aim was to examine the effect
             of pre-transplant pain and self-efficacy on quality of life
             domains in the year following transplant.One hundred
             sixty-six HSCT patients completed questionnaires providing
             information on pain, self-efficacy, and quality of life
             prior to transplant, at discharge, and 3-, 6-, and 12-months
             post-transplant as part of a longitudinal, observational
             study. Linear mixed modeling examined the trajectories of
             these variables and the effect of pre-transplant pain and
             self-efficacy on post-transplant quality of life.Pain and
             social and emotional quality of life remained stable in the
             year following transplant while self-efficacy and physical
             and functional quality of life improved. Pre-transplant pain
             was significantly related to lower physical well-being
             post-transplant. Lower pre-transplant self-efficacy was
             related to lower quality of life across all domains
             post-transplant.Above and beyond the effect of
             pre-transplant pain, self-efficacy for managing chronic
             disease is important in understanding quality of life
             following transplant. Identifying patients with pain and/or
             low self-efficacy pre-transplant may allow for early
             intervention with self-management strategies.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00520-017-3947-6},
   Key = {fds330575}
}

@article{fds330868,
   Author = {Rini, C and Vu, MB and Lerner, H and Bloom, C and Carda-Auten, J and Wood,
             WA and Basch, EM and Voorhees, PM and Reeder-Hayes, KE and Keefe,
             FJ},
   Title = {A qualitative study of patient and provider perspectives on
             using web-based pain coping skills training to treat
             persistent cancer pain.},
   Journal = {Palliative & Supportive Care},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {155-169},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s1478951517000086},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:Persistent pain is common and inadequately treated
             in cancer patients. Behavioral pain interventions are a
             recommended part of multimodal pain treatments, but they are
             underused in clinical care due to barriers such as a lack of
             the resources needed to deliver them in person and
             difficulties coordinating their use with clinical care. Pain
             coping skills training (PCST) is an evidence-based
             behavioral pain intervention traditionally delivered in
             person. Delivering this training via the web would increase
             access to it by addressing barriers that currently limit its
             use. We conducted a patient pilot study of an 8-week
             web-based PCST program to determine the acceptability of
             this approach to patients and the program features needed to
             meet their needs. Focus groups with healthcare providers
             identified strategies for coordinating the use of web-based
             PCST in clinical care. METHOD:Participants included 7 adults
             with bone pain due to multiple myeloma or metastasized
             breast or prostate cancer and 12 healthcare providers (4
             physicians and 8 advanced practice providers) who treat
             cancer-related bone pain. Patients completed web-based PCST
             at home and then took part in an in-depth qualitative
             interview. Providers attended focus groups led by a trained
             moderator. Qualitative analyses identified themes in the
             patient and provider data. RESULTS:Patients reported
             strongly favorable responses to web-based PCST and described
             emotional and physical benefits. They offered suggestions
             for adapting the approach to better fit their needs and to
             overcome barriers to completion. Focus groups indicated a
             need to familiarize healthcare providers with PCST and to
             address concerns about overburdening patients. Providers
             would recommend the program to patients they felt could
             benefit. They suggested applying a broad definition of
             cancer pain and having various types of providers help
             coordinate program its use with clinical care. SIGNIFICANCE
             OF RESULTS:Web-based PCST was acceptable to patients and
             providers. Our findings suggest that patients could benefit
             from this approach, especially if patient and provider
             barriers are addressed.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s1478951517000086},
   Key = {fds330868}
}

@article{fds333734,
   Author = {DeBar, L and Benes, L and Bonifay, A and Deyo, RA and Elder, CR and Keefe,
             FJ and Leo, MC and McMullen, C and Mayhew, M and Owen-Smith, A and Smith,
             DH and Trinacty, CM and Vollmer, WM},
   Title = {Interdisciplinary team-based care for patients with chronic
             pain on long-term opioid treatment in primary care (PPACT) -
             Protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized
             trial.},
   Journal = {Contemporary Clinical Trials},
   Volume = {67},
   Pages = {91-99},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2018.02.015},
   Abstract = {Chronic pain is one of the most common, disabling, and
             expensive public health problems in the United States.
             Interdisciplinary pain management treatments that employ
             behavioral approaches have been successful in helping
             patients with chronic pain reduce symptoms and regain
             functioning. However, most patients lack access to such
             treatments. We are conducting a pragmatic clinical trial to
             test the hypothesis that patients who receive an
             interdisciplinary biopsychosocial intervention, the Pain
             Program for Active Coping and Training (PPACT), at their
             primary care clinic will have a greater reduction in pain
             impact in the year following than patients receiving usual
             care.This is an effectiveness-implementation hybrid
             pragmatic clinical trial in which we randomize clusters of
             primary care providers and their patients with chronic pain
             who are on long-term opioid therapy to 1) receive an
             interdisciplinary behavioral intervention in conjunction
             with their current health care or 2) continue with current
             health care services. Our primary outcome is pain impact (a
             composite of pain intensity and pain-related interference)
             measured using the PEG, a validated three-item assessment.
             Secondary outcomes include pain-related disability, patient
             satisfaction, opioids dispensed and health care utilization.
             An economic evaluation assesses the resources and costs
             necessary to deliver the intervention and its
             cost-effectiveness compared with usual care. A formative
             evaluation employs mixed methods to understand the context
             for implementation in the participating health care
             systems.This trial will inform the feasibility of
             implementing interdisciplinary behavioral approaches to pain
             management in the primary care setting, potentially
             providing a more effective, safer, and more satisfactory
             alternative to opioid-based chronic pain treatment. Clinical
             Trials Registration Number: NCT02113592.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cct.2018.02.015},
   Key = {fds333734}
}

@article{fds336944,
   Author = {Somers, TJ and Kelleher, SA and Dorfman, CS and Shelby, RA and Fisher,
             HM and Rowe Nichols and K and Sullivan, KM and Chao, NJ and Samsa, GP and Abernethy, AP and Keefe, FJ},
   Title = {An mHealth Pain Coping Skills Training Intervention for
             Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Patients:
             Development and Pilot Randomized Controlled
             Trial.},
   Journal = {Jmir Mhealth and Uhealth},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {e66},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/mhealth.8565},
   Abstract = {Pain is a challenge for patients following hematopoietic
             stem cell transplantation (HCT).This study aimed to develop
             and test the feasibility, acceptability, and initial
             efficacy of a Web-based mobile pain coping skills training
             (mPCST) protocol designed to address the needs of HCT
             patients.Participants had undergone HCT and reported pain
             following transplant (N=68). To guide intervention
             development, qualitative data were collected from focus
             group participants (n=25) and participants who completed
             user testing (n=7). After their input was integrated into
             the mPCST intervention, a pilot randomized controlled trial
             (RCT, n=36) was conducted to examine the feasibility,
             acceptability, and initial efficacy of the intervention.
             Measures of acceptability, pain severity, pain disability,
             pain self-efficacy, fatigue, and physical disability
             (self-report and 2-min walk test [2MWT]) were
             collected.Participants in the focus groups and user testing
             provided qualitative data that were used to iteratively
             refine the mPCST protocol. Focus group qualitative data
             included participants' experiences with pain following
             transplant, perspectives on ways to cope with pain, and
             suggestions for pain management for other HCT patients. User
             testing participants provided feedback on the HCT protocol
             and information on the use of videoconferencing. The final
             version of the mPCST intervention was designed to bridge the
             intensive outpatient (1 in-person session) and home settings
             (5 videoconferencing sessions). A key component of the
             intervention was a website that provided personalized
             messages based on daily assessments of pain and activity.
             The website also provided intervention materials (ie,
             electronic handouts, short videos, and audio files). The
             intervention content included pain coping advice from other
             transplant patients and instructions on how to apply pain
             coping skills while engaging in meaningful and leisure
             activities. In the RCT phase of this research, HCT patients
             (n=36) were randomized to receive the mPCST intervention or
             to proceed with the treatment as usual. Results revealed
             that the mPCST participants completed an average of 5 out of
             6 sessions. The participants reported that the intervention
             was highly acceptable (mean 3/4), and they found the
             sessions to be helpful (mean 8/10) and easy to understand
             (mean 7/7). The mPCST participants demonstrated significant
             improvements in pre- to post-treatment pain, self-efficacy
             (P=.03, d=0.61), and on the 2MWT (P=.03, d=0.66), whereas
             the patients in the treatment-as-usual group did not report
             any such improvements. Significant changes in pain
             disability and fatigue were found in both groups (multiple
             P<.02); the magnitudes of the effect sizes were larger for
             the mPCST group than for the control group (pain disability:
             d=0.79 vs 0.69; fatigue: d=0.94 vs 0.81). There were no
             significant changes in pain severity in either group.Using
             focus groups and user testing, we developed an mPCST
             protocol that was feasible, acceptable, and beneficial for
             HCT patients with pain.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01984671;
             https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01984671 (Archived by
             WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6xbpx3clZ).},
   Doi = {10.2196/mhealth.8565},
   Key = {fds336944}
}

@article{fds337362,
   Author = {Janke, EA and Cheatle, M and Keefe, FJ and Dhingra, L and Society of
             Behavioral Medicine Health Policy Committee},
   Title = {Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) position statement:
             improving access to psychosocial care for individuals with
             persistent pain: supporting the National Pain Strategy's
             call for interdisciplinary pain care.},
   Journal = {Translational Behavioral Medicine},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {305-308},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tbm/ibx043},
   Abstract = {Policy makers have articulated a need for clear,
             evidence-based guidance to help inform pain policy.
             Persistent pain is common, expensive, and debilitating, and
             requires comprehensive assessment and treatment planning.
             Recently released opioid prescribing guidelines by the CDC
             (2016) emphasize the importance of using nonopioid therapies
             before considering opioid treatment for those without a
             malignant illness. The National Pain Strategy (2016)
             underscores the importance of comprehensive,
             interdisciplinary pain care. Unfortunately, despite
             persuasive evidence supporting the efficacy of psychosocial
             approaches, these interventions are inaccessible to the
             majority of Americans. Psychosocial approaches to pain
             management should be available for all individuals with
             persistent pain and in all health care settings and contexts
             as part of the comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to
             pain care as outlined in the National Pain Strategy. To
             achieve this, we must prioritize reimbursement of
             evidence-based psychosocial approaches for pain assessment
             and management and improve provider training and
             competencies to implement these approaches.},
   Doi = {10.1093/tbm/ibx043},
   Key = {fds337362}
}

@article{fds333735,
   Author = {Gerhart, JI and Burns, JW and Bruehl, S and Smith, DA and Post, KM and Porter, LS and Schuster, E and Buvanendran, A and Fras, AM and Keefe,
             FJ},
   Title = {Variability in negative emotions among individuals with
             chronic low back pain: relationships with pain and
             function.},
   Journal = {Pain},
   Volume = {159},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {342-350},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001102},
   Abstract = {Chronic pain is associated with elevated negative emotions,
             and resources needed to adaptively regulate these emotions
             can be depleted during prolonged pain. Studies of links
             between pain, function, and negative emotions in people with
             chronic pain, however, have focused almost exclusively on
             relationships among mean levels of these factors. Indexes
             that may reflect aspects of emotion regulation have
             typically not been analyzed. We propose that 1 index of
             emotion regulation is variability in emotion over time as
             opposed to average emotion over time. The sample was 105
             people with chronic low back pain and 105 of their pain-free
             spouses. They completed electronic diary measures 5x/d for
             14 consecutive days, producing 70 observations per person
             from which we derived estimates of within-subject variance
             in negative emotions. Location-scale models were used to
             simultaneously model predictors of both mean level and
             variance in patient negative emotions over time. Patients
             reported significantly more variability in negative emotions
             compared to their spouses. Patients who reported higher
             average levels of pain, pain interference, and downtime
             reported significantly higher levels of variability in
             negative emotions. Spouse-observed pain and pain behaviors
             were also associated with greater variability in patients'
             negative emotions. Test of the inverse associations between
             negative emotion level and variability in pain and function
             were significant but weaker in magnitude. These findings
             support the notion that chronic pain may erode negative
             emotion regulation resources, to the potential detriment of
             intra- and inter-personal function.},
   Doi = {10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001102},
   Key = {fds333735}
}

@article{fds339268,
   Author = {Langer, SL and Romano, JM and Todd, M and Strauman, TJ and Keefe, FJ and Syrjala, KL and Bricker, JB and Ghosh, N and Burns, JW and Bolger, N and Puleo, BK and Gralow, JR and Shankaran, V and Westbrook, K and Zafar,
             SY and Porter, LS},
   Title = {Links Between Communication and Relationship Satisfaction
             Among Patients With Cancer and Their Spouses: Results of a
             Fourteen-Day Smartphone-Based Ecological Momentary
             Assessment Study.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Psychology},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {OCT},
   Pages = {1843},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01843},
   Abstract = {Cancer treatment poses significant challenges not just for
             those diagnosed with the disease but also for their intimate
             partners. Evidence suggests that couples' communication
             plays a major role in the adjustment of both individuals and
             in the quality of their relationship. Most descriptive
             studies linking communication to adjustment have relied on
             traditional questionnaire methodologies and cross-sectional
             designs, limiting external validity and discernment of
             temporal patterns. Using the systemic-transactional model of
             dyadic coping as a framework, we examined intra- and
             inter-personal associations between communication (both
             enacted and perceived) and relationship satisfaction (RS)
             among patients with stage II-IV breast or colorectal cancer
             and their spouses (N = 107 couples). Participants (mean age
             = 51, 64.5% female patients, and 37.4% female spouses)
             independently completed twice-daily ecological momentary
             assessments (EMA) via smartphone for 14 consecutive days.
             Items assessed RS and communication (expression of feelings,
             holding back from expression, support and criticism of
             partner, and parallel ratings of partner behavior). Linear
             mixed models employing an Actor Partner Interdependence
             Model were used to examine concurrent, time-lagged, and
             cross-lagged associations between communication and RS.
             Expressing one's feelings was unassociated with RS. Holding
             back from doing so, in contrast, was associated with lower
             RS for both patients and spouses in concurrent models. These
             effects were both intrapersonal and interpersonal, meaning
             that when individuals held back from expressing their
             feelings, they reported lower RS and so too did their
             partner. Giving and receiving support were associated with
             one's own higher RS for both patients and spouses in
             concurrent models, and for patients in lagged models.
             Conversely, criticizing one's partner and feeling criticized
             were maladaptive, associated with lower RS (own and in some
             cases, partner's). Cross-lagged analyses (evening RS to
             next-day afternoon communication) yielded virtually no
             effects, suggesting that communication may have a stronger
             influence on short-term RS than the reverse. Findings
             underscore the importance of responsive communication, more
             so than expression per se, in explaining both concurrent and
             later relationship adjustment. In addition, a focus on
             holding back from expressing feelings may enhance the
             understanding of RS for couples coping with
             cancer.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01843},
   Key = {fds339268}
}

@article{fds333736,
   Author = {Burns, JW and Post, KM and Smith, DA and Porter, LS and Buvanendran, A and Fras, AM and Keefe, FJ},
   Title = {Spouse criticism and hostility during marital interaction:
             effects on pain intensity and behaviors among individuals
             with chronic low back pain.},
   Journal = {Pain},
   Volume = {159},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {25-32},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001037},
   Abstract = {Individuals with chronic pain may experience negative
             responses from spouse, family, and friends. Responses such
             as overt criticism and hostility may be associated with
             worsening pain and function for chronic pain sufferers. We
             used a laboratory procedure to evaluate whether variability
             in spouse criticism/hostility exhibited toward chronic low
             back pain (CLBP) patients during a conflictual discussion
             predicted variability in patient pain and function during a
             subsequent pain-induction task. Chronic low back pain
             patients (n = 71) and their spouses (n = 71) participated in
             a 10-minute discussion followed by the patient undergoing a
             10-minute structured pain behavior task (SPBT). Spouse
             criticism/hostility perceived by patients and patient Beck
             Depression Inventory-II (BDI) scores correlated
             significantly and positively with pain intensity during the
             SPBT, whereas perceived spouse hostility, patient BDI
             scores, and spouse trait hostility correlated significantly
             and positively with observed pain behaviors during the SPBT.
             Spouse criticism/hostility coded by raters from video
             recordings interacted significantly with patient BDI scores,
             such that observed spouse criticism/hostility was related
             significantly and positively with pain behaviors only for
             patients with high BDI scores. Patient sex interacted
             significantly with observed spouse criticism/hostility, such
             that observed spouse criticism/hostility was related
             significantly and positively with pain behaviors only for
             female patients. Results support the hypothesis that spouse
             criticism and hostility-actually expressed or perceived-may
             worsen CLBP patient symptoms. Further, women patients and
             patients high in depressive symptoms appeared most
             vulnerable to spouse criticism/hostility. Thus, negative
             marital communication patterns may be appropriate targets
             for intervention, especially among these 2 at risk
             groups.},
   Doi = {10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001037},
   Key = {fds333736}
}

@article{fds332333,
   Author = {Lumley, MA and Anderson, T and Ankawi, B and Goldman, G and Perri, LM and Bianco, JA and Keefe, FJ},
   Title = {The working alliance and Clinician-assisted Emotional
             Disclosure for rheumatoid arthritis.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychosomatic Research},
   Volume = {104},
   Pages = {9-15},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2017.11.004},
   Abstract = {The working alliance predicts improvement following general
             psychotherapy, but how it operates in brief interventions
             conducted with medically ill patients is unknown. Also, the
             role of the working alliance may differ in emotion-focused
             versus educational interventions.We report secondary
             analyses of a randomized clinical trial (Keefe et al.) [35],
             in which patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) received
             four nurse-provided sessions of either a) Clinician-assisted
             Emotional Disclosure (CAED), which emphasized the
             disclosure, expression, and processing of emotions related
             to stressful events; or b) Arthritis Education (AE), which
             provided basic education about RA. The Working Alliance
             Inventory was completed by both patient and nurse after each
             session. Patients were evaluated on multiple health measures
             at baseline and 1, 3, and 12months post-treatment.Analyses
             compared the alliance between interventions and related the
             alliance to outcomes within interventions. Patients in CAED
             reported a lower alliance than patients in AE.
             Interestingly, in CAED, lower alliance ratings predicted
             better outcomes (improved functioning, lower pain behaviors,
             lower inflammation, lower daily stress), whereas in AE, the
             working alliance was largely not predictive of
             outcomes.Having nurses encourage emotional disclosure among
             patients with RA reduced the patients' working alliance, but
             a lower alliance nonetheless predicted better patient
             outcomes, perhaps reflecting successful engagement in an
             intervention that is emotionally and relationally
             challenging. The level and predictive validity of the
             working alliance likely depends on patient, provider, and
             intervention factors, and further study of the working
             alliance in psychosocial interventions in the medical
             context is needed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpsychores.2017.11.004},
   Key = {fds332333}
}

@article{fds340525,
   Author = {Dorfman, CS and Kelleher, SA and Winger, JG and Shelby, RA and Thorn,
             BE and Sutton, LM and Keefe, FJ and Gandhi, V and Manohar, P and Somers,
             TJ},
   Title = {Development and pilot testing of an mHealth behavioral
             cancer pain protocol for medically underserved
             communities},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychosocial Oncology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07347332.2018.1479327},
   Abstract = {© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. The purpose of
             this study was to refine and test a mobile-health behavioral
             cancer pain coping skills training protocol for women with
             breast cancer and pain from medically underserved areas.
             Three focus groups (Phase 1) were used to refine the initial
             protocol. A single-arm pilot trial (Phase 2) was conducted
             to assess feasibility, acceptability, and changes in
             outcomes. The intervention was delivered at a
             community-based clinic via videoconferencing technology.
             Participants were women (N = 19 for Phase 1 and N = 20 for
             Phase 2) with breast cancer and pain in medically
             underserved areas. Major themes from focus groups were used
             to refine the intervention. The refined intervention
             demonstrated feasibility and acceptability. Participants
             reported significant improvement in pain severity, pain
             interference, and self-efficacy for pain management. Our
             intervention is feasible, acceptable, and likely to lead to
             improvement in pain-related outcomes for breast cancer
             patients in medically underserved areas. Implications for
             Psychosocial Oncology Practice Breast cancer patients being
             treated in medically underserved areas have a dearth of
             exposure to behavioral interventions that may improve their
             ability to manage pain. Evidence from this single-arm pilot
             trial suggests that our mobile-health behavioral cancer pain
             coping skills training protocol is acceptable and feasible
             in this vulnerable population. Appropriately adapted
             mobile-health technologies may provide an avenue to reach
             underserved patients and implement behavioral interventions
             to improve pain management.},
   Doi = {10.1080/07347332.2018.1479327},
   Key = {fds340525}
}

@article{fds336945,
   Author = {Lawford, BJ and Hinman, RS and Kasza, J and Nelligan, R and Keefe, F and Rini, C and Bennell, KL},
   Title = {Moderators of Effects of Internet-Delivered Exercise and
             Pain Coping Skills Training for People With Knee
             Osteoarthritis: Exploratory Analysis of the IMPACT
             Randomized Controlled Trial},
   Journal = {Journal of Medical Internet Research},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {e10021-e10021},
   Publisher = {JMIR Publications Inc.},
   Year = {2018},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/10021},
   Doi = {10.2196/10021},
   Key = {fds336945}
}


%% Keefe, Richard S.   
@article{fds339773,
   Author = {Wang, C and Lee, J and Ho, NF and Lim, JKW and Poh, JS and Rekhi, G and Krishnan, R and Keefe, RSE and Adcock, RA and Wood, SJ and Fornito, A and Chee, MWL and Zhou, J},
   Title = {Large-Scale Network Topology Reveals Heterogeneity in
             Individuals With at Risk Mental State for Psychosis:
             Findings From the Longitudinal Youth-at-Risk
             Study.},
   Journal = {Cerebral Cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {4234-4243},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhx278},
   Abstract = {Emerging evidence demonstrates heterogeneity in clinical
             outcomes of prodromal psychosis that only a small percentage
             of at-risk individuals eventually progress to full-blown
             psychosis. To examine the neurobiological underpinnings of
             this heterogeneity from a network perspective, we tested
             whether the early patterns of large-scale brain network
             topology were associated with risk of developing clinical
             psychosis. Task-free functional MRI data were acquired from
             subjects with At Risk Mental State (ARMS) for psychosis and
             healthy controls (HC). All individuals had no history of
             drug abuse and were not on antipsychotics. We performed
             functional connectomics analysis to identify patterns of
             system-level functional brain dysconnectivity associated
             with ARMS individuals with different outcomes. In comparison
             to HC and ARMS who did not transition to psychosis at
             follow-up (ARMS-NT), ARMS individuals who did (ARMS-T)
             showed marked brain functional dysconnectivity,
             characterized by loss of network segregation and disruption
             of network communities, especially the salience, default,
             dorsal attention, sensorimotor and limbic networks (P < 0.05
             FWE-corrected, Cohen's d > 1.00), and was associated with
             baseline symptom severity. In contrast, we did not observe
             connectivity differences between ARMS-NT and HC individuals.
             Taken together, these results suggest a possible large-scale
             functional brain network topology phenotype related to risk
             of psychosis transition in ARMS individuals.},
   Doi = {10.1093/cercor/bhx278},
   Key = {fds339773}
}

@article{fds336077,
   Author = {Yang, Z and Lim, K and Lam, M and Keefe, R and Lee, J},
   Title = {Factor structure of the positive and negative syndrome scale
             (PANSS) in people at ultra high risk (UHR) for
             psychosis.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Volume = {201},
   Pages = {85-90},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2018.05.024},
   Abstract = {INTRODUCTION:The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale
             (PANSS), a comprehensive psychopathology assessment scale
             used in the evaluation of psychopathology in schizophrenia,
             is also often used in the Ultra-High-Risk (UHR) population.
             This paper examined the dimensional structure of the PANSS
             in a UHR sample. METHODS:A total of 168 individuals assessed
             to be at UHR for psychosis on the Comprehensive Assessment
             of At-Risk Mental States (CAARMS) were evaluated on the
             PANSS, Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS),
             Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Brief Assessment of Cognition
             in Schizophrenia (BACS), and Global Assessment of
             Functioning (GAF). Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of the
             PANSS was performed to identify the factorial structure.
             Convergent validity was explored with the CAARMS, CDSS, BAI
             and BACS. RESULTS:EFA of the PANSS yielded five symptom
             factors - Positive, Negative, Cognition/Disorganization,
             Anxiety/Depression, and Hostility. This 5-factor solution
             showed good convergent validity with the CAARMS composite
             score, CDSS, BAI, and BACS. Positive, Negative and
             Anxiety/Depression factors were associated with functioning.
             CONCLUSION:The reported PANSS factor structure may serve to
             improve the understanding and measurement of clinical
             symptom dimensions manifested in people with UHR for future
             research and clinical setting.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2018.05.024},
   Key = {fds336077}
}

@article{fds339669,
   Author = {Keefe, RSE and Pani, L},
   Title = {Take This Cognitive Training Efficacy Bar Fight Outside (to
             a Regulatory Agency).},
   Journal = {Biological Psychiatry. Cognitive Neuroscience and
             Neuroimaging},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {900-902},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpsc.2018.09.002},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bpsc.2018.09.002},
   Key = {fds339669}
}

@article{fds338438,
   Author = {Kraus, MS and Walker, TM and Jarskog, LF and Millet, RA and Keefe,
             RSE},
   Title = {Basic auditory processing deficits and their association
             with auditory emotion recognition in schizophrenia.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2018.08.031},
   Abstract = {<label>BACKGROUND</label>Individuals with schizophrenia are
             impaired in their ability to recognize emotions based on
             vocal cues and these impairments are associated with poor
             global outcome. Basic perceptual processes, such as auditory
             pitch processing, are impaired in schizophrenia and
             contribute to difficulty identifying emotions. However,
             previous work has focused on a relatively narrow assessment
             of auditory deficits and their relation to emotion
             recognition impairment in schizophrenia.<label>METHODS</label>We
             have assessed 87 patients with schizophrenia and 73 healthy
             controls on a comprehensive battery of tasks spanning the
             five empirically derived domains of auditory function. We
             also explored the relationship between basic auditory
             processing and auditory emotion recognition within the
             patient group using correlational analysis.<label>RESULTS</label>Patients
             exhibited widespread auditory impairments across multiple
             domains of auditory function, with mostly medium effect
             sizes. Performance on all of the basic auditory tests
             correlated with auditory emotion recognition at the
             p < .01 level in the patient group, with 9 out of 13
             tests correlating with emotion recognition at r = 0.40
             or greater. After controlling for cognition, many of the
             largest correlations involved spectral processing within the
             phase-locking range and discrimination of vocally based
             stimuli.<label>CONCLUSIONS</label>While many auditory skills
             contribute to this impairment, deficient formant
             discrimination appears to be a key skill contributing to
             impaired emotion recognition as this was the only basic
             auditory skill to enter a step-wise multiple regression
             after first entering a measure of cognitive impairment, and
             formant discrimination accounted for significant unique
             variance in emotion recognition performance after accounting
             for deficits in pitch processing.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2018.08.031},
   Key = {fds338438}
}

@article{fds337700,
   Author = {Lam, M and Lee, J and Rapisarda, A and See, YM and Yang, Z and Lee, S-A and Abdul-Rashid, NA and Kraus, M and Subramaniam, M and Chong, S-A and Keefe, RSE},
   Title = {Longitudinal Cognitive Changes in Young Individuals at
             Ultrahigh Risk for Psychosis.},
   Journal = {Jama Psychiatry},
   Volume = {75},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {929-939},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2018.1668},
   Abstract = {Cognitive deficits are a key feature of risk for psychosis.
             Longitudinal changes in cognitive architecture may be
             associated with the social and occupational functioning in
             young people.To examine longitudinal profiles of cognition
             in individuals at ultrahigh risk (UHR) for psychosis,
             compared with healthy controls, and to investigate the
             association of cognition with functioning.This study has a
             multiple-group prospective design completed in 24 months and
             was conducted from January 1, 2009, to November 11, 2012, as
             part of the Longitudinal Youth at-Risk Study conducted in
             Singapore. Participants either were recruited from
             psychiatric outpatient clinics, educational institutions,
             and community mental health agencies or self-referred.
             Follow-up assessments were performed every 6 months for 2
             years or until conversion to psychosis. Individuals with
             medical causes for psychosis, current illicit substance use,
             or color blindness were excluded. Data analysis was
             conducted from June 2014 to May 2018.Neuropsychological,
             perceptual, and social cognitive tasks; semi-structured
             interviews, and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV
             Axis I disorders were administered every 6 months. The UHR
             status of nonconverters, converters, remitters, and
             nonremitters was monitored. Cognitive domain scores and
             functioning were investigated longitudinally.In total, 384
             healthy controls and 173 UHR individuals between ages 14 and
             29 years were evaluated prospectively. Of the 384 healthy
             controls, 153 (39.8%) were female and 231 (60.2%) were male
             with a mean (SD) age of 21.69 (3.26) years. Of the 173
             individuals at UHR for psychosis, 56 (32.4%) were female and
             117 (67.6%) were male with a mean (SD) age of 21.27 (3.52)
             years). After 24 months of follow-up, 383 healthy controls
             (99.7%) and 122 individuals at UHR for psychosis (70.5%)
             remained. Baseline cognitive deficits were associated with
             psychosis conversion later (mean odds ratio [OR], 1.66;
             combined 95% CI, 1.08-2.83; P = .04) and nonremission of
             UHR status (mean OR, 1.67; combined 95% CI, 1.09-2.95;
             P = .04). Five cognitive components-social cognition,
             attention, verbal fluency, general cognitive function, and
             perception-were obtained from principal components analysis.
             Longitudinal component structure change was observed in
             general cognitive function (maximum vertical
             deviation = 0.59; χ2 = 8.03; P = .01).
             Group-by-time interaction on general cognitive function
             (F = 12.23; η2 = 0.047; P < .001) and
             perception (F = 8.33; η2 = 0.032; P < .001) was
             present. Changes in attention (F = 5.65;
             η2 = 0.013; P = .02) and general cognitive function
             (F = 7.18; η2 = 0.014; P = .01) accounted for
             longitudinal changes in social and occupational
             functioning.Individuals in this study who met the UHR
             criteria appeared to demonstrate cognitive deficits, and
             those whose UHR status remitted were seen to recover
             cognitively. Cognition appeared as poor in nonremitters and
             appeared to be associated with poor functional outcome. This
             study suggests that cognitive dimensions are sensitive to
             the identification of young individuals at risk for
             psychosis and to the longitudinal course of those at highest
             risk.},
   Doi = {10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2018.1668},
   Key = {fds337700}
}

