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Publications of Lise Wallach    :recent first  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds254309,
   Author = {Wallach, L},
   Title = {The complexity of concept attainment},
   Journal = {American Journal of Psychology},
   Volume = {75},
   Pages = {277-283},
   Year = {1962},
   Key = {fds254309}
}

@article{fds254300,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Sprott, RL},
   Title = {Inducing number conservation in children},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {35},
   Pages = {1057-1071},
   Year = {1964},
   Key = {fds254300}
}

@article{fds254298,
   Author = {Turnure, C and Wallach, L},
   Title = {The influence of contextual variation on the differentiation
             of parts from wholes},
   Journal = {American Journal of Psychology},
   Volume = {78},
   Pages = {481-485},
   Year = {1965},
   Key = {fds254298}
}

@article{fds254299,
   Author = {Gardner, BT and Wallach, L},
   Title = {Shapes of figures identified as a baby's
             head},
   Journal = {Perceptual and Motor Skills},
   Volume = {20},
   Pages = {135-142},
   Year = {1965},
   Key = {fds254299}
}

@article{fds254301,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wall, AJ and Aderson, L},
   Title = {Number conservation: The roles of reversibility,
             addition-subtraction,and misleading perceptual
             cues},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {38},
   Pages = {425-442},
   Year = {1967},
   Key = {fds254301}
}

@article{fds254302,
   Author = {Wallach, L},
   Title = {Implications of recent work in philosophy of science for the
             role of operational definition in psychology},
   Journal = {Psychological Reports},
   Volume = {28},
   Pages = {583-608},
   Year = {1971},
   Key = {fds254302}
}

@article{fds254304,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA and Dozier, MG and Kaplan,
             NE},
   Title = {Poor children learning to read do not have trouble with
             auditory discrimination but do have trouble with phoneme
             recognition},
   Journal = {Journal of Educational Psychology},
   Volume = {69},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {36-39},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1977},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-0663},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1977CW05000006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The present study confirms the hypothesis, derived from the
             research of M. A. Wallach and L. Wallach (1976) and L.
             Wallach and M. A. Wallach (1976), on teaching disadvantaged
             children to read, that the troubles poor children frequently
             have with sounds stem not from deficiencies in auditory
             discrimination but from inadequate skill in phonemic
             analysis. Almost all of 76 disadvantaged and 70 middle-class
             kindergarten-age Ss could readily hear phoneme differences
             in words, as indicated by their ability to respond
             differentially to words that differed only in single
             phonemes, which were similar. On the other hand, almost all
             of the disadvantaged Ss, but almost none of the middle-class
             Ss, did very poorly on tasks involving phonemic analysis of
             words (e.g., indicating whether given sounded phonemes
             occurred in various spoken words). (22 ref) (PsycINFO
             Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). © 1977
             American Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-0663.69.1.36},
   Key = {fds254304}
}

@article{fds254303,
   Author = {DORVAL, B and WALLACH, L and WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {FIELD EVALUATION OF A TUTORIAL READING PROGRAM EMPHASIZING
             PHONEME IDENTIFICATION SKILLS},
   Journal = {The Reading teacher},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {784-790},
   Year = {1978},
   ISSN = {0034-0561},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1978EU40300011&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254303}
}

@article{fds254305,
   Author = {PENNINGTON, BF and WALLACH, L and WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {NON-CONSERVER USE AND UNDERSTANDING OF NUMBER AND
             ARITHMETIC},
   Journal = {Genetic psychology monographs},
   Volume = {101},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {231-243},
   Year = {1980},
   ISSN = {0016-6677},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1980JU55800005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254305}
}

@article{fds254308,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, L},
   Title = {How psychology sanctions the cult of the
             self},
   Journal = {The Washington Monthly},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {46-56},
   Year = {1985},
   Key = {fds254308}
}

@article{fds254307,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, L},
   Title = {The Part Played by Psychology in Promoting Selfishness: A
             Response},
   Journal = {Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {43-50},
   Publisher = {Guilford Publications},
   Year = {1985},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0736-7236},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1985ARZ2500008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1521/jscp.1985.3.1.43},
   Key = {fds254307}
}

@article{fds254306,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Gergen Versus the Mainstream: Are Hypotheses in Social
             Psychology Subject to Empirical Test?},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {233-242},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1994PC24500005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {K. J. Gergen's (1982) argument that hypotheses in social
             psychology are not empirical propositions is critically
             examined and shown to be erroneous. Nevertheless, this
             article demonstrates that, without necessarily appearing
             obvious, some hypotheses can be derived from propositions
             that are like tautologies and that their confirmation as
             such is of little interest. An analysis of hypotheses in
             recent articles in the Journal of Experimental Social
             Psychology and the Journal of Personality and Social
             Psychology suggests that hypotheses derivable from
             propositions very much like tautologies may not be
             infrequent. Implications are considered for what kinds of
             social psychology experiments are of value to
             perform.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-3514.67.2.233},
   Key = {fds254306}
}

