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Publications of Moria J. Smoski    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds336957,
   Author = {Lavretsky, H and Wetherell, J and Smoski, MJ and Varteresian,
             T},
   Title = {CULTIVATION OF WELL-BEING THROUGH MIND-BODY
             INTERVENTIONS},
   Journal = {American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {S49-S50},
   Publisher = {ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {fds336957}
}

@article{fds336959,
   Author = {Dichter, GS and Crowther, A and Minkel, J and Keng, S-L and Ji, JL and Eisenlohr-Moul, TA and Walsh, E and Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {Neural Mechanisms of Emotion Regulation in Major Depression
             and Implications for Psychotherapy Effectiveness},
   Journal = {Biological Psychiatry},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {295S-295S},
   Publisher = {ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {fds336959}
}

@article{fds329148,
   Author = {Rej, S and Smoski, MJ and Lavretsky, H and Newhouse,
             P},
   Title = {CAM for the Goose and the Gander: Demonstrations of
             Mind-Body Practices for Patients and Practitioners},
   Journal = {American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {S26-S27},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jagp.2016.01.038},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jagp.2016.01.038},
   Key = {fds329148}
}

@article{fds276257,
   Author = {Carl, H and Dichter, GS and Crowther, A and Minkel, J and Moore, T and Gibbs, D and Petty, C and Bizzell, J and Schiller, C and Sideris, J and Walsh, E and Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {Endurance of Neural Response to Rewards Predicts
             Post-Treatment Depression Severity},
   Journal = {Biological Psychiatry},
   Volume = {77},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {2 pages},
   Publisher = {ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0006-3223},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000352207501299&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds276257}
}

@article{fds276258,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Suarez, EC and Brantley, J and Wolever, RQ and Greeson,
             JM},
   Title = {Effects of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Across the
             Adult Lifespan},
   Journal = {American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {S168-S168},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1064-7481},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000350829500167&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jagp.2014.12.175},
   Key = {fds276258}
}

@article{fds276263,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Taylor, WD and Arean, P and Steffens,
             DC},
   Title = {Emotion Regulation in Late-Life Depression: Neural Models to
             Treatment Strategies},
   Journal = {American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {S15-S16},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1064-7481},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000336081800016&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jagp.2013.12.022},
   Key = {fds276263}
}

@article{fds276264,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Steffens, D and LaBar, K},
   Title = {Executive Function as a Moderator of Emotion Regulation in
             Late-Life Depression},
   Journal = {American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {S129-S130},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1064-7481},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000330358400142&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jagp.2012.12.172},
   Key = {fds276264}
}

@article{fds325130,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {Reward Optimization and Behavioral Activation Treatment for
             Late-Life Depression},
   Journal = {American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {S156-S157},
   Publisher = {ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {fds325130}
}

@article{fds276275,
   Author = {Payne, ME and Hayward, RD and Smoski, MJ and Krishnan, RR and Steffens,
             DC and Taylor, WD},
   Title = {Stress Vulnerability Moderates the Association between White
             Matter Lesions and Late-Life Depression},
   Journal = {Biological Psychiatry},
   Volume = {69},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {170S-170S},
   Publisher = {ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0006-3223},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000290641800543&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds276275}
}

@article{fds276273,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Steffens, D and LaBar, K},
   Title = {Functional Neuroimaging of Emotion Regulation in Late-Life
             Depression},
   Journal = {American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {S99-S100},
   Publisher = {LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1064-7481},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000289791000111&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds276273}
}

@article{fds276274,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Steffens, D and LaBar, K},
   Title = {Effectiveness of Reappraisal and Distraction as Emotion
             Regulation Strategies in Late-Life MDD},
   Journal = {American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {S66-S67},
   Publisher = {LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1064-7481},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000289791000064&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds276274}
}


%% Papers Published   
@article{fds330051,
   Author = {Dardas, LA and Silva, SG and van de Water, B and Vance, A and Smoski,
             MJ and Noonan, D and Simmons, LA},
   Title = {Psychosocial Correlates of Jordanian Adolescents'
             Help-Seeking Intentions for Depression: Findings From a
             Nationally Representative School Survey.},
   Journal = {J Sch Nurs},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {117-127},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1059840517731493},
   Abstract = {Little is known about help-seeking for depression among
             Jordanian adolescents who are a vulnerable population with
             high rates of depressive symptoms and few mental health
             services. The purpose of this study was to (1) explore
             Jordanian adolescents' helpseeking intentions for depression
             and (2) examine whether depression stigma, depression
             severity, or their interaction are associated with Jordanian
             adolescents' willingness to seek help for depression and the
             type of treatment they would seek. In collaboration with the
             Jordanian Ministry of Education, we conducted a nationally
             representative, school-based survey of adolescents aged
             12-17 years ( N = 2,349). One fourth of the adolescents
             reported they would not seek professional help for
             depression, and those respondents had higher average
             depression scores. Among those adolescents willing to seek
             help, the most likely sources included family member (57%),
             school counselor (46%), psychiatrist (43%), religious leader
             (39%), and general health practitioner (28%). Lower stigma
             scores were associated with greater likelihood to seek
             psychotherapy or visit a psychiatrist, while higher stigma
             scores were associated with increased likelihood to seek
             help from a school counselor or a family member. Jordanian
             adolescents experience significant barriers to seeking
             professional help for depression. However, even among
             adolescents with greater depression severity and depression
             stigma, school counselors were identified as a key resource
             for help. These findings suggest that school-based
             interventions may fill a critical service need for
             adolescents with depression and other mental health
             problems. School nurses should be leveraged along with
             counselors to address mental health issues in this
             vulnerable population.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1059840517731493},
   Key = {fds330051}
}

@article{fds338576,
   Author = {Walsh, EC and Eisenlohr-Moul, TA and Minkel, J and Bizzell, J and Petty,
             C and Crowther, A and Carl, H and Smoski, MJ and Dichter,
             GS},
   Title = {Pretreatment brain connectivity during positive emotion
             upregulation predicts decreased anhedonia following
             behavioral activation therapy for depression.},
   Journal = {Journal of Affective Disorders},
   Volume = {243},
   Pages = {188-192},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2018.09.065},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Neurobiological predictors of antidepressant
             response may help guide treatment selection and improve
             response rates to available treatments for major depressive
             disorder (MDD). Behavioral activation therapy for depression
             (BATD) is an evidence-based intervention designed to
             ameliorate core symptoms of MDD by promoting sustained
             engagement with value-guided, positively-reinforcing
             activities. The present study examined pre-treatment
             task-based functional brain connectivity as a predictor of
             antidepressant response to BATD. METHODS:Thirty-three
             outpatients with MDD and 20 nondepressed controls completed
             a positive emotion regulation task during fMRI after which
             participants with MDD received up to 15 sessions of BATD. We
             used generalized psychophysiological interaction analyses to
             examine group differences in pre-treatment functional brain
             connectivity during intentional upregulation of positive
             emotion to positive images. Hierarchical linear models were
             used to examine whether group differences in functional
             connectivity predicted changes in depression and anhedonia
             over the course of BATD. RESULTS:Compared to controls,
             participants with MDD exhibited decreased connectivity
             between the left middle frontal gyrus and right
             temporoparietal regions during upregulation of positive
             emotion. Within the MDD group, decreased connectivity of
             these regions predicted greater declines in anhedonia
             symptoms over treatment. LIMITATIONS:Future studies should
             include comparison treatments and longitudinal follow-up to
             clarify the unique effects of BATD on neural function and
             antidepressant response. CONCLUSIONS:Results are consistent
             with previous work showing BATD may be particularly
             effective for individuals with greater disturbances in brain
             reward network function, but extend these findings to
             highlight the importance of frontotemporoparietal
             connectivity in targeting symptoms of low motivation and
             engagement.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2018.09.065},
   Key = {fds338576}
}

@article{fds340790,
   Author = {Krystal, AD and Pizzagalli, DA and Mathew, SJ and Sanacora, G and Keefe,
             R and Song, A and Calabrese, J and Goddard, A and Goodman, W and Lisanby,
             SH and Smoski, M and Weiner, R and Iosifescu, D and Nurnberger, J and Szabo, S and Murrough, J and Shekhar, A and Potter,
             W},
   Title = {The first implementation of the NIMH FAST-FAIL approach to
             psychiatric drug development.},
   Journal = {Nat Rev Drug Discov},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {82-84},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrd.2018.222},
   Doi = {10.1038/nrd.2018.222},
   Key = {fds340790}
}

@article{fds343769,
   Author = {Nagy, GA and Cernasov, P and Pisoni, A and Walsh, E and Dichter, GS and Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {Reward Network Modulation as a Mechanism of Change in
             Behavioral Activation.},
   Journal = {Behav Modif},
   Pages = {145445518805682},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0145445518805682},
   Abstract = {Behavioral Activation (BA) is a contemporary third-wave
             psychosocial treatment approach that emphasizes helping
             individuals become more active in ways that are meaningful
             to them as a means of improving mood and quality of life. BA
             has been designated as a well-established, validated
             treatment for depression by the American Psychological
             Association following several decades of accumulated
             empirical support demonstrating that BA techniques
             successfully reduce depression symptoms and produce other
             desirable outcomes across a variety of populations and
             contexts. The purported mechanism of change underlying BA
             treatment lies in increasing activation, which in turn
             increases contact with positive reinforcement thereby
             reversing the cycle of depression. Current studies are
             further investigating how increasing activation and
             subsequent contact with mood reinforcers can influence mood
             and behavior. Specifically, there is growing evidence that
             BA modifies function of reward-related networks in the
             brain, and that these changes are associated with clinical
             improvement. Herein, we provide a brief history of BA,
             describe the primary components of BA treatment, and
             describe BA's purported mechanisms of change at behavioral,
             neural, and subjective activation levels. We present
             limitations as well as gaps in the current state of
             knowledge regarding mechanisms of action of
             BA.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0145445518805682},
   Key = {fds343769}
}

@article{fds336956,
   Author = {Dardas, LA and Silva, SG and Scott, J and Gondwe, KW and Smoski, MJ and Noonan, D and Simmons, LA},
   Title = {Do beliefs about depression etiologies influence the type
             and severity of depression stigma? The case of Arab
             adolescents.},
   Journal = {Perspect Psychiatr Care},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {547-556},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ppc.12270},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: Research has documented that holding certain
             etiological beliefs about depression can determine the level
             of stigma experienced by individuals with depression. To
             date, no studies have yet examined this relationship among
             adolescents. Using a sample of Arab adolescents, the purpose
             of this study was to describe adolescents' beliefs about the
             etiology of depression, and examine whether these beliefs
             influence the type and severity of depression stigma.
             METHODS: A nationwide school survey was conducted in a
             representative sample of Jordanian public and private
             schools located in Jordan, a Middle-Eastern Arab country. A
             total of 2,349 adolescents aged 12-17 (59% female) completed
             and returned an anonymous survey that included measures on
             adolescents' sociodemographic and health characteristics,
             depression symptoms, depression stigma, and depression
             etiological beliefs. An exploratory factor analysis with
             principal components analysis (PCA) was used to examine the
             factor structure of the Depression Etiological Beliefs
             Scale. The stability of the PCA findings was tested using a
             cross-validation method. Regression analyses were performed
             to examine whether depression etiological beliefs,
             depression severity, or their interaction are associated
             with depression stigma. RESULTS: Adolescents endorsed
             multiple etiological beliefs about depression. The beliefs
             in which likely or very likely was most often reported were
             stressful events in one's life (72%), social factors (65%),
             and one's weak will (56%). On the other hand, the least
             reported beliefs were genetic or inherited problems (24%),
             chemical imbalance (30%), and punishment for wrong doings
             (35%). The interaction between adolescents' depression
             severity and depression beliefs significantly predicted
             personal stigma. Adolescent sex, age, and region of
             residence significantly affected the relationship between
             depression beliefs and stigma. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses need to
             consider the beliefs and attitudes their patients have
             around depression, as these can influence symptom severity,
             comprehensive treatment plans, and adherence to provider
             recommendations. This study provides a better understanding
             of how depression beliefs affect Jordanian adolescents'
             attitudes toward depression, which can guide intervention
             programs to increase awareness about depression and promote
             treatment utilization.},
   Doi = {10.1111/ppc.12270},
   Key = {fds336956}
}

@article{fds332808,
   Author = {Dardas, LA and Silva, SG and Smoski, MJ and Noonan, D and Simmons,
             LA},
   Title = {Corrigendum to "Personal and Perceived Depression Stigma
             among Arab Adolescents: Associations with Depression
             Severity and Personal Characteristics" [Archives of
             Psychiatric Nursing 31/5 (2017) 499-506].},
   Journal = {Arch Psychiatr Nurs},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {325},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apnu.2018.01.005},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.apnu.2018.01.005},
   Key = {fds332808}
}