@article{fds332787,
   Author = {Xavier, RM and Dungan, JR and Keefe, RSE and Vorderstrasse,
             A},
   Title = {Polygenic signal for symptom dimensions and cognitive
             performance in patients with chronic schizophrenia.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research. Cognition},
   Volume = {12},
   Pages = {11-19},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scog.2018.01.001},
   Abstract = {Genetic etiology of psychopathology symptoms and cognitive
             performance in schizophrenia is supported by candidate gene
             and polygenic risk score (PRS) association studies. Such
             associations are reported to be dependent on several factors
             - sample characteristics, illness phase, illness severity
             etc. We aimed to examine if schizophrenia PRS predicted
             psychopathology symptoms and cognitive performance in
             patients with chronic schizophrenia. We also examined if
             schizophrenia associated autosomal loci were associated with
             specific symptoms or cognitive domains. Case-only analysis
             using data from the Clinical Antipsychotics Trials of
             Intervention Effectiveness-Schizophrenia trials
             (n = 730). PRS was constructed using Psychiatric
             Genomics Consortium (PGC) leave one out genome wide
             association analysis as the discovery data set. For
             candidate region analysis, we selected 105-schizophrenia
             associated autosomal loci from the PGC study. We found a
             significant effect of PRS on positive symptoms at
             p-threshold (PT ) of 0.5 (R2 = 0.007, p = 0.029,
             empirical p = 0.029) and negative symptoms at PT of
             1e-07 (R2 = 0.005, p = 0.047, empirical
             p = 0.048). For models that additionally controlled for
             neurocognition, best fit PRS predicted positive (p-threshold
             0.01, R2 = 0.007, p = 0.013, empirical
             p = 0.167) and negative symptoms (p-threshold 0.1,
             R2 = 0.012, p = 0.004, empirical p = 0.329). No
             associations were seen for overall neurocognitive and social
             cognitive performance tests. Post-hoc analyses revealed that
             PRS predicted working memory and vigilance performance but
             did not survive correction. No candidate regions that
             survived multiple testing corrections were associated with
             either symptoms or cognitive performance. Our findings point
             to potentially distinct pathogenic mechanisms for
             schizophrenia symptoms.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.scog.2018.01.001},
   Key = {fds332787}
}

@article{fds329375,
   Author = {Blokland, GAM and Del Re and EC and Mesholam-Gately, RI and Jovicich, J and Trampush, JW and Keshavan, MS and DeLisi, LE and Walters, JTR and Turner, JA and Malhotra, AK and Lencz, T and Shenton, ME and Voineskos,
             AN and Rujescu, D and Giegling, I and Kahn, RS and Roffman, JL and Holt,
             DJ and Ehrlich, S and Kikinis, Z and Dazzan, P and Murray, RM and Di Forti,
             M and Lee, J and Sim, K and Lam, M and Wolthusen, RPF and de Zwarte, SMC and Walton, E and Cosgrove, D and Kelly, S and Maleki, N and Osiecki, L and Picchioni, MM and Bramon, E and Russo, M and David, AS and Mondelli, V and Reinders, AATS and Falcone, MA and Hartmann, AM and Konte, B and Morris,
             DW and Gill, M and Corvin, AP and Cahn, W and Ho, NF and Liu, JJ and Keefe,
             RSE and Gollub, RL and Manoach, DS and Calhoun, VD and Schulz, SC and Sponheim, SR and Goff, DC and Buka, SL and Cherkerzian, S and Thermenos,
             HW and Kubicki, M and Nestor, PG and Dickie, EW and Vassos, E and Ciufolini, S and Reis Marques and T and Crossley, NA and Purcell, SM and Smoller, JW and van Haren, NEM and Toulopoulou, T and Donohoe, G and Goldstein, JM and Seidman, LJ and McCarley, RW and Petryshen,
             TL},
   Title = {The Genetics of Endophenotypes of Neurofunction to
             Understand Schizophrenia (GENUS) consortium: A collaborative
             cognitive and neuroimaging genetics project.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Volume = {195},
   Pages = {306-317},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.09.024},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Schizophrenia has a large genetic component, and
             the pathways from genes to illness manifestation are
             beginning to be identified. The Genetics of Endophenotypes
             of Neurofunction to Understand Schizophrenia (GENUS)
             Consortium aims to clarify the role of genetic variation in
             brain abnormalities underlying schizophrenia. This article
             describes the GENUS Consortium sample collection. METHODS:We
             identified existing samples collected for schizophrenia
             studies consisting of patients, controls, and/or individuals
             at familial high-risk (FHR) for schizophrenia. Samples had
             single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data or genomic
             DNA, clinical and demographic data, and neuropsychological
             and/or brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Data
             were subjected to quality control procedures at a central
             site. RESULTS:Sixteen research groups contributed data from
             5199 psychosis patients, 4877 controls, and 725 FHR
             individuals. All participants have relevant demographic data
             and all patients have relevant clinical data. The sex ratio
             is 56.5% male and 43.5% female. Significant differences
             exist between diagnostic groups for premorbid and current IQ
             (both p<1×10-10). Data from a diversity of
             neuropsychological tests are available for 92% of
             participants, and 30% have structural MRI scans (half also
             have diffusion-weighted MRI scans). SNP data are available
             for 76% of participants. The ancestry composition is 70%
             European, 20% East Asian, 7% African, and 3% other.
             CONCLUSIONS:The Consortium is investigating the genetic
             contribution to brain phenotypes in a schizophrenia sample
             collection of >10,000 participants. The breadth of data
             across clinical, genetic, neuropsychological, and MRI
             modalities provides an important opportunity for elucidating
             the genetic basis of neural processes underlying
             schizophrenia.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2017.09.024},
   Key = {fds329375}
}

@article{fds336078,
   Author = {Keefe, RSE and Nomikos, G and Zhong, W and Christensen, MC and Jacobson,
             W},
   Title = {A Subgroup Analysis of the Impact of Vortioxetine on
             Functional Capacity, as Measured by UPSA, in Patients with
             Major Depressive Disorder and Subjective Cognitive
             Dysfunction.},
   Journal = {The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {442-447},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ijnp/pyy020},
   Abstract = {We evaluated vortioxetine's effects on functional capacity
             in demographic and clinical subgroups of patients with major
             depressive disorder.This was an exploratory analysis of the
             CONNECT study (NCT01564862) that evaluated changes in
             functional capacity using University of California San Diego
             Performance-based Skills Assessment data, categorized by
             sex, age, education, employment status, and baseline disease
             severity (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale,
             Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness).Greater
             changes in University of California San Diego
             Performance-based Skills Assessment composite scores were
             observed with vortioxetine vs placebo in specific subgroups:
             males (∆+3.2), females (∆+2.9), 45-54 or ≥55 years
             (∆+5.6, ∆+3.4), working (∆+2.8), high school or
             greater education (∆+2.7, ∆+2.8), disease severity
             (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, <30, ∆+3.5;
             ≥30, ∆+2.5; Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of
             Illness ≤4, ∆+2.8; >4, ∆+3.0), major depressive
             episodes (≤2, >2 [∆+2.7,+3.3]), and episode duration
             (≤22, >22 weeks [∆+3.7,+2.4]).Our findings support the
             need for additional studies to assess whether vortioxetine
             improves functional capacity within specific patient
             subgroups.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01564862.},
   Doi = {10.1093/ijnp/pyy020},
   Key = {fds336078}
}

@article{fds336079,
   Author = {Keefe, RSE and Harvey, PD and Khan, A and Saoud, JB and Staner, C and Davidson, M and Luthringer, R},
   Title = {Cognitive Effects of MIN-101 in Patients With Schizophrenia
             and Negative Symptoms: Results From a Randomized Controlled
             Trial.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {3},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/jcp.17m11753},
   Abstract = {Current dopamine-blocking antipsychotic drugs have little
             impact on the cognitive deficits associated with
             schizophrenia. We evaluated whether MIN-101, a molecule that
             combines sigma-2 antagonism and 5-HT2A antagonism, might
             improve cognitive deficits in individuals with moderate to
             severe negative symptoms in schizophrenia.Individuals (N =
             244) aged 18 to 60 years with stable symptoms of
             DSM-5-defined schizophrenia and moderate to severe negative
             symptoms were randomized to placebo (n = 83), MIN-101 32 mg
             (n = 78), or MIN-101 64 mg (n = 83) in a 12-week, phase 2b,
             prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled,
             parallel-group trial between May 2015 and December 2015. In
             a post hoc analysis, mean z and T score changes from
             baseline at 12 weeks of treatment in the cognitive composite
             score and individual tests on the Brief Assessment of
             Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) Battery were compared
             between MIN-101 and placebo.A total of 79 patients (95.2%)
             from the placebo group, 76 (97.4%) from the MIN-101 32 mg
             group, and 79 (95.2%) from the MIN-101 64 mg group completed
             the BACS at baseline. The BACS token motor (P = .04), verbal
             fluency (P = .01), and composite z scores (P = .05) showed
             significant improvements in the MIN-101 32 mg group compared
             to the placebo group. At week 4, the clinical improvements
             from baseline in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale
             (PANSS) negative factor showed a significant correlation
             with improvements from baseline on the BACS composite in the
             64 mg group (r = -0.292, P = .020). At week 12, improvement
             in the PANSS negative factor showed significant correlations
             with improvements in the BACS composite (r = -0.408, P =
             .002), Trail Making Test (r = -0.394, P = .003), and verbal
             memory (r = -0.322, P = .017) for the 64 mg group.Results
             suggest a possible benefit of MIN-101 on cognitive
             performance in individuals with schizophrenia with stable
             positive symptoms and concurrent clinically significant
             negative symptoms.EU Clinical Trials Register identifier:
             2014-004878-42​.},
   Doi = {10.4088/jcp.17m11753},
   Key = {fds336079}
}

@article{fds329482,
   Author = {Xavier, RM and Vorderstrasse, A and Keefe, RSE and Dungan,
             JR},
   Title = {Genetic correlates of insight in schizophrenia.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Volume = {195},
   Pages = {290-297},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.10.021},
   Abstract = {Insight in schizophrenia is clinically important as it is
             associated with several adverse outcomes. Genetic
             contributions to insight are unknown. We examined genetic
             contributions to insight by investigating if polygenic risk
             scores (PRS) and candidate regions were associated with
             insight. METHOD:Schizophrenia case-only analysis of the
             Clinical Antipsychotics Trials of Intervention Effectiveness
             trial. Schizophrenia PRS was constructed using Psychiatric
             Genomics Consortium (PGC) leave-one out GWAS as discovery
             data set. For candidate regions, we selected 105
             schizophrenia-associated autosomal loci and 11
             schizophrenia-related oligodendrocyte genes. We used
             regressions to examine PRS associations and set-based
             testing for candidate analysis. RESULTS:We examined data
             from 730 subjects. Best-fit PRS at p-threshold of 1e-07 was
             associated with total insight (R2=0.005, P=0.05, empirical
             P=0.054) and treatment insight (R2=0.005, P=0.048, empirical
             P=0.048). For models that controlled for neurocognition, PRS
             significantly predicted treatment insight but at higher
             p-thresholds (0.1 to 0.5) but did not survive correction.
             Patients with highest polygenic burden had 5.9 times
             increased risk for poor insight compared to patients with
             lowest burden. PRS explained 3.2% (P=0.002, empirical
             P=0.011) of variance in poor insight. Set-based analyses
             identified two variants associated with poor insight-
             rs320703, an intergenic variant (within-set P=6e-04, FDR
             P=0.046) and rs1479165 in SOX2-OT (within-set P=9e-04, FDR
             P=0.046). CONCLUSION:To the best of our knowledge, this is
             the first study examining genetic basis of insight. We
             provide evidence for genetic contributions to impaired
             insight. Relevance of findings and necessity for replication
             are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2017.10.021},
   Key = {fds329482}
}

@article{fds336080,
   Author = {Shafee, R and Nanda, P and Padmanabhan, JL and Tandon, N and Alliey-Rodriguez, N and Kalapurakkel, S and Weiner, DJ and Gur, RE and Keefe, RSE and Hill, SK and Bishop, JR and Clementz, BA and Tamminga,
             CA and Gershon, ES and Pearlson, GD and Keshavan, MS and Sweeney, JA and McCarroll, SA and Robinson, EB},
   Title = {Polygenic risk for schizophrenia and measured domains of
             cognition in individuals with psychosis and
             controls.},
   Journal = {Translational Psychiatry},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {78},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41398-018-0124-8},
   Abstract = {Psychotic disorders including schizophrenia are commonly
             accompanied by cognitive deficits. Recent studies have
             reported negative genetic correlations between schizophrenia
             and indicators of cognitive ability such as general
             intelligence and processing speed. Here we compare the
             effect of polygenetic risk for schizophrenia (PRSSCZ) on
             measures that differ in their relationships with psychosis
             onset: a measure of current cognitive abilities (the Brief
             Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia, BACS) that is
             greatly reduced in psychotic disorder patients, a measure of
             premorbid intelligence that is minimally affected by
             psychosis onset (the Wide-Range Achievement Test, WRAT); and
             educational attainment (EY), which covaries with both BACS
             and WRAT. Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism
             (SNP) data from 314 psychotic and 423 healthy research
             participants in the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network for
             Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) Consortium, we investigated
             the association of PRSSCZ with BACS, WRAT, and EY. Among
             apparently healthy individuals, greater genetic risk for
             schizophrenia (PRSSCZ) was significantly associated with
             lower BACS scores (r = -0.17, p = 6.6 × 10-4 at
             PT = 1 × 10-4), but not with WRAT or EY. Among
             individuals with psychosis, PRSSCZ did not associate with
             variations in any of these three phenotypes. We further
             investigated the association between PRSSCZ and WRAT in more
             than 4500 healthy subjects from the Philadelphia
             Neurodevelopmental Cohort. The association was again null
             (p > 0.3, N = 4511), suggesting that different
             cognitive phenotypes vary in their etiologic relationship
             with schizophrenia.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41398-018-0124-8},
   Key = {fds336080}
}

@article{fds327061,
   Author = {Kendler, KS and Ohlsson, H and Keefe, RSE and Sundquist, K and Sundquist, J},
   Title = {The joint impact of cognitive performance in adolescence and
             familial cognitive aptitude on risk for major psychiatric
             disorders: a delineation of four potential pathways to
             illness.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1076-1083},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.78},
   Abstract = {How do joint measures of premorbid cognitive ability and
             familial cognitive aptitude (FCA) reflect risk for a
             diversity of psychiatric and substance use disorders? To
             address this question, we examined, using Cox models, the
             predictive effects of school achievement (SA) measured at
             age 16 and FCA-assessed from SA in siblings and cousins, and
             educational attainment in parents-on risk for 12 major
             psychiatric syndromes in 1 140 608 Swedes born
             1972-1990. Four developmental patterns emerged. In the
             first, risk was predicted jointly by low levels of SA and
             high levels of FCA-that is a level of SA lower than would be
             predicted from the FCA. This pattern was strongest in autism
             spectrum disorders and schizophrenia, and weakest in bipolar
             illness. In these disorders, a pathologic process seems to
             have caused cognitive functioning to fall substantially
             short of familial potential. In the second pattern, seen in
             the internalizing conditions of major depression and anxiety
             disorders, risk was associated with low SA but was unrelated
             to FCA. Externalizing disorders-drug abuse and alcohol use
             disorders-demonstrated the third pattern, in which risk was
             predicted jointly by low SA and low FCA. The fourth pattern,
             seen in eating disorders, was directly opposite of that
             observed in externalizing disorders with risk associated
             with high SA and high FCA. When measured together,
             adolescent cognitive ability and FCA identified four
             developmental patterns leading to diverse psychiatric
             disorders. The value of cognitive assessments in psychiatric
             research can be substantially increased by also evaluating
             familial cognitive potential.},
   Doi = {10.1038/mp.2017.78},
   Key = {fds327061}
}

@article{fds327210,
   Author = {Xavier, RM and Pan, W and Dungan, JR and Keefe, RSE and Vorderstrasse,
             A},
   Title = {Unraveling interrelationships among psychopathology
             symptoms, cognitive domains and insight dimensions in
             chronic schizophrenia.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Volume = {193},
   Pages = {83-90},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.07.002},
   Abstract = {INTRODUCTION:Insight in schizophrenia is long known to have
             a complex relationship with psychopathology symptoms and
             cognition. However, very few studies have examined models
             that explain these interrelationships. METHODS:In a large
             sample derived from the NIMH Clinical Antipsychotic Trials
             of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) schizophrenia trial
             (N=1391), we interrogated these interrelationships for
             potential causal pathways using structural equation
             modeling. Using the NIMH consensus model, latent variables
             were constructed for psychopathology symptom dimensions,
             including positive, negative, disorganized, excited and
             depressed from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale
             (PANSS) items. Neurocognitive variables were created from
             five predefined domains of working memory, verbal memory,
             reasoning, vigilance and processing speed. Illness insight
             and treatment insight were tested using latent variables
             constructed from the Illness and Treatment Attitude
             Questionnaire (ITAQ). RESULTS:Disorganized symptoms had the
             strongest effect on insight. Illness insight mediated the
             relationship of positive, depressed, and disorganized
             symptoms with treatment insight. Neurocognition mediated the
             relationship between disorganized and treatment insight and
             depressed symptoms and treatment insight. There was no
             effect of negative symptoms on either illness insight or
             treatment insight. Taken together, our results indicate
             overlapping and unique relational paths for illness and
             treatment insight dimensions, which could suggest
             differences in causal mechanisms and potential interventions
             to improve insight.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2017.07.002},
   Key = {fds327210}
}

@article{fds326634,
   Author = {Hochberger, WC and Combs, T and Reilly, JL and Bishop, JR and Keefe,
             RSE and Clementz, BA and Keshavan, MS and Pearlson, GD and Tamminga, CA and Hill, SK and Sweeney, JA},
   Title = {Deviation from expected cognitive ability across psychotic
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Research},
   Volume = {192},
   Pages = {300-307},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.05.019},
   Abstract = {Patients with schizophrenia show a deficit in cognitive
             ability compared to estimated premorbid and familial
             intellectual abilities. However, the degree to which this
             pattern holds across psychotic disorders and is familial is
             unclear. The present study examined deviation from expected
             cognitive level in schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder,
             and psychotic bipolar disorder probands and their
             first-degree relatives. Using a norm-based regression
             approach, parental education and WRAT-IV Reading scores
             (both significant predictors of cognitive level in the
             healthy control group) were used to predict global
             neuropsychological function as measured by the composite
             score from the Brief Assessment of Cognition in
             Schizophrenia (BACS) test in probands and relatives. When
             compared to healthy control group, psychotic probands showed
             a significant gap between observed and predicted BACS
             composite scores and a greater likelihood of robust
             cognitive decline. This effect was not seen in unaffected
             relatives. While BACS and WRAT-IV Reading scores were
             themselves highly familial, the decline in cognitive
             function from expectation had lower estimates of
             familiality. Thus, illness-related factors such as
             epigenetic, treatment, or pathophysiological factors may be
             important causes of illness related decline in cognitive
             abilities across psychotic disorders. This is consistent
             with the markedly greater level of cognitive impairment seen
             in affected individuals compared to their unaffected family
             members.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.schres.2017.05.019},
   Key = {fds326634}
}

@article{fds337740,
   Author = {Healey, KM and Penn, DL and Perkins, D and Woods, SW and Keefe, RSE and Addington, J},
   Title = {Latent Profile Analysis and Conversion to Psychosis:
             Characterizing Subgroups to Enhance Risk
             Prediction.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {286-296},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbx080},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Groups at clinical high risk (CHR) of developing
             psychosis are heterogeneous, composed of individuals with
             different clusters of symptoms. It is likely that there
             exist subgroups, each associated with different symptom
             constellations and probabilities of conversion.
             METHOD:Present study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to
             ascertain subgroups in a combined sample of CHR (n = 171)
             and help-seeking controls (HSCs; n = 100; PREDICT study).
             Indicators in the LPA model included baseline Scale of
             Prodromal Symptoms (SOPS), Calgary Depression Scale for
             Schizophrenia (CDSS), and neurocognitive performance as
             measured by multiple instruments, including category
             instances (CAT). Subgroups were further characterized using
             covariates measuring demographic and clinical features.
             RESULTS:Three classes emerged: class 1 (mild, transition
             rate 5.6%), lowest SOPS and depression scores, intact
             neurocognitive performance; class 2 (paranoid-affective,
             transition rate 14.2%), highest suspiciousness, mild
             negative symptoms, moderate depression; and class 3
             (negative-neurocognitive, transition rate 29.3%), highest
             negative symptoms, neurocognitive impairment, social
             cognitive impairment. Classes 2 and 3 evidenced poor social
             functioning. CONCLUSIONS:Results support a subgroup approach
             to research, assessment, and treatment of help-seeking
             individuals. Class 3 may be an early risk stage of
             developing schizophrenia.},
   Doi = {10.1093/schbul/sbx080},
   Key = {fds337740}
}

@article{fds339319,
   Author = {Atkins, AS and Khan, A and Ulshen, D and Vaughan, A and Balentin, D and Dickerson, H and Liharska, LE and Plassman, B and Welsh-Bohmer, K and Keefe, RSE},
   Title = {Assessment of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in
             Older Adults with Subjective Cognitive Decline Using the
             Virtual Reality Functional Capacity Assessment Tool
             (VRFCAT).},
   Journal = {The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer'S
             Disease},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {216-234},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jpad.2018.28},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Continuing advances in the understanding of
             Alzheimer's disease progression have inspired development of
             disease-modifying therapeutics intended for use in
             preclinical populations. However, identification of
             clinically meaningful cognitive and functional outcomes for
             individuals who are, by definition, asymptomatic remains a
             significant challenge. Clinical trials for prevention and
             early intervention require measures with increased
             sensitivity to subtle deficits in instrumental activities of
             daily living (IADL) that comprise the first functional
             declines in prodromal disease. Validation of potential
             endpoints is required to ensure measure sensitivity and
             reliability in the populations of interest. OBJECTIVES:The
             present research validates use of the Virtual Reality
             Functional Capacity Assessment Tool (VRFCAT) for
             performance-based assessment of IADL functioning in older
             adults (age 55+) with subjective cognitive decline.
             DESIGN:Cross-sectional validation study. SETTING:All
             participants were evaluated on-site at NeuroCog Trials,
             Durham, NC, USA. PARTICIPANTS:Participants included 245
             healthy younger adults ages 20-54 (131 female), 247 healthy
             older adults ages 55-91 (151 female) and 61 older adults
             with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) ages 56-97 (45
             female). MEASURES:Virtual Reality Functional Capacity
             Assessment Tool; Brief Assessment of Cognition App;
             Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Prevention Instrument
             Project - Mail-In Cognitive Function Screening Instrument;
             Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Instrumental
             Activities of Daily Living - Prevention Instrument,
             University of California, San Diego Performance-Based Skills
             Assessment - Validation of Intermediate Measures; Montreal
             Cognitive Assessment; Trail Making Test- Part B.
             RESULTS:Participants with SCD performed significantly worse
             than age-matched normative controls on all VRFCAT endpoints,
             including total completion time, errors and forced
             progressions (p≤0001 for all, after Bonferonni
             correction). Consistent with prior findings, both groups
             performed significantly worse than healthy younger adults
             (age 20-54). Participants with SCD also performed
             significantly worse than controls on objective cognitive
             measures. VRFCAT performance was strongly correlated with
             cognitive performance. In the SCD group, VRFCAT performance
             was strongly correlated with cognitive performance across
             nearly all tests with significant correlation coefficients
             ranging from 0.3 to 0.7; VRFCAT summary measures all had
             correlations greater than r=0.5 with MoCA performance and
             BAC App Verbal Memory (p<0.01 for all). CONCLUSIONS:Findings
             suggest the VRFCAT provides a sensitive tool for evaluation
             of IADL functioning in individuals with subjective cognitive
             decline. Strong correlations with cognition across groups
             suggest the VRFCAT may be uniquely suited for clinical
             trials in preclinical AD, as well as longitudinal
             investigations of the relationship between cognition and
             function.},
   Doi = {10.14283/jpad.2018.28},
   Key = {fds339319}
}

@article{fds337108,
   Author = {Romero, HR and Monsch, AU and Hayden, KM and Plassman, BL and Atkins,
             AS and Keefe, RSE and Brewster, S and Chiang, C and O'Neil, J and Runyan,
             G and Atkinson, MJ and Crawford, S and Budur, K and Burns, DK and Welsh-Bohmer, KA},
   Title = {TOMMORROW neuropsychological battery: German language
             validation and normative study.},
   Journal = {Alzheimer'S & Dementia (New York, N. Y.)},
   Volume = {4},
   Pages = {314-323},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trci.2018.06.009},
   Abstract = {Assessment of preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) requires
             reliable and validated methods to detect subtle cognitive
             changes. The battery of standardized cognitive assessments
             that is used for diagnostic criteria for mild cognitive
             impairment due to AD in the TOMMORROW study have only been
             fully validated in English-speaking countries. We conducted
             a validation and normative study of the German language
             version of the TOMMORROW neuropsychological test battery,
             which tests episodic memory, language, visuospatial ability,
             executive function, and attention.German-speaking
             cognitively healthy controls (NCs) and subjects with AD were
             recruited from a memory clinic at a Swiss medical center.
             Construct validity, test-retest, and alternate form
             reliability were assessed in NCs. Criterion and discriminant
             validities of the cognitive measures were tested using
             logistic regression and discriminant analysis.
             Cross-cultural equivalency of performance of the German
             language tests was compared with English language tests.A
             total of 198 NCs and 25 subjects with AD (aged
             65-88 years) were analyzed. All German language tests
             discriminated NCs from persons with AD. Episodic memory
             tests had the highest potential to discriminate with almost
             twice the predictive power of any other domain. Test-retest
             reliability of the test battery was adequate, and alternate
             form reliability for episodic memory tests was supported.
             For most tests, age was a significant predictor of group
             effect sizes; therefore, normative data were stratified by
             age. Validity and reliability results were similar to those
             in the published US cognitive testing literature.This study
             establishes the reliability and validity of the German
             language TOMMORROW test battery, which performed similarly
             to the English language tests. Some variations in test
             performance underscore the importance of regional normative
             values. The German language battery and normative data will
             improve the precision of measuring cognition and diagnosing
             incident mild cognitive impairment due to AD in clinical
             settings in German-speaking countries.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.trci.2018.06.009},
   Key = {fds337108}
}


%% Kollins, Scott H.   
@article{fds340526,
   Author = {Murphy, SK and Itchon-Ramos, N and Visco, Z and Huang, Z and Grenier, C and Schrott, R and Acharya, K and Boudreau, M-H and Price, TM and Raburn,
             DJ and Corcoran, DL and Lucas, JE and Mitchell, JT and McClernon, FJ and Cauley, M and Hall, BJ and Levin, ED and Kollins,
             SH},
   Title = {Cannabinoid exposure and altered DNA methylation in rat and
             human sperm.},
   Journal = {Epigenetics},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15592294.2018.1554521},
   Abstract = {Little is known about the reproductive effects of paternal
             cannabis exposure. We evaluated associations between
             cannabis or tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure and altered
             DNA methylation in sperm from humans and rats, respectively.
             DNA methylation, measured by reduced representation
             bisulfite sequencing, differed in the sperm of human users
             from non-users by at least 10% at 3,979 CpG sites. Pathway
             analyses indicated Hippo Signaling and Pathways in Cancer as
             enriched with altered genes (Bonferroni p<0.02). These same
             two pathways were also enriched with genes having altered
             methylation in sperm from THC-exposed versus vehicle-exposed
             rats (p<0.01). Data validity is supported by significant
             correlations between THC exposure levels in humans and
             methylation for 177 genes, and substantial overlap in THC
             target genes in rat sperm (this study) and genes previously
             reported as having altered methylation in the brain of rat
             offspring born to parents both exposed to THC during
             adolescence. In humans, cannabis use was also associated
             with significantly lower sperm concentration. Findings point
             to possible pre-conception paternal reproductive risks
             associated with cannabis use.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15592294.2018.1554521},
   Key = {fds340526}
}

@article{fds338018,
   Author = {Lunsford-Avery, JR and Kollins, SH},
   Title = {Editorial Perspective: Delayed circadian rhythm phase: a
             cause of late-onset attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
             among adolescents?},
   Journal = {Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1248-1251},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12956},
   Abstract = {Late-onset attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
             has been a topic of significant debate within our field. One
             question focuses on whether there may be alternative
             explanations for the onset of inattentive and/or hyperactive
             symptoms in adolescence. Adolescence is a developmental
             period associated with a normative circadian rhythm phase
             delay, and there is significant overlap in the behavioral
             and cognitive manifestations and genetic underpinnings of
             ADHD and circadian misalignment. Delayed circadian rhythm
             phase is also common among individuals with traditionally
             diagnosed ADHD, and exposure to bright light may be
             protective against ADHD, a process potentially mediated by
             improved circadian timing. In addition, daytime sleepiness
             is prevalent in late-onset ADHD. Despite these converging
             lines of evidence, circadian misalignment is yet to be
             considered in the context of late-onset ADHD - a glaring
             gap. It is imperative for future research in late-onset ADHD
             to consider a possible causal role of delayed circadian
             rhythm phase in adolescence. Clarification of this issue has
             significant implications for research, clinical care, and
             public health.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jcpp.12956},
   Key = {fds338018}
}

@article{fds340085,
   Author = {Lunsford-Avery, JR and Kollins, SH and Mittal,
             VA},
   Title = {Eveningness diurnal preference associated with poorer
             socioemotional cognition and social functioning among
             healthy adolescents and young adults.},
   Journal = {Chronobiology International},
   Pages = {1-6},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07420528.2018.1538156},
   Abstract = {Recently there has been growing interest in associations
             between sleep, emotion, and social functioning. Less is
             known about relationships between chronotype preference and
             socioemotional cognition and functioning, particularly among
             adolescents, who experience dramatic normative shifts in
             diurnal preference, affective functioning, and social
             competence. Fifty-five healthy adolescents and young adults
             completed a self-report chronotype preference measure, a
             computerized measure of socioemotional cognition, and a
             semi-structured clinical interview assessing interpersonal
             functioning. Greater eveningness preference was associated
             with poorer socioemotional cognition and social functioning
             in this age group. Future studies should assess these
             relationships across development and using objective
             measures of circadian timing.},
   Doi = {10.1080/07420528.2018.1538156},
   Key = {fds340085}
}

@article{fds337741,
   Author = {Kollins, SH},
   Title = {Moving Beyond Symptom Remission to Optimize Long-term
             Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity
             Disorder.},
   Journal = {Jama Pediatrics},
   Volume = {172},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {901-902},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.1642},
   Doi = {10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.1642},
   Key = {fds337741}
}

@article{fds338439,
   Author = {Lunsford-Avery, JR and Engelhard, MM and Navar, AM and Kollins,
             SH},
   Title = {Validation of the Sleep Regularity Index in Older Adults and
             Associations with Cardiometabolic Risk.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {14158},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-32402-5},
   Abstract = {Sleep disturbances, including insufficient sleep duration
             and circadian misalignment, confer risk for cardiometabolic
             disease. Less is known about the association between the
             regularity of sleep/wake schedules and cardiometabolic risk.
             This study evaluated the external validity of a new metric,
             the Sleep Regularity Index (SRI), among older adults
             (n = 1978; mean age 68.7 ± 9.2), as well as
             relationships between the SRI and cardiometabolic risk using
             data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).
             Results indicated that sleep irregularity was associated
             with delayed sleep timing, increased daytime sleep and
             sleepiness, and reduced light exposure, but was independent
             of sleep duration. Greater sleep irregularity was also
             correlated with 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease and
             greater obesity, hypertension, fasting glucose, hemoglobin
             A1C, and diabetes status. Finally, greater sleep
             irregularity was associated with increased perceived stress
             and depression, psychiatric factors integrally tied to
             cardiometabolic disease. These results suggest that the SRI
             is a useful measure of sleep regularity in older adults.
             Additionally, sleep irregularity may represent a target for
             early identification and prevention of cardiometabolic
             disease. Future studies may clarify the causal direction of
             these effects, mechanisms underlying links between sleep
             irregularity and cardiometabolic risk, and the utility of
             sleep interventions in reducing cardiometabolic
             risk.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-32402-5},
   Key = {fds338439}
}