@article{fds26801,
   Author = {Wallach, M.A. and Wallach, L.},
   Title = {When experiments serve little purpose: Misguided research in
             mainstream psychology},
   Journal = {Theory and Psychology},
   Volume = {8},
   Pages = {183-194},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds26801}
}

@article{fds254310,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, L},
   Title = {When Experiments Serve Little Purpose: Misguided Research in
             Mainstream Psychology},
   Journal = {Theory & Psychology},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {183-194},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0959-3543},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000073414400005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {This paper attempts further to explicate and justify the
             belief, held by a number of critics of mainstream
             psychology, that much customary empirical research tells one
             little that could not have been known without it. Apart from
             questions of tautology or indeterminate relations to
             observation, many hypotheses are derivable from propositions
             that are unfalsifiable because they cannot be tested without
             relying on conceptualizations which imply the propositions
             themselves. Experiments that serve no purpose beyond the
             operationalization of such hypotheses are a misguided
             enterprise. © 1998, Sage Publications. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0959354398082005},
   Key = {fds254310}
}

@article{fds254311,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Experiments in social psychology: Science or
             self-deception?},
   Journal = {Theory & Psychology},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {451-473},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0959-3543},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000170444400001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Criticisms of the very idea of experimentation in social
             psychology are longstanding; a focal claim recently has been
             that social psychological hypotheses are non-empirical. We
             contest this claim, but argue that many experiments in
             social psychology are pointless nonetheless because they are
             fundamentally circular. Testing hypotheses requires
             operationalization; operationalization requires assumptions;
             and in social psychology, we argue, the necessary
             assumptions often already imply that the hypotheses can be
             confirmed. Confirmability of the hypotheses of a number of
             experiments recently reported in the Journal of Experimental
             Social Psychology is shown to be implied by two illustrative
             truistic principles central to theories assumed in any tests
             of these hypotheses. We suggest that research aimed at
             finding specifically social psychological laws may only
             yield unfalsifiable truisms, while useful social
             psychological research aims elsewhere. © 2001, Sage
             Publications. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0959354301114001},
   Key = {fds254311}
}

@article{fds254295,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Some Theories are Unfalsifiable: A Comment on
             Trafimow},
   Journal = {Theory & Psychology},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {703-706},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0959-3543},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0959354310373676},
   Abstract = {Trafimow (2009) claims that there are no unfalsifiable
             theories: To test any theory, one must make auxiliary
             assumptions, and with sufficient creativity about auxiliary
             assumptions one could always arrive at reasonably risky
             predictions. We argue that a prediction from a theory plus a
             given set of auxiliary assumptions will not be risky for the
             theory when the initial level of confidence in the theory is
             greater than the initial level of confidence in one or more
             of the auxiliary assumptions. Some theories, we claim, are
             so basic that initial confidence in these theories will be
             greater than initial confidence in any set of auxiliary
             assumptions with which they could be tested, and such
             theories are unfalsifiable. We illustrate this with a
             principle that forms part of the theory of reasoned action.
             © 2010, SAGE Publications. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0959354310373676},
   Key = {fds254295}
}


%% Books   
@book{fds26780,
   Author = {Wallach, M.A. and Wallach, L.},
   Title = {Teaching all children to read},
   Editor = {Chicago: University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1976},
   Key = {fds26780}
}

@book{fds325145,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, L},
   Title = {Psychology's Sanction for Selfishness The Error of Egoism in
             Theory and Therapy},
   Pages = {307 pages},
   Publisher = {New York: W.H. Freeman and Company},
   Year = {1983},
   ISBN = {0716714655},
   Key = {fds325145}
}

@book{fds325144,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, L},
   Title = {Rethinking Goodness},
   Pages = {156 pages},
   Publisher = {SUNY Press},
   Year = {1990},
   ISBN = {0791402991},
   Abstract = {Arguing that a psychological basis for ethics can be found
             in human motivation, Rethinking Goodness proposes a
             naturalistic ethics that transcends the conflict between
             liberalism and authoritarianism the conflict between freedom
             at the ...},
   Key = {fds325144}
}

@book{fds254292,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Seven views of mind},
   Pages = {1-116},
   Publisher = {PSYCHOLOGY PRESS},
   Address = {New York},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780203103876},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203103876},
   Abstract = {© 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. This book examines
             seven different answers to the question, “What are we
             talking about when we talk about the mind?” It begins by
             considering the dualistic view, frequently taken for granted
             by students, that words like “belief,” “anger,” and
             “jealousy” refer to a realm quite distinct from the
             physical world, and notes the difficulties associated with
             this view as well as why many find it compelling. The book
             then describes six further major views of mind alternative
             to dualism that have been developed by psychologists,
             philosophers, and neuroscientists: Some claim that such
             words are just about behavior. Some claim that such words
             are theoretical constructs, like “quarks“ in physics.
             Some identify the mind with the brain or with a kind of
             program in the brain like the software in a computer. Some
             think there is nothing to which such words refer. Some think
             mental talk reflects nothing but convention.Students in
             psychology learn about different views of mind in various
             courses, but they tend to be left on their own to deal with
             the conflicts among them. How to conceive of mind is usually
             addressed in the context not of psychology but of
             philosophy, where it tends to be treated in ways that may
             seem esoteric to psychology students. Seldom discussed in
             one place, this book presents all seven views and the
             reasons for and against each in a relatively nontechnical,
             informal manner designed to appeal to psychology students
             and their instructors, permitting comparisons and possible
             resolutions.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203103876},
   Key = {fds254292}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds26776,
   Author = {Wallach, L.},
   Title = {On the bases on conservation},
   Pages = {191-219},
   Booktitle = {Studies in cognitive development: Essays in honor of Jean
             Piaget},
   Publisher = {New York: Oxford University Press},
   Editor = {D. Elkind and J.H. Flavell},
   Year = {1969},
   Key = {fds26776}
}