@article{fds332790,
   Author = {Dardas, LA and Silva, SG and Smoski, MJ and Noonan, D and Simmons,
             LA},
   Title = {The prevalence of depressive symptoms among Arab
             adolescents: Findings from Jordan.},
   Journal = {Public Health Nurs},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {100-108},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/phn.12363},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: The lack of research regarding the current
             profile of adolescent depression in the Arab countries in
             general, and Jordan in particular, makes it difficult to
             design, implement, and disseminate effective interventions
             to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of
             adolescent depression in the region. The purpose of this
             study was to estimate a national prevalence of depressive
             symptoms among adolescents in Jordan, and to identify
             characteristics associated with severity of depression.
             METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional, nationally
             representative school survey was utilized. A total of 2,349
             Jordanian adolescents aged 12-17 completed and returned the
             survey packets, which included the Beck Depression
             Inventory-II and measures of sociodemographics and health
             history. Participants represented all three regions in the
             country, with 34% from the northern (suburban) region, 43%
             from the central (urban) region, and 23% from the southern
             (rural) region. RESULTS: The majority of the adolescents
             were females (59%) and 15-17 years old (67%). Almost 14%
             reported having at least one chronic health problem, 15%
             reported having a mental health problem, 25% reported having
             academic difficulties, 8% reported that they had received a
             psychiatric diagnosis, and 22% reported that they had sought
             psychological help at some point in the past. The mean total
             depression score was 16.3 (SD = 11.2, 95%
             CI = 15.8-16.7), with 34% of the sample reporting moderate
             to severe depression. Depression was significantly higher
             among respondents who were female, ages 14-15 years, and
             living in families with low monthly incomes; and who
             reported having a chronic health problem, mental health
             problem, learning difficulty, a psychiatric diagnosis and/or
             seeking previous psychological help. CONCLUSIONS: Our
             findings should serve as an alarm, particularly given that
             rates of depression in the Arab countries are expected to
             increase rapidly in the context of the Arab Spring.
             Healthcare providers, researchers, and educators should
             focus attention on developing effective and culturally
             appropriate screening, prevention, and intervention
             approaches using evidence-based guidelines to promote
             Jordanian adolescent mental health, particularly for
             depression.},
   Doi = {10.1111/phn.12363},
   Key = {fds332790}
}

@article{fds331886,
   Author = {Dardas, LA and Silva, SG and Smoski, MJ and Noonan, D and Simmons,
             LA},
   Title = {Adolescent Depression in Jordan: Symptoms Profile, Gender
             Differences, and the Role of Social Context.},
   Journal = {Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health
             Services},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {44-55},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/02793695-20171027-04},
   Abstract = {The influence of gender and other individual and context
             characteristics on the prevalence and severity of depressive
             symptoms among Jordanian adolescents remains unclear. The
             aims of the current study were to: (a) characterize
             depressive symptoms profiles for Jordanian adolescents; and
             (b) examine gender differences in the type, severity, and
             correlates of depressive symptoms. Cross-sectional data were
             collected from 2,349 Jordanian adolescents ages 12 to 17
             using a nationally representative school survey. The Beck
             Depression Inventory-II was used to assess the presence and
             severity of depressive symptoms. Female adolescents had
             significantly higher mean depression scores (17.9 [SD =
             11.6], 95% confidence interval [CI] [17.3, 18.5]) than their
             male counterparts (13.8 [SD = 10.2], 95% CI [13.2, 14.5]).
             Approximately 41% of girls and 26% of boys reported scores
             indicating moderate to severe depression. Sex differences
             and socially constructed gender differences need to be
             adequately considered in the planning and delivery of mental
             health care for adolescent depression. If the risk for
             depression is gender-specific, prevention strategies cannot
             be gender-neutral. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and
             Mental Health Services, 56(2), 44-55.].},
   Doi = {10.3928/02793695-20171027-04},
   Key = {fds331886}
}

@article{fds336958,
   Author = {Greeson, JM and Zarrin, H and Smoski, MJ and Brantley, JG and Lynch, TR and Webber, DM and Hall, MH and Suarez, EC and Wolever,
             RQ},
   Title = {Mindfulness Meditation Targets Transdiagnostic Symptoms
             Implicated in Stress-Related Disorders: Understanding
             Relationships between Changes in Mindfulness, Sleep Quality,
             and Physical Symptoms.},
   Journal = {Evidence Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine :
             Ecam},
   Volume = {2018},
   Pages = {4505191},
   Year = {2018},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/4505191},
   Abstract = {Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is an 8-week
             meditation program known to improve anxiety, depression, and
             psychological well-being. Other health-related effects, such
             as sleep quality, are less well established, as are the
             psychological processes associated with therapeutic change.
             This prospective, observational study (n = 213) aimed to
             determine whether perseverative cognition, indicated by
             rumination and intrusive thoughts, and emotion regulation,
             measured by avoidance, thought suppression, emotion
             suppression, and cognitive reappraisal, partly accounted for
             the hypothesized relationship between changes in mindfulness
             and two health-related outcomes: sleep quality and
             stress-related physical symptoms. As expected, increased
             mindfulness following the MBSR program was directly
             correlated with decreased sleep disturbance (r = -0.21, p =
             0.004) and decreased stress-related physical symptoms (r =
             -0.38, p < 0.001). Partial correlations revealed that
             pre-post changes in rumination, unwanted intrusive thoughts,
             thought suppression, experiential avoidance, emotion
             suppression, and cognitive reappraisal each uniquely
             accounted for up to 32% of the correlation between the
             change in mindfulness and change in sleep disturbance and up
             to 30% of the correlation between the change in mindfulness
             and change in stress-related physical symptoms. Results
             suggest that the stress-reducing effects of MBSR are due, in
             part, to improvements in perseverative cognition and emotion
             regulation, two "transdiagnostic" mental processes that cut
             across stress-related disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1155/2018/4505191},
   Key = {fds336958}
}

@article{fds326770,
   Author = {Dardas, LA and Silva, SG and Smoski, MJ and Noonan, D and Simmons,
             LA},
   Title = {Personal and Perceived Depression Stigma among Arab
             Adolescents: Associations with Depression Severity and
             Personal Characteristics.},
   Journal = {Archives of Psychiatric Nursing},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {499-506},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apnu.2017.06.005},
   Abstract = {In Arab communities, the selection, utilization, and
             attitudes towards mental health services are substantially
             affected by existing mental illness stigma. However, little
             is known about how the stigma of depression manifests among
             Arab adolescents, which makes it difficult to design,
             implement, and disseminate effective anti-stigma
             interventions for this vulnerable population. Therefore, the
             purpose of this study was to determine levels of depression
             stigma among Arab adolescents. The specific aims were to (1)
             describe the severity of personal and perceived depression
             stigma among Arab adolescents and its relationship to
             severity of depression, and (2) determine characteristics
             associated with severity of depression stigma among Arab
             adolescents.This study was conducted in Jordan, a Middle
             Eastern Arab country. A nationally representative,
             school-based survey was utilized. A total of 2349 Jordanian
             adolescents aged 12-17 completed and returned the survey
             packets, which included measures on individual
             characteristics, depression severity, and depression
             stigma.The majority of the adolescents (88%) reported scores
             indicating moderate to high depression stigma. Adolescents
             reported higher rates of perceived stigma than personal
             stigma. Depression stigma was not significantly associated
             with severity of depression, but with adolescent's sex, age,
             region of residence, parents' education, and history of
             mental health problem.This is the first Arab study to
             isolate the influence of adolescent depression and personal
             characteristics on personal and perceived depression
             stigmas, and highlight the presence of these distinctions
             early in adolescence. Such distinction can inform the design
             and implementation of policies and interventions to reduce
             both personal and perceived stigma. The study provides
             important recommendations on when, how, and why to utilize
             school settings for anti-depression stigma
             interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.apnu.2017.06.005},
   Key = {fds326770}
}

@article{fds323970,
   Author = {Keng, S-L and Tan, ELY and Eisenlohr-Moul, TA and Smoski,
             MJ},
   Title = {Effects of mindfulness, reappraisal, and suppression on sad
             mood and cognitive resources.},
   Journal = {Behav Res Ther},
   Volume = {91},
   Pages = {33-42},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2017.01.006},
   Abstract = {The present study investigated the relative effects of
             mindfulness, reappraisal and suppression in reducing
             sadness, and the extent to which implementation of these
             strategies affects cognitive resources in a laboratory
             context. A total of 171 Singaporean undergraduate
             participants were randomly assigned to receive brief
             training in mindfulness, reappraisal, or suppression prior
             to undergoing a sad mood induction. Individual adherence to
             Asian cultural values was assessed as a potential moderator
             of strategy effectiveness. Participants rated their mood and
             completed a Color-Word Stroop task before and after mood
             regulation instructions. Analyses using multi-level
             modelling showed that the suppression condition caused less
             robust declines in sadness over time compared to
             mindfulness. There was also a nonsignificant trend in which
             mindfulness was associated with greater sadness recovery
             compared to reappraisal. Suppression resulted in lower
             average sadness compared to mindfulness among those high on
             Asian cultural values, but not those low on Asian cultural
             values. Both mindfulness and reappraisal buffered against
             increases in Stroop interference from pre-to post-regulation
             compared to suppression. The findings highlight the
             advantage of mindfulness as a strategy effective not only in
             the regulation of sad mood, but also in the preservation of
             cognitive resources in the context of mood
             regulation.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brat.2017.01.006},
   Key = {fds323970}
}

@article{fds320766,
   Author = {Walsh, E and Carl, H and Eisenlohr-Moul, T and Minkel, J and Crowther,
             A and Moore, T and Gibbs, D and Petty, C and Bizzell, J and Smoski, MJ and Dichter, GS},
   Title = {Attenuation of Frontostriatal Connectivity During Reward
             Processing Predicts Response to Psychotherapy in Major
             Depressive Disorder.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {831-843},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2016.179},
   Abstract = {There are few reliable predictors of response to
             antidepressant treatments. In the present investigation, we
             examined pretreatment functional brain connectivity during
             reward processing as a potential predictor of response to
             Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD), a
             validated psychotherapy that promotes engagement with
             rewarding stimuli and reduces avoidance behaviors.
             Thirty-three outpatients with major depressive disorder
             (MDD) and 20 matched controls completed two runs of the
             monetary incentive delay task during functional magnetic
             resonance imaging after which participants with MDD received
             up to 15 sessions of BATD. Seed-based generalized
             psychophysiological interaction analyses focused on
             task-based connectivity across task runs, as well as the
             attenuation of connectivity from the first to the second run
             of the task. The average change in Beck Depression
             Inventory-II scores due to treatment was 10.54 points, a
             clinically meaningful response. Groups differed in
             seed-based functional connectivity among multiple
             frontostriatal regions. Hierarchical linear modeling
             revealed that improved treatment response to BATD was
             predicted by greater connectivity between the left putamen
             and paracingulate gyrus during reward anticipation. In
             addition, MDD participants with greater attenuation of
             connectivity between several frontostriatal seeds, and
             midline subcallosal cortex and left paracingulate gyrus
             demonstrated improved response to BATD. These findings
             indicate that pretreatment frontostriatal functional
             connectivity during reward processing is predictive of
             response to a psychotherapy modality that promotes improving
             approach-related behaviors in MDD. Furthermore, connectivity
             attenuation among reward-processing regions may be a
             particularly powerful endophenotypic predictor of response
             to BATD in MDD.},
   Doi = {10.1038/npp.2016.179},
   Key = {fds320766}
}

@article{fds319711,
   Author = {Carl, H and Walsh, E and Eisenlohr-Moul, T and Minkel, J and Crowther,
             A and Moore, T and Gibbs, D and Petty, C and Bizzell, J and Dichter, GS and Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {Sustained anterior cingulate cortex activation during reward
             processing predicts response to psychotherapy in major
             depressive disorder.},
   Journal = {J Affect Disord},
   Volume = {203},
   Pages = {204-212},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2016.06.005},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present investigation was to
             evaluate whether pre-treatment neural activation in response
             to rewards is a predictor of clinical response to Behavioral
             Activation Therapy for Depression (BATD), an empirically
             validated psychotherapy that decreases depressive symptoms
             by increasing engagement with rewarding stimuli and reducing
             avoidance behaviors. METHODS: Participants were 33
             outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 20
             matched controls. We examined group differences in
             activation, and the capacity to sustain activation, across
             task runs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
             and the monetary incentive delay (MID) task. Hierarchical
             linear modeling was used to investigate whether
             pre-treatment neural responses predicted change in
             depressive symptoms over the course of BATD treatment.
             RESULT: MDD and Control groups differed in sustained
             activation during reward outcomes in the right nucleus
             accumbens, such that the MDD group experienced a significant
             decrease in activation in this region from the first to
             second task run relative to controls. Pretreatment anhedonia
             severity and pretreatment task-related reaction times were
             predictive of response to treatment. Furthermore, sustained
             activation in the anterior cingulate cortex during reward
             outcomes predicted response to psychotherapy; patients with
             greater sustained activation in this region were more
             responsive to BATD treatment. LIMITATION: The current study
             only included a single treatment condition, thus it unknown
             whether these predictors of treatment response are specific
             to BATD or psychotherapy in general. CONCLUSION: Findings
             add to the growing body of literature suggesting that the
             capacity to sustain neural responses to rewards may be a
             critical endophenotype of MDD.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2016.06.005},
   Key = {fds319711}
}