@article{fds338440,
   Author = {Do, EK and Zucker, NL and Huang, ZY and Schechter, JC and Kollins, SH and Maguire, RL and Murphy, SK and Hoyo, C and Fuemmeler,
             BF},
   Title = {Associations between imprinted gene differentially
             methylated regions, appetitive traits and body mass index in
             children.},
   Journal = {Pediatric Obesity},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijpo.12454},
   Abstract = {Knowledge regarding genetic influences on eating behaviours
             is expanding; yet less is known regarding contributions of
             epigenetic variation to appetitive traits and body mass
             index (BMI) in children.The purpose of this study was to
             explore relationships between methylation at differentially
             methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes (insulin-like
             growth factor 2/H19 and Delta-like, Drosophila, homolog
             1/maternally expressed gene 3) using DNA extracted from
             umbilical cord blood leucocytes, two genetically influenced
             appetitive traits (food responsiveness and satiety
             responsiveness) and BMI.Data were obtained from participants
             (N = 317; mean age = 3.6 years; SD = 1.8 years) from
             the Newborn Epigenetic STudy. Conditional process models
             were implemented to investigate the associations between
             DMRs of imprinted genes and BMI, and test whether this
             association was mediated by appetitive traits and
             birthweight and moderated by sex.Appetitive traits and
             birthweight did not mediate the relationship between
             methylation at DMRs. Increased insulin-like growth factor 2
             DMR methylation was associated with higher satiety
             responsiveness. Higher satiety responsiveness was associated
             with lower BMI. Associations between methylation at DMRs,
             appetitive traits and BMI differed by sex.This is one of the
             first studies to demonstrate associations between epigenetic
             variation established prior to birth with appetitive traits
             and BMI in children, providing support for the need to
             uncover genetic and epigenetic mechanisms for appetitive
             traits predisposing some individuals to obesity.},
   Doi = {10.1111/ijpo.12454},
   Key = {fds338440}
}

@article{fds311591,
   Author = {Faraone, SV and Childress, A and Wigal, SB and Kollins, SH and McDonnell, MA and DeSousa, NJ and Sallee, FR},
   Title = {Reliability and Validity of the Daily Parent Rating of
             Evening and Morning Behavior Scale, Revised.},
   Journal = {Journal of Attention Disorders},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1066-1073},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {1087-0547},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1087054715619009},
   Abstract = {Children with ADHD frequently manifest behavioral
             difficulties in the morning prior to school. We sought to
             assess the reliability and validity of the Daily Parent
             Rating of Evening and Morning Behavior Scale, Revised
             (DPREMB-R) morning score as a measure of morning behaviors
             impaired by ADHD.We used data from a clinical trial of
             HLD200 treatment in pediatric participants with ADHD to
             address our objectives.The DPREMB-R morning score showed
             significant internal homogeneity, test-retest reliability (
             r = .52-.45), and good concurrent validity ( r =
             .50-.71).The DPREMB-R morning score could be a useful
             instrument for assessing treatment efficacy in the morning
             before school.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1087054715619009},
   Key = {fds311591}
}

@article{fds337110,
   Author = {Gao, L and Liu, X and Millstein, J and Siegmund, KD and Dubeau, L and Maguire, RL and Jim Zhang and J and Fuemmeler, BF and Kollins, SH and Hoyo,
             C and Murphy, SK and Breton, CV},
   Title = {Self-reported prenatal tobacco smoke exposure, AXL gene-body
             methylation, and childhood asthma phenotypes.},
   Journal = {Clinical Epigenetics},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {98},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13148-018-0532-x},
   Abstract = {Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, act as
             one potential mechanism underlying the detrimental effects
             associated with prenatal tobacco smoke (PTS) exposure.
             Methylation in a gene called AXL was previously reported to
             differ in response to PTS.We investigated the association
             between PTS and epigenetic changes in AXL and how this was
             related to childhood asthma phenotypes. We tested the
             association between PTS and DNA methylation at multiple CpG
             loci of AXL at birth using Pyrosequencing in two separate
             study populations, the Children's Health Study (CHS, n =
             799) and the Newborn Epigenetic Study (NEST, n = 592).
             Plasma cotinine concentration was used to validate findings
             with self-reported smoking status. The inter-relationships
             among AXL mRNA and miR-199a1 expression, PTS, and AXL
             methylation were examined. Lastly, we evaluated the joint
             effects of AXL methylation and PTS on the risk of asthma and
             related symptoms at age 10 years old.PTS was associated with
             higher methylation level in the AXL gene body in both CHS
             and NEST subjects. In the pooled analysis, exposed subjects
             had a 0.51% higher methylation level in this region compared
             to unexposed subjects (95% CI 0.29, 0.74; p < 0.0001).
             PTS was also associated with 21.2% lower expression of
             miR-199a1 (95% CI - 37.9, - 0.1; p = 0.05), a
             microRNA known to regulate AXL expression. Furthermore, the
             combination of higher AXL methylation and PTS exposure at
             birth increased the risk of recent episodes of bronchitic
             symptoms in childhood.PTS was associated with methylation
             level of AXL and the combination altered the risk of
             childhood bronchitic symptoms.},
   Doi = {10.1186/s13148-018-0532-x},
   Key = {fds337110}
}

@article{fds337111,
   Author = {Lunsford-Avery, JR and Kollins, SH and Mitchell,
             JT},
   Title = {Sluggish Cognitive Tempo in Adults Referred for an ADHD
             Evaluation: A Psychometric Analysis of Self- and Collateral
             Report.},
   Journal = {Journal of Attention Disorders},
   Pages = {1087054718787894},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1087054718787894},
   Abstract = {Sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptoms uniquely contribute
             to psychiatric and functional outcomes in child samples;
             however, the psychometric properties of SCT measures among
             adult outpatients are unknown.Adults ( n = 124) presenting
             for an ADHD evaluation provided self- and collateral report
             of SCT symptoms.The SCT scale had good internal consistency
             and yielded three factors across raters: Slow/Daydreamy,
             Sleepy/Sluggish, and Low Initiation/Persistence. SCT scores
             exhibited convergent validity with ADHD symptoms across
             raters. Individuals with ADHD received higher SCT ratings
             than those without ADHD via collateral report, a pattern
             that was similar when comorbidity was considered. SCT was
             associated with poorer functioning after accounting for ADHD
             symptoms with some differential effects based on reporting
             source.Findings support the internal consistency and
             validity of a three-factor SCT scale among adult
             outpatients. Differential results between self- and
             collateral report demonstrate the importance of multiple
             reporters of SCT in clinical settings.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1087054718787894},
   Key = {fds337111}
}

@misc{fds336084,
   Author = {Lunsford-Avery, JR and Kollins, SH and Krystal,
             AD},
   Title = {SLEEPING AT HOME: FEASIBILITY AND TOLERABILITY OF AMBULATORY
             POLYSOMNOGRAPHY FOR USE WITH ADOLESCENTS WITH
             ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER},
   Journal = {Sleep},
   Volume = {41},
   Pages = {A283-A284},
   Publisher = {OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {fds336084}
}

@article{fds330274,
   Author = {Sanchez, CE and Barry, C and Sabhlok, A and Russell, K and Majors, A and Kollins, SH and Fuemmeler, BF},
   Title = {Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and child neurodevelopmental
             outcomes: a meta-analysis.},
   Journal = {Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International
             Association for the Study of Obesity},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {464-484},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/obr.12643},
   Abstract = {This review examined evidence of the association between
             maternal pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity status and child
             neurodevelopmental outcomes. PubMed and PsycINFO databases
             were systematically searched for empirical studies published
             before April 2017 using keywords related to prenatal obesity
             and children's neurodevelopment. Of 1483 identified papers,
             41 were included in the systematic review, and 32 articles
             representing 36 cohorts were included in the meta-analysis.
             Findings indicated that compared with children of normal
             weight mothers, children whose mothers were overweight or
             obese prior to pregnancy were at increased risk for
             compromised neurodevelopmental outcomes (overweight:
             OR = 1.17, 95% CI [1.11, 1.24], I2  = 65.51; obese:
             OR = 1.51; 95% CI [1.35, 1.69], I2  = 79.63).
             Pre-pregnancy obesity increased the risk of attention
             deficit-hyperactivity disorder (OR = 1.62; 95% CI [1.23,
             2.14], I2  = 70.15), autism spectrum disorder
             (OR = 1.36; 95% CI [1.08, 1.70], I2  = 60.52),
             developmental delay (OR = 1.58; 95% CI [1.39, 1.79], I2
              = 75.77) and emotional/behavioural problems (OR = 1.42;
             95% CI [1.26, 1.59], I2  = 87.74). Given the current
             obesity prevalence among young adults and women of
             childbearing age, this association between maternal obesity
             during pregnancy and atypical child neurodevelopment
             represents a potentially high public health
             burden.},
   Doi = {10.1111/obr.12643},
   Key = {fds330274}
}

@article{fds336085,
   Author = {Dozmorov, MG and Bilbo, SD and Kollins, SH and Zucker, N and Do, EK and Schechter, JC and Zhang, JJ and Murphy, SK and Hoyo, C and Fuemmeler,
             BF},
   Title = {Associations between maternal cytokine levels during
             gestation and measures of child cognitive abilities and
             executive functioning.},
   Journal = {Brain, Behavior, and Immunity},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2018.03.029},
   Abstract = {Preclinical studies demonstrate that environmentally-induced
             alterations in inflammatory cytokines generated by the
             maternal and fetal immune system can significantly impact
             fetal brain development. Yet, the relationship between
             maternal cytokines during gestation and later cognitive
             ability and executive function remains understudied.
             Children (n = 246) were born of mothers enrolled in the
             Newborn Epigenetic Study - a prospective pre-birth cohort in
             the Southeastern US. We characterized seven cytokines
             [IL-1β, IL-4,IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-17A, tumor necrosis
             factor-α (TNFα), and interferon-γ (IFNγ)] and one
             chemokine (IL-8) from maternal plasma collected during
             pregnancy. We assessed children's cognitive abilities and
             executive functioning at a mean age of 4.5 (SD = 1.1)
             years. Children's DAS-II and NIH toolbox scores were
             regressed on cytokines and the chemokine, controlling for
             maternal age, race, education, body mass index, IQ, parity,
             smoking status, delivery type, gestational weeks, and child
             birth weight and sex. Higher IL-12p70 (βIL-12p70 = 4.26,
             p = 0.023) and IL-17A (βIL-17A = 3.70, p = 0.042)
             levels were related to higher DAS-II GCA score, whereas
             higher IL-1β (βIL-1B = -6.07, p = 0.003) was related
             to lower GCA score. Higher IL-12p70 was related to higher
             performance on NIH toolbox measures of executive functions
             related to inhibitory control and attention (βIL-12p70 =
             5.20, p = 0.046) and cognitive flexibility (βIL-12p70 =
             5.10, p = 0.047). Results suggest that dysregulation in
             gestational immune activity are associated with child
             cognitive ability and executive functioning.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bbi.2018.03.029},
   Key = {fds336085}
}

@article{fds336086,
   Author = {Mitchell, JT and Howard, AL and Belendiuk, KA and Kennedy, TM and Stehli, A and Swanson, JM and Hechtman, L and Arnold, LE and Hoza, B and Vitiello, B and Lu, B and Kollins, SH and Molina,
             BSG},
   Title = {Cigarette Smoking Progression among Young Adults Diagnosed
             with ADHD in Childhood: A 16-year Longitudinal Study of
             Children with and without ADHD.},
   Journal = {Nicotine & Tobacco Research : Official Journal of the
             Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/nty045},
   Abstract = {Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
             (ADHD) are at increased risk for smoking cigarettes, but
             there is little longitudinal research on the array of
             smoking characteristics known to be prognostic of long-term
             smoking outcomes into adulthood. These variables were
             studied into early adulthood in a multi-site sample
             diagnosed with ADHD combined-type at ages 7-9.9 and followed
             prospectively alongside an age- and sex-matched local
             normative comparison group (LNCG).Cigarette smoking
             quantity, quit attempts, dependence, and other
             characteristics were assessed in the longitudinal Multimodal
             Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (MTA) eight times to a
             mean age of 24.9 years: ADHD n=469; LNCG n=240.In adulthood,
             the ADHD group had higher rates of daily cigarette smoking,
             one or more quit attempts, shorter time to first cigarette
             of the day, and more severe withdrawal than the LNCG. The
             ADHD group did not appear to have better smoking cessation
             rates despite a higher proportion quitting at least once.
             Smoking quantity and nicotine dependence did not differ
             between groups. The ADHD group reported younger daily
             smoking onset and faster progression from smoking initiation
             to daily smoking across assessments. Finally, ADHD symptom
             severity in later adolescence and adulthood was associated
             with higher risk for daily smoking across assessments in the
             ADHD sample.This study shows that ADHD-related smoking risk
             begins at a young age, progresses rapidly, and becomes
             resistant to cessation attempts by adulthood. Prevention
             efforts should acknowledge the speed of uptake; treatments
             should target the higher relapse risk in this vulnerable
             population.},
   Doi = {10.1093/ntr/nty045},
   Key = {fds336086}
}

@article{fds329549,
   Author = {Lee, C-T and McClernon, FJ and Kollins, SH and Fuemmeler,
             BF},
   Title = {Childhood ADHD Symptoms and Future Illicit Drug Use: The
             Role of Adolescent Cigarette Use.},
   Journal = {Journal of Pediatric Psychology},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {162-171},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsx098},
   Abstract = {The aim of this study is to understand how early cigarette
             use might predict subsequent illicit drug use, especially
             among individuals with attention-deficit hyperactivity
             disorder (ADHD) symptoms during childhood.Data were drawn
             from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
             (Waves I-IV). The analysis sample involves participants who
             had not used illicit drugs at Wave I, with no missing
             responses for studied predictors (N = 7,332).Smoking
             status at Wave I (ever regular vs. never regular) and
             childhood ADHD symptoms predicted subsequent illicit drug
             use at Waves II to IV. No interaction effect of smoking
             status at Wave I and childhood ADHD symptoms was found.
             However, an indirect effect from childhood ADHD symptoms on
             illicit drug use was identified, through smoking status at
             Wave I. Similar results were observed for predicting illicit
             drug dependence.The findings support the notion that smoking
             status during early adolescence may mediate the association
             between childhood ADHD symptoms and risk of later adult drug
             use. Interventions to prevent smoking among adolescents may
             be particularly effective at decreasing subsequent drug use,
             especially among children with ADHD symptoms.},
   Doi = {10.1093/jpepsy/jsx098},
   Key = {fds329549}
}

@article{fds329548,
   Author = {Sweitzer, MM and Kollins, SH and Kozink, RV and Hallyburton, M and English, J and Addicott, MA and Oliver, JA and McClernon,
             FJ},
   Title = {ADHD, Smoking Withdrawal, and Inhibitory Control: Results of
             a Neuroimaging Study with Methylphenidate
             Challenge.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {851-858},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2017.248},
   Abstract = {Smoking withdrawal negatively impacts inhibitory control,
             and these effects are greater for smokers with preexisting
             attention problems, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity
             disorder (ADHD). The current study preliminarily evaluated
             changes in inhibitory control-related behavior and brain
             activation during smoking withdrawal among smokers with
             ADHD. Moreover, we investigated the role of catecholamine
             transmission in these changes by examining the effects of
             40 mg methylphenidate (MPH) administration. Adult daily
             smokers with (n=17) and without (n=20) ADHD completed fMRI
             scanning under each of three conditions: (a) smoking as
             usual+placebo; (b) 24 h smoking abstinence+placebo and (c)
             24 h smoking abstinence+MPH. Scan order was randomized and
             counterbalanced. Participants completed a modified Go/No-Go
             task to assess both sustained and transient inhibitory
             control. Voxelwise analysis of task-related BOLD signal
             revealed a significant group-by-abstinence interaction in
             occipital/parietal cortex during sustained inhibition, with
             greater abstinence-induced decreases in activation observed
             among ADHD smokers compared with non-ADHD smokers. Changes
             in behavioral performance during abstinence were associated
             with changes in activation in regions of occipital and
             parietal cortex and bilateral insula during sustained
             inhibition in both groups. MPH administration improved
             behavioral performance and increased sustained inhibitory
             control-related activation for both groups. During transient
             inhibition, MPH increased prefrontal activation for both
             groups and increased striatal activation only among ADHD
             smokers. These preliminary findings suggest that
             abstinence-induced changes in catecholamine transmission in
             visual attention areas (eg, occipital and superior parietal
             cortex) may be associated with inhibitory control deficits
             and contribute to smoking vulnerability among individuals
             with ADHD.},
   Doi = {10.1038/npp.2017.248},
   Key = {fds329548}
}

@article{fds332067,
   Author = {Davis, NO and Bower, J and Kollins, SH},
   Title = {Proof-of-concept study of an at-home, engaging, digital
             intervention for pediatric ADHD.},
   Journal = {Plos One},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {e0189749},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0189749},
   Abstract = {Pharmacological and behavioral therapies have limited impact
             on the distinct neurocognitive impairments associated with
             ADHD, and existing cognitive training programs have shown
             limited efficacy. This proof-of-concept study assessed
             treatment acceptability and explored outcomes for a novel
             digital treatment targeting cognitive processes implicated
             in ADHD.Participants included 40 children with ADHD and 40
             children without ADHD. Following psychiatric screening, ADHD
             ratings, and baseline neuropsychological measures,
             participants completed 28-days of at-home treatment.
             Neuropsychological assessment was repeated at end-of-study
             along with treatment satisfaction measures.Eighty-four
             percent of treatment sessions were completed and ratings
             showed strong intervention appeal. Significant improvements
             were observed on a computerized attention task for the ADHD
             group and a highly impaired ADHD High Severity subgroup.
             There was no change for the non-ADHD group. Spatial working
             memory also improved for the ADHD group and the ADHD High
             Severity subgroup.Findings provide preliminary support that
             this treatment may improve attention, working memory, and
             inhibition in children with ADHD. Future research requires
             larger-scale randomized controlled trials that also evaluate
             treatment impact on functional impairments.ClinicalTrials.gov
             NCT01943539.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0189749},
   Key = {fds332067}
}

@article{fds331559,
   Author = {Schechter, JC and Fuemmeler, BF and Hoyo, C and Murphy, SK and Zhang,
             JJ and Kollins, SH},
   Title = {Impact of Smoking Ban on Passive Smoke Exposure in Pregnant
             Non-Smokers in the Southeastern United States.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Environmental Research and Public
             Health},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010083},
   Abstract = {Prenatal passive smoke exposure raises risk for negative
             birth outcomes. Legislation regulating public smoking has
             been shown to impact exposure levels, though fewer studies
             involving pregnant women have been conducted within the U.S.
             where bans are inconsistent across regions. This study
             examined the effect of a ban enacted in the southeastern
             U.S. on pregnant women's cotinine levels. Additional
             analyses compared self-reported exposure to cotinine and
             identified characteristics associated with passive exposure.
             Pregnant women (N = 851) were recruited prospectively
             between 2005 and 2011 in North Carolina. Sociodemographic
             and health data were collected via surveys; maternal blood
             samples were assayed for cotinine. Among non-active smokers
             who provided self-report data regarding passive exposure (N
             = 503), 20% were inconsistent with corresponding cotinine.
             Among all non-smokers (N = 668), being unmarried, African
             American, and less educated were each associated with
             greater passive exposure. Controlling for covariates, mean
             cotinine was higher prior to the ban compared to after, F(1,
             640) = 24.65, p < 0.001. Results suggest that banning
             smoking in public spaces may reduce passive smoke exposure
             for non-smoking pregnant women. These data are some of the
             first to examine the impact of legislation on passive smoke
             exposure in pregnant women within the U.S. using a biomarker
             and can inform policy in regions lacking comprehensive
             smoke-free legislation.},
   Doi = {10.3390/ijerph15010083},
   Key = {fds331559}
}


%% LaBar, Kevin S   
@article{fds340130,
   Author = {Powers, JP and LaBar, KS},
   Title = {Regulating emotion through distancing: A taxonomy,
             neurocognitive model, and supporting meta-analysis.},
   Journal = {Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews},
   Volume = {96},
   Pages = {155-173},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.04.023},
   Abstract = {Distancing is a type of emotion regulation that involves
             simulating a new perspective to alter the psychological
             distance and emotional impact of a stimulus. The
             effectiveness and versatility of distancing relative to
             other types of emotion regulation make it a promising tool
             for clinical applications. However, the neurocognitive
             mechanisms of this tactic are unclear, and inconsistencies
             in terminology and methods across studies make it difficult
             to synthesize the literature. To promote more effective
             research, we propose a taxonomy of distancing within the
             broader context of emotion regulation strategies; review the
             effects of this tactic; and offer a preliminary
             neurocognitive model describing key cognitive processes and
             their neural bases. Our model emphasizes three
             components-self-projection, affective self-reflection, and
             cognitive control. Additionally, we present results from a
             supporting meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of
             distancing. These efforts are presented within the
             overarching goals of supporting effective applications of
             distancing in laboratory, clinical, and other real-world
             contexts, and advancing understanding of the relevant
             high-level cognitive functions in the brain.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.04.023},
   Key = {fds340130}
}

@article{fds338535,
   Author = {Chen, LW and Sun, D and Davis, SL and Haswell, CC and Dennis, EL and Swanson, CA and Whelan, CD and Gutman, B and Jahanshad, N and Iglesias,
             JE and Thompson, P and Mid-Atlantic MIRECC Workgroup, and Wagner,
             HR and Saemann, P and LaBar, KS and Morey, RA},
   Title = {Smaller hippocampal CA1 subfield volume in posttraumatic
             stress disorder.},
   Journal = {Depression and Anxiety},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1018-1029},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/da.22833},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Smaller hippocampal volume in patients with
             posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) represents the most
             consistently reported structural alteration in the brain.
             Subfields of the hippocampus play distinct roles in encoding
             and processing of memories, which are disrupted in PTSD. We
             examined PTSD-associated alterations in 12 hippocampal
             subfields in relation to global hippocampal shape, and
             clinical features. METHODS:Case-control cross-sectional
             studies of U.S. military veterans (n = 282) from the Iraq
             and Afghanistan era were grouped into PTSD (n = 142) and
             trauma-exposed controls (n = 140). Participants underwent
             clinical evaluation for PTSD and associated clinical
             parameters followed by MRI at 3 T. Segmentation with
             FreeSurfer v6.0 produced hippocampal subfield volumes for
             the left and right CA1, CA3, CA4, DG, fimbria, fissure,
             hippocampus-amygdala transition area, molecular layer,
             parasubiculum, presubiculum, subiculum, and tail, as well as
             hippocampal meshes. Covariates included age, gender, trauma
             exposure, alcohol use, depressive symptoms, antidepressant
             medication use, total hippocampal volume, and MRI scanner
             model. RESULTS:Significantly lower subfield volumes were
             associated with PTSD in left CA1 (P = 0.01; d = 0.21;
             uncorrected), CA3 (P = 0.04; d = 0.08; uncorrected), and
             right CA3 (P = 0.02; d = 0.07; uncorrected) only if
             ipsilateral whole hippocampal volume was included as a
             covariate. A trend level association of L-CA1 with PTSD (F4,
             221  = 3.32, P = 0.07) is present and the other subfield
             findings are nonsignificant if ipsilateral whole hippocampal
             volume is not included as a covariate. PTSD-associated
             differences in global hippocampal shape were nonsignificant.
             CONCLUSIONS:The present finding of smaller hippocampal CA1
             in PTSD is consistent with model systems in rodents that
             exhibit increased anxiety-like behavior from repeated
             exposure to acute stress. Behavioral correlations with
             hippocampal subfield volume differences in PTSD will
             elucidate their relevance to PTSD, particularly behaviors of
             associative fear learning, extinction training, and
             formation of false memories.},
   Doi = {10.1002/da.22833},
   Key = {fds338535}
}

@article{fds332658,
   Author = {Wing, EA and Iyengar, V and Hess, TM and LaBar, KS and Huettel, SA and Cabeza, R},
   Title = {Neural mechanisms underlying subsequent memory for personal
             beliefs:An fMRI study.},
   Journal = {Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {216-231},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13415-018-0563-y},
   Abstract = {Many fMRI studies have examined the neural mechanisms
             supporting emotional memory for stimuli that generate
             emotion rather automatically (e.g., a picture of a dangerous
             animal or of appetizing food). However, far fewer studies
             have examined how memory is influenced by emotion related to
             social and political issues (e.g., a proposal for large
             changes in taxation policy), which clearly vary across
             individuals. In order to investigate the neural substrates
             of affective and mnemonic processes associated with personal
             opinions, we employed an fMRI task wherein participants
             rated the intensity of agreement/disagreement to
             sociopolitical belief statements paired with neural face
             pictures. Following the rating phase, participants performed
             an associative recognition test in which they distinguished
             identical versus recombined face-statement pairs. The study
             yielded three main findings: behaviorally, the intensity of
             agreement ratings was linked to greater subjective emotional
             arousal as well as enhanced high-confidence subsequent
             memory. Neurally, statements that elicited strong (vs. weak)
             agreement or disagreement were associated with greater
             activation of the amygdala. Finally, a subsequent memory
             analysis showed that the behavioral memory advantage for
             statements generating stronger ratings was dependent on the
             medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Together, these results
             both underscore consistencies in neural systems supporting
             emotional arousal and suggest a modulation of
             arousal-related encoding mechanisms when emotion is
             contingent on referencing personal beliefs.},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13415-018-0563-y},
   Key = {fds332658}
}

@article{fds335693,
   Author = {Sun, D and Davis, SL and Haswell, CC and Swanson, CA and Mid-Atlantic
             MIRECC Workgroup, and LaBar, KS and Fairbank, JA and Morey,
             RA},
   Title = {Brain Structural Covariance Network Topology in Remitted
             Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Psychiatry},
   Volume = {9},
   Pages = {90},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00090},
   Abstract = {Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, chronic
             disorder with high psychiatric morbidity; however, a
             substantial portion of affected individuals experience
             remission after onset. Alterations in brain network topology
             derived from cortical thickness correlations are associated
             with PTSD, but the effects of remitted symptoms on network
             topology remain essentially unexplored. In this
             cross-sectional study, US military veterans (N = 317)
             were partitioned into three diagnostic groups, current PTSD
             (CURR-PTSD, N = 101), remitted PTSD with lifetime but no
             current PTSD (REMIT-PTSD, N = 35), and trauma-exposed
             controls (CONTROL, n = 181). Cortical thickness was
             assessed for 148 cortical regions (nodes) and suprathreshold
             interregional partial correlations across subjects
             constituted connections (edges) in each group. Four
             centrality measures were compared with characterize
             between-group differences. The REMIT-PTSD and CONTROL groups
             showed greater centrality in left frontal pole than the
             CURR-PTSD group. The REMIT-PTSD group showed greater
             centrality in right subcallosal gyrus than the other two
             groups. Both REMIT-PTSD and CURR-PTSD groups showed greater
             centrality in right superior frontal sulcus than CONTROL
             group. The centrality in right subcallosal gyrus, left
             frontal pole, and right superior frontal sulcus may play a
             role in remission, current symptoms, and PTSD history,
             respectively. The network centrality changes in critical
             brain regions and structural networks are associated with
             remitted PTSD, which typically coincides with enhanced
             functional behaviors, better emotion regulation, and
             improved cognitive processing. These brain regions and
             associated networks may be candidates for developing novel
             therapies for PTSD. Longitudinal work is needed to
             characterize vulnerability to chronic PTSD, and resilience
             to unremitting PTSD.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00090},
   Key = {fds335693}
}

@article{fds335694,
   Author = {Hall, SA and Brodar, KE and LaBar, KS and Berntsen, D and Rubin,
             DC},
   Title = {Neural responses to emotional involuntary memories in
             posttraumatic stress disorder: Differences in timing and
             activity.},
   Journal = {Neuroimage. Clinical},
   Volume = {19},
   Pages = {793-804},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2018.05.009},
   Abstract = {Background:Involuntary memories are a hallmark symptom of
             posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but studies of the
             neural basis of involuntary memory retrieval in
             posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are sparse. The study
             of the neural correlates of involuntary memories of
             stressful events in PTSD focuses on the voluntary retrieval
             of memories that are sometimes recalled as intrusive
             involuntary memories, not on involuntary retrieval while
             being scanned. Involuntary memory retrieval in controls has
             been shown to elicit activity in the parahippocampal gyrus,
             precuneus, inferior parietal cortex, and posterior midline
             regions. However, it is unknown whether involuntary memories
             are supported by the same mechanisms in PTSD. Because
             previous work has shown that both behavioral and neural
             responsivity is slowed in PTSD, we examined the
             spatiotemporal dynamics of the neural activity underlying
             negative and neutral involuntary memory retrieval.
             Methods:Twenty-one individuals with PTSD and 21 non-PTSD,
             trauma-exposed controls performed an involuntary memory
             task, while undergoing a functional magnetic resonance
             imaging scan. Environmental sounds served as cues for
             well-associated pictures of negative and neutral scenes. We
             used a finite impulse response model to analyze temporal
             differences between groups in neural responses.
             Results:Compared with controls, participants with PTSD
             reported more involuntary memories, which were more
             emotional and more vivid, but which activated a similar
             network of regions. However, compared to controls,
             individuals with PTSD showed delayed neural responsivity in
             this network and increased vmPFC/ACC activity for
             negative > neutral stimuli. Conclusions:The similarity
             between PTSD and controls in neural substrates underlying
             involuntary memories suggests that, unlike voluntary
             memories, involuntary memories elicit similar activity in
             regions critical for memory retrieval. Further, the delayed
             neural responsivity for involuntary memories in PTSD
             suggests that factors affecting cognition in PTSD, like
             increased fatigue, or avoidance behaviors could do so by
             delaying activity in regions necessary for cognitive
             processing. Finally, compared to neutral memories, negative
             involuntary memories elicit hyperactivity in the vmPFC,
             whereas the vmPFC is typically shown to be hypoactive in
             PTSD during voluntary memory retrieval. These patterns
             suggest that considering both the temporal dynamics of
             cognitive processes as well as involuntary cognitive
             processes would improve existing neurobiological models of
             PTSD.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.nicl.2018.05.009},
   Key = {fds335694}
}


%% Larrick, Richard P.   
@article{fds340527,
   Author = {Camilleri, AR and Larrick, RP and Hossain, S and Patino-Echeverri,
             D},
   Title = {Consumers underestimate the emissions associated with food
             but are aided by labels},
   Journal = {Nature Climate Change},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {53-58},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41558-018-0354-z},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41558-018-0354-z},
   Key = {fds340527}
}

@article{fds333267,
   Author = {Minson, JA and Mueller, JS and Larrick, RP},
   Title = {The Contingent Wisdom of Dyads: When Discussion Enhances vs.
             Undermines the Accuracy of Collaborative
             Judgments},
   Journal = {Management Science},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {4177-4192},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2017.2823},
   Doi = {10.1287/mnsc.2017.2823},
   Key = {fds333267}
}

@article{fds333265,
   Author = {Schaerer, M and Tost, LP and Huang, L and Gino, F and Larrick,
             R},
   Title = {Advice Giving: A Subtle Pathway to Power.},
   Journal = {Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {746-761},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167217746341},
   Abstract = {We propose that interpersonal behaviors can activate
             feelings of power, and we examine this idea in the context
             of advice giving. Specifically, we show (a) that advice
             giving is an interpersonal behavior that enhances
             individuals' sense of power and (b) that those who seek
             power are motivated to engage in advice giving. Four
             studies, including two experiments ( N = 290, N = 188), an
             organization-based field study ( N = 94), and a negotiation
             simulation ( N = 124), demonstrate that giving advice
             enhances the adviser's sense of power because it gives the
             adviser perceived influence over others' actions. Two of our
             studies further demonstrate that people with a high tendency
             to seek power are more likely to give advice than those with
             a low tendency. This research establishes advice giving as a
             subtle route to a sense of power, shows that the desire to
             feel powerful motivates advice giving, and highlights the
             dynamic interplay between power and advice.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0146167217746341},
   Key = {fds333265}
}

@article{fds333266,
   Author = {Ungemach, C and Camilleri, AR and Johnson, EJ and Larrick, RP and Weber,
             EU},
   Title = {Translated Attributes as Choice Architecture: Aligning
             Objectives and Choices Through Decision Signposts},
   Journal = {Management Science},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {2445-2459},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2016.2703},
   Doi = {10.1287/mnsc.2016.2703},
   Key = {fds333266}
}

@article{fds330876,
   Author = {Kay, MB and Proudfoot, D and Larrick, RP},
   Title = {There's no team in I: How observers perceive individual
             creativity in a team setting.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Applied Psychology},
   Volume = {103},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {432-442},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/apl0000270},
   Abstract = {Creativity is highly valued in organizations as an important
             source of innovation. As most creative projects require the
             efforts of groups of individuals working together, it is
             important to understand how creativity is perceived for team
             products, including how observers attribute creative ability
             to focal actors who worked as part of a creative team.
             Evidence from three experiments suggests that observers
             commit the fundamental attribution error-systematically
             discounting the contribution of the group when assessing the
             creative ability of a single group representative,
             particularly when the group itself is not visually salient.
             In a pilot study, we found that, in the context of the
             design team at Apple, a target group member visually
             depicted alone is perceived to have greater personal
             creative ability than when he is visually depicted with his
             team. In Study 1, using a sample of managers, we
             conceptually replicated this finding and further observed
             that, when shown alone, a target member of a group that
             produced a creative product is perceived to be as creative
             as an individual described as working alone on the same
             output. In Study 2, we replicated the findings of Study 1
             and also observed that a target group member depicted alone,
             rather than with his team, is also attributed less creative
             ability for uncreative group output. Findings are discussed
             in light of how overattribution of individual creative
             ability can harm organizations in the long run. (PsycINFO
             Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/apl0000270},
   Key = {fds330876}
}

@article{fds331495,
   Author = {Tong, J and Feiler, D and Larrick, R},
   Title = {A Behavioral Remedy for the Censorship Bias},
   Journal = {Production and Operations Management},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {624-643},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/poms.12823},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Production and Operations Management Society.
             Existing evidence suggests that managers exhibit a
             censorship bias: demand beliefs tend to be biased low when
             lost sales from stockouts are unobservable (censored demand)
             compared to when they are observable (uncensored demand). We
             develop a non-constraining, easily implementable behavioral
             debias technique to help mitigate this tendency in demand
             forecasting and inventory decision-making settings. The
             debiasing technique has individuals record estimates of
             demand outcomes (REDO): participants explicitly record a
             self-generated estimate of every demand realization,
             allowing them to record a different value than the number of
             sales in periods with stockouts. In doing so, they construct
             a more representative sample of demand realizations (that
             differs from the sales sample). In three laboratory
             experiments with MBA and undergraduate students, this remedy
             significantly reduces downward bias in demand beliefs under
             censorship and leads to higher inventory order
             decisions.},
   Doi = {10.1111/poms.12823},
   Key = {fds331495}
}

@article{fds336087,
   Author = {Morewedge, CK and Tang, S and Larrick, RP},
   Title = {Betting Your Favorite to Win: Costly Reluctance to Hedge
             Desired Outcomes},
   Journal = {Management Science},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {997-1014},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2016.2656},
   Doi = {10.1287/mnsc.2016.2656},
   Key = {fds336087}
}


%% Leary, Mark R.   
@article{fds339751,
   Author = {Martin, JL and Smart Richman and L and Leary, MR},
   Title = {A lasting sting: Examining the short-term and long-term
             effects of real-life group rejection},
   Journal = {Group Processes & Intergroup Relations},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1109-1124},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1368430217695443},
   Doi = {10.1177/1368430217695443},
   Key = {fds339751}
}

@article{fds339300,
   Author = {Stutts, LA and Leary, MR and Zeveney, AS and Hufnagle,
             AS},
   Title = {A longitudinal analysis of the relationship between
             self-compassion and the psychological effects of perceived
             stress},
   Journal = {Self and Identity},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {609-626},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15298868.2017.1422537},
   Abstract = {© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &
             Francis Group. Self-compassion is consistently associated
             with psychological well-being, but most research has
             examined their relationship at only a single point in time.
             This study employed a longitudinal design to investigate the
             relationship between baseline self-compassion, perceived
             stress, and psychological outcomes in college students
             (n = 462) when the outcomes were measured both
             concurrently with perceived stress and after a lag of six
             months. Self-compassion moderated the effects of perceived
             stress such that stress was less strongly related to
             depression, anxiety, and negative affect among participants
             who scored high rather than low in self-compassion.
             Self-compassion also moderated the effects of perceived
             stress on depression and anxiety prospectively after six
             months. Self-compassion predicted positive affect but
             moderated the effects of perceived stress on positive affect
             in only one analysis. This study suggests that high
             self-compassion provides emotional benefits over time,
             partly by weakening the link between stress and negative
             outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15298868.2017.1422537},
   Key = {fds339300}
}

@article{fds339301,
   Author = {Parrish, MH and Inagaki, TK and Muscatell, KA and Haltom, KEB and Leary,
             MR and Eisenberger, NI},
   Title = {Self-compassion and responses to negative social feedback:
             The role of fronto-amygdala circuit connectivity},
   Journal = {Self and Identity},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {723-738},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15298868.2018.1490344},
   Abstract = {© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &
             Francis Group. Self-compassion has been shown to have
             significant relationships with psychological health and
             well-being. Despite the increasing growth of research on the
             topic, no studies to date have investigated how
             self-compassion relates to neural responses to threats to
             the self. To investigate whether self-compassion relates to
             threat-regulatory mechanisms at the neural level of
             analysis, we conducted a functional MRI study in a sample of
             college-aged students. We hypothesized that self-compassion
             would relate to greater negative connectivity between the
             ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) and amygdala during a
             social feedback task. Interestingly, we found a negative
             correlation between self-compassion and VMPFC-amygdala
             functional connectivity as predicted; however, this seemed
             to be due to low levels of self-compassion relating to
             greater positive connectivity in this circuit (rather than
             high levels of self-compassion relating to more negative
             connectivity). We also found significant relationships with
             multiple subcomponents of self-compassion (Common Humanity,
             Self-Judgment). These results shed light on how
             self-compassion might affect neural responses to threat and
             informs our understanding of the basic psychological
             regulatory mechanisms linking a lack of self-compassion with
             poor mental health.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15298868.2018.1490344},
   Key = {fds339301}
}

@article{fds337063,
   Author = {Diebels, KJ and Leary, MR and Chon, D},
   Title = {Individual differences in selfishness as a major dimension
             of personality: A reinterpretation of the sixth personality
             factor.},
   Journal = {Review of General Psychology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {367-376},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/gpr0000155},
   Abstract = {© 2018 American Psychological Association. Research on the
             structure of personality has identified a sixth major trait
             that emerges in addition to the Big Five. This factor has
             been characterized in a number of ways-as integrity,
             morality, trustworthiness, honesty, values, and, most
             commonly, honesty-humility. Although each of these labels
             captures some of the attributes associated with the trait,
             none of them fully represents the range of associated
             characteristics. In this article, we provide a
             reinterpretation of the sixth factor as reflecting
             individual differences in selfishness and review research
             that supports this interpretation. Interpreting the sixth
             trait as dispositional selfishness parsimoniously represents
             the array of variables that are associated with the sixth
             factor and reflects the behaviors of people who score low
             versus high on the trait. This reinterpretation provides
             greater coherence to six-factor models of personality and
             suggests new directions for research on the sixth factor and
             on dispositional selfishness more generally.},
   Doi = {10.1037/gpr0000155},
   Key = {fds337063}
}

@article{fds338536,
   Author = {Jongman-Sereno, KP and Leary, MR},
   Title = {The enigma of being yourself: A critical examination of the
             concept of authenticity.},
   Journal = {Review of General Psychology},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/gpr0000157},
   Abstract = {© 2018 American Psychological Association. As the term is
             typically used, authenticity refers to the degree to which a
             particular behavior is congruent with a person's attitudes,
             beliefs, values, motives, and other dispositions. However,
             researchers disagree regarding the best way to conceptualize
             and measure authenticity, whether being authentic is always
             desirable, why people are motivated to be authentic, and the
             nature of the relationship between authenticity and
             psychological well-being. In this article, we examine
             existing views of authenticity, identify questionable
             assumptions about the concept of authenticity, and discuss
             issues regarding subjective feelings of inauthenticity, the
             implications of authenticity for psychological and social
             well-being, and the importance that people place on being
             authentic.},
   Doi = {10.1037/gpr0000157},
   Key = {fds338536}
}

@article{fds339302,
   Author = {Jongman-Sereno, KP and Leary, MR},
   Title = {Self-judgments of authenticity},
   Journal = {Self and Identity},
   Pages = {1-32},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15298868.2018.1526109},
   Abstract = {© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &
             Francis Group. People feel more authentic at certain times
             than at others, and people differ in how authentic they
             believe they are overall. Although self-judgments of
             authenticity and inauthenticity are important to people, we
             know little about factors that influence people’s
             inferences about or reactions to their authenticity. Three
             studies examined beliefs about authenticity and the criteria
             people use to assess whether their actions are congruent
             with who they really are. Authenticity beliefs fell into
             three categories that: (a) require strict behavioral and
             attitudinal congruence across time and situations, (b) allow
             behavioral and attitudinal flexibility across time and
             situations, and (c) view all behaviors as inevitably
             authentic. Study 1 showed that these three construals of
             authenticity correlated in meaningful ways with views about
             authenticity and behavioral variability. In Study 2,
             inducing the belief that all behavior is authentic led
             participants to feel more authentic. Study 3 challenged
             participants’ reasons for feeling inauthentic, which led
             them to feel more authentic and confirmed the use of these
             criteria to judge authenticity. Results showed that
             self-judgments of authenticity were affected by factors
             unrelated to self-congruence per se, such as the positivity
             of the behavior and the stringency of their construals of
             authenticity.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15298868.2018.1526109},
   Key = {fds339302}
}


%% Levin, Edward D.   
@article{fds337701,
   Author = {Oliveri, AN and Levin, ED},
   Title = {Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonism during development
             alters later behavior in zebrafish.},
   Journal = {Behavioural Brain Research},
   Volume = {356},
   Pages = {250-256},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2018.08.028},
   Abstract = {This study sought to examine the long-term behavioral
             impacts of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonism during
             development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish embryos of
             both the AB* and 5D strains were exposed via immersion to
             either the D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23,390 or the D2
             receptor antagonist haloperidol, at either 0.5 or 1.5-μM,
             from 5 h post-fertilization to 5 days post-fertilization.
             Aquarium water served as a control. Fish were then either
             tested as larvae on day 6 post-fertilization on a light/dark
             locomotor assay, or were grown to adulthood and tested on a
             behavioral battery that included assays for novel
             environment exploration, startle habituation, social
             affiliation, and predator escape (AB* strain only). Overall,
             developmental exposure to dopamine D1 and D2 receptor
             antagonists caused clear effects in larval locomotor
             behavior, driving hyperactivity in dark phases and
             hypoactivity in light phases. Additionally, control fish
             from the two strains were significantly different from each
             other (p < 0.05) with the AB* fish being more active
             than SD during the dark periods of the test. In the adult
             behavioral battery, developmental exposure to 1.5-μM of the
             D1 antagonist SCH-23390 significantly reduced activity
             (p < 0.05) in the predator escape assay. Despite the
             fact that embryonic exposure to D1 and D2 receptor
             antagonists caused clear behavioral alterations in larval
             activity there were much more subtle effects persisting into
             adulthood.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bbr.2018.08.028},
   Key = {fds337701}
}

@article{fds340154,
   Author = {Levin, ED and Rezvani, AH and Wells, C and Slade, S and Yenugonda, VM and Liu, Y and Brown, ML and Xiao, Y and Kellar, KJ},
   Title = {α4β2 Nicotinic receptor desensitizing compounds can
             decrease self-administration of cocaine and methamphetamine
             in rats.},
   Journal = {European Journal of Pharmacology},
   Volume = {845},
   Pages = {1-7},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2018.12.010},
   Abstract = {Sazetidine-A [6-(5(((S)-azetidine-2-yl)methoxy)pyridine-3-yl)hex-5-yn-1-ol]
             is a selective α4β2 nicotinic receptor desensitizing agent
             and partial agonist. Sazetidine-A has been shown in our
             previous studies to significantly reduce nicotine and
             alcohol self-administration in rats. The question arises
             whether sazetidine-A would reduce self-administration of
             other addictive drugs as well. Nicotinic receptors on the
             dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area play an
             important role in controlling the activity of these neurons
             and release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, which is
             critical mechanism for reinforcing value of drugs of abuse.
             Previously, we showed that the nonspecific nicotinic
             antagonist mecamylamine significantly reduces cocaine
             self-administration in rats. In this study, we acutely
             administered systemically sazetidine-A and two other
             selective α4β2 nicotinic receptor-desensitizing agents,
             VMY-2-95 and YL-2-203, to young adult female Sprague-Dawley
             rats and determined their effects on IV self-administration
             of cocaine and methamphetamine. Cocaine self-administration
             was significantly reduced by 0.3 mg/kg of sazetidine-A. In
             another set of rats, sazetidine-A (3 mg/kg) significantly
             reduced methamphetamine self-administration. VMY-2-95
             significantly reduced both cocaine and methamphetamine
             self-administration with threshold effective doses of 3 and
             0.3 mg/kg, respectively. In contrast, YL-2-203 did not
             significantly reduce cocaine self-administration at the same
             dose range and actually significantly increased cocaine
             self-administration at the 1 mg/kg dose. YL-2-203
             (3 mg/kg) did significantly decrease methamphetamine
             self-administration. Sazetidine-A and VMY-2-95 are promising
             candidates to develop as new treatments to help addicts
             successfully overcome a variety of addictions including
             tobacco, alcohol as well as the stimulant drugs cocaine and
             methamphetamine.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ejphar.2018.12.010},
   Key = {fds340154}
}

@article{fds336089,
   Author = {Pitt, JA and Trevisan, R and Massarsky, A and Kozal, JS and Levin, ED and Di Giulio and RT},
   Title = {Maternal transfer of nanoplastics to offspring in zebrafish
             (Danio rerio): A case study with nanopolystyrene.},
   Journal = {The Science of the Total Environment},
   Volume = {643},
   Pages = {324-334},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.06.186},
   Abstract = {Plastics are ubiquitous anthropogenic contaminants that are
             a growing concern in aquatic environments. The ecological
             implications of macroplastics pollution are well documented,
             but less is known about nanoplastics. The current study
             investigates the potential adverse effects of nanoplastics,
             which likely contribute to the ecological burden of plastic
             pollution. To this end, we examined whether a dietary
             exposure of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) to polystyrene
             nanoparticles (PS NPs) could lead to the transfer of
             nanoplastics to the offspring, and whether nanoplastics
             exposure affects zebrafish physiology. Specifically, adult
             female and male zebrafish (F0 generation) were exposed to PS
             NPs via diet for one week and bred to produce the F1
             generation. Four F1 groups were generated: control
             (unexposed females and males), maternal (exposed females),
             paternal (exposed males), and co-parental (exposed males and
             females). Co-parental PS NP exposure did not significantly
             affect reproductive success. Assessment of tissues from F0
             fish revealed that exposure to PS NPs significantly reduced
             glutathione reductase activity in brain, muscle, and testes,
             but did not affect mitochondrial function parameters in
             heart or gonads. Assessment of F1 embryos and larvae
             revealed that PS NPs were present in the yolk sac,
             gastrointestinal tract, liver, and pancreas of the
             maternally and co-parentally exposed F1 embryos/larvae.
             Bradycardia was also observed in embryos from maternal and
             co-parental exposure groups. In addition, the activity of
             glutathione reductase and the levels of thiols were reduced
             in F1 embryos/larvae from maternal and/or co-parental
             exposure groups. Mitochondrial function and locomotor
             activity were not affected in F1 larvae. This study
             demonstrates that (i) PS NPs are transferred from mothers to
             offspring, and (ii) exposure to PS NPs modifies the
             antioxidant system in adult tissues and F1 larvae. We
             conclude that PS NPs could bioaccumulate and be passed on to
             the offspring, but this does not lead to major physiological
             disturbances.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.06.186},
   Key = {fds336089}
}

@article{fds339670,
   Author = {DiPalma, D and Rezvani, AH and Willette, B and Wells, C and Slade, S and Hall, BJ and Levin, ED},
   Title = {Persistent attenuation of nicotine self-administration in
             rats by co-administration of chronic nicotine infusion with
             the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390 or the
             serotonin 5-HT2C agonist lorcaserin.},
   Journal = {Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior},
   Volume = {176},
   Pages = {16-22},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2018.11.002},
   Abstract = {Tobacco addiction each year causes millions of deaths
             worldwide. Brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been
             shown to be central to tobacco addiction. Nicotine
             replacement therapy aids tobacco cessation, but the success
             rate is still far too low. This may in part be due to the
             fact that neurons with nicotinic receptors are not the only
             neural systems involved in tobacco addiction. Interacting
             neural systems also play important roles in tobacco
             addiction. Nicotine increases the release of a variety of
             neurotransmitters, including dopamine and serotonin.
             Dopamine, in particular dopamine D1 receptors, has been
             shown to be involved in the reinforcing action of nicotine.
             Serotonin through its actions on 5-HT2C receptors has been
             shown to play a key role in modulating the reinforcement of
             addictive drugs, including nicotine and alcohol. Combination
             of treatments could provide greater treatment efficacy.
             These studies were conducted to evaluate combination
             therapies utilizing nicotine replacement therapy in
             conjunction with either a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist
             SCH-23390 or a serotonin 5-HT2C receptor agonist,
             lorcaserin. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given access to
             self-administer nicotine via IV infusions. Osmotic pumps
             were implanted to reproduce the kinetic of chronic nicotine
             patch therapy. SCH-23390 (0.02 mg/kg) or lorcaserin
             (0.6 mg/kg) were administered prior to nicotine
             self-administration sessions. Reproducing earlier findings
             SCH-23390, lorcaserin and nicotine replacement therapy were
             effective at reducing IV nicotine self-administration. 5HT2C
             agonist treatment had additive effects with chronic nicotine
             infusion for significantly lowering nicotine
             self-administration. This study demonstrates the feasibility
             of combination of chronic nicotine with therapies targeting
             non-nicotinic receptors as treatment options for tobacco
             addiction.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.pbb.2018.11.002},
   Key = {fds339670}
}

@article{fds336088,
   Author = {Cauley, M and Hall, BJ and Abreu-Villaça, Y and Junaid, S and White, H and Kiany, A and Slotkin, TA and Levin, ED},
   Title = {Critical developmental periods for effects of low-level
             tobacco smoke exposure on behavioral performance.},
   Journal = {Neurotoxicology},
   Volume = {68},
   Pages = {81-87},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2018.07.012},
   Abstract = {Tobacco exposure during development leads to neurobehavioral
             dysfunction in children, even when exposure is limited to
             secondhand smoke. We have previously shown in rats that
             developmental exposure to tobacco smoke extract (TSE), at
             levels mimicking secondhand smoke, starting preconception
             and extending throughout gestation, evoked subsequent
             locomotor hyperactivity and cognitive impairment. These
             effects were greater than those caused by equivalent
             exposures to nicotine alone, implying that other agents in
             tobacco smoke contributed to the adverse behavioral effects.
             In the present study, we examined the critical developmental
             windows of vulnerability for these effects, restricting TSE
             administration (0.2 mg/kg/day nicotine equivalent, or DMSO
             vehicle, delivered by subcutaneously-implanted pumps) to
             three distinct 10 day periods: the 10 days preceding mating,
             the first 10 days of gestation (early gestation), or the
             second 10 days of gestation (late gestation). The principal
             behavioral effects revealed a critical developmental window
             of vulnerability, as well as sex selectivity. Late
             gestational TSE exposure significantly increased errors in
             the initial training on the radial-arm maze in female
             offspring, whereas no effects were seen in males exposed
             during late gestation, or with either sex in the other
             exposure windows. In attentional testing with the visual
             signal detection test, male offspring exposed to TSE during
             early or late gestation showed hypervigilance during
             low-motivating conditions. These results demonstrate that
             gestational TSE exposure causes persistent behavioral
             effects that are dependent on the developmental window in
             which exposure occurs. The fact that effects were seen at
             TSE levels modeling secondhand smoke, emphasizes the need
             for decreasing involuntary tobacco smoke exposure,
             particularly during pregnancy.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuro.2018.07.012},
   Key = {fds336088}
}

@article{fds329144,
   Author = {Glazer, L and Wells, CN and Drastal, M and Odamah, K-A and Galat, RE and Behl, M and Levin, ED},
   Title = {Developmental exposure to low concentrations of two
             brominated flame retardants, BDE-47 and BDE-99, causes
             life-long behavioral alterations in zebrafish.},
   Journal = {Neurotoxicology},
   Volume = {66},
   Pages = {221-232},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2017.09.007},
   Abstract = {Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were widely used as
             flame retardants until the early 2000s, mainly in home
             furnishings and electronics. The persistence of PBDEs in the
             environment leads to continued ubiquitous exposure to low
             levels, with infants and children experiencing higher
             exposures than adults. Accumulating evidence suggest that
             low-level exposures during early life stages can affect
             brain development and lead to long-term behavioral
             impairments. We investigated the effects of zebrafish
             exposure to low doses of the two prominent PBDEs;
             2,2',4,4',5,-Pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99) and
             2,2',4,4',-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), during
             embryo-development on short- and long-term behavioral
             endpoints. We included the organophosphate pesticide
             chlorpyrifos (CPF) due to its well documented neurotoxicity
             across species from zebrafish to humans.Zebrafish embryos
             were exposed to the following individual treatments; 0.1%
             DMSO (vehicle control); 0.3μM CPF; 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3μM
             BDE-47; 0.003, 0.03, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 20μM BDE-99 from 5
             until 120h post fertilization (hpf). Low exposure levels
             were determined as those not causing immediate overt
             toxicity, and behavior assays were conducted in the
             low-level range. At 144 hpf the larvae were tested for
             locomotor activity. At approximately 6 months of age adult
             zebrafish were tested in a behavioral battery including
             assays for anxiety-related behavior, sensorimotor response
             and habituation, social interaction, and predator
             avoidance.In the short-term, larval locomotor activity was
             reduced in larvae treated with 0.3μM CPF and 0.1μM BDE-47.
             BDE-99 treatment caused non-monotonic dose effects, with
             0.3μM causing hyperactivity and 1μM or higher causing
             hypoactivity. In the long-term, adult anxiety-related
             behavior was reduced in all treatments as measured in both
             the novel tank dive test and tap test.We show that exposure
             of zebrafish embryos to low concentrations of the brominated
             flame retardants BDE-47 and BDE-99, and the organophosphate
             pesticide CPF, caused both short- and long-term behavioral
             impairments. Interestingly, we also found that at very low
             exposure concentrations, where there were no visible effects
             on larval activity, adult behavior was still strongly
             affected.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuro.2017.09.007},
   Key = {fds329144}
}

@article{fds333553,
   Author = {Oliveri, AN and Ortiz, E and Levin, ED},
   Title = {Developmental exposure to an organophosphate flame retardant
             alters later behavioral responses to dopamine antagonism in
             zebrafish larvae.},
   Journal = {Neurotoxicology and Teratology},
   Volume = {67},
   Pages = {25-30},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ntt.2018.03.002},
   Abstract = {Human exposure to organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs)
             is widespread, including pregnant women and young children
             with whom developmental neurotoxic risk is a concern. Given
             similarities of OPFRs to organophosphate (OP) pesticides,
             research into the possible neurotoxic impacts of
             developmental OPFR exposure has been growing. Building upon
             research implicating exposure to OP pesticides in
             dopaminergic (DA) dysfunction, we exposed developing
             zebrafish to the OPFR tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate
             (TDCIPP), during the first 5 days following fertilization.
             On day 6, larvae were challenged with acute administration
             of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists and then tested
             in a light-dark locomotor assay. We found that both
             developmental TDCIPP exposure and acute dopamine D1 and D2
             antagonism decreased locomotor activity separately. The OPFR
             and DA effects were not additive; rather, TDCIPP blunted
             further D1 and D2 antagonist-induced decreases in activity.
             Our results suggest that TDCIPP exposure may be disrupting
             dopamine signaling. These findings support further research
             on the effects of OPFR exposure on the normal
             neurodevelopment of DA systems, whether these results might
             persist into adulthood, and whether they interact with OPFR
             effects on other neurotransmitter systems in producing the
             developmental neurobehavioral toxicity.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ntt.2018.03.002},
   Key = {fds333553}
}

@article{fds332218,
   Author = {Levin, ED and Wells, C and Slade, S and Rezvani, AH},
   Title = {Mutually augmenting interactions of dextromethorphan and
             sazetidine-A for reducing nicotine self-administration in
             rats.},
   Journal = {Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior},
   Volume = {166},
   Pages = {42-47},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2018.01.005},
   Abstract = {A variety of nicotinic drug treatments have been found to
             decrease nicotine self-administration. However, interactions
             of drugs affecting different nicotinic receptor subtypes
             have not been much investigated. This study investigated the
             interactions between dextromethorphan, which blocks
             nicotinic α3β2 receptors as well as a variety of other
             receptors with sazetidine-A which is a potent and selective
             α4β2 nicotinic receptor partial agonist with desensitizing
             properties. This interaction was compared with
             dextromethorphan combination treatment with mecamylamine,
             which is a nonspecific nicotinic channel blocker.
             Co-administration of dextromethorphan (either 0.5 or
             5 mg/kg) and lower dose of sazetidine-A (0.3 mg/kg)
             caused a significant reduction in nicotine SA. With regard
             to food-motivated responding, 3 mg/kg of sazetidine-A
             given alone caused a significant decrease in food intake.
             However, the lower 0.3 mg/kg sazetidine-A dose did not
             significantly affect food-motivated responding even when
             given in combination with the higher 5 mg/kg
             dextromethorphan dose which itself caused a significant
             decrease in food motivated responding. Interestingly, this
             higher dextromethorphan dose significantly attenuated the
             decrease in food motivated responding caused by 3 mg/kg of
             sazetidine-A. Locomotor activity was increased by the lower
             0.3 mg/kg sazetidine-A dose and decreased by the 5 mg/kg
             dextromethorphan dose. Mecamylamine at the doses (0.1 and
             1 mg/kg) did not affect nicotine SA, but at 1 mg/kg
             significantly decreased food-motivated responding. None of
             the mecamylamine doses augmented the effect of
             dextromethorphan in reducing nicotine self-administration.
             These studies showed that the combination of
             dextromethorphan and sazetidine-A had mutually potentiating
             effects, which could provide a better efficacy for promoting
             smoking cessation, however the strength of the interactions
             was fairly modest.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.pbb.2018.01.005},
   Key = {fds332218}
}

@article{fds332068,
   Author = {Rezvani, AH and Tizabi, Y and Slade, S and Getachew, B and Levin,
             ED},
   Title = {Sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine attenuate nicotine
             self-administration in rats.},
   Journal = {Neuroscience Letters},
   Volume = {668},
   Pages = {98-102},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2018.01.022},
   Abstract = {Smoking cessation strategies are of prime medical
             importance. Despite availability of various pharmacological
             agents in combating addiction to nicotine, more effective
             medications are needed. Based on recent findings, the
             glutamatergic system in the brain may provide novel targets.
             Here, we evaluated the effects of acute administration of
             sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine, an NMDA receptor
             antagonist, in both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats
             trained to self-administer nicotine. Animals were injected
             subcutaneously with 5, 7.5 and 10 mg/kg ketamine or saline
             and the effects on the number of intravenous nicotine
             infusions during a 45 min session was measured. Ketamine
             treatment significantly reduced nicotine self-administration
             in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, a differential
             sensitivity between the sexes was observed as male rats
             responded to a lower dose of ketamine and with higher
             magnitude of effect than female rats. It is concluded that
             glutamatergic receptor manipulations may offer a novel and
             potentially sex-dependent intervention in nicotine
             addiction.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neulet.2018.01.022},
   Key = {fds332068}
}

@article{fds333002,
   Author = {Massarsky, A and Abdel, A and Glazer, L and Levin, ED and Di Giulio,
             RT},
   Title = {Neurobehavioral effects of 1,2-propanediol in zebrafish
             (Danio rerio).},
   Journal = {Neurotoxicology},
   Volume = {65},
   Pages = {111-124},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2018.02.007},
   Abstract = {The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is
             increasing despite insufficient information concerning their
             long-term effects, including the effects of maternal
             e-cigarette use on pre- and postnatal development. Our
             previous study demonstrated that developmental exposure to
             1,2-propanediol (a principal component of e-cigarette
             liquid) affected early development of zebrafish, causing
             reduced growth, deformities, and hyperactive swimming
             behavior in larvae. The current study extends assessment of
             the developmental toxicity of 1,2-propanediol by examining
             additional long-term behavioral effects. We demonstrate that
             embryonic/larval exposure of zebrafish to 1,2-propanediol
             (0.625% or 1.25%) not only affected behavioral parameters in
             the larvae, but also caused persisting behavioral effects in
             adults after early developmental exposure. Additional
             parameters, including neural and vascular development in
             larvae, stress response in adults, and concentration of
             neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin in adult brain were
             examined, in order to explain the behavioral differences.
             These additional assessments did not find 1,2-propanediol
             exposure to significantly affect Tg(Neurog1:GFP) or the
             transcript abundance of neural genes (Neurog1, Ascl1a,
             Elavl3, and Lef1). Vascular development was not found to be
             affected by 1,2-propanediol exposure, as inferred from
             experiments with Tg(Flk1:eGFP) zebrafish; however,
             transcript abundance of vascular genes (Flk1, Vegf, Tie-2,
             and Angpt1) was decreased. No statistically significant
             changes were noted for plasma cortisol or brain
             neurotransmitters in adult fish. Lastly, analysis of gene
             transcripts involved with 1,2-propanediol metabolism (Adh5,
             Aldh2.1, and Ldha) showed an increase in Adh5 transcript.
             This is the first study to demonstrate that developmental
             exposure to 1,2-propanediol has long-term neurobehavioral
             consequences in adult zebrafish, showing that e-cigarettes
             contain substances potentially harmful to
             neurodevelopment.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuro.2018.02.007},
   Key = {fds333002}
}