@article{fds323548,
   Author = {Keng, S-L and Seah, STH and Tong, EMW and Smoski,
             M},
   Title = {Effects of brief mindful acceptance induction on implicit
             dysfunctional attitudes and concordance between implicit and
             explicit dysfunctional attitudes.},
   Journal = {Behav Res Ther},
   Volume = {83},
   Pages = {1-10},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2016.05.004},
   Abstract = {Mindfulness-based interventions have been shown to be
             effective in alleviating depressive symptoms. While much
             work has examined the effects of mindfulness training on
             subjective symptoms and experiences, and less is known
             regarding whether mindfulness training may alter relatively
             uncontrollable cognitive processes associated with depressed
             mood, particularly implicit dysfunctional attitudes. The
             present study examined the effects of a brief mindful
             acceptance induction on implicit dysfunctional attitudes and
             degree of concordance between implicit and explicit
             dysfunctional attitudes in the context of sad mood. A total
             of 79 adult participants with elevated depressive symptoms
             underwent an autobiographical mood induction procedure
             before being randomly assigned to mindful acceptance or
             thought wandering inductions. Results showed that the effect
             of mindful acceptance on implicit dysfunctional attitude was
             significantly moderated by trait mindfulness. Participants
             high on trait mindfulness demonstrated significant
             improvements in implicit dysfunctional attitudes following
             the mindful acceptance induction. Those low on trait
             mindfulness demonstrated significantly worse implicit
             dysfunctional attitudes following the induction.
             Significantly greater levels of concordance between implicit
             and explicit dysfunctional attitudes were observed in the
             mindful acceptance condition versus the thought wandering
             condition. The findings highlight changes in implicit
             dysfunctional attitudes and improvements in self-concordance
             as two potential mechanisms underlying the effects of
             mindfulness-based interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brat.2016.05.004},
   Key = {fds323548}
}

@article{fds323549,
   Author = {Kaiser, RH and Whitfield-Gabrieli, S and Dillon, DG and Goer, F and Beltzer, M and Minkel, J and Smoski, M and Dichter, G and Pizzagalli,
             DA},
   Title = {Dynamic Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Major
             Depression.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {1822-1830},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2015.352},
   Abstract = {Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by abnormal
             resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), especially in
             medial prefrontal cortical (MPFC) regions of the default
             network. However, prior research in MDD has not examined
             dynamic changes in functional connectivity as networks form,
             interact, and dissolve over time. We compared unmedicated
             individuals with MDD (n=100) to control participants (n=109)
             on dynamic RSFC (operationalized as SD in RSFC over a series
             of sliding windows) of an MPFC seed region during a
             resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan.
             Among participants with MDD, we also investigated the
             relationship between symptom severity and RSFC. Secondary
             analyses probed the association between dynamic RSFC and
             rumination. Results showed that individuals with MDD were
             characterized by decreased dynamic (less variable) RSFC
             between MPFC and regions of parahippocampal gyrus within the
             default network, a pattern related to sustained positive
             connectivity between these regions across sliding windows.
             In contrast, the MDD group exhibited increased dynamic (more
             variable) RSFC between MPFC and regions of insula, and
             higher severity of depression was related to increased
             dynamic RSFC between MPFC and dorsolateral prefrontal
             cortex. These patterns of highly variable RSFC were related
             to greater frequency of strong positive and negative
             correlations in activity across sliding windows. Secondary
             analyses indicated that increased dynamic RSFC between MPFC
             and insula was related to higher levels of recent
             rumination. These findings provide initial evidence that
             depression, and ruminative thinking in depression, are
             related to abnormal patterns of fluctuating communication
             among brain systems involved in regulating attention and
             self-referential thinking.},
   Doi = {10.1038/npp.2015.352},
   Key = {fds323549}
}

@article{fds319712,
   Author = {Keng, SL and Smoski, MJ and Robins, CJ},
   Title = {Effects of Mindful Acceptance and Reappraisal Training on
             Maladaptive Beliefs About Rumination},
   Journal = {Mindfulness},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {493-503},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12671-015-0480-x},
   Abstract = {© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. The
             present study examined the relative effects of mindful
             acceptance and reappraisal on metacognitive attitudes and
             beliefs in relation to rumination and negative experiences.
             A small but growing literature has compared the effects of
             these strategies on immediate emotional experience, but
             little work has examined the broader, metacognitive impact
             of these strategies, such as maladaptive beliefs about
             rumination. One hundred and twenty-nine participants who
             reported elevated symptoms of depression were randomly
             assigned to receive brief training in mindful acceptance,
             reappraisal, or no training prior to undergoing an
             autobiographical sad mood induction. Participants rated
             their beliefs in relation to rumination and negative
             experiences before and after instructions to engage in mood
             regulation. Results showed that relative to reappraisal or
             no training, training in mindful acceptance resulted in
             greater decreases in maladaptive beliefs about rumination.
             The study suggests that training in mindful acceptance
             promotes beneficial changes in metacognitive attitudes and
             beliefs relevant to depression, and contributes to a greater
             understanding of the mechanisms through which
             mindfulness-based interventions lead to positive
             outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s12671-015-0480-x},
   Key = {fds319712}
}

@article{fds276255,
   Author = {Richey, JA and Damiano, CR and Sabatino, A and Rittenberg, A and Petty,
             C and Bizzell, J and Voyvodic, J and Heller, AS and Coffman, MC and Smoski,
             M and Davidson, RJ and Dichter, GS},
   Title = {Neural Mechanisms of Emotion Regulation in Autism Spectrum
             Disorder.},
   Journal = {J Autism Dev Disord},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {3409-3423},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0162-3257},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2359-z},
   Abstract = {Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by high
             rates of comorbid internalizing and externalizing disorders.
             One mechanistic account of these comorbidities is that ASD
             is characterized by impaired emotion regulation (ER) that
             results in deficits modulating emotional responses. We
             assessed neural activation during cognitive reappraisal of
             faces in high functioning adults with ASD. Groups did not
             differ in looking time, pupilometry, or subjective ratings
             of faces during reappraisal. However, instructions to
             increase positive and negative emotional responses resulted
             in less increase in nucleus accumbens and amygdala
             activations (respectively) in the ASD group, and both
             regulation instructions resulted in less change in
             dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation in the ASD group.
             Results suggest a potential mechanistic account of impaired
             ER in ASD.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10803-015-2359-z},
   Key = {fds276255}
}

@article{fds276260,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Keng, S-L and Ji, JL and Moore, T and Minkel, J and Dichter,
             GS},
   Title = {Neural indicators of emotion regulation via acceptance vs
             reappraisal in remitted major depressive
             disorder.},
   Journal = {Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1187-1194},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {1749-5016},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsv003},
   Abstract = {Mood disorders are characterized by impaired emotion
             regulation abilities, reflected in alterations in
             frontolimbic brain functioning during regulation. However,
             little is known about differences in brain function when
             comparing regulatory strategies. Reappraisal and emotional
             acceptance are effective in downregulating negative affect,
             and are components of effective depression psychotherapies.
             Investigating neural mechanisms of reappraisal vs emotional
             acceptance in remitted major depressive disorder (rMDD) may
             yield novel mechanistic insights into depression risk and
             prevention. Thirty-seven individuals (18 rMDD, 19 controls)
             were assessed during a functional magnetic resonance imaging
             task requiring reappraisal, emotional acceptance or no
             explicit regulation while viewing sad images. Lower negative
             affect was reported following reappraisal than acceptance,
             and was lower following acceptance than no explicit
             regulation. In controls, the acceptance > reappraisal
             contrast revealed greater activation in left insular cortex
             and right prefrontal gyrus, and less activation in several
             other prefrontal regions. Compared with controls, the rMDD
             group had greater paracingulate and right midfrontal gyrus
             (BA 8) activation during reappraisal relative to acceptance.
             Compared with reappraisal, acceptance is associated with
             activation in regions linked to somatic and emotion
             awareness, although this activation is associated with less
             reduction in negative affect. Additionally, a history of MDD
             moderated these effects.},
   Doi = {10.1093/scan/nsv003},
   Key = {fds276260}
}

@article{fds276261,
   Author = {Crowther, A and Smoski, MJ and Minkel, J and Moore, T and Gibbs, D and Petty, C and Bizzell, J and Schiller, CE and Sideris, J and Carl, H and Dichter, GS},
   Title = {Resting-state connectivity predictors of response to
             psychotherapy in major depressive disorder.},
   Journal = {Neuropsychopharmacology},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {1659-1673},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0893-133X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2015.12},
   Abstract = {Despite the heterogeneous symptom presentation and complex
             etiology of major depressive disorder (MDD), functional
             neuroimaging studies have shown with remarkable consistency
             that dysfunction in mesocorticolimbic brain systems are
             central to the disorder. Relatively less research has
             focused on the identification of biological markers of
             response to antidepressant treatment that would serve to
             improve the personalized delivery of empirically supported
             antidepressant interventions. In the present study, we
             investigated whether resting-state functional brain
             connectivity (rs-fcMRI) predicted response to Behavioral
             Activation Treatment for Depression, an empirically
             validated psychotherapy modality designed to increase
             engagement with rewarding stimuli and reduce avoidance
             behaviors. Twenty-three unmedicated outpatients with MDD and
             20 matched nondepressed controls completed rs-fcMRI scans
             after which the MDD group received an average of 12 sessions
             of psychotherapy. The mean change in Beck Depression
             Inventory-II scores after psychotherapy was 12.04 points, a
             clinically meaningful response. Resting-state neuroimaging
             data were analyzed with a seed-based approach to investigate
             functional connectivity with four canonical resting-state
             networks: the default mode network, the dorsal attention
             network, the executive control network, and the salience
             network. At baseline, the MDD group was characterized by
             relative hyperconnectivity of multiple regions with
             precuneus, anterior insula, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex
             (dACC), and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex seeds and by
             relative hypoconnectivity with intraparietal sulcus,
             anterior insula, and dACC seeds. Additionally, connectivity
             of the precuneus with the left middle temporal gyrus and
             connectivity of the dACC with the parahippocampal gyrus
             predicted the magnitude of pretreatment MDD symptoms.
             Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that response to
             psychotherapy in the MDD group was predicted by pretreatment
             connectivity of the right insula with the right middle
             temporal gyrus and the left intraparietal sulcus with the
             orbital frontal cortex. These results add to the nascent
             body of literature investigating pretreatment rs-fcMRI
             predictors of antidepressant treatment response and is the
             first study to examine rs-fcMRI predictors of response to
             psychotherapy.},
   Doi = {10.1038/npp.2015.12},
   Key = {fds276261}
}

@article{fds276259,
   Author = {Greeson, JM and Smoski, MJ and Suarez, EC and Brantley, JG and Ekblad,
             AG and Lynch, TR and Wolever, RQ},
   Title = {Decreased symptoms of depression after mindfulness-based
             stress reduction: potential moderating effects of
             religiosity, spirituality, trait mindfulness, sex, and
             age.},
   Journal = {J Altern Complement Med},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {166-174},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1075-5535},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/act.2015.29008.sh},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is a
             secular meditation training program that reduces depressive
             symptoms. Little is known, however, about the degree to
             which a participant's spiritual and religious background, or
             other demographic characteristics associated with risk for
             depression, may affect the effectiveness of MBSR. Therefore,
             this study tested whether individual differences in
             religiosity, spirituality, motivation for spiritual growth,
             trait mindfulness, sex, and age affect MBSR effectiveness.
             METHODS: As part of an open trial, multiple regression was
             used to analyze variation in depressive symptom outcomes
             among 322 adults who enrolled in an 8-week, community-based
             MBSR program. RESULTS: As hypothesized, depressive symptom
             severity decreased significantly in the full study sample
             (d=0.57; p<0.01). After adjustment for baseline symptom
             severity, moderation analyses revealed no significant
             differences in the change in depressive symptoms following
             MBSR as a function of spirituality, religiosity, trait
             mindfulness, or demographic variables. Paired t tests found
             consistent, statistically significant (p<0.01) reductions in
             depressive symptoms across all subgroups by religious
             affiliation, intention for spiritual growth, sex, and
             baseline symptom severity. After adjustment for baseline
             symptom scores, age, sex, and religious affiliation, a
             significant proportion of variance in post-MBSR depressive
             symptoms was uniquely explained by changes in both
             spirituality (β=-0.15; p=0.006) and mindfulness (β=-0.17;
             p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that MBSR, a
             secular meditation training program, is associated with
             improved depressive symptoms regardless of affiliation with
             a religion, sense of spirituality, trait level of
             mindfulness before MBSR training, sex, or age. Increases in
             both mindfulness and daily spiritual experiences uniquely
             explained improvement in depressive symptoms.},
   Doi = {10.1089/act.2015.29008.sh},
   Key = {fds276259}
}