@article{fds332917,
   Author = {Pitt, JA and Kozal, JS and Jayasundara, N and Massarsky, A and Trevisan,
             R and Geitner, N and Wiesner, M and Levin, ED and Di Giulio,
             RT},
   Title = {Uptake, tissue distribution, and toxicity of polystyrene
             nanoparticles in developing zebrafish (Danio
             rerio).},
   Journal = {Aquatic Toxicology (Amsterdam, Netherlands)},
   Volume = {194},
   Pages = {185-194},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquatox.2017.11.017},
   Abstract = {Plastic pollution is a critical environmental concern and
             comprises the majority of anthropogenic debris in the ocean,
             including macro, micro, and likely nanoscale (less than
             100nm in at least one dimension) plastic particles. While
             the toxicity of macroplastics and microplastics is
             relatively well studied, the toxicity of nanoplastics is
             largely uncharacterized. Here, fluorescent polystyrene
             nanoparticles (PS NPs) were used to investigate the
             potential toxicity of nanoplastics in developing zebrafish
             (Danio rerio), as well as to characterize the uptake and
             distribution of the particles within embryos and larvae.
             Zebrafish embryos at 6h post-fertilization (hpf) were
             exposed to PS NPs (0.1, 1, or 10ppm) until 120 hpf. Our
             results demonstrate that PS NPs accumulated in the yolk sac
             as early as 24 hpf and migrated to the gastrointestinal
             tract, gallbladder, liver, pancreas, heart, and brain
             throughout development (48-120 hpf). Accumulation of PS NPs
             decreased during the depuration phase (120-168 hpf) in all
             organs, but at a slower rate in the pancreas and
             gastrointestinal tract. Notably, exposure to PS NPs did not
             induce significant mortality, deformities, or changes to
             mitochondrial bioenergetics, but did decrease the heart
             rate. Lastly, exposure to PS NPs altered larval behavior as
             evidenced by swimming hypoactivity in exposed larvae. Taken
             together, these data suggest that at least some nanoplastics
             can penetrate the chorion of developing zebrafish,
             accumulate in the tissues, and affect physiology and
             behavior, potentially affecting organismal fitness in
             contaminated aquatic ecosystems.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.aquatox.2017.11.017},
   Key = {fds332917}
}


%% Lisanby, Sarah H.   
@article{fds339671,
   Author = {Sathappan, AV and Luber, BM and Lisanby, SH},
   Title = {The Dynamic Duo: Combining noninvasive brain stimulation
             with cognitive interventions.},
   Journal = {Progress in Neuro Psychopharmacology & Biological
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {89},
   Pages = {347-360},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pnpbp.2018.10.006},
   Abstract = {Pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and non-invasive brain
             stimulation (NIBS)1 each show efficacy in the treatment of
             psychiatric disorders; however, more efficacious
             interventions are needed as reflected by an overall unmet
             need in mental health care. While each modality has
             typically been studied and developed as a monotherapy, in
             practice they are typically used in combination. Research
             has begun to emerge studying the potential synergistic
             actions of multi-modal, combination therapies. For example,
             NIBS combined with rehabilitation strategies have
             demonstrated some success for speech and motor
             rehabilitation in stroke patients. In this review we present
             evidence suggesting that combining NIBS with targeted,
             cognitive interventions offers a potentially powerful new
             approach to treating neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we
             focus on NIBS studies using transcranial direct current
             stimulation (tDCS)2 and transcranial magnetic stimulation
             (TMS)3 given that these modalities are relatively safe,
             noninvasive, and can be performed simultaneously with
             neurocognitive interventions. We review the concept of
             "state dependent" effects of NIBS and highlight how
             simultaneous or sequential cognitive interventions could
             help optimize NIBS therapy by providing further control of
             ongoing neural activity in targeted neural networks. This
             review spans a range of neuropsychiatric disorders including
             major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, generalized
             anxiety, and autism. For each disorder, we emphasize
             neuroanatomical circuitry that could be engaged with
             combination therapy and critically discuss the literature
             that has begun to emerge. Finally, we present possible
             underlying mechanisms and propose future research strategies
             that may further refine the potential of combination
             therapies.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.pnpbp.2018.10.006},
   Key = {fds339671}
}

@article{fds340502,
   Author = {Davis, SW and Crowell, CA and Beynel, L and Deng, L and Lakhlani, D and Hilbig, SA and Lim, W and Nguyen, D and Peterchev, AV and Luber, BM and Lisanby, SH and Appelbaum, LG and Cabeza, R},
   Title = {Complementary topology of maintenance and manipulation brain
             networks in working memory.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {17827},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-35887-2},
   Abstract = {Working memory (WM) is assumed to consist of a process that
             sustains memory representations in an active state
             (maintenance) and a process that operates on these activated
             representations (manipulation). We examined evidence for two
             distinct, concurrent cognitive functions supporting
             maintenance and manipulation abilities by testing brain
             activity as participants performed a WM alphabetization
             task. Maintenance was investigated by varying the number of
             letters held in WM and manipulation by varying the number of
             moves required to sort the list alphabetically. We found
             that both maintenance and manipulation demand had
             significant effects on behavior that were associated with
             different cortical regions: maintenance was associated with
             bilateral prefrontal and left parietal cortex, and
             manipulation with right parietal activity, a link that is
             consistent with the role of parietal cortex in symbolic
             computations. Both structural and functional architecture of
             these systems suggested that these cognitive functions are
             supported by two dissociable brain networks. Critically,
             maintenance and manipulation functional networks became
             increasingly segregated with increasing demand, an effect
             that was positively associated with individual WM ability.
             These results provide evidence that network segregation may
             act as a protective mechanism to enable successful
             performance under increasing WM demand.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-35887-2},
   Key = {fds340502}
}

@article{fds339774,
   Author = {Neacsiu, AD and Luber, BM and Davis, SW and Bernhardt, E and Strauman,
             TJ and Lisanby, SH},
   Title = {On the Concurrent Use of Self-System Therapy and Functional
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Transcranial Magnetic
             Stimulation as Treatment for Depression.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Ect},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {266-273},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/yct.0000000000000545},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVES:Despite the growing use of repetitive
             transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as a treatment for
             unipolar depression, its typical effect sizes have been
             modest, and methodological and conceptual challenges remain
             regarding how to optimize its efficacy. Linking rTMS to a
             model of the neurocircuitry underlying depression and
             applying such a model to personalize the site of stimulation
             may improve the efficacy of rTMS. Recent developments in the
             psychology and neurobiology of self-regulation offer a
             conceptual framework for identifying mechanisms of action in
             rTMS for depression, as well as for developing guidelines
             for individualized rTMS treatment. We applied this framework
             to develop a multimodal treatment for depression by pairing
             self-system therapy (SST) with simultaneously administered
             rTMS delivered to an individually targeted region of
             dorsolateral prefrontal cortex identified via functional
             magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). METHODS:In this
             proof-of-concept study, we examined the acceptability,
             feasibility, and preliminary efficacy of combining
             individually fMRI-targeted rTMS with SST. Using the format
             of a cognitive paired associative stimulation paradigm, the
             treatment was administered to 5 adults with unipolar
             depression in an open-label trial. RESULTS:The rTMS/SST
             combination was well tolerated, feasible, and acceptable.
             Preliminary evidence of efficacy also was promising. We
             hypothesized that both treatment modalities were targeting
             the same neural circuitry through cognitive paired
             associative stimulation, and observed changes in task-based
             fMRI were consistent with our model. These neural changes
             were directly related to improvements in depression
             severity. CONCLUSIONS:The new combination treatment
             represents a promising exemplar for theory-based,
             individually targeted, multimodal intervention in mood
             disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1097/yct.0000000000000545},
   Key = {fds339774}
}

@article{fds340788,
   Author = {Krystal, AD and Pizzagalli, DA and Mathew, SJ and Sanacora, G and Keefe,
             R and Song, A and Calabrese, J and Goddard, A and Goodman, W and Lisanby,
             SH and Smoski, M and Weiner, R and Iosifescu, D and Nurnberger, J and Szabo, S and Murrough, J and Shekhar, A and Potter,
             W},
   Title = {The first implementation of the NIMH FAST-FAIL approach to
             psychiatric drug development.},
   Journal = {Nature Reviews. Drug Discovery},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {82-84},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrd.2018.222},
   Doi = {10.1038/nrd.2018.222},
   Key = {fds340788}
}

@article{fds337702,
   Author = {Martin, DM and McClintock, SM and Aaronson, ST and Alonzo, A and Husain,
             MM and Lisanby, SH and McDonald, WM and Mohan, A and Nikolin, S and O'Reardon, J and Weickert, CS and Loo, CK},
   Title = {Pre-treatment attentional processing speed and
             antidepressant response to transcranial direct current
             stimulation: Results from an international randomized
             controlled trial.},
   Journal = {Brain Stimulation},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1282-1290},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2018.08.011},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)
             has promising antidepressant effects, however, clinical
             trials have shown variable efficacy. Pre-treatment
             neurocognitive functioning has previously been identified as
             an inter-individual predictor of tDCS antidepressant
             efficacy. OBJECTIVE:In this international multicentre,
             sham-controlled study, we investigated this relationship
             while also assessing the influence of clinical and genotype
             (BDNF Val66Met and COMT Val158Met polymorphisms) factors as
             predictors of response to active tDCS. METHODS:The study was
             a triple-masked, parallel, randomized, controlled design
             across 6 international academic medical centers.
             Participants were randomized to active (2.5 mA) or sham
             (34 μA) tDCS for 30 min each session for 20 sessions.
             The anode was centered over the left dorsolateral prefrontal
             cortex at F3 (10/20 EEG system) and the cathode over the
             lateral right frontal area at F8. RESULTS:Better
             pre-treatment attentional processing speed on the Ruff 2 & 7
             Selective Attention Test (Total Speed: β = 0.25,
             p < .05) and concurrent antidepressant medication use
             (β = 0.31, p < .05) predicted antidepressant
             efficacy with active tDCS. Genotype differences in the BDNF
             Val66Metand COMT Val158Met polymorphisms were not associated
             with antidepressant effects. Secondary analyses revealed
             that only participants in the highest performing Ruff 2 & 7
             Total Speed group at pre-treatment in both active and sham
             tDCS conditions showed significantly greater antidepressant
             response compared to those with lower performance at both
             the 2 and 4 week treatment time points (p < .05).
             CONCLUSIONS:These results suggest that high pre-treatment
             attentional processing speed may be relevant for identifying
             participants more likely to show better tDCS antidepressant
             response to both high (2.5 mA) and very low (34 μA)
             current intensity stimulation. CLINICAL TRIALS
             REGISTRATION:www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01562184.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brs.2018.08.011},
   Key = {fds337702}
}

@article{fds337112,
   Author = {Koroshetz, W and Gordon, J and Adams, A and Beckel-Mitchener, A and Churchill, J and Farber, G and Freund, M and Gnadt, J and Hsu, NS and Langhals, N and Lisanby, S and Liu, G and Peng, GCY and Ramos, K and Steinmetz, M and Talley, E and White, S},
   Title = {The State of the NIH BRAIN Initiative},
   Journal = {The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the
             Society for Neuroscience},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {29},
   Pages = {6427-6438},
   Publisher = {Society for Neuroscience},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.3174-17.2018},
   Doi = {10.1523/jneurosci.3174-17.2018},
   Key = {fds337112}
}

@article{fds338019,
   Author = {Wang, W-C and Wing, EA and Murphy, DLK and Luber, BM and Lisanby, SH and Cabeza, R and Davis, SW},
   Title = {Excitatory TMS modulates memory representations.},
   Journal = {Cognitive Neuroscience},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {3-4},
   Pages = {151-166},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17588928.2018.1512482},
   Abstract = {Brain stimulation technologies have seen increasing
             application in basic science investigations, specifically
             toward the goal of improving memory function. However,
             proposals concerning the neural mechanisms underlying
             cognitive enhancement often rely on simplified notions of
             excitation. As a result, most applications examining the
             effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on
             functional neuroimaging measures have been limited to
             univariate analyses of brain activity. We present here
             analyses using representational similarity analysis (RSA)
             and encoding-retrieval similarity (ERS) analysis to quantify
             the effect of TMS on memory representations. To test whether
             an increase in local excitability in PFC can have measurable
             influences on upstream representations in earlier temporal
             memory regions, we compared 1 and 5Hz stimulation to the
             left dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC). We found that 5Hz rTMS,
             relative to 1Hz, had multiple effects on neural
             representations: 1) greater representational similarity
             during both encoding and retrieval in ventral stream
             regions, 2) greater ERS in the hippocampus, and, critically,
             3) increasing ERS in MTL was correlated with increasing
             univariate activity in DLPFC, and greater functional
             connectivity for hits than misses between these regions.
             These results provide the first evidence of rTMS modulating
             semantic representations and strengthen the idea that rTMS
             may affect the reinstatement of previously experienced
             events in upstream regions.},
   Doi = {10.1080/17588928.2018.1512482},
   Key = {fds338019}
}

@article{fds336946,
   Author = {Cycowicz, YM and Rowny, SB and Luber, B and Lisanby,
             SH},
   Title = {Differences in Seizure Expression Between Magnetic Seizure
             Therapy and Electroconvulsive Shock.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Ect},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {95-103},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/yct.0000000000000470},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:Evidence suggests that magnetic seizure therapy
             (MST) results in fewer side effects than electroconvulsive
             treatment, both in humans treated with electroconvulsive
             therapy (ECT) as well as in the animal preclinical model
             that uses electroconvulsive shock (ECS). Evidence suggests
             that MST results in fewer cognitive side effects than ECT.
             Although MST offers enhanced control over seizure induction
             and spread, little is known about how MST and ECT seizures
             differ. Seizure characteristics are associated with
             treatment effect. This study presents quantitative analyses
             of electroencephalogram (EEG) power after electrical and
             magnetic seizure induction and anesthesia-alone sham in an
             animal model. The aim was to test whether differential
             neurophysiological characteristics of the seizures could be
             identified that support earlier observations that the powers
             of theta, alpha, and beta but not delta frequency bands were
             lower after MST when compared with those after ECS.
             METHODS:In a randomized, sham-controlled trial, 24 macaca
             mulatte received 6 weeks of daily sessions while scalp EEG
             was recorded. Electroencephalogram power was quantified
             within delta, theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands.
             RESULTS:Magnetic seizure therapy induced lower ictal
             expression in the theta, alpha and beta frequencies than
             ECS, but MST and ECS were indistinguishable in the delta
             band. Magnetic seizure therapy showed less postictal
             suppression than ECS. Increasing electrical dosage increased
             ictal power, whereas increasing MST dosage had no effect on
             EEG expression. CONCLUSIONS:Magnetic seizure therapy
             seizures have less robust electrophysiological expression
             than ECS, and these differences are largest in the alpha and
             beta bands. The relevance of these differences in higher
             frequency bands to clinical outcomes deserves further
             exploration. SIGNIFICANCE:Contrasting EEG in ECS and MST may
             lead to insights on the physiological underpinnings of
             seizure-induced amnesia and to finding ways to reduce
             cognitive side effects.},
   Doi = {10.1097/yct.0000000000000470},
   Key = {fds336946}
}

@article{fds332918,
   Author = {Bikson, M and Brunoni, AR and Charvet, LE and Clark, VP and Cohen, LG and Deng, Z-D and Dmochowski, J and Edwards, DJ and Frohlich, F and Kappenman, ES and Lim, KO and Loo, C and Mantovani, A and McMullen, DP and Parra, LC and Pearson, M and Richardson, JD and Rumsey, JM and Sehatpour, P and Sommers, D and Unal, G and Wassermann, EM and Woods,
             AJ and Lisanby, SH},
   Title = {Rigor and reproducibility in research with transcranial
             electrical stimulation: An NIMH-sponsored
             workshop.},
   Journal = {Brain Stimulation},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {465-480},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2017.12.008},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Neuropsychiatric disorders are a leading source
             of disability and require novel treatments that target
             mechanisms of disease. As such disorders are thought to
             result from aberrant neuronal circuit activity,
             neuromodulation approaches are of increasing interest given
             their potential for manipulating circuits directly. Low
             intensity transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) with
             direct currents (transcranial direct current stimulation,
             tDCS) or alternating currents (transcranial alternating
             current stimulation, tACS) represent novel, safe,
             well-tolerated, and relatively inexpensive putative
             treatment modalities. OBJECTIVE:This report seeks to promote
             the science, technology and effective clinical applications
             of these modalities, identify research challenges, and
             suggest approaches for addressing these needs in order to
             achieve rigorous, reproducible findings that can advance
             clinical treatment. METHODS:The National Institute of Mental
             Health (NIMH) convened a workshop in September 2016 that
             brought together experts in basic and human neuroscience,
             electrical stimulation biophysics and devices, and clinical
             trial methods to examine the physiological mechanisms
             underlying tDCS/tACS, technologies and technical strategies
             for optimizing stimulation protocols, and the state of the
             science with respect to therapeutic applications and trial
             designs. RESULTS:Advances in understanding mechanisms,
             methodological and technological improvements
             (e.g., electronics, computational models to facilitate
             proper dosing), and improved clinical trial designs are
             poised to advance rigorous, reproducible therapeutic
             applications of these techniques. A number of challenges
             were identified and meeting participants made
             recommendations made to address them. CONCLUSIONS:These
             recommendations align with requirements in NIMH funding
             opportunity announcements to, among other needs, define
             dosimetry, demonstrate dose/response relationships,
             implement rigorous blinded trial designs, employ
             computational modeling, and demonstrate target engagement
             when testing stimulation-based interventions for the
             treatment of mental disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brs.2017.12.008},
   Key = {fds332918}
}

@article{fds324470,
   Author = {McCall, WV and Lisanby, SH and Rosenquist, PB and Dooley, M and Husain,
             MM and Knapp, RG and Petrides, G and Rudorfer, MV and Young, RC and McClintock, SM and Mueller, M and Prudic, J and Greenberg, RM and Weiner, RD and Bailine, SH and Riley, MA and McCloud, L and Kellner, CH and CORE/PRIDE Work Group},
   Title = {Effects of a Course of Right Unilateral Ultrabrief Pulse
             Electroconvulsive Therapy Combined With Venlafaxine on
             Insomnia Symptoms in Elderly Depressed Patients.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {219-220},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/jcp.16m11089},
   Abstract = {Antidepressant medications have a variety of effects on
             sleep, apart from their antidepressant effects. It is
             unknown whether electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has effects
             on perceived sleep in depressed patients. This secondary
             analysis examines the effects of ECT on perceived sleep,
             separate from its antidepressant effects.Elderly patients
             with major depressive disorder, as defined by DSM-IV,
             received open-label high-dose, right unilateral ultrabrief
             pulse ECT, combined with venlafaxine, as part of
             participating in phase 1 of the National Institute of Mental
             Health-supported study Prolonging Remission in Depressed
             Elderly (PRIDE). Phase 1 of PRIDE participant enrollment
             period extended from February 2009 to August 2014.
             Depression severity was measured with the Hamilton
             Depression Rating Scale-24 item (HDRS₂₄), and measures
             of insomnia severity were extracted from the HDRS₂₄.
             Participants were characterized at baseline as either
             "high-insomnia" or "low-insomnia" subtypes, based upon the
             sum of the 3 HDRS₂₄ sleep items as either 4-6 or 0-3,
             respectively. Insomnia scores were followed during ECT and
             were adjusted for the sum of all the HDRS₂₄ non-sleep
             items. Generalized linear models were used for longitudinal
             analysis of insomnia scores.Two hundred forty patients
             participated, with 48.3% in the high-insomnia and 51.7% in
             the low-insomnia group. Although there was a reduction in
             the insomnia scores in the high-insomnia group, only 12.4%
             of them experienced remission of insomnia after a course of
             ECT, despite an increase in utilization of sleep aids across
             the course of ECT, from 8.6% to 23.2%. The degree of
             improvement in insomnia symptoms paralleled the degree of
             improvement in non-insomnia symptoms. A "low" amount of
             improvement on the sum of the HDRS non-insomnia items
             (HDRS-sleep) was accompanied by a "low" amount of
             improvement in insomnia scores (change of -1.6 ± 1.2, P <
             .0001), while a "high" amount of improvement on the sum of
             the HDRS non-insomnia items was accompanied by a "higher"
             amount of improvement in insomnia scores (change of -3.1 ±
             1.6, P < .0001). After adjustment for non-insomnia symptoms,
             there was no change in insomnia in the low-insomnia group.We
             found that ECT, combined with venlafaxine, has a modest
             anti-insomnia effect that is linked to its antidepressant
             effect. Most patients will have some degree of residual
             insomnia after ECT, and will require some consideration of
             whether additional, targeted assessment and treatment of
             insomnia is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
             NCT01028508.},
   Doi = {10.4088/jcp.16m11089},
   Key = {fds324470}
}

@article{fds330881,
   Author = {McCall, WV and Lisanby, SH and Rosenquist, PB and Dooley, M and Husain,
             MM and Knapp, RG and Petrides, G and Rudorfer, MV and Young, RC and McClintock, SM and Mueller, M and Prudic, J and Greenberg, RM and Weiner, RD and Bailine, SH and Youssef, NA and McCloud, L and Kellner,
             CH and CORE/PRIDE Work Group},
   Title = {Effects of continuation electroconvulsive therapy on quality
             of life in elderly depressed patients: A randomized clinical
             trial.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychiatric Research},
   Volume = {97},
   Pages = {65-69},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.11.001},
   Abstract = {We examined whether electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) plus
             medications ("STABLE + PHARM" group) had superior HRQOL
             compared with medications alone ("PHARM" group) as
             continuation strategy after successful acute right
             unilateral ECT for major depressive disorder (MDD). We
             hypothesized that scores from the Medical Outcomes Study
             Short Form-36 (SF-36) would be higher during continuation
             treatment in the "STABLE + PHARM" group versus the "PHARM"
             group. The overall study design was called "Prolonging
             Remission in Depressed Elderly" (PRIDE). Remitters to the
             acute course of ECT were re-consented to enter a 6 month RCT
             of "STABLE + PHARM" versus "PHARM". Measures of depressive
             symptoms and cognitive function were completed by blind
             raters; SF-36 measurements were patient self-report every 4
             weeks. Participants were 120 patients >60 years old.
             Patients with dementia, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or
             substance abuse were excluded. The "PHARM" group received
             venlafaxine and lithium. The "STABLE + PHARM" received the
             same medications, plus 4 weekly outpatient ECT sessions,
             with additional ECT session as needed. Participants were
             mostly female (61.7%) with a mean age of 70.5 ± 7.2
             years. "STABLE + PHARM" patients received 4.5 ± 2.5 ECT
             sessions during Phase 2. "STABLE + PHARM" group had 7
             point advantage (3.5-10.4, 95% CI) for Physical Component
             Score of SF-36 (P < 0.0001), and 8.2 point advantage
             (4.2-12.2, 95% CI) for Mental Component Score
             (P < 0.0001). Additional ECT resulted in overall net
             health benefit. Consideration should be given to
             administration of additional ECT to prevent relapse during
             the continuation phase of treatment of MDD. CLINICAL
             TRIALS.GOV: NCT01028508.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.11.001},
   Key = {fds330881}
}

@article{fds336947,
   Author = {McClintock, SM and Reti, IM and Carpenter, LL and McDonald, WM and Dubin, M and Taylor, SF and Cook, IA and O'Reardon, J and Husain, MM and Wall, C and Krystal, AD and Sampson, SM and Morales, O and Nelson, BG and Latoussakis, V and George, MS and Lisanby, SH and National Network of
             Depression Centers rTMS Task Group, and American Psychiatric
             Association Council on Research Task Force on Novel
             Biomarkers and Treatments},
   Title = {Consensus Recommendations for the Clinical Application of
             Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in the
             Treatment of Depression.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.16cs10905},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:To provide expert recommendations for the safe and
             effective application of repetitive transcranial magnetic
             stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of major depressive
             disorder (MDD). PARTICIPANTS:Participants included a group
             of 17 expert clinicians and researchers with expertise in
             the clinical application of rTMS, representing both the
             National Network of Depression Centers (NNDC) rTMS Task
             Group and the American Psychiatric Association Council on
             Research (APA CoR) Task Force on Novel Biomarkers and
             Treatments. EVIDENCE:The consensus statement is based on a
             review of extensive literature from 2 databases (OvidSP
             MEDLINE and PsycINFO) searched from 1990 through 2016. The
             search terms included variants of major depressive disorder
             and transcranial magnetic stimulation. The results were
             limited to articles written in English that focused on adult
             populations. Of the approximately 1,500 retrieved studies, a
             total of 118 publications were included in the consensus
             statement and were supplemented with expert opinion to
             achieve consensus recommendations on key issues surrounding
             the administration of rTMS for MDD in clinical practice
             settings. CONSENSUS PROCESS:In cases in which the research
             evidence was equivocal or unclear, a consensus decision on
             how rTMS should be administered was reached by the authors
             of this article and is denoted in the article as "expert
             opinion." CONCLUSIONS:Multiple randomized controlled trials
             and published literature have supported the safety and
             efficacy of rTMS antidepressant therapy. These consensus
             recommendations, developed by the NNDC rTMS Task Group and
             APA CoR Task Force on Novel Biomarkers and Treatments,
             provide comprehensive information for the safe and effective
             clinical application of rTMS in the treatment of
             MDD.},
   Doi = {10.4088/JCP.16cs10905},
   Key = {fds336947}
}

@article{fds336948,
   Author = {McClintock, SM and Reti, IM and Carpenter, LL and Dubin, M and Taylor,
             SF and Husain, MM and Wall, C and Sampson, S and George, MS and Lisanby,
             SH},
   Title = {Dr McClintock and Colleagues Reply.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/jcp.17lr11887a},
   Doi = {10.4088/jcp.17lr11887a},
   Key = {fds336948}
}

@article{fds336949,
   Author = {McClintock, SM and Reti, IM and Carpenter, LL and McDonald, WM and Dubin, M and Taylor, SF and Cook, IA and O'Reardon, J and Husain, MM and Wall, C and Krystal, A and Sampson, S and Morales, O and Nelson, BG and George, MS and Lisanby, SH},
   Title = {Dr McClintock and Colleagues Reply.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/jcp.17lr11851a},
   Doi = {10.4088/jcp.17lr11851a},
   Key = {fds336949}
}

@article{fds330049,
   Author = {Loo, CK and Husain, MM and McDonald, WM and Aaronson, S and O'Reardon,
             JP and Alonzo, A and Weickert, CS and Martin, DM and McClintock, SM and Mohan, A and Lisanby, SH and International Consortium of Research
             in tDCS (ICRT)},
   Title = {International randomized-controlled trial of transcranial
             Direct Current Stimulation in depression.},
   Journal = {Brain Stimulation},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {125-133},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2017.10.011},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Evidence suggests that transcranial Direct
             Current Stimulation (tDCS) has antidepressant effects in
             unipolar depression, but there is limited information for
             patients with bipolar depression. Additionally, prior
             research suggests that brain derived neurotrophic factor
             (BDNF) Val66Met genotype may moderate response to tDCS.
             OBJECTIVE:To examine tDCS efficacy in unipolar and bipolar
             depression and assess if BDNF genotype is associated with
             antidepressant response to tDCS. METHODS:130 participants
             diagnosed with a major depressive episode were randomized to
             receive active (2.5 milliamps (mA), 30 min) or sham
             (0.034 mA and two 60-second current ramps up to 1 and
             0.5 mA) tDCS to the left prefrontal cortex, administered in
             20 sessions over 4 weeks, in a double-blinded, international
             multisite study. Mixed effects repeated measures analyses
             assessed change in mood and neuropsychological scores in
             participants with at least one post-baseline rating in the
             unipolar (N = 84) and bipolar (N = 36) samples.
             RESULTS:Mood improved significantly over the 4-week
             treatment period in both unipolar (p = 0.001) and bipolar
             groups (p < 0.001). Among participants with unipolar
             depression, there were more remitters in the sham treatment
             group (p = 0.03). There was no difference between active
             and sham stimulation in the bipolar sample. BDNF genotype
             was unrelated to antidepressant outcome.
             CONCLUSIONS:Overall, this study found no antidepressant
             difference between active and sham stimulation for unipolar
             or bipolar depression. However, the possibility that the low
             current delivered in the sham tDCS condition was
             biologically active cannot be discounted. Moreover, BDNF
             genotype did not moderate antidepressant outcome. CLINICAL
             TRIALS REGISTRATION:www.clinicaltrials.gov,
             NCT01562184.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brs.2017.10.011},
   Key = {fds330049}
}


%% Madden, David J.   
@article{fds340087,
   Author = {Diaz, MT and Johnson, MA and Burke, DM and Truong, T-K and Madden,
             DJ},
   Title = {Age-related differences in the neural bases of phonological
             and semantic processes in the context of task-irrelevant
             information.},
   Journal = {Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13415-018-00671-2},
   Abstract = {As we age we have increasing difficulty with phonological
             aspects of language production. Yet semantic processes are
             largely stable across the life span. This suggests a
             fundamental difference in the cognitive and potentially
             neural architecture supporting these systems. Moreover,
             language processes such as these interact with other
             cognitive processes that also show age-related decline, such
             as executive function and inhibition. The present study
             examined phonological and semantic processes in the presence
             of task-irrelevant information to examine the influence of
             such material on language production. Older and younger
             adults made phonological and semantic decisions about
             pictures in the presence of either phonologically or
             semantically related words, which were unrelated to the
             task. FMRI activation during the semantic condition showed
             that all adults engaged typical left-hemisphere language
             regions, and that this activation was positively correlated
             with efficiency across all adults. In contrast, the
             phonological condition elicited activation in bilateral
             precuneus and cingulate, with no clear brain-behavior
             relationship. Similarly, older adults exhibited greater
             activation than younger adults in several regions that were
             unrelated to behavioral performance. Our results suggest
             that as we age, brain-behavior relations decline, and there
             is an increased reliance on both language-specific and
             domain-general brain regions that are seen most prominently
             during phonological processing. In contrast, the core
             semantic system continues to be engaged throughout the life
             span, even in the presence of task-irrelevant
             information.},
   Doi = {10.3758/s13415-018-00671-2},
   Key = {fds340087}
}

@article{fds331315,
   Author = {Zhuang, J and Madden, DJ and Duong-Fernandez, X and Chen, N-K and Cousins, SW and Potter, GG and Diaz, MT and Whitson,
             HE},
   Title = {Language processing in age-related macular degeneration
             associated with unique functional connectivity signatures in
             the right hemisphere.},
   Journal = {Neurobiology of Aging},
   Volume = {63},
   Pages = {65-74},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.11.003},
   Abstract = {Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease
             associated with significant vision loss among older adults.
             Previous large-scale behavioral studies indicate that people
             with AMD are at increased risk of cognitive deficits in
             language processing, particularly in verbal fluency tasks.
             The neural underpinnings of any relationship between AMD and
             higher cognitive functions, such as language processing,
             remain unclear. This study aims to address this issue using
             independent component analysis of spontaneous brain activity
             at rest. In 2 components associated with visual processing,
             we observed weaker functional connectivity in the primary
             visual cortex and lateral occipital cortex in AMD patients
             compared with healthy controls, indicating that AMD might
             lead to differences in the neural representation of vision.
             In a component related to language processing, we found that
             increasing connectivity within the right inferior frontal
             gyrus was associated with better verbal fluency performance
             across all older adults, and the verbal fluency effect was
             greater in AMD patients than controls in both right inferior
             frontal gyrus and right posterior temporal regions. As the
             behavioral performance of our patients is as good as that of
             controls, these findings suggest that preservation of verbal
             fluency performance in AMD patients might be achieved
             through higher contribution from right hemisphere regions in
             bilateral language networks. If that is the case, there may
             be an opportunity to promote cognitive resilience among
             seniors with AMD or other forms of late-life vision
             loss.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.11.003},
   Key = {fds331315}
}


%% March, John S.   
@article{fds138619,
   Title = {March, J., Parker, J., Sullivan, K., Stallings, P., Conners,
             C. (in press), The Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for
             Children (MASC): Factor structure, reliability and validity.
             J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry},
   Key = {fds138619}
}

@article{fds138635,
   Title = {March, J., Amaya-Jackson, L., Costanzo, P., Terry, R. (in
             press), Post-traumatic stress in children and adolescents
             after an industrial fire. Journal of the American Academy of
             Child and Adolescent Psychiatry},
   Key = {fds138635}
}


%% Marsh, Elizabeth J.   
@article{fds339752,
   Author = {Wang, W-C and Brashier, NM and Wing, EA and Marsh, EJ and Cabeza,
             R},
   Title = {Neural basis of goal-driven changes in knowledge
             activation.},
   Journal = {The European Journal of Neuroscience},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {3389-3396},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejn.14196},
   Abstract = {Depending on a person's goals, different aspects of stored
             knowledge are accessed. Decades of behavioral work document
             the flexible use of knowledge, but little neuroimaging work
             speaks to these questions. We used representational
             similarity analysis to investigate whether the relationship
             between brain activity and semantic structure of statements
             varied in two tasks hypothesized to differ in the degree to
             which knowledge is accessed: judging truth (semantic task)
             and judging oldness (episodic task). During truth judgments,
             but not old/new recognition judgments, a left-lateralized
             network previously associated with semantic memory exhibited
             correlations with semantic structure. At a neural level,
             people activate knowledge representations in different ways
             when focused on different goals. The present results
             demonstrate the potential of multivariate approaches in
             characterizing knowledge storage and retrieval, as well as
             the ways that it shapes our understanding and long-term
             memory.},
   Doi = {10.1111/ejn.14196},
   Key = {fds339752}
}

@article{fds338051,
   Author = {Stanley, ML and Yang, BW and Marsh, EJ},
   Title = {When the Unlikely Becomes Likely: Qualifying Language Does
             Not Influence Later Truth Judgments},
   Journal = {Journal of Applied Research in Memory and
             Cognition},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jarmac.2018.08.004},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition
             Judgments and decisions are frequently made under
             uncertainty. People often express and interpret this
             uncertainty with epistemic qualifiers (e.g., likely,
             improbable). We investigate the extent to which qualifiers
             influence truth judgments over time. In four studies,
             participants studied qualified statements, and two days
             later they rated the truth of previously qualified
             statements along with new statements. Previously qualified
             statements were rated as more likely true than new
             statements, even when the qualifiers had distinctly opposite
             meanings (i.e., certain versus impossible; Study 1) and when
             all qualifiers cast doubt on the veracity of the statements
             (e.g., improbable, impossible; Studies 2–4). Three
             additional studies suggested that this effect was not
             dependent on memory for the qualifiers. Consistent with a
             fluency interpretation, prior exposure made the statements
             easier to read, driving truth judgments, and overriding the
             influence of qualifying information. Implications for
             improving communication using qualifiers are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jarmac.2018.08.004},
   Key = {fds338051}
}

@article{fds333724,
   Author = {Wang, W-C and Brashier, NM and Wing, EA and Marsh, EJ and Cabeza,
             R},
   Title = {Knowledge supports memory retrieval through familiarity, not
             recollection.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychologia},
   Volume = {113},
   Pages = {14-21},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.01.019},
   Abstract = {Semantic memory, or general knowledge of the world, guides
             learning and supports the formation and retrieval of new
             episodic memories. Behavioral evidence suggests that this
             knowledge effect is supported by recollection-a more
             controlled form of memory retrieval generally accompanied by
             contextual details-to a greater degree than familiarity-a
             more automatic form of memory retrieval generally absent of
             contextual details. In the current study, we used functional
             magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the role
             that regions associated with recollection and familiarity
             play in retrieving recent instances of known (e.g., The
             Summer Olympic Games are held four years apart) and unknown
             (e.g., A flaky deposit found in port bottles is beeswing)
             statements. Our results revealed a surprising pattern:
             Episodic retrieval of known statements recruited regions
             associated with familiarity, but not recollection. Instead,
             retrieval of unknown statements recruited regions associated
             with recollection. These data, in combination with quicker
             reaction times for the retrieval of known than unknown
             statements, suggest that known statements can be
             successfully retrieved on the basis of familiarity, whereas
             unknown statements were retrieved on the basis of
             recollection. Our results provide insight into how knowledge
             influences episodic retrieval and demonstrate the role of
             neuroimaging in providing insights into cognitive processes
             in the absence of explicit behavioral responses.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.01.019},
   Key = {fds333724}
}


%% Mauro, Christian F.   
@article{fds333644,
   Author = {Allen, TM and Wren, AA and Anderson, LM and Sabholk, A and Mauro,
             CF},
   Title = {A group CBT-yoga protocol targeting pain-related and
             internalizing symptoms in youth.},
   Journal = {Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {7-18},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cpp0000206},
   Abstract = {© 2018 American Psychological Association. There is a high
             prevalence of pain-related somatic symptoms among children
             with internalizing disorders. Despite the documented
             comorbidity between somatic and internalizing symptoms in
             youth, there are limited empirically supported interventions
             that simultaneously target these issues. In light of this,
             the current pilot study investigated the feasibility and
             preliminary efficacy of a novel 12-week manualized
             group-based CBT-yoga protocol, which aimed to target
             co-occurring physical and internalizing symptoms in a sample
             of youth. Twenty-eight children between the ages of 10 and
             12 years old who had clinically relevant internalizing
             symptoms and pain-related somatic symptoms were enrolled in
             the 12-week intervention protocol. Attendance rates and
             parent and child responses on social validity scales
             provided measures of feasibility. Preliminary efficacy was
             examined through a series of paired sample t tests,
             measuring changes in internalizing and somatic symptoms, and
             pain-related coping following the intervention. Results
             suggest strong levels of childand parent-rated feasibility.
             Preliminary data also reveal improvements in internalizing
             and somatic symptoms following the intervention, in addition
             to improvements in pain-related coping. These findings
             provide initial support for the feasibility and acceptance
             of an integrative group-based intervention combining
             cognitive-behavioral strategies with yogic
             practices.},
   Doi = {10.1037/cpp0000206},
   Key = {fds333644}
}


%% Mazuka, Reiko   
@article{fds335695,
   Author = {Guevara-Rukoz, A and Cristia, A and Ludusan, B and Thiollière, R and Martin, A and Mazuka, R and Dupoux, E},
   Title = {Are Words Easier to Learn From Infant- Than Adult-Directed
             Speech? A Quantitative Corpus-Based Investigation.},
   Journal = {Cognitive Science},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cogs.12616},
   Abstract = {We investigate whether infant-directed speech (IDS) could
             facilitate word form learning when compared to
             adult-directed speech (ADS). To study this, we examine the
             distribution of word forms at two levels, acoustic and
             phonological, using a large database of spontaneous speech
             in Japanese. At the acoustic level we show that, as has been
             documented before for phonemes, the realizations of words
             are more variable and less discriminable in IDS than in ADS.
             At the phonological level, we find an effect in the opposite
             direction: The IDS lexicon contains more distinctive words
             (such as onomatopoeias) than the ADS counterpart. Combining
             the acoustic and phonological metrics together in a global
             discriminability score reveals that the bigger separation of
             lexical categories in the phonological space does not
             compensate for the opposite effect observed at the acoustic
             level. As a result, IDS word forms are still globally less
             discriminable than ADS word forms, even though the effect is
             numerically small. We discuss the implication of these
             findings for the view that the functional role of IDS is to
             improve language learnability.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cogs.12616},
   Key = {fds335695}
}

@article{fds335696,
   Author = {Shin, M and Choi, Y and Mazuka, R},
   Title = {Development of fricative sound perception in Korean infants:
             The role of language experience and infants' initial
             sensitivity.},
   Journal = {Plos One},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {e0199045},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0199045},
   Abstract = {In this paper, we report data on the development of Korean
             infants' perception of a rare fricative phoneme distinction.
             Korean fricative consonants have received much interest in
             the linguistic community due to the language's distinct
             categorization of sounds. Unlike many fricative contrasts
             utilized in most of the world's languages, Korean fricatives
             (/s*/-/s/) are all voiceless. Moreover, compared with other
             sound categories, fricatives have received very little
             attention in the speech perception development field and no
             studies thus far have examined Korean infants' development
             of native phonology in this domain. Using a visual
             habituation paradigm, we tested 4‒6-month-old and
             7‒9-month-old Korean infants on their abilities to
             discriminate the Korean fricative pair in the [a] vowel
             context, /s*a/-/sa/, which can be distinguished based on
             acoustic cues, such as the durations of aspiration and
             frication noise. Korean infants older than 7 months were
             able to reliably discriminate the fricative pair but younger
             infants did not show clear signs of such discrimination.
             These results add to the growing evidence that there are
             native sound contrasts infants cannot discriminate early on
             without a certain amount of language exposure, providing
             further data to help delineate the specific nature of early
             perceptual capacity.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0199045},
   Key = {fds335696}
}


%% Meade, Christina S.   
@article{fds338575,
   Author = {Meade, CS and Bell, RP and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Hobkirk, AL and Huettel, SA},
   Title = {Synergistic effects of marijuana abuse and HIV infection on
             neural activation during a cognitive interference
             task.},
   Journal = {Addiction Biology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adb.12678},
   Abstract = {Marijuana use, which is disproportionately prevalent among
             human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons, can
             alter activity in fronto-parietal regions during cognitively
             demanding tasks. While HIV is also associated with altered
             neural activation, it is not known how marijuana may further
             affect brain function in this population. Our study examined
             the independent and additive effects of HIV infection and
             regular marijuana use on neural activation during a
             cognitive interference task. The sample included 93 adults
             who differed on marijuana (MJ) and HIV statuses
             (20 MJ+/HIV+, 19 MJ+/HIV-, 29 MJ-/HIV+, 25 MJ-/HIV-).
             Participants completed a counting Stroop task during a
             functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Main and
             interactive effects on neural activation during interference
             versus neutral blocks were examined using a mixed-effects
             analysis. The sample showed the expected Stroop effect for
             both speed and accuracy. There were main effects of MJ in
             the right and left inferior parietal lobules, with the left
             cluster extending into the posterior middle temporal gyrus
             and a main effect of HIV in the dorsal anterior cingulate
             cortex. There was an interaction in the left fronto-insular
             cortex, such that the MJ+/HIV+ group had the largest
             increase in activation compared with other groups. Among
             MJ+, signal change in this cluster correlated positively
             with cumulative years of regular marijuana use. These
             results suggest that comorbid HIV and marijuana use is
             associated with complex neural alterations in multiple brain
             regions during cognitive interference. Follow-up research is
             needed to determine how marijuana-related characteristics
             may moderate HIV neurologic disease and impact real-world
             functioning.},
   Doi = {10.1111/adb.12678},
   Key = {fds338575}
}

@article{fds336954,
   Author = {Towe, SL and Horton, OE and Martin, B and Meade, CS},
   Title = {A Comparison of Motivations for Marijuana Use in
             HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Adults.},
   Journal = {Aids and Behavior},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {2807-2814},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10461-018-2123-4},
   Abstract = {While medicinal marijuana use is common among persons with
             HIV, it is not known whether persons with HIV are more
             motivated to use marijuana medically compared to
             HIV-negative counterparts. This study examined motivations
             for marijuana use in a sample of 94 HIV+ and
             HIV- adults. Participants used marijuana 21.27 days in
             the last 30 days on average. HIV+ participants reported
             using marijuana for medical reasons more often than
             HIV- participants, but HIV+ and HIV- participants did
             not differ in other domains. Problematic marijuana use was
             associated with motives, regardless of HIV status. Motives
             were associated with mental and physical health functioning,
             but there were no interactions between motivations and HIV
             status. Overall this study found that motivations were
             similar for HIV+ and HIV- participants. Future research
             including qualitative work to further understand motivations
             would benefit the field, as would research examining the
             effectiveness of marijuana in treating physical
             symptoms.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10461-018-2123-4},
   Key = {fds336954}
}

@article{fds336955,
   Author = {Bell, RP and Barnes, LL and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Song, AW and Meade,
             CS},
   Title = {Structural connectome differences in HIV infection: brain
             network segregation associated with nadir CD4 cell
             count.},
   Journal = {Journal of Neurovirology},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {454-463},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13365-018-0634-4},
   Abstract = {This study investigated structural brain organization using
             diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in 35 HIV-positive and 35
             HIV-negative individuals. We used global and nodal graph
             theory metrics to investigate whether HIV was associated
             with differences in brain network organization based on
             fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD).
             Participants also completed a comprehensive
             neuropsychological testing battery. For global network
             metrics, HIV-positive individuals displayed a lower FA
             clustering coefficient relative to HIV-negative individuals.
             For nodal network metrics, HIV-positive individuals had less
             MD nodal degree in the left thalamus. Within HIV-positive
             individuals, the FA global clustering coefficient was
             positively correlated with nadir CD4 cell count. Across the
             sample, cognitive performance was negatively correlated with
             characteristic path length and positively correlated with
             global efficiency for FA. These results suggest that,
             despite management with combination antiretroviral therapy,
             HIV infection is associated with altered structural brain
             network segregation and thalamic centrality and that low
             nadir CD4 cell count may be a risk factor. These graph
             theory metrics may serve as neural biomarkers to identify
             individuals at risk for HIV-related neurological
             complications.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s13365-018-0634-4},
   Key = {fds336955}
}

@article{fds336953,
   Author = {Khatiwoda, P and Proeschold-Bell, RJ and Meade, CS and Park, LP and Proescholdbell, S},
   Title = {Facilitators and Barriers to Naloxone Kit Use Among
             Opioid-Dependent Patients Enrolled in Medication Assisted
             Therapy Clinics in North Carolina.},
   Journal = {North Carolina Medical Journal},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {149-155},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.18043/ncm.79.3.149},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND Naloxone-an opioid antagonist that reverses the
             effects of opioids-is increasingly being distributed in
             non-medical settings. We sought to identify the facilitators
             of, and barriers to, opioid users using naloxone kits in
             North Carolina.METHODS In 2015, we administered a 15-item
             survey to a convenience sample of 100 treatment seekers at 4
             methadone/buprenorphine Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT)
             clinics in North Carolina.RESULTS Seventy-four percent of
             participants reported having ever gotten a naloxone kit;
             this percentage was higher for females (81%) than males
             (63%) (P = .06). The primary reason given for not having a
             kit was not knowing where to get one. Only 6% had heard of
             kits from the media and only 5% received one from a medical
             provider. Among kit recipients, 56% of both females and
             males reported mostly or sometimes carrying the kit, with
             additional participants reporting always. Reasons for not
             carrying a kit were no longer being around drugs, forgetting
             it, and the kit being too large. Men discussed the
             difficulties of carrying the naloxone kits, which are
             currently too large to fit in a pocket. Ninety-four percent
             of naloxone users reported intending to call emergency
             services in case of an overdose emergency.LIMITATIONS Study
             limitations included a small sample, participants limited to
             MAT clinics, and a predominantly white sample.CONCLUSIONS
             MAT treatment seekers reported a willingness to carry and
             use naloxone kits. Education, outreach, media, and medical
             providers need to promote naloxone kits. A smaller kit may
             increase the likelihood of men carrying one.},
   Doi = {10.18043/ncm.79.3.149},
   Key = {fds336953}
}

@article{fds327328,
   Author = {Meade, CS and Addicott, M and Hobkirk, AL and Towe, SL and Chen, N-K and Sridharan, S and Huettel, SA},
   Title = {Cocaine and HIV are independently associated with neural
             activation in response to gain and loss valuation during
             economic risky choice.},
   Journal = {Addiction Biology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {796-809},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/adb.12529},
   Abstract = {Stimulant abuse is disproportionately common in HIV-positive
             persons. Both HIV and stimulants are independently
             associated with deficits in reward-based decision making,
             but their interactive and/or additive effects are poorly
             understood despite their prevalent co-morbidity. Here, we
             examined the effects of cocaine dependence and HIV infection
             in 69 adults who underwent functional magnetic resonance
             imaging while completing an economic loss aversion task. We
             identified two neural networks that correlated with the
             evaluation of the favorable characteristics of the gamble
             (i.e. higher gains/lower losses: ventromedial prefrontal
             cortex, anterior cingulate, anterior and posterior precuneus
             and visual cortex) versus unfavorable characteristics of the
             gamble (i.e. lower gains/higher losses: dorsal prefrontal,
             lateral orbitofrontal, posterior parietal cortex, anterior
             insula and dorsal caudate). Behaviorally, cocaine and HIV
             had additive effects on loss aversion scores, with
             HIV-positive cocaine users being the least loss averse.
             Cocaine users had greater activation in brain regions that
             tracked the favorability of gamble characteristics (i.e.
             increased activation to gains, but decreased activation to
             losses). In contrast, HIV infection was independently
             associated with lesser activation in regions that tracked
             the unfavorability of gamble characteristics. These results
             suggest that cocaine is associated with an overactive
             reward-seeking system, while HIV is associated with an
             underactive cognitive control system. Together, these
             alterations may leave HIV-positive cocaine users
             particularly vulnerable to making unfavorable decisions when
             outcomes are uncertain.},
   Doi = {10.1111/adb.12529},
   Key = {fds327328}
}


%% Meck, Warren H.   
@article{fds338052,
   Author = {Petter, EA and Gershman, SJ and Meck, WH},
   Title = {Integrating Models of Interval Timing and Reinforcement
             Learning.},
   Journal = {Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {911-922},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2018.08.004},
   Abstract = {We present an integrated view of interval timing and
             reinforcement learning (RL) in the brain. The computational
             goal of RL is to maximize future rewards, and this depends
             crucially on a representation of time. Different RL systems
             in the brain process time in distinct ways. A model-based
             system learns 'what happens when', employing this internal
             model to generate action plans, while a model-free system
             learns to predict reward directly from a set of temporal
             basis functions. We describe how these systems are subserved
             by a computational division of labor between several brain
             regions, with a focus on the basal ganglia and the
             hippocampus, as well as how these regions are influenced by
             the neuromodulator dopamine.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.tics.2018.08.004},
   Key = {fds338052}
}

@article{fds338538,
   Author = {Bareš, M and Apps, R and Avanzino, L and Breska, A and D'Angelo, E and Filip, P and Gerwig, M and Ivry, RB and Lawrenson, CL and Louis, ED and Lusk, NA and Manto, M and Meck, WH and Mitoma, H and Petter,
             EA},
   Title = {Consensus paper: Decoding the Contributions of the
             Cerebellum as a Time Machine. From Neurons to Clinical
             Applications.},
   Journal = {Cerebellum (London, England)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12311-018-0979-5},
   Abstract = {Time perception is an essential element of conscious and
             subconscious experience, coordinating our perception and
             interaction with the surrounding environment. In recent
             years, major technological advances in the field of
             neuroscience have helped foster new insights into the
             processing of temporal information, including extending our
             knowledge of the role of the cerebellum as one of the key
             nodes in the brain for this function. This consensus paper
             provides a state-of-the-art picture from the experts in the
             field of the cerebellar research on a variety of crucial
             issues related to temporal processing, drawing on recent
             anatomical, neurophysiological, behavioral, and clinical
             research.The cerebellar granular layer appears especially
             well-suited for timing operations required to confer
             millisecond precision for cerebellar computations. This may
             be most evident in the manner the cerebellum controls the
             duration of the timing of agonist-antagonist EMG bursts
             associated with fast goal-directed voluntary movements. In
             concert with adaptive processes, interactions within the
             cerebellar cortex are sufficient to support sub-second
             timing. However, supra-second timing seems to require
             cortical and basal ganglia networks, perhaps operating in
             concert with cerebellum. Additionally, sensory information
             such as an unexpected stimulus can be forwarded to the
             cerebellum via the climbing fiber system, providing a
             temporally constrained mechanism to adjust ongoing behavior
             and modify future processing. Patients with cerebellar
             disorders exhibit impairments on a range of tasks that
             require precise timing, and recent evidence suggest that
             timing problems observed in other neurological conditions
             such as Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia
             may reflect disrupted interactions between the basal ganglia
             and cerebellum.The complex concepts emerging from this
             consensus paper should provide a foundation for further
             discussion, helping identify basic research questions
             required to understand how the brain represents and utilizes
             time, as well as delineating ways in which this knowledge
             can help improve the lives of those with neurological
             conditions that disrupt this most elemental sense. The panel
             of experts agrees that timing control in the brain is a
             complex concept in whom cerebellar circuitry is deeply
             involved. The concept of a timing machine has now expanded
             to clinical disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s12311-018-0979-5},
   Key = {fds338538}
}

@article{fds335700,
   Author = {Gu, B-M and Kukreja, K and Meck, WH},
   Title = {Oscillation patterns of local field potentials in the dorsal
             striatum and sensorimotor cortex during the encoding,
             maintenance, and decision stages for the ordinal comparison
             of sub- and supra-second signal durations.},
   Journal = {Neurobiology of Learning and Memory},
   Volume = {153},
   Number = {Pt A},
   Pages = {79-91},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2018.05.003},
   Abstract = {Ordinal comparison of successively presented signal
             durations requires (a) the encoding of the first signal
             duration (standard), (b) maintenance of temporal information
             specific to the standard duration in memory, and (c) timing
             of the second signal duration (comparison) during which a
             comparison is made of the first and second durations. Rats
             were first trained to make ordinal comparisons of signal
             durations within three time ranges using 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0-s
             standard durations. Local field potentials were then
             recorded from the dorsal striatum and sensorimotor cortex in
             order to investigate the pattern of neural oscillations
             during each phase of the ordinal-comparison process.
             Increased power in delta and theta frequency ranges was
             observed during both the encoding and comparison stages.
             Active maintenance of a selected response, "shorter" or
             "longer" (counter-balanced across left and right levers),
             was represented by an increase of theta and delta
             oscillations in the contralateral striatum and cortex. Taken
             together, these data suggest that neural oscillations in the
             delta-theta range play an important role in the encoding,
             maintenance, and comparison of signal durations.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.nlm.2018.05.003},
   Key = {fds335700}
}


%% Mitroff, Stephen   
@article{fds332884,
   Author = {Mitroff, SR and Ericson, JM and Sharpe, B},
   Title = {Predicting Airport Screening Officers’ Visual Search
             Competency With a Rapid Assessment},
   Journal = {Human Factors},
   Volume = {60},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {201-211},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0018720817743886},
   Abstract = {© 2017, © 2017, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.
             Objective: The study’s objective was to assess a new
             personnel selection and assessment tool for aviation
             security screeners. A mobile app was modified to create a
             tool, and the question was whether it could predict
             professional screeners’ on-job performance. Background: A
             variety of professions (airport security, radiology, the
             military, etc.) rely on visual search performance—being
             able to detect targets. Given the importance of such
             professions, it is necessary to maximize performance, and
             one means to do so is to select individuals who excel at
             visual search. A critical question is whether it is possible
             to predict search competency within a professional search
             environment. Method: Professional searchers from the USA
             Transportation Security Administration (TSA) completed a
             rapid assessment on a tablet-based X-ray simulator (XRAY
             Screener, derived from the mobile technology app Airport
             Scanner; Kedlin Company). The assessment contained 72 trials
             that were simulated X-ray images of bags. Participants
             searched for prohibited items and tapped on them with their
             finger. Results: Performance on the assessment significantly
             related to on-job performance measures for the TSA officers
             such that those who were better XRAY Screener performers
             were both more accurate and faster at the actual airport
             checkpoint. Conclusion: XRAY Screener successfully predicted
             on-job performance for professional aviation security
             officers. While questions remain about the underlying
             cognitive mechanisms, this quick assessment was found to
             significantly predict on-job success for a task that relies
             on visual search performance. Application: It may be
             possible to quickly assess an individual’s visual search
             competency, which could help organizations select new hires
             and assess their current workforce.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0018720817743886},
   Key = {fds332884}
}


%% Moffitt, Terrie E.   
@article{fds336530,
   Author = {Matthews, T and Danese, A and Caspi, A and Fisher, HL and Goldman-Mellor, S and Kepa, A and Moffitt, TE and Odgers, CL and Arseneault, L},
   Title = {Lonely young adults in modern Britain: findings from an
             epidemiological cohort study.},
   Journal = {Psychological Medicine},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {268-277},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0033291718000788},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:The aim of this study was to build a detailed,
             integrative profile of the correlates of young adults'
             feelings of loneliness, in terms of their current health and
             functioning and their childhood experiences and
             circumstances. METHODS:Data were drawn from the
             Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, a birth cohort
             of 2232 individuals born in England and Wales in 1994 and
             1995. Loneliness was measured when participants were aged
             18. Regression analyses were used to test concurrent
             associations between loneliness and health and functioning
             in young adulthood. Longitudinal analyses were conducted to
             examine childhood factors associated with young adult
             loneliness. RESULTS:Lonelier young adults were more likely
             to experience mental health problems, to engage in physical
             health risk behaviours, and to use more negative strategies
             to cope with stress. They were less confident in their
             employment prospects and were more likely to be out of work.
             Lonelier young adults were, as children, more likely to have
             had mental health difficulties and to have experienced
             bullying and social isolation. Loneliness was evenly
             distributed across genders and socioeconomic backgrounds.
             CONCLUSIONS:Young adults' experience of loneliness co-occurs
             with a diverse range of problems, with potential
             implications for health in later life. The findings
             underscore the importance of early intervention to prevent
             lonely young adults from being trapped in loneliness as they
             age.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0033291718000788},
   Key = {fds336530}
}

@article{fds340540,
   Author = {Hartwig, FP and Davies, NM and Horta, BL and Ahluwalia, TS and Bisgaard,
             H and Bønnelykke, K and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Poulton, R and Sajjad, A and Tiemeier, HW and Dalmau-Bueno, A and Guxens, M and Bustamante, M and Santa-Marina, L and Parker, N and Paus, T and Pausova,
             Z and Lauritzen, L and Schnurr, TM and Michaelsen, KF and Hansen, T and Oddy, W and Pennell, CE and Warrington, NM and Davey Smith and G and Victora, CG},
   Title = {Effect modification of FADS2 polymorphisms on the
             association between breastfeeding and intelligence: results
             from a collaborative meta-analysis.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Epidemiology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyy273},
   Abstract = {Background:Accumulating evidence suggests that breastfeeding
             benefits children's intelligence, possibly due to long-chain
             polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) present in breast
             milk. Under a nutritional adequacy hypothesis, an
             interaction between breastfeeding and genetic variants
             associated with endogenous LC-PUFAs synthesis might be
             expected. However, the literature on this topic is
             controversial. Methods:We investigated this gene ×
             environment interaction through a collaborative effort. The
             primary analysis involved >12 000 individuals and used ever
             breastfeeding, FADS2 polymorphisms rs174575 and rs1535 coded
             assuming a recessive effect of the G allele, and
             intelligence quotient (IQ) in Z scores. Results:There was no
             strong evidence of interaction, with pooled
             covariate-adjusted interaction coefficients (i.e. difference
             between genetic groups of the difference in IQ Z scores
             comparing ever with never breastfed individuals) of
             0.12[(95% confidence interval (CI): -0.19; 0.43] and 0.06
             (95% CI: -0.16; 0.27) for the rs174575 and rs1535 variants,
             respectively. Secondary analyses corroborated these results.
             In studies with ≥5.85 and <5.85 months of breastfeeding
             duration, pooled estimates for the rs174575 variant were
             0.50 (95% CI: -0.06; 1.06) and 0.14 (95% CI: -0.10; 0.38),
             respectively, and 0.27 (95% CI: -0.28; 0.82) and -0.01 (95%
             CI: -0.19; 0.16) for the rs1535 variant. Conclusions:Our
             findings did not support an interaction between ever
             breastfeeding and FADS2 polymorphisms. However, subgroup
             analysis suggested that breastfeeding may supply LC-PUFAs
             requirements for cognitive development if breastfeeding
             lasts for some (currently unknown) time. Future studies in
             large individual-level datasets would allow properly powered
             subgroup analyses and further improve our understanding on
             the breastfeeding × FADS2 interaction.},
   Doi = {10.1093/ije/dyy273},
   Key = {fds340540}
}

@article{fds340541,
   Author = {Roberts, S and Arseneault, L and Barratt, B and Beevers, S and Danese,
             A and Odgers, CL and Moffitt, TE and Reuben, A and Kelly, FJ and Fisher,
             HL},
   Title = {Exploration of NO2 and PM2.5 air pollution and mental health
             problems using high-resolution data in London-based children
             from a UK longitudinal cohort study.},
   Journal = {Psychiatry Research},
   Volume = {272},
   Pages = {8-17},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2018.12.050},
   Abstract = {Air pollution is a worldwide environmental health issue.
             Increasingly, reports suggest that poor air quality may be
             associated with mental health problems, but these studies
             often use global measures and rarely focus on early
             development when psychopathology commonly emerges. To
             address this, we combined high-resolution air pollution
             exposure estimates and prospectively-collected phenotypic
             data to explore concurrent and longitudinal associations
             between air pollutants of major concern in urban areas and
             mental health problems in childhood and adolescence.
             Exploratory analyses were conducted on 284 London-based
             children from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal
             Twin Study. Exposure to annualized PM2.5 and NO2
             concentrations was estimated at address-level when children
             were aged 12. Symptoms of anxiety, depression, conduct
             disorder, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder were
             assessed at ages 12 and 18. Psychiatric diagnoses were
             ascertained from interviews with the participants at age 18.
             We found no associations between age-12 pollution exposure
             and concurrent mental health problems. However, age-12
             pollution estimates were significantly associated with
             increased odds of major depressive disorder at age 18, even
             after controlling for common risk factors. This study
             demonstrates the potential utility of incorporating
             high-resolution pollution estimates into large
             epidemiological cohorts to robustly investigate associations
             between air pollution and youth mental health.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psychres.2018.12.050},
   Key = {fds340541}
}