@article{fds276262,
   Author = {Dichter, GS and Gibbs, D and Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {A systematic review of relations between resting-state
             functional-MRI and treatment response in major depressive
             disorder.},
   Journal = {J Affect Disord},
   Volume = {172},
   Pages = {8-17},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0165-0327},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2014.09.028},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance
             imaging (fMRI) is a promising predictor of treatment
             response in major depressive disorder (MDD). METHODS: A
             search for papers published in English was conducted using
             PubMed with the following words: depression, treatment,
             resting-state, connectivity, and fMRI. Findings from 21
             studies of relations between resting-state fMRI and
             treatment response in MDD are presented, and common findings
             and themes are discussed. RESULTS: The use of resting-state
             fMRI in research on MDD treatment response has yielded a
             number of consistent findings that provide a basis for
             understanding the potential mechanisms of action of
             antidepressant treatment response. These included (1)
             associations between response to antidepressant medications
             and increased functional connectivity between frontal and
             limbic brain regions, possibly resulting in greater
             inhibitory control over neural circuits that process
             emotions; (2) connectivity of visual recognition circuits in
             studies that compared treatment resistant and treatment
             sensitive patients; (3) response to TMS was consistently
             predicted by subcallosal cortex connectivity; and (4)
             hyperconnectivity of the default mode network and
             hypoconnectivity of the cognitive control network
             differentiated treatment-resistant from treatment-sensitive
             MDD patients. LIMITATIONS: There was also considerable
             variability between studies with respect to study designs
             and analytic strategies that made direct comparisons across
             all studies difficult. CONCLUSIONS: Continued
             standardization of study designs and analytic strategies as
             well as aggregation of larger datasets will allow the field
             to better elucidate the potential mechanisms of action of
             treatment response in patients with MDD to ultimately
             generate algorithms to predict which patients will respond
             to which antidepressant treatments.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2014.09.028},
   Key = {fds276262}
}

@article{fds276267,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and LaBar, KS and Steffens, DC},
   Title = {Relative effectiveness of reappraisal and distraction in
             regulating emotion in late-life depression.},
   Journal = {Am J Geriatr Psychiatry},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {898-907},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24021222},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVES: The present study compares the effectiveness of
             two strategies, reappraisal and distraction, in reducing
             negative affect in older adults induced by focusing on
             personally relevant negative events and stressors.
             PARTICIPANTS: 30 adults with major depressive disorger (MDD)
             and 40 never-depressed (ND) comparison participants ages 60
             years and over (mean age = 69.7 years). DESIGN AND
             MEASUREMENTS: Participants underwent three affect induction
             trials, each followed by a different emotion regulation
             strategy: distraction, reappraisal, and a no-instruction
             control condition. Self-reported affect was recorded pre-
             and post-affect induction, and at one-minute intervals
             during regulation. RESULTS: Across groups, participants
             reported greater reductions in negative affect with
             distraction than reappraisal or the no-instruction control
             condition. An interaction between group and regulation
             condition indicated that distraction was more effective in
             reducing negative affect in the MDD group than the ND group.
             CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that distraction is an
             especially effective strategy for reducing negative affect
             in older adults with MDD. Finding ways to incorporate
             distraction skills into psychotherapeutic interventions for
             late-life MDD may improve their effectiveness, especially
             for short-term improvement of affect following
             rumination.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jagp.2013.01.070},
   Key = {fds276267}
}

@article{fds276266,
   Author = {Keng, S-L and Robins, CJ and Smoski, MJ and Dagenbach, J and Leary,
             MR},
   Title = {Reappraisal and mindfulness: a comparison of subjective
             effects and cognitive costs.},
   Journal = {Behav Res Ther},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {899-904},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24225174},
   Abstract = {The present study investigated the relative effects of
             mindfulness and reappraisal in reducing sad mood and whether
             trait mindfulness and habitual reappraisal moderated the
             effects. The study also compared the extent to which
             implementation of these strategies incurred cognitive
             resources. A total of 129 participants were randomly
             assigned to receiving training in mindfulness, reappraisal,
             or no training prior to undergoing an autobiographical sad
             mood induction. Results showed that mindfulness and
             reappraisal were superior to no training, and equivalent in
             their effects in lowering sad mood. Compared to mindfulness,
             reappraisal resulted in significantly higher interference
             scores on a subsequent Stroop test, reflecting greater
             depletion of cognitive resources. Higher trait mindfulness,
             but not habitual reappraisal, predicted greater reductions
             in sadness across conditions. The study suggests that
             although mindfulness and reappraisal are equally effective
             in down-regulating sad mood, they incur different levels of
             cognitive costs.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.brat.2013.10.006},
   Key = {fds276266}
}

@article{fds276268,
   Author = {Steffens, DC and McQuoid, DR and Smoski, MJ and Potter,
             GG},
   Title = {Clinical outcomes of older depressed patients with and
             without comorbid neuroticism.},
   Journal = {Int Psychogeriatr},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1985-1990},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23941723},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Neuroticism is a psychological construct that
             includes tendency to exhibit negative affect (NA), having
             poor stress tolerance and being at risk for depression and
             anxiety disorders. The consequences of neuroticism in the
             elderly adults are understudied. We hypothesized that older
             depressed patients with comorbid neuroticism at baseline
             would have worse mood and cognitive outcomes compared with
             older depressed patients without neuroticism. METHODS: One
             hundred and ten older depressed adults completed baseline
             self-reports of depression and the NEO-Personality Inventory
             as a measure of neuroticism, were administered a battery of
             cognitive tests annually and were seen by a study
             psychiatrist who assessed patients using the Montgomery
             Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and treated patients
             with antidepressants using an established treatment
             guideline. Patients were followed as clinically indicated
             for up to three years. We measured remission (defined as
             MADRS score ≤ 6) rates at one year as a categorical
             outcome. In addition, we used Cox proportional hazard models
             to examine the relationship between neuroticism and change
             in MADRS and cognitive score over time. RESULTS:
             Non-remitters (30%) at one year had higher scores in total
             neuroticism (TN), vulnerability to stress (VS), and NA. Over
             three years, time to achieve remission was associated with
             higher TN, higher VS, and greater NA. In analyses
             controlling for baseline cognitive score, age, sex, and
             education, VS was associated with baseline to two-year
             change in cognition. CONCLUSIONS: Presence of neuroticism in
             older depressed patients treated with medication is
             associated with poor mood outcomes and may indicate
             increased risk of cognitive decline.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S1041610213001324},
   Key = {fds276268}
}

@article{fds276269,
   Author = {Schiller, CE and Minkel, J and Smoski, MJ and Dichter,
             GS},
   Title = {Remitted major depression is characterized by reduced
             prefrontal cortex reactivity to reward loss.},
   Journal = {J Affect Disord},
   Volume = {151},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {756-762},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23835103},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Major depression (MDD) is characterized by
             anhedonia. Although a growing body of literature has linked
             anhedonia in MDD to reduced frontostriatal activity during
             reward gains, relatively few studies have examined neural
             responsivity to loss, and no studies to date have examined
             neural responses to loss in euthymic individuals with a
             history of MDD. METHODS: An fMRI monetary incentive delay
             task was administered to 19 participants with remitted MDD
             (rMDD) and 19 never depressed controls. Analyses examined
             group activation differences in brain reward circuitry
             during monetary loss anticipation and outcomes. Secondary
             analyses examined the association between self-reported
             rumination and brain activation in the rMDD group. RESULTS:
             Compared to controls, the rMDD group showed less superior
             frontal gyrus activation during loss anticipation and less
             inferior and superior frontal gyri activation during loss
             outcomes (cluster corrected p's<.05). Ruminative Responses
             Scale scores were negatively correlated with superior
             frontal gyrus activation (r=-.68, p=.001) during loss
             outcomes in the rMDD group. LIMITATIONS: Replication with a
             larger sample is needed. CONCLUSIONS: Euthymic individuals
             with a history of MDD showed prefrontal cortex
             hypoactivation during loss anticipation and outcomes, and
             the degree of superior frontal gyrus hypoactivation was
             associated with rumination. Abnormal prefrontal cortex
             responses to loss may reflect a trait-like vulnerability to
             MDD, although future research is needed to evaluate the
             utility of this functional neural endophenotype as a
             prospective risk marker.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2013.06.016},
   Key = {fds276269}
}

@article{fds276270,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Keng, S-L and Schiller, CE and Minkel, J and Dichter,
             GS},
   Title = {Neural mechanisms of cognitive reappraisal in remitted major
             depressive disorder.},
   Journal = {J Affect Disord},
   Volume = {151},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {171-177},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23796796},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Down-regulation of negative emotions by
             cognitive strategies relies on prefrontal cortical
             modulation of limbic brain regions, and impaired
             frontolimbic functioning during cognitive reappraisal has
             been observed in affective disorders. However, no study to
             date has examined cognitive reappraisal in unmedicated
             euthymic individuals with a history of major depressive
             disorder relative to symptom-matched controls. Given that a
             history of depression is a critical risk factor for future
             depressive episodes, investigating the neural mechanisms of
             emotion regulation in remitted major depressive disorder
             (rMDD) may yield novel insights into depression risk.
             METHOD: We assessed 37 individuals (18 rMDD, 19 controls)
             with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a
             task requiring cognitive reappraisal of sad images. RESULTS:
             Both groups demonstrated decreased self-reported negative
             affect after cognitive reappraisal and no group differences
             in the effects of cognitive reappraisal on mood were
             evident. Functional MRI results indicated greater
             paracingulate gyrus (rostral anterior cingulate cortex,
             Brodmann area 32) activation and decreased right midfrontal
             gyrus (Brodmann area 6) activation during the reappraisal of
             sad images. LIMITATIONS: Trial-by-trial ratings of
             pre-regulation affect were not collected, limiting the
             interpretation of post-regulation negative affect scores.
             CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that activation of rostral
             anterior cingulate cortex, a region linked to the prediction
             of antidepressant treatment response, and of the right
             midfrontal gyrus, a region involved in cognitive control in
             the context of cognitive reappraisal, may represent
             endophenotypic markers of future depression risk. Future
             prospective studies will be needed to validate the
             predictive utility of these neural markers.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2013.05.073},
   Key = {fds276270}
}

@article{fds276276,
   Author = {Hayward, RD and Taylor, WD and Smoski, MJ and Steffens, DC and Payne,
             ME},
   Title = {Association of five-factor model personality domains and
             facets with presence, onset, and treatment outcomes of major
             depression in older adults.},
   Journal = {Am J Geriatr Psychiatry},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {88-96},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23290206},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVES: To assess the relationship of multiple domains
             and facets of the five-factor model of personality with
             presence, onset, and severity of late-life depression.
             DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of depression status, and
             age of onset. Retrospective analysis of baseline severity.
             Longitudinal analysis of severity after 3 and 12 months of
             psychiatric treatment. SETTING: Private university-affiliated
             medical center in the Southeastern United States.
             PARTICIPANTS: One hundred twelve psychiatric patients with a
             current episode of unipolar major depression, and 104
             nondepressed comparison subjects, age 60 and older (mean:
             70, SD: 6). MEASUREMENTS: Revised NEO Personality Inventory,
             Diagnostic Interview Schedule, and Montgomery-Åsberg
             Depression Rating Scale. RESULTS: Binary logistic regression
             found that depression was related to higher neuroticism (and
             all its facets) and to lower extraversion (and facets of
             assertiveness, activity, and positive emotionality) and
             conscientiousness (and facets of competence, order,
             dutifulness, and self-discipline). Multinomial logistic
             regression found some of these relationships held only for
             depression with onset before age 50 (hostility,
             self-consciousness, extraversion, assertiveness, positive
             emotions, order, and dutifulness). Linear regression found
             that personality was unrelated to depression severity at the
             beginning of treatment, but improvement after 3 months was
             related to lower neuroticism (and facets depressiveness and
             stress-vulnerability) and higher warmth and competence.
             Improvement after 12 months was related to lower
             neuroticism, depressiveness, and stress-vulnerability.
             CONCLUSIONS: Specific personality facets are related with
             depression and treatment outcomes. Screening for certain
             personality traits at the start of treatment may help
             identify patients at risk of worse response to treatment
             after 3 months.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jagp.2012.11.012},
   Key = {fds276276}
}