@article{fds339247,
   Author = {Selzam, S and Coleman, JRI and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Plomin,
             R},
   Title = {A polygenic p factor for major psychiatric
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Translational Psychiatry},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {205},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41398-018-0217-4},
   Abstract = {It has recently been proposed that a single dimension,
             called the p factor, can capture a person's liability to
             mental disorder. Relevant to the p hypothesis, recent
             genetic research has found surprisingly high genetic
             correlations between pairs of psychiatric disorders. Here,
             for the first time, we compare genetic correlations from
             different methods and examine their support for a genetic p
             factor. We tested the hypothesis of a genetic p factor by
             applying principal component analysis to matrices of genetic
             correlations between major psychiatric disorders estimated
             by three methods-family study, genome-wide complex trait
             analysis, and linkage-disequilibrium score regression-and on
             a matrix of polygenic score correlations constructed for
             each individual in a UK-representative sample of 7 026
             unrelated individuals. All disorders loaded positively on a
             first unrotated principal component, which accounted for 57,
             43, 35, and 22% of the variance respectively for the four
             methods. Our results showed that all four methods provided
             strong support for a genetic p factor that represents the
             pinnacle of the hierarchical genetic architecture of
             psychopathology.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41398-018-0217-4},
   Key = {fds339247}
}

@article{fds340542,
   Author = {Elliott, ML and Belsky, DW and Anderson, K and Corcoran, DL and Ge, T and Knodt, A and Prinz, JA and Sugden, K and Williams, B and Ireland, D and Poulton, R and Caspi, A and Holmes, A and Moffitt, T and Hariri,
             AR},
   Title = {A Polygenic Score for Higher Educational Attainment is
             Associated with Larger Brains.},
   Journal = {Cerebral Cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhy219},
   Abstract = {People who score higher on intelligence tests tend to have
             larger brains. Twin studies suggest the same genetic factors
             influence both brain size and intelligence. This has led to
             the hypothesis that genetics influence intelligence partly
             by contributing to the development of larger brains. We
             tested this hypothesis using four large imaging genetics
             studies (combined N = 7965) with polygenic scores derived
             from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of educational
             attainment, a correlate of intelligence. We conducted
             meta-analysis to test associations among participants'
             genetics, total brain volume (i.e., brain size), and
             cognitive test performance. Consistent with previous
             findings, participants with higher polygenic scores achieved
             higher scores on cognitive tests, as did participants with
             larger brains. Participants with higher polygenic scores
             also had larger brains. We found some evidence that brain
             size partly mediated associations between participants'
             education polygenic scores and their cognitive test
             performance. Effect sizes were larger in the
             population-based samples than in the convenience-based
             samples. Recruitment and retention of population-representative
             samples should be a priority for neuroscience research.
             Findings suggest promise for studies integrating GWAS
             discoveries with brain imaging to understand neurobiology
             linking genetics with cognitive performance.},
   Doi = {10.1093/cercor/bhy219},
   Key = {fds340542}
}

@article{fds336531,
   Author = {Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {All for One and One for All: Mental Disorders in One
             Dimension.},
   Journal = {The American Journal of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {175},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {831-844},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.17121383},
   Abstract = {In both child and adult psychiatry, empirical evidence has
             now accrued to suggest that a single dimension is able to
             measure a person's liability to mental disorder, comorbidity
             among disorders, persistence of disorders over time, and
             severity of symptoms. This single dimension of general
             psychopathology has been termed "p," because it conceptually
             parallels a dimension already familiar to behavioral
             scientists and clinicians: the "g" factor of general
             intelligence. As the g dimension reflects low to high mental
             ability, the p dimension represents low to high
             psychopathology severity, with thought disorder at the
             extreme. The dimension of p unites all disorders. It
             influences present/absent status on hundreds of psychiatric
             symptoms, which modern nosological systems typically
             aggregate into dozens of distinct diagnoses, which in turn
             aggregate into three overarching domains, namely, the
             externalizing, internalizing, and psychotic experience
             domains, which finally aggregate into one dimension of
             psychopathology from low to high: p. Studies show that the
             higher a person scores on p, the worse that person fares on
             measures of family history of psychiatric illness, brain
             function, childhood developmental history, and adult life
             impairment. A dimension of p may help account for ubiquitous
             nonspecificity in psychiatry: multiple disorders share the
             same risk factors and biomarkers and often respond to the
             same therapies. Here, the authors summarize the history of
             the unidimensional idea, review modern research into p,
             demystify statistical models, articulate some implications
             of p for prevention and clinical practice, and outline a
             transdiagnostic research agenda. [AJP AT 175: Remembering
             Our Past As We Envision Our Future October 1910: A Study of
             Association in Insanity Grace Helen Kent and A.J. Rosanoff:
             "No sharp distinction can be drawn between mental health and
             mental disease; a large collection of material shows a
             gradual and not an abrupt transition from the normal state
             to pathological states."(Am J Psychiatry 1910; 67(2):317-390
             )].},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.17121383},
   Key = {fds336531}
}

@article{fds336525,
   Author = {Agnew-Blais, JC and Polanczyk, GV and Danese, A and Wertz, J and Moffitt, TE and Arseneault, L},
   Title = {Young adult mental health and functional outcomes among
             individuals with remitted, persistent and late-onset
             ADHD.},
   Journal = {The British Journal of Psychiatry : the Journal of Mental
             Science},
   Volume = {213},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {526-534},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1192/bjp.2018.97},
   Abstract = {Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is
             associated with mental health problems and functional
             impairment across many domains. However, how the
             longitudinal course of ADHD affects later functioning
             remains unclear.AimsWe aimed to disentangle how ADHD
             developmental patterns are associated with young adult
             functioning.The Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal
             Twin Study is a population-based cohort of 2232 twins born
             in England and Wales in 1994-1995. We assessed ADHD in
             childhood at ages 5, 7, 10 and 12 years and in young
             adulthood at age 18 years. We examined three developmental
             patterns of ADHD from childhood to young adulthood -
             remitted, persistent and late-onset ADHD - and compared
             these groups with one another and with non-ADHD controls on
             functioning at age 18 years. We additionally tested whether
             group differences were attributable to childhood IQ,
             childhood conduct disorder or familial factors shared
             between twins.Compared with individuals without ADHD, those
             with remitted ADHD showed poorer physical health and
             socioeconomic outcomes in young adulthood. Individuals with
             persistent or late-onset ADHD showed poorer functioning
             across all domains, including mental health, substance
             misuse, psychosocial, physical health and socioeconomic
             outcomes. Overall, these associations were not explained by
             childhood IQ, childhood conduct disorder or shared familial
             factors.Long-term associations of childhood ADHD with
             adverse physical health and socioeconomic outcomes
             underscore the need for early intervention. Young adult ADHD
             showed stronger associations with poorer mental health,
             substance misuse and psychosocial outcomes, emphasising the
             importance of identifying and treating adults with
             ADHD.Declaration of interestNone.},
   Doi = {10.1192/bjp.2018.97},
   Key = {fds336525}
}

@article{fds336526,
   Author = {Crush, E and Arseneault, L and Moffitt, TE and Danese, A and Caspi, A and Jaffee, SR and Matthews, T and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {Protective factors for psychotic experiences amongst
             adolescents exposed to multiple forms of
             victimization.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychiatric Research},
   Volume = {104},
   Pages = {32-38},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.06.011},
   Abstract = {Experiencing multiple types of victimization
             (poly-victimization) during adolescence is associated with
             the onset of psychotic experiences (such as hearing voices,
             having visions, or being extremely paranoid). However, many
             poly-victimized adolescents will not develop such
             subclinical phenomena and the factors that protect them are
             unknown. This study investigated whether individual, family,
             or community-level characteristics were associated with an
             absence of psychotic experiences amongst poly-victimized
             adolescents. Participants were from the Environmental Risk
             (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally-representative
             cohort of 2232 UK-born twins. Exposure to seven different
             types of victimization between ages 12-18 was ascertained
             using a modified version of the Juvenile Victimization
             Questionnaire at age 18. Adolescents were also interviewed
             about psychotic experiences at age 18. Protective factors
             were measured at ages 12 and 18. We found that exposure to
             poly-victimization during adolescence was associated with
             age-18 psychotic experiences (OR = 4.62, 95% CI
             3.59-5.94, P < 0.001), but more than a third of the
             poly-victimized adolescents reported having no psychotic
             experiences (40.1%). Greater social support was found to be
             protective against adolescent psychotic experiences even
             amongst those exposed to poly-victimization. Engaging in
             physical activity and greater neighborhood social cohesion
             were also associated with a reduced likelihood of age-18
             psychotic experiences in the whole sample, with
             non-significant trends in the poly-victimized group.
             Increasing social support and promoting physical activity
             appear to be important areas for future research into the
             development of preventive interventions targeting adolescent
             psychotic experiences. This adds further weight to calls to
             increase the promotion of these factors on a public health
             scale.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.06.011},
   Key = {fds336526}
}

@article{fds336524,
   Author = {Belsky, DW and Domingue, BW and Wedow, R and Arseneault, L and Boardman,
             JD and Caspi, A and Conley, D and Fletcher, JM and Freese, J and Herd, P and Moffitt, TE and Poulton, R and Sicinski, K and Wertz, J and Harris,
             KM},
   Title = {Genetic analysis of social-class mobility in five
             longitudinal studies.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the
             United States of America},
   Volume = {115},
   Number = {31},
   Pages = {E7275-E7284},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1801238115},
   Abstract = {A summary genetic measure, called a "polygenic score,"
             derived from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of
             education can modestly predict a person's educational and
             economic success. This prediction could signal a biological
             mechanism: Education-linked genetics could encode
             characteristics that help people get ahead in life.
             Alternatively, prediction could reflect social history:
             People from well-off families might stay well-off for social
             reasons, and these families might also look alike
             genetically. A key test to distinguish biological mechanism
             from social history is if people with higher education
             polygenic scores tend to climb the social ladder beyond
             their parents' position. Upward mobility would indicate
             education-linked genetics encodes characteristics that
             foster success. We tested if education-linked polygenic
             scores predicted social mobility in >20,000 individuals in
             five longitudinal studies in the United States, Britain, and
             New Zealand. Participants with higher polygenic scores
             achieved more education and career success and accumulated
             more wealth. However, they also tended to come from
             better-off families. In the key test, participants with
             higher polygenic scores tended to be upwardly mobile
             compared with their parents. Moreover, in sibling-difference
             analysis, the sibling with the higher polygenic score was
             more upwardly mobile. Thus, education GWAS discoveries are
             not mere correlates of privilege; they influence social
             mobility within a life. Additional analyses revealed that a
             mother's polygenic score predicted her child's attainment
             over and above the child's own polygenic score, suggesting
             parents' genetics can also affect their children's
             attainment through environmental pathways. Education GWAS
             discoveries affect socioeconomic attainment through
             influence on individuals' family-of-origin environments and
             their social mobility.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.1801238115},
   Key = {fds336524}
}

@article{fds340543,
   Author = {Freedman, R and Brown, AS and Cannon, TD and Druss, BG and Earls, FJ and Escobar, J and Hurd, YL and Lewis, DA and López-Jaramillo, C and Luby,
             J and Mayberg, HS and Moffitt, TE and Oquendo, M and Perlis, RH and Pine,
             DS and Rush, AJ and Tamminga, CA and Tohen, M and Vieta, E and Wisner, KL and Xin, Y},
   Title = {Can a Framework Be Established for the Safe Use of
             Ketamine?},
   Journal = {The American Journal of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {175},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {587-589},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18030290},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18030290},
   Key = {fds340543}
}

@article{fds332178,
   Author = {Marzi, SJ and Sugden, K and Arseneault, L and Belsky, DW and Burrage, J and Corcoran, DL and Danese, A and Fisher, HL and Hannon, E and Moffitt, TE and Odgers, CL and Pariante, C and Poulton, R and Williams, BS and Wong,
             CCY and Mill, J and Caspi, A},
   Title = {Analysis of DNA Methylation in Young People: Limited
             Evidence for an Association Between Victimization Stress and
             Epigenetic Variation in Blood.},
   Journal = {The American Journal of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {175},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {517-529},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17060693},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:DNA methylation has been proposed as an epigenetic
             mechanism by which early-life experiences become "embedded"
             in the genome and alter transcriptional processes to
             compromise health. The authors sought to investigate whether
             early-life victimization stress is associated with
             genome-wide DNA methylation. METHOD:The authors tested the
             hypothesis that victimization is associated with DNA
             methylation in the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal
             Study, a nationally representative 1994-1995 birth cohort of
             2,232 twins born in England and Wales and assessed at ages
             5, 7, 10, 12, and 18 years. Multiple forms of victimization
             were ascertained in childhood and adolescence (including
             physical, sexual, and emotional abuse; neglect; exposure to
             intimate-partner violence; bullying; cyber-victimization;
             and crime). RESULTS:Epigenome-wide analyses of
             polyvictimization across childhood and adolescence revealed
             few significant associations with DNA methylation in
             peripheral blood at age 18, but these analyses were
             confounded by tobacco smoking and/or did not survive co-twin
             control tests. Secondary analyses of specific forms of
             victimization revealed sparse associations with DNA
             methylation that did not replicate across different
             operationalizations of the same putative victimization
             experience. Hypothesis-driven analyses of six candidate
             genes in the stress response (NR3C1, FKBP5, BDNF, AVP,
             CRHR1, SLC6A4) did not reveal predicted associations with
             DNA methylation in probes annotated to these genes.
             CONCLUSIONS:Findings from this epidemiological analysis of
             the epigenetic effects of early-life stress do not support
             the hypothesis of robust changes in DNA methylation in
             victimized young people. We need to come to terms with the
             possibility that epigenetic epidemiology is not yet well
             matched to experimental, nonhuman models in uncovering the
             biological embedding of stress.},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17060693},
   Key = {fds332178}
}

@article{fds336527,
   Author = {Belsky, DW and Moffitt, TE and Cohen, AA and Corcoran, DL and Levine,
             ME and Prinz, JA and Schaefer, J and Sugden, K and Williams, B and Poulton,
             R and Caspi, A},
   Title = {Eleven Telomere, Epigenetic Clock, and Biomarker-Composite
             Quantifications of Biological Aging: Do They Measure the
             Same Thing?},
   Journal = {American Journal of Epidemiology},
   Volume = {187},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1220-1230},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwx346},
   Abstract = {The geroscience hypothesis posits that therapies to slow
             biological processes of aging can prevent disease and extend
             healthy years of life. To test such "geroprotective"
             therapies in humans, outcome measures are needed that can
             assess extension of disease-free life span. This need has
             spurred development of different methods to quantify
             biological aging. But different methods have not been
             systematically compared in the same humans. We implemented 7
             methods to quantify biological aging using repeated-measures
             physiological and genomic data in 964 middle-aged humans in
             the Dunedin Study (New Zealand; persons born 1972-1973). We
             studied 11 measures in total: telomere-length and erosion, 3
             epigenetic-clocks and their ticking rates, and 3
             biomarker-composites. Contrary to expectation, we found low
             agreement between different measures of biological aging. We
             next compared associations between biological aging measures
             and outcomes that geroprotective therapies seek to modify:
             physical functioning, cognitive decline, and subjective
             signs of aging, including aged facial appearance. The
             71-cytosine-phosphate-guanine epigenetic clock and biomarker
             composites were consistently related to these aging-related
             outcomes. However, effect sizes were modest. Results
             suggested that various proposed approaches to quantifying
             biological aging may not measure the same aspects of the
             aging process. Further systematic evaluation and refinement
             of measures of biological aging is needed to furnish
             outcomes for geroprotector trials.},
   Doi = {10.1093/aje/kwx346},
   Key = {fds336527}
}

@article{fds336528,
   Author = {Rasmussen, LJH and Moffitt, TE and Eugen-Olsen, J and Belsky, DW and Danese, A and Harrington, H and Houts, RM and Poulton, R and Sugden, K and Williams, B and Caspi, A},
   Title = {Cumulative childhood risk is associated with a new measure
             of chronic inflammation in adulthood.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12928},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Childhood risk factors are associated with
             elevated inflammatory biomarkers in adulthood, but it is
             unknown whether these risk factors are associated with
             increased adult levels of the chronic inflammation marker
             soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR). We
             aimed to test the hypothesis that childhood exposure to risk
             factors for adult disease is associated with elevated suPAR
             in adulthood and to compare suPAR with the oft-reported
             inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP).
             METHODS:Prospective study of a population-representative
             1972-1973 birth cohort; the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health
             and Development Study observed participants to age
             38 years. Main childhood predictors were poor health,
             socioeconomic disadvantage, adverse childhood experiences
             (ACEs), low IQ, and poor self-control. Main adult outcomes
             were adulthood inflammation measured as suPAR and
             high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP). RESULTS:Participants with
             available plasma samples at age 38 were included (N = 837,
             50.5% male). suPAR (mean 2.40 ng/ml; SD 0.91) was
             positively correlated with hsCRP (r 0.15, p < .001). After
             controlling for sex, body mass index (BMI), and smoking,
             children who experienced more ACEs, lower IQ, or had poorer
             self-control showed elevated adult suPAR. When the five
             childhood risks were aggregated into a Cumulative Childhood
             Risk index, and controlling for sex, BMI, and smoking,
             Cumulative Childhood Risk was associated with higher suPAR
             (b 0.10; SE 0.03; p = .002). Cumulative Childhood Risk
             predicted elevated suPAR, after controlling for hsCRP (b
             0.18; SE 0.03; p < .001). CONCLUSIONS:Exposure to more
             childhood risk factors was associated with higher suPAR
             levels, independent of CRP. suPAR is a useful addition to
             studies connecting childhood risk to adult inflammatory
             burden.},
   Doi = {10.1111/jcpp.12928},
   Key = {fds336528}
}

@article{fds336529,
   Author = {Schaefer, JD and Moffitt, TE and Arseneault, L and Danese, A and Fisher,
             HL and Houts, R and Sheridan, MA and Wertz, J and Caspi,
             A},
   Title = {Adolescent Victimization and Early-Adult Psychopathology:
             Approaching Causal Inference Using a Longitudinal Twin Study
             to Rule Out Noncausal Explanations.},
   Journal = {Clinical Psychological Science : a Journal of the
             Association for Psychological Science},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {352-371},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2167702617741381},
   Abstract = {Adolescence is the peak age for both victimization and
             mental disorder onset. Previous research has reported
             associations between victimization exposure and many
             psychiatric conditions. However, causality remains
             controversial. Within the Environmental Risk Longitudinal
             Twin Study, we tested whether seven types of adolescent
             victimization increased risk of multiple psychiatric
             conditions and approached causal inference by systematically
             ruling out noncausal explanations. Longitudinal
             within-individual analyses showed that victimization was
             followed by increased mental health problems over a
             childhood baseline of emotional/behavioral problems.
             Discordant-twin analyses showed that victimization increased
             risk of mental health problems independent of family
             background and genetic risk. Both childhood and adolescent
             victimization made unique contributions to risk.
             Victimization predicted heightened generalized liability
             (the "p factor") to multiple psychiatric spectra, including
             internalizing, externalizing, and thought disorders. Results
             recommend violence reduction and identification and
             treatment of adolescent victims to reduce psychiatric
             burden.},
   Doi = {10.1177/2167702617741381},
   Key = {fds336529}
}

@article{fds333593,
   Author = {Wertz, J and Caspi, A and Belsky, DW and Beckley, AL and Arseneault, L and Barnes, JC and Corcoran, DL and Hogan, S and Houts, RM and Morgan, N and Odgers, CL and Prinz, JA and Sugden, K and Williams, BS and Poulton, R and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Genetics and Crime: Integrating New Genomic Discoveries Into
             Psychological Research About Antisocial Behavior.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {791-803},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797617744542},
   Abstract = {Drawing on psychological and sociological theories of crime
             causation, we tested the hypothesis that genetic risk for
             low educational attainment (assessed via a genome-wide
             polygenic score) is associated with criminal offending. We
             further tested hypotheses of how polygenic risk relates to
             the development of antisocial behavior from childhood
             through adulthood. Across the Dunedin and Environmental Risk
             (E-Risk) birth cohorts of individuals growing up 20 years
             and 20,000 kilometers apart, education polygenic scores
             predicted risk of a criminal record with modest effects.
             Polygenic risk manifested during primary schooling in lower
             cognitive abilities, lower self-control, academic
             difficulties, and truancy, and it was associated with a
             life-course-persistent pattern of antisocial behavior that
             onsets in childhood and persists into adulthood. Crime is
             central in the nature-nurture debate, and findings reported
             here demonstrate how molecular-genetic discoveries can be
             incorporated into established theories of antisocial
             behavior. They also suggest that improving school
             experiences might prevent genetic influences on crime from
             unfolding.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0956797617744542},
   Key = {fds333593}
}

@article{fds326211,
   Author = {Romer, AL and Knodt, AR and Houts, R and Brigidi, BD and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {Structural alterations within cerebellar circuitry are
             associated with general liability for common mental
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Molecular Psychiatry},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1084-1090},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Abstract = {Accumulating mental-health research encourages a shift in
             focus toward transdiagnostic dimensional features that are
             shared across categorical disorders. In support of this
             shift, recent studies have identified a general liability
             factor for psychopathology-sometimes called the 'p factor'-
             that underlies shared risk for a wide range of mental
             disorders. Identifying neural correlates of this general
             liability would substantiate its importance in
             characterizing the shared origins of mental disorders and
             help us begin to understand the mechanisms through which the
             'p factor' contributes to risk. Here we believe we first
             replicate the 'p factor' using cross-sectional data from a
             volunteer sample of 1246 university students, and then using
             high-resolution multimodal structural neuroimaging, we
             demonstrate that individuals with higher 'p factor' scores
             show reduced structural integrity of white matter pathways,
             as indexed by lower fractional anisotropy values, uniquely
             within the pons. Whole-brain analyses further revealed that
             higher 'p factor' scores are associated with reduced gray
             matter volume in the occipital lobe and left cerebellar
             lobule VIIb, which is functionally connected with prefrontal
             regions supporting cognitive control. Consistent with the
             preponderance of cerebellar afferents within the pons, we
             observed a significant positive correlation between the
             white matter integrity of the pons and cerebellar gray
             matter volume associated with higher 'p factor' scores. The
             results of our analyses provide initial evidence that
             structural alterations in corticocerebellar circuitry
             supporting core functions related to the basic integration,
             coordination and monitoring of information may contribute to
             a general liability for common mental disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1038/mp.2017.57},
   Key = {fds326211}
}

@misc{fds340544,
   Author = {Fisher, H and Marzi, S and Arseneault, L and Wong, C and Kandaswamy, R and Moffitt, T and Roberts, S and Mill, J and Caspi, A},
   Title = {EPIGENETIC SIGNATURES OF CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENT
             VICTIMISATION USING A GENETICALLY SENSITIVE LONGITUDINAL
             COHORT STUDY},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Volume = {44},
   Pages = {S25-S25},
   Publisher = {OXFORD UNIV PRESS},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {fds340544}
}

@misc{fds340545,
   Author = {Crush, E and Arseneault, L and Moffitt, T and Danese, A and Caspi, A and Jaffee, S and Fisher, H},
   Title = {PROTECTIVE FACTORS FOR PSYCHOTIC EXPERIENCES AMONGST
             ADOLESCENTS EXPOSED TO MULTIPLE FORMS OF
             VICTIMIZATION},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Volume = {44},
   Pages = {S110-S110},
   Publisher = {OXFORD UNIV PRESS},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {fds340545}
}

@misc{fds340546,
   Author = {Trotta, A and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Danese, A and Moffitt, T and Pariante, C and Fisher, H},
   Title = {CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES IN YOUNG ADULTHOOD OF
             CHILDREN WITH PSYCHOTIC SYMPTOMS: A LONGITUDINAL TWIN COHORT
             STUDY},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Volume = {44},
   Pages = {S97-S97},
   Publisher = {OXFORD UNIV PRESS},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {fds340546}
}

@article{fds333592,
   Author = {Choi, KW and Houts, R and Arseneault, L and Pariante, C and Sikkema, KJ and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Maternal depression in the intergenerational transmission of
             childhood maltreatment and its sequelae: Testing postpartum
             effects in a longitudinal birth cohort.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Pages = {1-14},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579418000032},
   Abstract = {Mothers who have experienced childhood maltreatment are more
             likely to have children also exposed to maltreatment, a
             phenomenon known as intergenerational transmission. Factors
             in the perinatal period may contribute uniquely to this
             transmission, but timing effects have not been ascertained.
             Using structural equation modeling with 1,016 mothers and
             their 2,032 children in the Environmental Risk Longitudinal
             Twin Study, we tested the mediating role of postpartum
             depression between maternal childhood maltreatment and a
             cascade of negative child outcomes, specifically child
             exposure to maltreatment, internalizing symptoms, and
             externalizing symptoms: (a) adjusting for later maternal
             depression, (b) comparing across sex differences, and (c)
             examining the relative role of maltreatment subtypes.
             Mothers who had been maltreated as children, especially
             those who had experienced emotional or sexual abuse, were at
             increased risk for postpartum depression. In turn,
             postpartum depression predicted children's exposure to
             maltreatment, followed by emotional and behavioral problems.
             Indirect effects from maternal childhood maltreatment to
             child outcomes were robust across child sex and supported
             significant mediation through postpartum depression;
             however, this appeared to be carried by mothers' depression
             beyond the postpartum period. Identifying and treating
             postpartum depression, and preventing its recurrence, may
             help interrupt the intergenerational transmission of
             maltreatment and its sequelae.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579418000032},
   Key = {fds333592}
}

@article{fds333594,
   Author = {Beckley, AL and Caspi, A and Arseneault, L and Barnes, JC and Fisher,
             HL and Harrington, H and Houts, R and Morgan, N and Odgers, CL and Wertz,
             J and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {The Developmental Nature of the Victim-Offender
             Overlap.},
   Journal = {Journal of Developmental and Life Course
             Criminology},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {24-49},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40865-017-0068-3},
   Abstract = {Purpose:It is well-established that victims and offenders
             are often the same people, a phenomenon known as the
             victim-offender overlap, but the developmental nature of
             this overlap remains uncertain. In this study, we drew from
             a developmental theoretical framework to test effects of
             genetics, individual characteristics, and
             routine-activity-based risks. Drawing from developmental
             literature, we additionally tested the effect of an
             accumulation of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs).
             Methods:Data came from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk)
             Study, a representative UK birth cohort of 2232 twins born
             in 1994-1995 and followed to age 18 (with 93% retention).
             Crime victimization and offending were assessed through
             self-reports at age 18 (but findings replicated using crime
             records). We used the classical twin study method to
             decompose variance in the victim-offender overlap into
             genetic and environmental components. We used logistic
             regression to test the effects of childhood risk factors.
             Results:In contrast to past twin studies, we found that
             environment (as well as genes) contributed to the
             victim-offender overlap. Our logistic regression results
             showed that childhood low self-control and childhood
             antisocial behavior nearly doubled the odds of becoming a
             victim-offender, compared to a victim-only or an
             offender-only. Each additional ACE increased the odds of
             becoming a victim-offender, compared to a victim-only or an
             offender-only, by approximately 12%, pointing to the
             importance of cumulative childhood adversity.
             Conclusions:This study showed that the victim-offender
             overlap is, at least partially, developmental in nature and
             predictable from personal childhood characteristics and an
             accumulation of many adverse childhood experiences.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s40865-017-0068-3},
   Key = {fds333594}
}

@article{fds329193,
   Author = {Newbury, J and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Odgers,
             CL and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {Cumulative Effects of Neighborhood Social Adversity and
             Personal Crime Victimization on Adolescent Psychotic
             Experiences.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {348-358},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbx060},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Little is known about the impact of urbanicity,
             adverse neighborhood conditions and violent crime
             victimization on the emergence of adolescent psychotic
             experiences. METHODS:Participants were from the
             Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a
             nationally-representative cohort of 2232 British twins who
             were interviewed about adolescent psychotic experiences at
             age 18. Urbanicity, neighborhood characteristics, and
             personal victimization by violent crime were measured during
             childhood and adolescence via geocoded census data, surveys
             of over 5000 immediate neighbors of the E-Risk participants,
             and interviews with participants themselves.
             RESULTS:Adolescents raised in urban vs rural neighborhoods
             were significantly more likely to have psychotic experiences
             (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.21-2.30, P = .002). This association
             remained significant after considering potential confounders
             including family socioeconomic status, family psychiatric
             history, and adolescent substance problems (OR = 1.43, 95%
             CI = 1.01-2.03, P = .042), but became nonsignificant after
             considering adverse social conditions in urban neighborhoods
             such as low social cohesion and high neighborhood disorder
             (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.94-1.92, P = .102). The combined
             association of adverse neighborhood social conditions and
             personal crime victimization with adolescent psychotic
             experiences (adjusted OR = 4.86, 95% CI = 3.28-7.20, P <
             .001) was substantially greater than for either exposure
             alone, highlighting a potential interaction between
             neighborhood conditions and crime victimization (interaction
             contrast ratio = 1.81, 95% CI = -0.03 to 3.65) that was
             significant at the P = .054 level. CONCLUSIONS:Cumulative
             effects of adverse neighborhood social conditions and
             personal victimization by violent crime during upbringing
             partly explain why adolescents in urban settings are more
             likely to report psychotic experiences. Early intervention
             efforts for psychosis could be targeted towards victimized
             youth living in urban and socially adverse
             neighborhoods.},
   Doi = {10.1093/schbul/sbx060},
   Key = {fds329193}
}

@article{fds328906,
   Author = {Meier, MH and Caspi, A and Danese, A and Fisher, HL and Houts, R and Arseneault, L and Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Associations between adolescent cannabis use and
             neuropsychological decline: a longitudinal co-twin control
             study.},
   Journal = {Addiction (Abingdon, England)},
   Volume = {113},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {257-265},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/add.13946},
   Abstract = {This study tested whether adolescents who used cannabis or
             met criteria for cannabis dependence showed
             neuropsychological impairment prior to cannabis initiation
             and neuropsychological decline from before to after cannabis
             initiation.A longitudinal co-twin control study.Participants
             were 1989 twins from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk)
             Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally representative birth
             cohort of twins born in England and Wales from 1994 to
             1995.Frequency of cannabis use and cannabis dependence were
             assessed at age 18. Intelligence quotient (IQ) was obtained
             at ages 5, 12 and 18. Executive functions were assessed at
             age 18.Compared with adolescents who did not use cannabis,
             adolescents who used cannabis had lower IQ in childhood
             prior to cannabis initiation and lower IQ at age 18, but
             there was little evidence that cannabis use was associated
             with IQ decline from ages 12-18. For example, adolescents
             with cannabis dependence had age 12 and age 18 IQ scores
             that were 5.61 (t = -3.11, P = 0.002) and 7.34 IQ points
             (t = -5.27, P < 0.001) lower than adolescents without
             cannabis dependence, but adolescents with cannabis
             dependence did not show greater IQ decline from age 12-18
             (t = -1.27, P = 0.20). Moreover, adolescents who used
             cannabis had poorer executive functions at age 18 than
             adolescents who did not use cannabis, but these associations
             were generally not apparent within twin pairs. For example,
             twins who used cannabis more frequently than their co-twin
             performed similarly to their co-twin on five of six
             executive function tests (Ps > 0.10). The one exception
             was that twins who used cannabis more frequently than their
             co-twin performed worse on one working memory test (Spatial
             Span reversed; β = -0.07, P = 0.036).Short-term
             cannabis use in adolescence does not appear to cause IQ
             decline or impair executive functions, even when cannabis
             use reaches the level of dependence. Family background
             factors explain why adolescent cannabis users perform worse
             on IQ and executive function tests.},
   Doi = {10.1111/add.13946},
   Key = {fds328906}
}

@article{fds332179,
   Author = {Beckley, AL and Caspi, A and Broadbent, J and Harrington, H and Houts,
             RM and Poulton, R and Ramrakha, S and Reuben, A and Moffitt,
             TE},
   Title = {Association of Childhood Blood Lead Levels With Criminal
             Offending.},
   Journal = {Jama Pediatrics},
   Volume = {172},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {166-173},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.4005},
   Abstract = {Importance:Lead is a neurotoxin with well-documented effects
             on health. Research suggests that lead may be associated
             with criminal behavior. This association is difficult to
             disentangle from low socioeconomic status, a factor in both
             lead exposure and criminal offending. Objective:To test the
             hypothesis that a higher childhood blood lead level (BLL) is
             associated with greater risk of criminal conviction,
             recidivism (repeat conviction), conviction for violent
             offenses, and variety of self-reported criminal offending in
             a setting where BLL was not associated with low
             socioeconomic status. Design, Setting, and Participants:A
             total of 553 individuals participated in a prospective study
             based on a population-representative cohort born between
             April 1, 1972, and March 31, 1973, from New Zealand; the
             Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study
             observed participants to age 38 years (December 2012).
             Statistical analysis was performed from November 10, 2016,
             to September 5, 2017. Exposures:Blood lead level measured at
             age 11 years. Main Outcomes and Measures:Official criminal
             conviction cumulative to age 38 years (data collected in
             2013), single conviction or recidivism, conviction for
             nonviolent or violent crime, and self-reported variety of
             crime types at ages 15, 18, 21, 26, 32, and 38 years.
             Results:Participants included 553 individuals (255 female
             and 298 male participants) who had their blood tested for
             lead at age 11 years. The mean (SD) BLL at age 11 years was
             11.01 (4.62) μg/dL. A total of 154 participants (27.8%) had
             a criminal conviction, 86 (15.6%) had recidivated, and 53
             (9.6%) had a violent offense conviction. Variety scores for
             self-reported offending ranged from 0 to 10 offense types at
             each assessment; higher numbers indicated greater crime
             involvement. Self-reported offending followed the
             well-established age-crime curve (ie, the mean [SD] variety
             of self-reported offending increased from 1.99 [2.82] at age
             15 years to its peak of 4.24 [3.15] at age 18 years and 4.22
             [3.02] at age 21 years and declined thereafter to 1.10
             [1.59] at age 38 years). Blood lead level was a poor
             discriminator between no conviction and conviction (area
             under the curve, 0.58). Overall, associations between BLL
             and conviction outcomes were weak. The estimated effect of
             BLL was lower for recidivism than for single convictions and
             lower for violent offending than for nonviolent offending.
             Sex-adjusted associations between BLL reached statistical
             significance for only 1 of the 6 self-reported offending
             outcomes at age 15 years (r = 0.10; 95% CI, 0.01-0.18;
             P = .02). Conclusions and Relevance:This study overcomes
             past limitations of studies of BLL and crime by studying the
             association in a place and time where the correlation was
             not confounded by childhood socioeconomic status. Findings
             failed to support a dose-response association between BLL
             and consequential criminal offending.},
   Doi = {10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.4005},
   Key = {fds332179}
}

@article{fds329770,
   Author = {Newbury, JB and Arseneault, L and Moffitt, TE and Caspi, A and Danese,
             A and Baldwin, JR and Fisher, HL},
   Title = {Measuring childhood maltreatment to predict early-adult
             psychopathology: Comparison of prospective informant-reports
             and retrospective self-reports.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychiatric Research},
   Volume = {96},
   Pages = {57-64},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.09.020},
   Abstract = {Both prospective informant-reports and retrospective
             self-reports may be used to measure childhood maltreatment,
             though both methods entail potential limitations such as
             underestimation and memory biases. The validity and utility
             of standard measures of childhood maltreatment requires
             clarification in order to inform the design of future
             studies investigating the mental health consequences of
             maltreatment. The present study assessed agreement between
             prospective informant-reports and retrospective self-reports
             of childhood maltreatment, as well as the comparative
             utility of both reports for predicting a range of
             psychiatric problems at age 18. Data were obtained from the
             Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a
             nationally-representative birth cohort of 2232 children
             followed to 18 years of age (with 93% retention). Childhood
             maltreatment was assessed in two ways: (i) prospective
             informant-reports from caregivers, researchers, and
             clinicians when children were aged 5, 7, 10 and 12; and (ii)
             retrospective self-reports of maltreatment experiences
             occurring up to age 12, obtained at age 18 using the
             Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Participants were privately
             interviewed at age 18 concerning several psychiatric
             problems including depression, anxiety, self-injury,
             alcohol/cannabis dependence, and conduct disorder. There was
             only slight to fair agreement between prospective and
             retrospective reports of childhood maltreatment (all
             Kappa's ≤ 0.31). Both prospective and retrospective
             reports of maltreatment were associated with age-18
             psychiatric problems, though the strongest associations were
             found when maltreatment was retrospectively self-reported.
             These findings indicate that prospective and retrospective
             reports of childhood maltreatment capture largely
             non-overlapping groups of individuals. Young adults who
             recall being maltreated have a particularly elevated risk
             for psychopathology.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jpsychires.2017.09.020},
   Key = {fds329770}
}

@article{fds329192,
   Author = {Baldwin, JR and Arseneault, L and Caspi, A and Fisher, HL and Moffitt,
             TE and Odgers, CL and Pariante, C and Ambler, A and Dove, R and Kepa, A and Matthews, T and Menard, A and Sugden, K and Williams, B and Danese,
             A},
   Title = {Childhood victimization and inflammation in young adulthood:
             A genetically sensitive cohort study.},
   Journal = {Brain, Behavior, and Immunity},
   Volume = {67},
   Pages = {211-217},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2017.08.025},
   Abstract = {Childhood victimization is an important risk factor for
             later immune-related disorders. Previous evidence has
             demonstrated that childhood victimization is associated with
             elevated levels of inflammation biomarkers measured decades
             after exposure. However, it is unclear whether this
             association is (1) already detectable in young people, (2)
             different in males and females, and (3) confounded by
             genetic liability to inflammation. Here we sought to address
             these questions.Participants were 2232 children followed
             from birth to age 18years as part of the Environmental Risk
             (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study. Childhood victimization
             was measured prospectively from birth to age 12years.
             Inflammation was measured through C-reactive protein (CRP)
             levels in dried blood spots at age 18years. Latent genetic
             liability for high inflammation levels was assessed through
             a twin-based method.Greater exposure to childhood
             victimization was associated with higher CRP levels at age
             18 (serum-equivalent means were 0.65 in non-victimized Study
             members, 0.74 in those exposed to one victimization type,
             and 0.81 in those exposed to poly-victimization; p=0.018).
             However, this association was driven by a significant
             association in females (serum-equivalent means were 0.75 in
             non-victimized females, 0.87 in those exposed to one type of
             victimization, and 1.19 in those exposed to
             poly-victimization; p=0.010), while no significant
             association was observed in males (p=0.19). Victimized
             females showed elevated CRP levels independent of latent
             genetic influence, as well as childhood socioeconomic
             status, and waist-hip ratio and body temperature at the time
             of CRP assessment.Childhood victimization is associated with
             elevated CRP levels in young women, independent of latent
             genetic influences and other key risk factors. These results
             strengthen causal inference about the effects of childhood
             victimization on inflammation levels in females by
             accounting for potential genetic confounding.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.bbi.2017.08.025},
   Key = {fds329192}
}

@article{fds333009,
   Author = {Moffitt, TE},
   Title = {Male antisocial behaviour in adolescence and
             beyond.},
   Journal = {Nature Human Behaviour},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {177-186},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41562-018-0309-4},
   Abstract = {Male antisocial behavior is concentrated in the adolescent
             period of the life course, as documented by the curve of
             crime over age. This article reviews recent evidence
             regarding the hypothesis that the age-crime curve conceals
             two groups with different causes. Life-course persistent
             males show extreme, pervasive, persistent antisocial
             behavior from early childhood to adulthood. They are
             hypothesized to be rare, with pathological risk factors and
             poor life outcomes. In contrast, adolescence-limited males
             show similar levels of antisocial behavior but primarily
             during the adolescent stage of development. They are
             hypothesized to be common and normative, whereas abstainers
             from offending are rare. This article recaps the taxonomy's
             25-year history, concluding that it is standing the test of
             time in research, and making an impact on policy in
             early-years prevention and juvenile justice. Research is
             needed into how the taxonomy relates to neuroscience,
             health, genetics, and changes in modern crime, including
             digital crime.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41562-018-0309-4},
   Key = {fds333009}
}

@article{fds332046,
   Author = {Wertz, J and Agnew-Blais, J and Caspi, A and Danese, A and Fisher, HL and Goldman-Mellor, S and Moffitt, TE and Arseneault,
             L},
   Title = {From Childhood Conduct Problems to Poor Functioning at Age
             18 Years: Examining Explanations in a Longitudinal Cohort
             Study.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {57},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {54-60.e4},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.09.437},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:Childhood conduct problems are associated with
             poor functioning in early adulthood. We tested a series of
             hypotheses to understand the mechanisms underlying this
             association. METHOD:We used data from the Environmental Risk
             (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a birth cohort of 2,232
             twins born in England and Wales in 1994 and 1995, followed
             up to age 18 years with 93% retention. Severe conduct
             problems in childhood were assessed at ages 5, 7, and 10
             years using parent and teacher reports. Poor functioning at
             age 18 years, including cautions and convictions, daily
             cigarette smoking, heavy drinking, and psychosocial
             difficulties, was measured through interviews with
             participants and official crime record searches.
             RESULTS:Participants 18 years old with versus without a
             childhood history of severe conduct problems had greater
             rates of each poor functional outcome, and they were more
             likely to experience multiple poor outcomes. This
             association was partly accounted for by concurrent
             psychopathology in early adulthood, as well as by early
             familial risk factors, both genetic and environmental.
             Childhood conduct problems, however, continued to predict
             poor outcomes at age 18 years after accounting for these
             explanations. CONCLUSION:Children with severe conduct
             problems display poor functioning at age 18 years because of
             concurrent problems in early adulthood and familial risk
             factors originating in childhood. However, conduct problems
             also exert a lasting effect on young people's lives
             independent of these factors, pointing to early conduct
             problems as a target for early interventions aimed at
             preventing poor functional outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jaac.2017.09.437},
   Key = {fds332046}
}

@article{fds336532,
   Author = {Elliot, M and Knodt, AR and Kim, MJ and Melzer, TR and Keenan, R and Ireland, D and Ramrakha, S and Poulton, R and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Hariri, AR},
   Title = {General Functional Connectivity: Shared Features of
             Restingstate and Task FMRI Drive Reliable Individual
             Differences in Functional Brain Networks},
   Year = {2018},
   Key = {fds336532}
}


%% Newpher, Thomas M.   
@article{fds337439,
   Author = {Newpher, TM and Harris, S and Pringle, J and Hamilton, C and Soderling,
             S},
   Title = {Regulation of spine structural plasticity by
             Arc/Arg3.1.},
   Journal = {Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology},
   Volume = {77},
   Pages = {25-32},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semcdb.2017.09.022},
   Abstract = {Dendritic spines are actin-rich, postsynaptic protrusions
             that contact presynaptic terminals to form excitatory
             chemical synapses. These synaptic contacts are widely
             believed to be the sites of memory formation and information
             storage, and changes in spine shape are thought to underlie
             several forms of learning-related plasticity. Both membrane
             trafficking pathways and the actin cytoskeleton drive
             activity-dependent structural and functional changes in
             dendritic spines. A key molecular player in regulating these
             processes is the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated
             protein (Arc), a protein that has diverse roles in
             expression of synaptic plasticity. In this review, we
             highlight important findings that have shaped our
             understanding of Arc's functions in structural and
             functional plasticity, as well as Arc's contributions to
             memory consolidation and disease.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.semcdb.2017.09.022},
   Key = {fds337439}
}


%% Nicolelis, Miguel A.   
@article{fds336090,
   Author = {Yin, A and Tseng, PH and Rajangam, S and Lebedev, MA and Nicolelis,
             MAL},
   Title = {Place Cell-Like Activity in the Primary Sensorimotor and
             Premotor Cortex During Monkey Whole-Body
             Navigation.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {9184},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-27472-4},
   Abstract = {Primary motor (M1), primary somatosensory (S1) and dorsal
             premotor (PMd) cortical areas of rhesus monkeys previously
             have been associated only with sensorimotor control of limb
             movements. Here we show that a significant number of neurons
             in these areas also represent body position and orientation
             in space. Two rhesus monkeys (K and M) used a wheelchair
             controlled by a brain-machine interface (BMI) to navigate in
             a room. During this whole-body navigation, the discharge
             rates of M1, S1, and PMd neurons correlated with the
             two-dimensional (2D) room position and the direction of the
             wheelchair and the monkey head. This place cell-like
             activity was observed in both monkeys, with 44.6% and 33.3%
             of neurons encoding room position in monkeys K and M,
             respectively, and the overlapping populations of 41.0% and
             16.0% neurons encoding head direction. These observations
             suggest that primary sensorimotor and premotor cortical
             areas in primates are likely involved in allocentrically
             representing body position in space during whole-body
             navigation, which is an unexpected finding given the
             classical hierarchical model of cortical processing that
             attributes functional specialization for spatial processing
             to the hippocampal formation.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-27472-4},
   Key = {fds336090}
}

@misc{fds337113,
   Author = {Nicolelis, MAL},
   Title = {The human brain, the true creator of everything, cannot be
             simulated by any turing machine},
   Pages = {263-269},
   Booktitle = {Think Tank: Forty Neuroscientists Explore the Biological
             Roots of Human Experience},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   ISBN = {9780300225549},
   Key = {fds337113}
}

@article{fds333768,
   Author = {Tseng, P-H and Rajangam, S and Lehew, G and Lebedev, MA and Nicolelis,
             MAL},
   Title = {Interbrain cortical synchronization encodes multiple aspects
             of social interactions in monkey pairs.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {4699},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-22679-x},
   Abstract = {While it is well known that the primate brain evolved to
             cope with complex social contingencies, the
             neurophysiological manifestation of social interactions in
             primates is not well understood. Here, concurrent wireless
             neuronal ensemble recordings from pairs of monkeys were
             conducted to measure interbrain cortical synchronization
             (ICS) during a whole-body navigation task that involved
             continuous social interaction of two monkeys. One monkey,
             the passenger, was carried in a robotic wheelchair to a food
             dispenser, while a second monkey, the observer, remained
             stationary, watching the passenger. The two monkeys
             alternated the passenger and the observer roles. Concurrent
             neuronal ensemble recordings from the monkeys' motor cortex
             and the premotor dorsal area revealed episodic occurrence of
             ICS with probability that depended on the wheelchair
             kinematics, the passenger-observer distance, and the
             passenger-food distance - the social-interaction factors
             previously described in behavioral studies. These results
             suggest that ICS represents specific aspects of primate
             social interactions.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-22679-x},
   Key = {fds333768}
}

@article{fds340155,
   Author = {Shokur, S and Donati, ARC and Campos, DSF and Gitti, C and Bao, G and Fischer, D and Almeida, S and Braga, VAS and Augusto, P and Petty, C and Alho, EJL and Lebedev, M and Song, AW and Nicolelis,
             MAL},
   Title = {Training with brain-machine interfaces, visuo-tactile
             feedback and assisted locomotion improves sensorimotor,
             visceral, and psychological signs in chronic paraplegic
             patients.},
   Journal = {Plos One},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {e0206464},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0206464},
   Abstract = {Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces severe deficiencies in
             sensory-motor and autonomic functions and has a significant
             negative impact on patients' quality of life. There is
             currently no systematic rehabilitation technique assuring
             recovery of the neurological impairments caused by a
             complete SCI. Here, we report significant clinical
             improvement in a group of seven chronic SCI patients (six
             AIS A, one AIS B) following a 28-month, multi-step protocol
             that combined training with non-invasive brain-machine
             interfaces, visuo-tactile feedback and assisted locomotion.
             All patients recovered significant levels of nociceptive
             sensation below their original SCI (up to 16 dermatomes,
             average 11 dermatomes), voluntary motor functions
             (lower-limbs muscle contractions plus multi-joint movements)
             and partial sensory function for several modalities
             (proprioception, tactile, pressure, vibration). Patients
             also recovered partial intestinal, urinary and sexual
             functions. By the end of the protocol, all patients had
             their AIS classification upgraded (six from AIS A to C, one
             from B to C). These improvements translated into significant
             changes in the patients' quality of life as measured by
             standardized psychological instruments. Reexamination of one
             patient that discontinued the protocol after 12 months of
             training showed that the 16-month break resulted in
             neurological stagnation and no reclassification. We suggest
             that our neurorehabilitation protocol, based uniquely on
             non-invasive technology (therefore necessitating no surgical
             operation), can become a promising therapy for patients
             diagnosed with severe paraplegia (AIS A, B), even at the
             chronic phase of their lesion.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0206464},
   Key = {fds340155}
}

@article{7951637,
   Author = {Wiest, M.C. and Nicolelis, M.A.L.},
   Title = {Behavioral detection of tactile stimuli during 7-12 Hz
             cortical oscillations in awake rats},
   Journal = {Nat. Neurosci. (USA)},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {913 - 14},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn1107},
   Keywords = {bioelectric potentials;biological techniques;brain;microelectrodes;neurophysiology;touch
             (physiological);},
   Abstract = {Prominent 7-12 Hz oscillations in the primary somatosensory
             cortex (S1) of awake but immobile rats might represent a
             seizure-like state1 in which neuronal burst firing renders
             animals unresponsive to incoming tactile stimuli; others
             have proposed that these oscillations are analogous to human
             &mu; rhythm. To test whether rats can respond to tactile
             stimuli during 7-12 Hz oscillatory activity, we trained
             head-immobilized awake animals to indicate whether they
             could detect the occurrence of transient whisker deflections
             while we recorded local field potentials (LFPs) from
             microelectrode arrays implanted bilaterally in the S1
             whisker representation area. They responded rapidly and
             reliably, suggesting that this brain rhythm represents
             normal physiological activity that does not preclude
             perception},
   Key = {7951637}
}


%% Nowicki, Stephen   
@article{fds337000,
   Author = {Caves, EM and Green, PA and Zipple, MN and Peters, S and Johnsen, S and Nowicki, S},
   Title = {Categorical perception of colour signals in a
             songbird.},
   Journal = {Nature},
   Volume = {560},
   Number = {7718},
   Pages = {365-367},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0377-7},
   Abstract = {In many contexts, animals assess each other using signals
             that vary continuously across individuals and, on average,
             reflect variation in the quality of the signaller1,2. It is
             often assumed that signal receivers perceive and respond
             continuously to continuous variation in the signal2.
             Alternatively, perception and response may be
             discontinuous3, owing to limitations in discrimination,
             categorization or both. Discrimination is the ability to
             tell two stimuli apart (for example, whether one can tell
             apart colours close to each other in hue). Categorization
             concerns whether stimuli are grouped based on similarities
             (for example, identifying colours with qualitative
             similarities in hue as similar even if they can be
             distinguished)4. Categorical perception is a mechanism by
             which perceptual systems categorize continuously varying
             stimuli, making specific predictions about discrimination
             relative to category boundaries. Here we show that female
             zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) categorically perceive a
             continuously variable assessment signal: the orange to red
             spectrum of male beak colour. Both predictions of
             categorical perception5 were supported: females (1)
             categorized colour stimuli that varied along a continuum and
             (2) showed increased discrimination between colours from
             opposite sides of a category boundary compared to equally
             different colours from within a category. To our knowledge,
             this is the first demonstration of categorical perception of
             signal-based colouration in a bird, with implications for
             understanding avian colour perception and signal evolution
             in general.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41586-018-0377-7},
   Key = {fds337000}
}

@article{fds335257,
   Author = {Lachlan, RF and Ratmann, O and Nowicki, S},
   Title = {Cultural conformity generates extremely stable traditions in
             bird song.},
   Journal = {Nature Communications},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {2417},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-04728-1},
   Abstract = {Cultural traditions have been observed in a wide variety of
             animal species. It remains unclear, however, what is
             required for social learning to give rise to stable
             traditions: what level of precision and what learning
             strategies are required. We address these questions by
             fitting models of cultural evolution to learned bird song.
             We recorded 615 swamp sparrow (Melospiza georgiana) song
             repertoires, and compared syllable frequency distributions
             to the output of individual-based simulations. We find that
             syllables are learned with an estimated error rate of 1.85%
             and with a conformist bias in learning. This bias is
             consistent with a simple mechanism of overproduction and
             selective attrition. Finally, we estimate that syllable
             types could frequently persist for more than 500 years. Our
             results demonstrate conformist bias in natural animal
             behaviour and show that this, along with moderately precise
             learning, may support traditions whose stability rivals
             those of humans.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41467-018-04728-1},
   Key = {fds335257}
}

@article{fds335258,
   Author = {Liu, IA and Soha, JA and Nowicki, S},
   Title = {Song type matching and vocal performance in territorial
             signalling by male swamp sparrows},
   Journal = {Animal Behaviour},
   Volume = {139},
   Pages = {117-125},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.03.007},
   Abstract = {© 2018 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour In
             songbird species with repertoires of multiple songs,
             individuals in territorial interactions can engage in song
             type matching, in which one bird responds to another using
             the same song type. Song type matching is thought to be
             associated with aggressive intent, although empirical
             support for this hypothesis is mixed. Here we test the
             alternative hypothesis that males selectively use song type
             matching, depending on singing ability, to optimize their
             relative performance in a communication network. We recorded
             the responses of male swamp sparrows, Melospiza georgiana,
             to playback trials in which they heard stimulus songs of
             higher or lower vocal performance relative to their own
             version of those songs. We predicted that, if males use song
             type matching to influence the perceptions of conspecifics
             outside the interacting dyad, males would (1) match stimulus
             songs that they themselves could perform better and (2)
             respond with a different song type to stimulus songs that
             they could not perform as well. We found that males
             song-type matched more often than expected by chance across
             trials, but contrary to our expectations, they were at least
             as likely to match to playback of higher-performance songs
             as to playback of lower-performance songs. As in previous
             studies, we also found that males sang with higher vocal
             performance in response to playback than when singing
             spontaneously, and that they did not preferentially respond
             with their highest-performance song type as a countersinging
             strategy. Our results support the idea that in swamp
             sparrows, song type matching functions primarily within the
             dyad rather than to broadcast superior performance ability
             to other conspecifics in the communication
             network.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.03.007},
   Key = {fds335258}
}

@article{fds335259,
   Author = {Sewall, KB and Anderson, RC and Soha, JA and Peters, S and Nowicki,
             S},
   Title = {Early life conditions that impact song learning in male
             zebra finches also impact neural and behavioral responses to
             song in females.},
   Journal = {Developmental Neurobiology},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dneu.22600},
   Abstract = {Early life stressors can impair song in songbirds by
             negatively impacting brain development and subsequent
             learning. Even in species in which only males sing, early
             life stressors might also impact female behavior and its
             underlying neural mechanisms, but fewer studies have
             examined this possibility. We manipulated brood size in
             zebra finches to simultaneously examine the effects of
             developmental stress on male song learning and female
             behavioral and neural response to song. Although adult male
             HVC volume was unaffected, we found that males from larger
             broods imitated tutor song less accurately. In females,
             early condition did not affect the direction of song
             preference: all females preferred tutor song over unfamiliar
             song in an operant test. However, treatment did affect the
             magnitude of behavioral response to song: females from
             larger broods responded less during song preference trials.
             This difference in activity level did not reflect boldness
             per se, as a separate measure of this trait did not differ
             with brood size. Additionally, in females we found a
             treatment effect on expression of the immediate early gene
             ZENK in response to tutor song in brain regions involved in
             song perception (dNCM) and social motivation (LSc.vl, BSTm,
             TnA), but not in a region implicated in song memory (CMM).
             These results are consistent with the hypothesis that
             developmental stressors that impair song learning in male
             zebra finches also influence perceptual and/or motivational
             processes in females. However, our results suggest that the
             learning of tutor song by females is robust to disturbance
             by developmental stress. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
             Develop Neurobiol, 2018.},
   Doi = {10.1002/dneu.22600},
   Key = {fds335259}
}

@article{fds333183,
   Author = {DuBois, AL and Nowicki, S and Peters, S and Rivera-Cáceres, KD and Searcy, WA},
   Title = {Song is not a reliable signal of general cognitive ability
             in a songbird},
   Journal = {Animal Behaviour},
   Volume = {137},
   Pages = {205-213},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.01.020},
   Abstract = {© 2018 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour
             Learned aspects of song affect female mating preferences in
             a number of species of songbirds, including swamp sparrows,
             Melospiza georgiana. One explanation for why female
             songbirds attend to such song features is that these song
             attributes convey information on the general cognitive
             ability of singers. The fact that song attributes and
             cognitive ability are affected during development by the
             same stressors makes a connection between the two plausible.
             Here we test the hypothesis that song is a signal of
             cognitive ability by relating five measures of song quality
             to five measures of cognitive performance in 49 captive male
             swamp sparrows. The five song measures are repertoire size,
             mean and minimum vocal deviation (measures of vocal
             performance), and mean and maximum typicality (measures of
             song learning). Cognitive performance was measured as the
             speed with which five cognitive tasks were mastered: a novel
             foraging task, a colour association, a colour reversal, a
             spatial learning problem and a detour-reaching test. In
             general linear mixed models controlling for neophobia, none
             of the song measures were predictive of any of the cognitive
             performance measures. Thus the results do not support the
             hypothesis that song attributes signal general cognition in
             swamp sparrows.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.anbehav.2018.01.020},
   Key = {fds333183}
}

@article{fds333184,
   Author = {Niederhauser, JM and DuBois, AL and Searcy, WA and Nowicki, S and Anderson, RC},
   Title = {A test of the eavesdropping avoidance hypothesis as an
             explanation for the structure of low-amplitude aggressive
             signals in the song sparrow},
   Journal = {Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {3},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature America, Inc},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2469-7},
   Abstract = {© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer
             Nature. Abstract: Low-amplitude signals function in private
             exchanges of information between signalers and nearby
             receivers. The eavesdropping avoidance hypothesis proposes
             that selection favors quiet threat signals in order to avoid
             the costs of eavesdroppers. If true, then selection should
             favor other acoustic traits in addition to low amplitude
             that lead to quiet signals transmitting less effectively
             through the environment compared to broadcast signals. The
             “warbled” soft songs of male song sparrows differ from
             “crystallized” soft songs and from broadcast songs in a
             number of acoustic traits, suggesting that these songs may
             transmit less effectively. We tested this prediction in a
             field experiment by playing broadcast songs, crystallized
             soft songs, and warbled soft songs through a loudspeaker at
             the same amplitude and recording the propagated songs at
             five distances, at two heights, and in two different habitat
             types. Counter to our prediction, we found no evidence that
             either form of soft song transmits differently than
             broadcast song when all were played loudly. If anything,
             soft songs transmitted more effectively when all songs were
             played quietly. Our resu lts do not support one prediction
             made by the eavesdropping avoidance hypothesis, although the
             possibility remains that reduced amplitude alone is
             sufficient to reduce eavesdropping. The question of why
             warbled soft song differs in acoustic structure remains
             unresolved. Significance statement: Quiet aggressive signals
             are a puzzle because their meek form seems counter to their
             purpose—to threaten and intimidate rivals. One explanation
             for quiet signals is that reducing the signal’s
             transmission range reduces the costs imposed by
             eavesdroppers, which predicts that quiet signals will
             transmit through the environment poorly relative to louder,
             broadcast signals. We tested this prediction by playing song
             sparrow “soft songs” and “broadcast songs” at the
             same amplitudes and measured their transmission properties
             at different distances and heights, and in two habitats. We
             found that soft and broadcast songs did not transmit
             differently when played loudly, and soft songs transmitted
             slightly better when played softly. Our results do not
             support the idea that quiet signals are explained by
             eavesdropping avoidance, at least not in the song
             sparrow.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00265-018-2469-7},
   Key = {fds333184}
}


%% Odgers, Candice L.   
@article{fds335192,
   Author = {Matthews, T and Danese, A and Caspi, A and Fisher, HL and Goldman-Mellor, S and Kepa, A and Moffitt, TE and Odgers, CL and Arseneault, L},
   Title = {Lonely young adults in modern Britain: findings from an
             epidemiological cohort study.},
   Journal = {Psychological Medicine},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {268-277},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0033291718000788},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:The aim of this study was to build a detailed,
             integrative profile of the correlates of young adults'
             feelings of loneliness, in terms of their current health and
             functioning and their childhood experiences and
             circumstances. METHODS:Data were drawn from the
             Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, a birth cohort
             of 2232 individuals born in England and Wales in 1994 and
             1995. Loneliness was measured when participants were aged
             18. Regression analyses were used to test concurrent
             associations between loneliness and health and functioning
             in young adulthood. Longitudinal analyses were conducted to
             examine childhood factors associated with young adult
             loneliness. RESULTS:Lonelier young adults were more likely
             to experience mental health problems, to engage in physical
             health risk behaviours, and to use more negative strategies
             to cope with stress. They were less confident in their
             employment prospects and were more likely to be out of work.
             Lonelier young adults were, as children, more likely to have
             had mental health difficulties and to have experienced
             bullying and social isolation. Loneliness was evenly
             distributed across genders and socioeconomic backgrounds.
             CONCLUSIONS:Young adults' experience of loneliness co-occurs
             with a diverse range of problems, with potential
             implications for health in later life. The findings
             underscore the importance of early intervention to prevent
             lonely young adults from being trapped in loneliness as they
             age.},