@article{fds276297,
   Author = {Paul, NA and Stanton, SJ and Greeson, JM and Smoski, MJ and Wang,
             L},
   Title = {Psychological and neural mechanisms of trait mindfulness in
             reducing depression vulnerability.},
   Journal = {Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {56-64},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1749-5024},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22717383},
   Abstract = {Mindfulness-based interventions are effective for reducing
             depressive symptoms. However, the psychological and neural
             mechanisms are unclear. This study examined which facets of
             trait mindfulness offer protection against negative bias and
             rumination, which are key risk factors for depression.
             Nineteen male volunteers completed a 2-day functional
             magnetic resonance imaging study. One day utilized a
             stress-induction task and the other day utilized a mindful
             breathing task. An emotional inhibition task was used to
             measure neural and behavioral changes related to state
             negative bias, defined by poorer performance in inhibiting
             negative relative to neutral stimuli. Associations among
             trait mindfulness [measured by the Five Facet Mindfulness
             Questionnaire (FFMQ)], trait rumination, and negative bias
             were examined. Non-reactivity scores on the FFMQ correlated
             negatively with rumination and negative bias following the
             stress induction. Non-reactivity was inversely correlated
             with insula activation during inhibition to negative stimuli
             after the mindful breathing task. Our results suggest
             non-reactivity to inner experience is the key facet of
             mindfulness that protects individuals from psychological
             risk for depression. Based on these results, mindfulness
             could reduce vulnerability to depression in at least two
             ways: (i) by buffering against trait rumination and negative
             bias and (ii) by reducing automatic emotional responding via
             the insula.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1093/scan/nss070},
   Key = {fds276297}
}

@article{fds276271,
   Author = {Wang, L and Paul, N and Stanton, SJ and Greeson, JM and Smoski,
             MJ},
   Title = {Loss of sustained activity in the ventromedial prefrontal
             cortex in response to repeated stress in individuals with
             early-life emotional abuse: implications for depression
             vulnerability.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Psychology},
   Volume = {4},
   Pages = {320},
   Year = {2013},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23761775},
   Abstract = {Repeated psychosocial stress in early-life has significant
             impact on both behavior and neural function which, together,
             increase vulnerability to depression. However, neural
             mechanisms related to repeated stress remain unclear. We
             hypothesize that early-life stress may result in a reduced
             capacity for cognitive control in response to a repeated
             stressor, particularly in individuals who developed
             maladaptive emotional processing strategies, namely trait
             rumination. Individuals who encountered early-life stress
             but have adaptive emotional processing, namely trait
             mindfulness, may demonstrate an opposite pattern. Using a
             mental arithmetic task to induce mild stress and a mindful
             breathing task to induce a mindful state, we tested this
             hypothesis by examining blood perfusion changes over time in
             healthy young men. We found that subjects with early-life
             stress, particularly emotional abuse, failed to sustain
             neural activation in the orbitofrontal and ventromedial
             prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) over time. Given that the vmPFC is
             known to regulate amygdala activity during emotional
             processing, we subsequently compared the perfusion in the
             vmPFC and the amygdala in depression-vulnerable (having
             early-life stress and high in rumination) and resilient
             (having early-life stress and high in mindfulness) subjects.
             We found that depression-vulnerable subjects had increased
             amygdala perfusion and reduced vmPFC perfusion during the
             later runs than that during the earlier stressful task runs.
             In contrast, depression-resilient individuals showed the
             reverse pattern. Our results indicate that the vmPFC of
             depression-vulnerable subjects may have a limited capacity
             to inhibit amygdala activation to repeated stress over time,
             whereas the vmPFC in resilient individuals may adapt to
             stress quickly. This pilot study warrants future
             investigation to clarify the stress-related neural activity
             pattern dynamically to identify depression vulnerability at
             an individual level.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00320},
   Key = {fds276271}
}

@article{fds276286,
   Author = {Felder, JN and Smoski, MJ and Kozink, RV and Froeliger, B and McClernon,
             J and Bizzell, J and Petty, C and Dichter, GS},
   Title = {Neural mechanisms of subclinical depressive symptoms in
             women: a pilot functional brain imaging study.},
   Journal = {Bmc Psychiatry},
   Volume = {12},
   Pages = {152},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22998631},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Studies of individuals who do not meet criteria
             for major depressive disorder (MDD) but with subclinical
             levels of depressive symptoms may aid in the identification
             of neurofunctional abnormalities that possibly precede and
             predict the development of MDD. The purpose of this study
             was to evaluate relations between subclinical levels of
             depressive symptoms and neural activation patterns during
             tasks previously shown to differentiate individuals with and
             without MDD. METHODS: Functional magnetic resonance imaging
             (fMRI) was used to assess neural activations during active
             emotion regulation, a resting state scan, and reward
             processing. Participants were twelve females with a range of
             depressive symptoms who did not meet criteria for MDD.
             RESULTS: Increased depressive symptom severity predicted (1)
             decreased left midfrontal gyrus activation during
             reappraisal of sad stimuli; (2) increased right midfrontal
             gyrus activation during distraction from sad stimuli; (3)
             increased functional connectivity between a precuneus seed
             region and left orbitofrontal cortex during a resting state
             scan; and (4) increased paracingulate activation during
             non-win outcomes during a reward-processing task.
             CONCLUSIONS: These pilot data shed light on relations
             between subclinical levels of depressive symptoms in the
             absence of a formal MDD diagnosis and neural activation
             patterns. Future studies will be needed to test the utility
             of these activation patterns for predicting MDD onset in
             at-risk samples.},
   Doi = {10.1186/1471-244X-12-152},
   Key = {fds276286}
}

@article{fds276281,
   Author = {Itzhar-Nabarro, Z and Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {A Review of Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives on
             Marital Satisfaction and Bereavement Outcomes: Implications
             for Working with Older Adults},
   Journal = {Clinical Gerontologist},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {257-269},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0731-7115},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07317115.2012.657604},
   Abstract = {The later years of one's life can contain many losses,
             perhaps none as prominent as the loss of one's spouse.
             Bereavement can be a life-changing loss, but the nature of
             that change can range from despair and depression to
             personal growth and resiliency. One factor that can play a
             role in bereavement outcomes is the quality of the lost
             relationship. It does not appear that the relationship
             between marital satisfaction and bereavement outcomes is as
             clear-cut as poor relationships leading to poor outcomes or
             vice-versa, however. Rather, multiple factors related to
             relationship dynamics, attachment style, and dependency may
             influence bereavement trajectories. In addition, marital
             satisfaction may interact with other factors including
             pre-loss psychological health and personality
             characteristics to influence outcomes. Similar factors may
             also influence the bereaved individual's post-loss
             assessment of the relationship, leading to idealization of
             the lost spouse and making clini vement and/or the need for
             intervention. © 2012 Taylor and Francis Group,
             LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1080/07317115.2012.657604},
   Key = {fds276281}
}

@article{fds276290,
   Author = {Hayward, RD and Taylor, WD and Smoski, MJ and Steffens, DC and Payne,
             ME},
   Title = {Association of Five-Factor Model Personality Domains and
             Facets with Presence, Onset, and Treatment Outcomes of Major
             Depression in Older Adults.},
   Journal = {Am J Geriatr Psychiatry},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1545-7214},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22426521},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVES:: To assess the relationship of multiple domains
             and facets of the five-factor model of personality with
             presence, onset, and severity of late-life depression.
             DESIGN:: Cross-sectional analysis of depression status, and
             age of onset. Retrospective analysis of baseline severity.
             Longitudinal analysis of severity after 3 and 12 months of
             psychiatric treatment. SETTING:: Private
             university-affiliated medical center in the Southeastern
             United States. PARTICIPANTS:: One hundred twelve psychiatric
             patients with a current episode of unipolar major
             depression, and 104 nondepressed comparison subjects, age 60
             and older (mean: 70, SD: 6). MEASUREMENTS:: Revised NEO
             Personality Inventory, Diagnostic Interview Schedule, and
             Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. RESULTS:: Binary
             logistic regression found that depression was related to
             higher neuroticism (and all its facets) and to lower
             extraversion (and facets of assertiveness, activity, and
             positive emotionality) and conscientiousness (and facets of
             competence, order, dutifulness, and self-discipline).
             Multinomial logistic regression found some of these
             relationships held only for depression with onset before age
             50 (hostility, self-consciousness, extraversion,
             assertiveness, positive emotions, order, and dutifulness).
             Linear regression found that personality was unrelated to
             depression severity at the beginning of treatment, but
             improvement after 3 months was related to lower neuroticism
             (and facets depressiveness and stress-vulnerability) and
             higher warmth and competence. Improvement after 12 months
             was related to lower neuroticism, depressiveness, and
             stress-vulnerability. CONCLUSIONS:: Specific personality
             facets are related with depression and treatment outcomes.
             Screening for certain personality traits at the start of
             treatment may help identify patients at risk of worse
             response to treatment after 3 months.},
   Language = {ENG},
   Doi = {10.1097/JGP.0b013e3182436200},
   Key = {fds276290}
}

@article{fds276288,
   Author = {Dichter, GS and Kozink, RV and McClernon, FJ and Smoski,
             MJ},
   Title = {Remitted major depression is characterized by reward network
             hyperactivation during reward anticipation and
             hypoactivation during reward outcomes.},
   Journal = {J Affect Disord},
   Volume = {136},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {1126-1134},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1573-2517},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22036801},
   Keywords = {Adult • Anticipation, Psychological • Brain •
             Depressive Disorder, Major • Female • Humans
             • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Male •
             Motivation • Prospective Studies • Reward* •
             Young Adult • diagnosis* • physiopathology*},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Although functional brain imaging has
             established that individuals with unipolar major depressive
             disorder (MDD) are characterized by frontostriatal
             dysfunction during reward processing, no research to date
             has examined the chronometry of neural responses to rewards
             in euthymic individuals with a history of MDD. METHOD: A
             monetary incentive delay task was used during fMRI scanning
             to assess neural responses in frontostriatal reward regions
             during reward anticipation and outcomes in 19 participants
             with remitted major depressive disorder (rMDD) and in 19
             matched control participants. RESULTS: During the
             anticipation phase of the task, the rMDD group was
             characterized by relatively greater activation in bilateral
             anterior cingulate gyrus, in right midfrontal gyrus, and in
             the right cerebellum. During the outcome phase of the task,
             the rMDD group was characterized by relatively decreased
             activation in bilateral orbital frontal cortex, right
             frontal pole, left insular cortex, and left thalamus.
             Exploratory analyses indicated that activation within a
             right frontal pole cluster that differentiated groups during
             reward anticipation predicted the number of lifetime
             depressive episodes within the rMDD group. LIMITATIONS:
             Replication with larger samples is needed. CONCLUSIONS:
             Results suggest a double dissociation between reward network
             reactivity and temporal phase of the reward response in
             rMDD, such that rMDD is generally characterized by reward
             network hyperactivation during reward anticipation and
             reward network hypoactivation during reward outcomes. More
             broadly, these data suggest that aberrant frontostriatal
             response to rewards may potentially represent a trait marker
             for MDD, though future research is needed to evaluate the
             prospective utility of this functional neural endophenotype
             as a marker of MDD risk.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2011.09.048},
   Key = {fds276288}
}

@article{fds276284,
   Author = {Keng, SL and Smoski, MJ and Robins, CJ and Ekblad, AG and Brantley,
             JG},
   Title = {Mechanisms of change in mindfulness-based stress reduction:
             Self-compassion and mindfulness as mediators of intervention
             outcomes},
   Journal = {Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {270-280},
   Publisher = {Springer Publishing Company},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0889-8391},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0889-8391.26.3.270},
   Abstract = {Research has demonstrated support for the efficacy of
             mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) in alleviating
             psychological distress and symptoms. Less is known, however,
             about the mechanisms through which MBSR achieves its
             outcomes. This study examined mindfulness and
             self-compassion as potential mediators of MBSR's effects on
             several processes and behaviors related to emotion
             regulation, using data from a randomized trial of MBSR
             versus waitlist (WL), in which MBSR participants
             demonstrated significantly greater improvements in worry,
             fear of emotion, difficulties in emotion regulation,
             suppression of anger, and aggressive anger expression.
             Mediation analysis using bootstrap resampling indicated that
             increases in self-compassion mediated MBSR's effects on
             worry, controlling for change in mindfulness. Increases in
             mindfulness mediated the intervention's effects on
             difficulties in emotion regulation, controlling for change
             in self-compassion. Both variables mediated MBSR's effects
             on fear of emotion. These findings highlight the importance
             of mindfulness and self-compassion as key processes of
             change that underlie MBSR's outcomes. © 2012 Springer
             Publishing Company.},
   Doi = {10.1891/0889-8391.26.3.270},
   Key = {fds276284}
}

@article{fds276285,
   Author = {Addicott, MA and Baranger, DAA and Kozink, RV and Smoski, MJ and Dichter, GS and McClernon, FJ},
   Title = {Erratum: Smoking withdrawal is associated with increases in
             brain activation during decision making and reward
             anticipation: A preliminary study},
   Journal = {Psychopharmacology},
   Volume = {219},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {685-686},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0033-3158},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-011-2531-x},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00213-011-2531-x},
   Key = {fds276285}
}

@article{fds276293,
   Author = {Addicott, MA and Baranger, DAA and Kozink, RV and Smoski, MJ and Dichter, GS and McClernon, FJ},
   Title = {Smoking withdrawal is associated with increases in brain
             activation during decision making and reward anticipation: a
             preliminary study.},
   Journal = {Psychopharmacology (Berl)},
   Volume = {219},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {563-573},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1432-2072},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21766170},
   Keywords = {Adolescent • Adult • Anticipation, Psychological
             • Brain • Brain Mapping • Choice Behavior
             • Decision Making • Female • Humans •
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Male • Middle Aged
             • Psychomotor Performance • Reaction Time •
             Reward* • Substance Withdrawal Syndrome • Tobacco
             Use Disorder • methods • physiology •
             physiology* • physiopathology* •
             psychology*},
   Abstract = {RATIONALE: Acute nicotine abstinence is associated with
             disruption of executive function and reward processes;
             however, the neurobiological basis of these effects has not
             been fully elucidated. METHODS: The effects of nicotine
             abstinence on brain function during reward-based
             probabilistic decision making were preliminarily
             investigated by scanning adult smokers (n = 13)
             following 24 h of smoking abstinence and in a
             smoking-satiated condition. During fMRI scanning,
             participants completed the wheel of fortune task (Ernst et
             al. in Neuropsychologia 42:1585-1597, 2004), a
             decision-making task with probabilistic monetary outcomes.
             Brain activation was modeled during selection of options,
             anticipation of outcomes, and outcome feedback. RESULTS:
             During choice selection, reaction times were slower, and
             there was greater neural activation in the postcentral
             gyrus, insula, and frontal and parietal cortices in the
             abstinent condition compared to the satiated condition.
             During reward anticipation, greater activation was observed
             in the frontal pole, insula, and paracingulate cortex in the
             abstinent condition compared to the satiated condition.
             Greater activation was also shown in the precentral gyrus
             and putamen in the satiated condition compared to the
             abstinent condition. During the outcome phase, rewards
             (compared to no rewards) resulted in significant activation
             in the paracingulate cortex in the satiated condition
             compared to the abstinent condition. CONCLUSIONS: The
             results of this preliminary study suggest that smoking
             withdrawal results in greater recruitment of insular,
             frontal, and parietal cortical areas during probabilistic
             decision making.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00213-011-2404-3},
   Key = {fds276293}
}

@article{fds276294,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Rittenberg, A and Dichter, GS},
   Title = {Major depressive disorder is characterized by greater reward
             network activation to monetary than pleasant image
             rewards.},
   Journal = {Psychiatry Research},
   Volume = {194},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {263-270},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0165-1781},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22079658},
   Keywords = {Adolescent • Adult • Brain • Brain Mapping
             • Choice Behavior • Depressive Disorder, Major*
             • Emotions* • Female • Games, Experimental
             • Humans • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
             • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Male • Middle
             Aged • Motivation • Multivariate Analysis •
             Nerve Net • Oxygen • Reaction Time • Reward*
             • Young Adult • blood • blood supply •
             diagnosis • pathology* • physiology •
             physiology* • physiopathology •
             psychology},
   Abstract = {Anhedonia, the loss of interest or pleasure in normally
             rewarding activities, is a hallmark feature of unipolar
             Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). A growing body of
             literature has identified frontostriatal dysfunction during
             reward anticipation and outcomes in MDD. However, no study
             to date has directly compared responses to different types
             of rewards such as pleasant images and monetary rewards in
             MDD. To investigate the neural responses to monetary and
             pleasant image rewards in MDD, a modified Monetary Incentive
             Delay task was used during functional magnetic resonance
             imaging to assess neural responses during anticipation and
             receipt of monetary and pleasant image rewards. Participants
             included nine adults with MDD and 13 affectively healthy
             controls. The MDD group showed lower activation than
             controls when anticipating monetary rewards in right
             orbitofrontal cortex and subcallosal cortex, and when
             anticipating pleasant image rewards in paracingulate and
             supplementary motor cortex. The MDD group had relatively
             greater activation in right putamen when anticipating
             monetary versus pleasant image rewards, relative to the
             control group. Results suggest reduced reward network
             activation in MDD when anticipating rewards, as well as
             relatively greater hypoactivation to pleasant image than
             monetary rewards.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.pscychresns.2011.06.012},
   Key = {fds276294}
}

@article{fds276295,
   Author = {Greeson, JM and Webber, DM and Smoski, MJ and Brantley, JG and Ekblad,
             AG and Suarez, EC and Wolever, RQ},
   Title = {Changes in spirituality partly explain health-related
             quality of life outcomes after Mindfulness-Based Stress
             Reduction.},
   Journal = {J Behav Med},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {508-518},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1573-3521},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21360283},
   Keywords = {Adult • Aged • Female • Health Surveys •
             Humans • Male • Meditation • Middle Aged
             • Models, Psychological • Quality of Life •
             Spirituality* • Stress, Psychological • methods
             • psychology* • statistics & numerical data •
             therapy*},
   Abstract = {Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction is a secular behavioral
             medicine program that has roots in meditative spiritual
             practices. Thus, spirituality may partly explain
             Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction outcomes. Participants
             (N = 279; M (SD) age = 45(12); 75% women) completed an
             online survey before and after an 8-week Mindfulness-Based
             Stress Reduction program. Structural equation modeling was
             used to test the hypothesis that, following
             Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, the relationship between
             enhanced mindfulness and improved health-related quality of
             life is mediated by increased daily spiritual experiences.
             Changes in both spirituality and mindfulness were
             significantly related to improvement in mental health.
             Although the initial mediation hypothesis was not supported,
             an alternate model suggested that enhanced mindfulness
             partly mediated the association between increased daily
             spiritual experiences and improved mental health-related
             quality of life (indirect effect: β = 0.07, P = 0.017).
             Effects on physical health-related quality of life were not
             significant. Findings suggest a novel mechanism by which
             increased daily spiritual experiences following
             Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction may partially explain
             improved mental health as a function of greater
             mindfulness.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10865-011-9332-x},
   Key = {fds276295}
}

@article{fds276292,
   Author = {Rosenthal, MZ and Kim, K and Herr, NR and Smoski, MJ and Cheavens, JS and Lynch, TR and Kosson, DS},
   Title = {Speed and accuracy of facial expression classification in
             avoidant personality disorder: a preliminary
             study.},
   Journal = {Personal Disord},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {327-334},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1949-2723},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22448805},
   Abstract = {The aim of this preliminary study was to examine whether
             individuals with avoidant personality disorder (APD) could
             be characterized by deficits in the classification of
             dynamically presented facial emotional expressions. Using a
             community sample of adults with APD (n = 17) and non-APD
             controls (n = 16), speed and accuracy of facial emotional
             expression recognition was investigated in a task that
             morphs facial expressions from neutral to prototypical
             expressions (Multi-Morph Facial Affect Recognition Task;
             Blair, Colledge, Murray, & Mitchell, 2001). Results
             indicated that individuals with APD were significantly more
             likely than controls to make errors when classifying fully
             expressed fear. However, no differences were found between
             groups in the speed to correctly classify facial emotional
             expressions. The findings are some of the first to
             investigate facial emotional processing in a sample of
             individuals with APD and point to an underlying deficit in
             processing social cues that may be involved in the
             maintenance of APD.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0023672},
   Key = {fds276292}
}

@article{fds276298,
   Author = {Keng, S-L and Smoski, MJ and Robins, CJ},
   Title = {Effects of mindfulness on psychological health: a review of
             empirical studies.},
   Journal = {Clin Psychol Rev},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1041-1056},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1873-7811},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21802619},
   Keywords = {Awareness • Cognitive Therapy • Humans •
             Meditation • Mental Health* • Mind-Body Relations,
             Metaphysical* • Stress, Psychological • methods
             • psychology • therapy*},
   Abstract = {Within the past few decades, there has been a surge of
             interest in the investigation of mindfulness as a
             psychological construct and as a form of clinical
             intervention. This article reviews the empirical literature
             on the effects of mindfulness on psychological health. We
             begin with a discussion of the construct of mindfulness,
             differences between Buddhist and Western psychological
             conceptualizations of mindfulness, and how mindfulness has
             been integrated into Western medicine and psychology, before
             reviewing three areas of empirical research:
             cross-sectional, correlational research on the associations
             between mindfulness and various indicators of psychological
             health; intervention research on the effects of
             mindfulness-oriented interventions on psychological health;
             and laboratory-based, experimental research on the immediate
             effects of mindfulness inductions on emotional and
             behavioral functioning. We conclude that mindfulness brings
             about various positive psychological effects, including
             increased subjective well-being, reduced psychological
             symptoms and emotional reactivity, and improved behavioral
             regulation. The review ends with a discussion on mechanisms
             of change of mindfulness interventions and suggested
             directions for future research.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cpr.2011.04.006},
   Key = {fds276298}
}

@article{fds276289,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Salsman, N and Wang, L and Smith, V and Lynch, TR and Dager,
             SR and LaBar, KS and Linehan, MM},
   Title = {Functional imaging of emotion reactivity in opiate-dependent
             borderline personality disorder.},
   Journal = {Personal Disord},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {230-241},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1949-2723},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22448769},
   Keywords = {Adult • Analysis of Variance • Arousal •
             Borderline Personality Disorder • Brain Mapping •
             Buprenorphine • Case-Control Studies • Comorbidity
             • Cues • Drug Combinations • Emotions •
             Functional Laterality • Humans • Limbic System
             • Magnetic Resonance Imaging • Male •
             Naloxone • Narcotic Antagonists • Opiate
             Substitution Treatment • Opioid-Related Disorders
             • Reaction Time • Self Report • drug therapy
             • epidemiology • methods • pathology* •
             physiology • physiology* • physiopathology •
             psychology • therapeutic use},
   Abstract = {Opiate dependence (OD) and borderline personality disorder
             (BPD), separately and together, are significant public
             health problems with poor treatment outcomes. BPD is
             associated with difficulties in emotion regulation, and
             brain-imaging studies in BPD individuals indicate
             differential activation in prefrontal cingulate cortices and
             their interactions with limbic regions. Likewise, a similar
             network is implicated in drug cue responsivity in substance
             abusers. The present, preliminary study used functional MRI
             to examine activation of this network in comorbid OD/BPD
             participants when engaged in an "oddball" task that required
             attention to a target in the context of emotionally negative
             distractors. Twelve male OD/BPD participants and 12 male
             healthy controls participated. All OD/BPD participants were
             taking the opiate replacement medication Suboxone, and a
             subset of participants was positive for substances of abuse
             on scan day. Relative to controls, OD/BPD participants
             demonstrated reduced activation to negative stimuli in the
             amygdala and anterior cingulate. Unlike previous studies
             that demonstrated hyperresponsivity in neural regions
             associated with affective processing in individuals with BPD
             versus healthy controls, comorbid OD/BPD participants were
             hyporesponsive to emotional cues. Future studies that also
             include BPD-only and OD-only groups are necessary to help
             clarify the individual and potentially synergistic effects
             of these two conditions.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0022228},
   Key = {fds276289}
}

@article{fds276287,
   Author = {Dichter, GS and Felder, JN and Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {The effects of Brief Behavioral Activation Therapy for
             Depression on cognitive control in affective contexts: An
             fMRI investigation.},
   Journal = {J Affect Disord},
   Volume = {126},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {236-244},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1573-2517},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20421135},
   Keywords = {Adult • Affect • Brain • Case-Control Studies
             • Cognition • Cognitive Therapy* • Depressive
             Disorder, Major • Female • Humans • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging • Male • Psychiatric Status
             Rating Scales • physiology • physiology* •
             physiopathology • physiopathology* • psychology
             • therapy},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) is
             characterized by impaired cognitive control in affective
             contexts, but the potential for psychotherapy to affect the
             neural correlates of these functions has not been evaluated.
             METHOD: Twelve adults with and 15 adults without MDD
             participated in two identical functional magnetic resonance
             imaging (fMRI) scans that utilized a task requiring
             cognitive control in both sad and neutral contexts. Between
             scans, MDD outpatients received Behavioral Activation
             Therapy for Depression, a psychotherapy modality designed to
             increase engagement with positive stimuli and reduce
             avoidance behaviors. RESULTS: Seventy-five percent of adults
             with MDD were treatment responders, achieving post-treatment
             Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score of six or below.
             Consistent with predictions, psychotherapy resulted in
             decreased activation in response to cognitive control
             stimuli presented within a sad context in prefrontal
             structures, including the paracingulate gyrus, the right
             orbital frontal cortex, and the right frontal pole.
             Furthermore, the magnitude of pretreatment activation in the
             paracingulate gyrus cluster responsive to psychotherapy
             predicted the magnitude of depressive symptom change after
             psychotherapy. LIMITATIONS: Replication with larger samples
             is needed, as are follow-up studies that involve placebo
             control groups, wait-list control groups, and alternative
             forms of antidepressant intervention. CONCLUSIONS:
             Behavioral Activation Therapy for Depression improves
             depressive symptoms and concomitantly influences brain
             systems mediating cognitive control in affective
             contexts.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2010.03.022},
   Key = {fds276287}
}

@article{fds276296,
   Author = {Dichter, GS and Smoski, MJ and Kampov-Polevoy, AB and Gallop, R and Garbutt, JC},
   Title = {Unipolar depression does not moderate responses to the Sweet
             Taste Test.},
   Journal = {Depress Anxiety},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {859-863},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {1520-6394},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20336799},
   Keywords = {Adult • Bipolar Disorder • Case-Control Studies
             • Depressive Disorder, Major • Female •
             Humans • Male • Middle Aged • Psychotherapy
             • Sucrose • Taste* • Young Adult •
             administration & dosage* • diagnosis •
             epidemiology • psychology* • therapy},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: The Sweet Taste Test (STT) measures hedonic
             responses to sweet tastes and has been linked to both
             alcoholism and to a family history of alcoholism. However,
             STT response profiles in unipolar major depressive disorder
             (MDD), a disorder characterized by anhedonia, have been
             minimally investigated. METHODS: Twelve adults with and 15
             adults without MDD participated in two identical STT
             assessments separated by approximately 12 weeks. Between
             assessments, MDD outpatients received Behavioral Activation
             Therapy for Depression, a psychotherapy modality designed to
             increase engagement with rewarding stimuli and reduce
             avoidance behaviors. Primary-dependent measures included
             sensitivity to sucrose, hedonic response to sucrose, and
             designation as a Sweet-Liker or Sweet-Disliker. RESULTS: A
             total of 75% of adults with MDD were treatment responders.
             There were no significant differences in STT response
             profiles between groups overall or at either timepoint.
             Furthermore, STT profiles of MDD participants did not differ
             after psychotherapy, relative to baseline. CONCLUSIONS:
             Findings suggest that although anhedonia is a symptom of
             MDD, the disorder is not characterized by altered responses
             to sweet tastes. Implications and future directions are
             discussed.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1002/da.20690},
   Key = {fds276296}
}

@article{fds276291,
   Author = {Hayes, JP and Morey, RA and Petty, CM and Seth, S and Smoski, MJ and McCarthy, G and Labar, KS},
   Title = {Staying cool when things get hot: emotion regulation
             modulates neural mechanisms of memory encoding.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Human Neuroscience},
   Volume = {4},
   Pages = {230},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {1662-5161},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21212840},
   Abstract = {During times of emotional stress, individuals often engage
             in emotion regulation to reduce the experiential and
             physiological impact of negative emotions. Interestingly,
             emotion regulation strategies also influence memory encoding
             of the event. Cognitive reappraisal is associated with
             enhanced memory while expressive suppression is associated
             with impaired explicit memory of the emotional event.
             However, the mechanism by which these emotion regulation
             strategies affect memory is unclear. We used event-related
             fMRI to investigate the neural mechanisms that give rise to
             memory formation during emotion regulation. Twenty-five
             participants viewed negative pictures while alternately
             engaging in cognitive reappraisal, expressive suppression,
             or passive viewing. As part of the subsequent memory design,
             participants returned to the laboratory two weeks later for
             a surprise memory test. Behavioral results showed a
             reduction in negative affect and a retention advantage for
             reappraised stimuli relative to the other conditions.
             Imaging results showed that successful encoding during
             reappraisal was uniquely associated with greater
             co-activation of the left inferior frontal gyrus, amygdala,
             and hippocampus, suggesting a possible role for elaborative
             encoding of negative memories. This study provides
             neurobehavioral evidence that engaging in cognitive
             reappraisal is advantageous to both affective and mnemonic
             processes.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.3389/fnhum.2010.00230},
   Key = {fds276291}
}

@article{fds276299,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Felder, J and Bizzell, J and Green, SR and Ernst, M and Lynch, TR and Dichter, GS},
   Title = {fMRI of alterations in reward selection, anticipation, and
             feedback in major depressive disorder.},
   Journal = {J Affect Disord},
   Volume = {118},
   Number = {1-3},
   Pages = {69-78},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1573-2517},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19261334},
   Keywords = {Adult • Arousal • Brain • Brain Mapping
             • Choice Behavior • Corpus Striatum •
             Decision Making • Depressive Disorder, Major •
             Dominance, Cerebral • Feedback, Psychological •
             Female • Frontal Lobe • Gyrus Cinguli •
             Humans • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted* •
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging* • Male • Middle Aged
             • Motivation • Nerve Net • Nucleus Accumbens
             • Reward* • Young Adult • diagnosis •
             physiology • physiology* • physiopathology •
             physiopathology* • psychology},
   Abstract = {The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate
             reward processing in unipolar major depressive disorder
             (MDD). Specifically, we investigated whether adults with MDD
             demonstrated hyporesponsivity in striatal brain regions
             and/or hyperresponsivity in cortical brain regions involved
             in conflict monitoring using a Wheel of Fortune task
             designed to probe responses during reward selection, reward
             anticipation, and reward feedback. Functional magnetic
             resonance imaging (fMRI) data indicated that the MDD group
             was characterized by reduced activation of striatal reward
             regions during reward selection, reward anticipation, and
             reward feedback, supporting previous data indicating
             hyporesponsivity of reward systems in MDD. Support was not
             found for hyperresponsivity of cognitive control regions
             during reward selection or reward anticipation. Instead, MDD
             participants showed hyperresponsivity in orbitofrontal
             cortex, a region associated with assessment of risk and
             reward, during reward selection, as well as decreased
             activation of the middle frontal gyrus and the rostral
             cingulate gyrus during reward selection and anticipation.
             Finally, depression severity was predicted by activation in
             bilateral midfrontal gyrus during reward selection. Results
             indicate that MDD is characterized by striatal
             hyporesponsivity, and that future studies of MDD treatments
             that seek to improve responses to rewarding stimuli should
             assess striatal functioning.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2009.01.034},
   Key = {fds276299}
}

@article{fds276300,
   Author = {Dichter, GS and Felder, JN and Petty, C and Bizzell, J and Ernst, M and Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {The effects of psychotherapy on neural responses to rewards
             in major depression.},
   Journal = {Biol Psychiatry},
   Volume = {66},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {886-897},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1873-2402},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19726030},
   Keywords = {Adult • Brain • Brain Mapping • Depressive
             Disorder, Major • Female • Humans • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging • Male • Middle Aged •
             Psychomotor Performance • Psychotherapy* • Reward*
             • physiology* • physiopathology* •
             therapy},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) is
             characterized by anomalous neurobiological responses to
             pleasant stimuli, a pattern that may be linked to symptoms
             of anhedonia. However, the potential for psychotherapy to
             normalize neurobiological responses to pleasant stimuli has
             not been evaluated. METHODS: Twelve adults with and 15
             adults without MDD participated in two identical functional
             magnetic resonance imaging scans that used a Wheel of
             Fortune task. Between scans, MDD outpatients received
             Behavioral Activation Therapy for Depression, a
             psychotherapy modality designed to increase engagement with
             rewarding stimuli and reduce avoidance behaviors. RESULTS:
             Seventy-five percent of adults with MDD were treatment
             responders, achieving post-treatment Hamilton Rating Scale
             for Depression score of six or below. Relative to changes in
             brain function in the matched nondepressed group,
             psychotherapy resulted in functional changes in structures
             that mediate responses to rewards, including the
             paracingulate gyrus during reward selection, the right
             caudate nucleus (i.e., the dorsal striatum), during reward
             anticipation, and the paracingulate and orbital frontal gyri
             during reward feedback. There was no effect of diagnostic
             status or psychotherapy on in-scanner task-related
             behavioral responses. CONCLUSIONS: Behavioral Activation
             Therapy for Depression, a psychotherapy modality designed to
             increase engagement with rewarding stimuli and reduce
             avoidance behaviors, results in improved functioning of
             unique reward structures during different temporal phases of
             responses to pleasurable stimuli, including the dorsal
             striatum during reward anticipation.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.06.021},
   Key = {fds276300}
}

@article{fds276305,
   Author = {Dichter, GS and Felder, JN and Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {Affective context interferes with cognitive control in
             unipolar depression: an fMRI investigation.},
   Journal = {J Affect Disord},
   Volume = {114},
   Number = {1-3},
   Pages = {131-142},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1573-2517},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18706701},
   Keywords = {Adult • Affect* • Brain • Case-Control
             Studies • Cognition* • Depressive Disorder, Major
             • Facial Expression • Female • Frontal Lobe
             • Functional Laterality • Gyrus Cinguli •
             Humans • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted •
             Magnetic Resonance Imaging* • Male • Middle Aged
             • Neuropsychological Tests • Photic Stimulation
             • Prefrontal Cortex • Psychomotor Performance*
             • Visual Perception* • Young Adult •
             diagnosis • methods • physiopathology •
             physiopathology* • psychology*},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) is
             characterized by aberrant amygdala responses to sad stimuli
             and poor cognitive control, but the interactive effects of
             these impairments are poorly understood. AIM: To evaluate
             brain activation in MDD in response to cognitive control
             stimuli embedded within sad and neutral contexts. METHOD:
             Fourteen adults with MDD and fifteen matched controls
             participated in a mixed block/event-related functional
             magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task that presented
             oddball target stimuli embedded within blocks of sad or
             neutral images. RESULTS: Target events activated similar
             prefrontal brain regions in both groups. However, responses
             to target events embedded within blocks of emotional images
             revealed a clear group dissociation. During neutral blocks,
             the control group demonstrated greater activation to targets
             in the midfrontal gyrus and anterior cingulate relative to
             the MDD group, replicating previous findings of prefrontal
             hypo-activation in MDD samples to cognitive control stimuli.
             However, during sad blocks, the MDD group demonstrated
             greater activation in a number of prefrontal regions,
             including the mid-, inferior, and orbito-frontal gyri and
             the anterior cingulate, suggesting that relatively more
             prefrontal brain activation was required to disengage from
             the sad images to respond to the target events. LIMITATIONS:
             A larger sample size would have provided greater statistical
             power, and more standardized stimuli would have increased
             external validity. CONCLUSIONS: This double dissociation of
             prefrontal responses to target events embedded within
             neutral and sad context suggests that MDD impacts not only
             responses to affective events, but extends to other
             cognitive processes carried out in the context of affective
             engagement. This implies that emotional reactivity to sad
             events in MDD may impact functioning more broadly than
             previously understood.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jad.2008.06.027},
   Key = {fds276305}
}

@article{fds276301,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Lynch, TR and Rosenthal, MZ and Cheavens, JS and Chapman,
             AL and Krishnan, RR},
   Title = {Decision-making and risk aversion among depressive
             adults.},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {567-576},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0005-7916},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18342834},
   Keywords = {Adult • Choice Behavior • Control Groups •
             Decision Making* • Depressive Disorder • Feedback
             • Female • Gambling • Humans • Male
             • Models, Psychological • Neuropsychological Tests
             • Punishment • Reward • Risk-Taking* •
             Task Performance and Analysis • diagnosis* •
             psychology},
   Abstract = {Depression is associated with behavioral avoidance of
             potentially rewarding environmental contexts. The present
             study examined the performance of depressive individuals and
             controls on a neuropsychological measure of decision-making
             that favors risk avoidance. Depressive (n=41) and control
             (n=44) participants were administered the Iowa Gambling
             Task, which measures the ability of participants to maximize
             earnings by choosing low-risk, low-reward responses over
             high-risk, high-reward responses. Results provided partial
             support for the hypothesis that depressive participants
             would learn to avoid risky responses faster than control
             participants. Depressive participants demonstrated better
             performance than controls, scoring higher than controls
             overall and showing a trend toward earning more money
             overall. However, the lack of an interaction between
             depressive status and time does not support the specific
             hypothesis of more rapid learning. Findings suggested
             enhanced feedback-based decision-making and risk aversion
             among depressive individuals.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jbtep.2008.01.004},
   Key = {fds276301}
}

@article{fds276280,
   Author = {Dichter, GS and Felder, JN and Smoski, M},
   Title = {Effects of psychotherapy on brain function: Brain imaging
             studies indicate changes},
   Journal = {Psychiatric Times},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {34-38},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0893-2905},
   Key = {fds276280}
}

@article{fds276308,
   Author = {Wang, L and LaBar, KS and Smoski, M and Rosenthal, MZ and Dolcos, F and Lynch, TR and Krishnan, RR and McCarthy, G},
   Title = {Prefrontal mechanisms for executive control over emotional
             distraction are altered in major depression.},
   Journal = {Psychiatry Research},
   Volume = {163},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {143-155},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0165-1781},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18455373},
   Keywords = {Adult • Arousal • Attention • Brain Mapping
             • Cerebral Cortex • Depressive Disorder, Major
             • Discrimination Learning • Dominance, Cerebral
             • Emotions • Facial Expression • Female
             • Frontal Lobe • Gyrus Cinguli • Humans
             • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted* • Magnetic
             Resonance Imaging* • Male • Middle Aged •
             Pattern Recognition, Visual • Prefrontal Cortex •
             Psychomotor Performance • Reaction Time •
             diagnosis • physiology • physiology* •
             physiopathology • physiopathology* •
             psychology},
   Abstract = {A dysfunction in the interaction between executive function
             and mood regulation has been proposed as the pathophysiology
             of depression. However, few studies have investigated the
             alteration in brain systems related to executive control
             over emotional distraction in depression. To address this
             issue, 19 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and
             20 healthy controls were scanned using functional magnetic
             resonance imaging. Participants performed an emotional
             oddball task in which infrequently presented circle targets
             required detection while sad and neutral pictures were
             irrelevant novel distractors. Hemodynamic responses were
             compared for targets, sad distractors, and for targets that
             followed sad or neutral distractors (Target-after-Sad and
             Target-after-Neutral). Patients with MDD revealed attenuated
             activation overall to targets in executive brain regions.
             Behaviorally, MDD patients were slower in response to
             Target-after-Sad than Target-after-Neutra stimuli. Patients
             also revealed a reversed activation pattern from controls in
             response to this contrast in the left anterior cingulate,
             insula, right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and bilateral
             middle frontal gyrus. Those patients who engaged the right
             IFG more during Target-after-Neutral stimuli responded
             faster to targets, confirming a role of this region in
             coping with emotional distraction. The results provide
             direct evidence of an alteration in the neural systems that
             interplay cognition with mood in MDD.},
   Language = {eng},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.pscychresns.2007.10.004},
   Key = {fds276308}
}

@article{fds276283,
   Author = {Lynch, TR and Rosenthal, MZ and Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {Dialectical behavior therapy: Efficacy, mechanisms, and
             application},
   Journal = {Psychiatric Times},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {76-77+78},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0893-2905},
   Key = {fds276283}
}

@article{fds276307,
   Author = {Cheavens, JS and Lynch, TR and Smoski, MJ},
   Title = {Response to the van Alphen et al. 'reaction to "treatment of
             older adults with co-morbid personality disorder and
             depression: a dialectical behavior therapy
             approach".},
   Journal = {International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {701-702},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0885-6230},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17600779},
   Keywords = {Age Factors • Aged • Behavior Therapy •
             Comorbidity • Depressive Disorder • Humans •
             Personality Assessment • Personality Disorders •
             Treatment Outcome • diagnosis • methods* •
             psychology • therapy*},
   Doi = {10.1002/gps.1843},
   Key = {fds276307}
}

@article{fds276282,
   Author = {Chapman, AL and Lynch, TR and Rosenthal, MZ and Cheavens, JS and Smoski,
             MJ and Krishnan, KRR},
   Title = {Risk aversion among depressed older adults with obsessive
             compulsive personality disorder},
   Journal = {Cognitive Therapy and Research},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {161-174},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0147-5916},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10608-006-9114-x},
   Abstract = {Despite considerable research on depression in older adults,
             few studies have included individuals with personality
             disorders or have used laboratory tasks to examine
             behavioral correlates of depression among older adults. This
             study used the Bechara Gambling Task to examine the
             hypothesis that depressed older adults with co-morbid
             personality disorders (n = 59) would demonstrate greater
             aversion to risk, when compared with older adult controls
             without depression or personality disorders (n = 34).
             Results indicated weak support for the notion that depressed
             individuals are more risk averse than non-depressed
             controls, and stronger support for the role of
             obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) in risk
             aversion. Individuals with OCPD became considerably more
             risk averse as the task progressed, compared with controls.
             In addition, the severity of OCPD features, rather than
             depression, accounted for increased risk aversion in
             depressed older adults with OCPD. © 2007 Springer
             Science+Business Media, LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10608-006-9114-x},
   Key = {fds276282}
}

@article{fds167095,
   Title = {Chapman, A., Lynch, T.R., Rosenthal, M.Z., Cheavens, J.S.,
             Smoski, M.J., & Krishnan, K.R.R. (2007). Risk aversion among
             depressed older adults with obsessive compulsive personality
             disorder. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 31,
             161-174.},
   Year = {2007},
   Key = {fds167095}
}

@article{fds276306,
   Author = {Smoski, MJ and Bachorowski, J-A},
   Title = {Antiphonal laughter in developing friendships.},
   Journal = {Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
   Volume = {1000},
   Pages = {300-303},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0077-8923},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14766642},
   Keywords = {Adult • Evolution* • Female • Friends* •
             Humans • Laughter* • Male •
             Phonation*},
   Doi = {10.1196/annals.1280.030},
   Key = {fds276306}
}

@article{fds276272,
   Author = {Smoski, M and Bachorowski, J-A},
   Title = {Antiphonal laughter between friends and strangers.},
   Journal = {Cogn Emot},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {327-340},
   Publisher = {PSYCHOLOGY PRESS},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0269-9931},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000180765800009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Drawing from an affect-induction model of laughter
             (Bachorowski & Owren, 2001; Owren & Bachorowski, 2002), we
             propose that "antiphonal" laughter--that is, laughter that
             occurs during or immediately after a social partner's
             laugh--is a behavioural manifestation of a conditioned
             positive emotional response to another individual's laugh
             acoustics. To test hypotheses concerning the occurrence of
             antiphonal laughter, participants (n = 148) were tested as
             part of either same- or mixed-sex friend or stranger dyads,
             and were audiorecorded while they played brief games
             intended to facilitate laugh production. An index of
             antiphonal laughter for each dyad was derived using Yule's
             Q. Significantly more antiphonal laughter was produced in
             friend than in stranger dyads, and females in mixed-sex
             dyads produced more antiphonal laughter than did their male
             partners. Antiphonal laughter may therefore reflect a
             mutually positive stance between social partners, and
             function to reinforce shared positive affective
             experiences.},
   Doi = {10.1080/02699930302296},
   Key = {fds276272}
}

@article{fds276303,
   Author = {Blake, R and Turner, LM and Smoski, MJ and Pozdol, SL and Stone,
             WL},
   Title = {Visual recognition of biological motion is impaired in
             children with autism.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {151-157},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12661677},
   Keywords = {Attention* • Autistic Disorder • Child •
             Child, Preschool • Concept Formation* • Female
             • Humans • Male • Motion Perception* •
             Pattern Recognition, Visual* • Perceptual Closure
             • Problem Solving • Psychophysics • Reference
             Values • Social Behavior • diagnosis •
             psychology*},
   Abstract = {Autistic children and typically developing control children
             were tested on two visual tasks, one involving grouping of
             small line elements into a global figure and the other
             involving perception of human activity portrayed in
             point-light animations. Performance of the two groups was
             equivalent on the figure task, but autistic children were
             significantly impaired on the biological motion task. This
             latter deficit may be related to the impaired social skills
             characteristic of autism, and we speculate that this deficit
             may implicate abnormalities in brain areas mediating
             perception of human movement.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-9280.01434},
   Key = {fds276303}
}

@article{fds276304,
   Author = {Kaplan, PS and Bachorowski, J-A and Smoski, MJ and Hudenko,
             WJ},
   Title = {Infants of depressed mothers, although competent learners,
             fail to learn in response to their own mothers'
             infant-directed speech.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {268-271},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12009049},
   Keywords = {Association Learning • Depressive Disorder •
             Female • Humans • Infant • Learning •
             Mother-Child Relations* • Speech • complications*
             • physiology*},
   Abstract = {Depressed mothers use less of the exaggerated prosody that
             is typical of infant-directed (ID) speech than do
             nondepressed mothers. We investigated the consequences of
             this reduced perceptual salience in ID speech for infant
             learning. Infants of nondepressed mothers readily learned
             that their mothers' speech signaled a face, whereas infants
             of depressed mothers failed to learn that their mothers'
             speech signaled the face. Infants of depressed mothers did,
             however, show strong learning in response to speech produced
             by an unfamiliar nondepressed mother. These outcomes
             indicate that the reduced perceptual salience of depressed
             mothers' ID speech could lead to deficient learning in
             otherwise competent learners.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-9280.00449},
   Key = {fds276304}
}

@article{fds276302,
   Author = {Bachorowski, JA and Smoski, MJ and Owren, MJ},
   Title = {The acoustic features of human laughter.},
   Journal = {The Journal of the Acoustical Society of
             America},
   Volume = {110},
   Number = {3 Pt 1},
   Pages = {1581-1597},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0001-4966},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11572368},
   Keywords = {Acoustics* • Female • Humans • Individuality
             • Laughter* • Male • Mouth • Reaction
             Time • Sex Characteristics • Voice •
             physiology},
   Abstract = {Remarkably little is known about the acoustic features of
             laughter. Here, acoustic outcomes are reported for 1024
             naturally produced laugh bouts recorded from 97 young adults
             as they watched funny video clips. Analyses focused on
             temporal features, production modes, source- and
             filter-related effects, and indexical cues to laugher sex
             and individual identity. Although a number of researchers
             have previously emphasized stereotypy in laughter, its
             acoustics were found now to be variable and complex. Among
             the variety of findings reported, evident diversity in
             production modes, remarkable variability in fundamental
             frequency characteristics, and consistent lack of
             articulation effects in supralaryngeal filtering are of
             particular interest. In addition, formant-related filtering
             effects were found to be disproportionately important as
             acoustic correlates of laugher sex and individual identity.
             These outcomes are examined in light of existing data
             concerning laugh acoustics, as well as a number of
             hypotheses and conjectures previously advanced about this
             species-typical vocal signal.},
   Doi = {10.1121/1.1391244},
   Key = {fds276302}
}

@article{fds276277,
   Author = {Kaplan, PS and Bachorowski, JA and Smoski, MJ and Zinser,
             M},
   Title = {Role of Clinical Diagnosis and Medication Use in Effects of
             Maternal Depression on Infant-Directed Speech},
   Journal = {Infancy},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {537-548},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1525-0008},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15327078IN0204_08},
   Abstract = {Infant-directed (ID) speech was recorded from mothers as
             they interacted with their 4- to 12-month-old infants.
             Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that two
             variables, age of the mother and mother's diagnosed
             depression, independently accounted for significant
             proportions of the variance in the extent of change in
             fundamental frequency (ΔF0). Specifically, depressed
             mothers produced ID speech with smaller ΔF0 than did
             nondepressed mothers, and older mothers produced ID speech
             with larger ΔF0 than did younger mothers. Mothers who were
             taking antidepressant medication and who were diagnosed as
             being in at least partial remission produced ID speech with
             mean ΔF0 values that were comparable to those of
             nondepressed mothers. These results demonstrate explicit
             associations between major depressive disorder and an
             acoustic attribute of ID speech that is highly salient to
             young infants.},
   Doi = {10.1207/S15327078IN0204_08},
   Key = {fds276277}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds342182,
   Author = {Dichter, GS and Smoski, M and Henderson, RK and Dimidjian,
             S},
   Title = {Behavioral activation as a treatment for depression theory,
             neurobiologic effects, and potential linkages to
             resilience},
   Pages = {211-226},
   Booktitle = {The Resilience Handbook: Approaches to Stress and
             Trauma},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780415699877},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203135303},
   Abstract = {© 2014 Taylor & Francis. Unipolar major depressive disorder
             (MDD) is a debilitating condition with a lifetime prevalence
             rate of 17% (Kessler et al., 1994). Recent epidemiological
             evidence indicates that MDD is the 4th leading cause of
             disease burden and the leading cause of disability-adjusted
             life years (Ustun, Ayuso-Mateos, Chatterji, Mathers, &
             Murray, 2004) and is associated with significant
             psychosocial and medical morbidity and mortality (Kovacs,
             1996). MDD is characterized by a high rate of relapse, with
             approximately 40% of patients reporting relapse within 2
             years (Solomon et al., 2000) and 85% within 15 years
             (Mueller et al., 1999). With each new episode of major
             depression, the likelihood of experiencing future episodes
             increases by 16% (Solomon et al., 2000). Given the chronic
             nature of MDD, a critical goal for treatment development is
             to target the core processes that make an individual
             vulnerable to depressive episodes and thus improve his/her
             resilience to future depression.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203135303},
   Key = {fds342182}
}


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