@misc{fds223443,
   Author = {L. Wallach},
   Title = {On the bases of conservation},
   Pages = {191-219},
   Booktitle = {Studies in Cognitive development},
   Publisher = {Oxford},
   Editor = {D. Elkind and J.H. Flavell},
   Year = {1969},
   Key = {fds223443}
}

@misc{fds26788,
   Author = {Wallach, M.A. and Wallach, L.},
   Title = {Helping disadvantaged children to read by teaching them
             phoneme identification skills},
   Volume = {3},
   Pages = {197-215},
   Booktitle = {Theory and practice of early reading},
   Publisher = {HIllsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates},
   Editor = {B. Resnick and P.A. Weaver},
   Year = {1979},
   Key = {fds26788}
}

@misc{fds26790,
   Author = {Wallach, L. and Wallach, M.A.},
   Title = {Phonemic analysis training in the teaching of
             reading},
   Pages = {155-169},
   Booktitle = {Coming of age: Vol. 3, The best of ACLD},
   Publisher = {Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press},
   Editor = {W.M. Cruickshank and J.W. Lerner},
   Year = {1982},
   Key = {fds26790}
}


%% Commentaries/Book Reviews   
@article{fds26768,
   Author = {Wallach, M.A. and Wallach, L.},
   Title = {Liberal eclecticism for perception},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology},
   Volume = {6},
   Pages = {423-425},
   Booktitle = {Review of C.M. Solley and G. Murphy's Development of the
             perceptual world},
   Year = {1961},
   Key = {fds26768}
}

@article{fds26777,
   Author = {L. Wallach},
   Title = {Is Falsifiability false?},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology},
   Volume = {15},
   Pages = {459},
   Booktitle = {Review of W.M. O'Neil's Fact and theory: An aspect of the
             philosophy of science},
   Year = {1970},
   Key = {fds26777}
}

@article{fds26779,
   Author = {L. Wallach},
   Title = {No reductionism without behaviorism?},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology},
   Volume = {17},
   Pages = {124-126},
   Booktitle = {Review of M.B. Turner's Realism and the explanation of
             behavior},
   Year = {1972},
   Key = {fds26779}
}

@article{fds254297,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {How best to critique egoism?},
   Journal = {Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {726-727},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0140-525X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1989AY40900062&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0140525X00025590},
   Key = {fds254297}
}

@article{fds325143,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Why Altruism, even though it Exists, Cannot be Demonstrated
             by Social Psychological Experiments},
   Journal = {Psychological Inquiry},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {153-155},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15327965pli0202_15},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15327965pli0202_15},
   Key = {fds325143}
}

@article{fds26765,
   Author = {Wallach, M.A. and Wallach, L.},
   Title = {Of Surrogacy, Circularity, Causality, and Near-Tautologies:
             A Response},
   Journal = {Theory and Psychology},
   Volume = {8},
   Pages = {213-217},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds26765}
}

@article{fds254296,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, L},
   Title = {Of Surrogacy, Circularity, Causality and Near-Tautologies: A
             Response},
   Journal = {Theory & Psychology},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {213-217},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0959-3543},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0959354398082008},
   Abstract = {Gigerenzer (1998) agrees with our critique of mainstream
             work (Wallach & Wallach, 1994, 1998). However, while he
             views near-tautologies as an additional species of
             surrogates for theory, we believe near-tautologies are
             implied by entrenched and uncontested proto-theories that
             are not without function, but pointless to subject to
             empirical test. Schaller and Crandall (1998) seem to have
             backed down from Schaller, Crandall, Stangor and Neuberg's
             (1995) earlier position that the concept of near-tautologies
             as developed by Wallach and Wallach (1994, 1998) is itself
             misguided. Instead, Schaller and Crandall now seek to
             distinguish ‘strong-form’ and ‘weak-form’
             near-tautologies, and claim that our argument against the
             usefulness of testing hypotheses derivable from
             near-tautologies holds only for the ‘strong’ form while
             the ‘weak’ form occurs in our derivations. We show here
             that their distinction is problematic and that supposed
             ‘weak-form’ as well as ‘strong-form’
             near-tautologies are unfalsifiable. © 1998, Sage
             Publications. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0959354398082008},
   Key = {fds254296}
}

@article{fds254294,
   Author = {WALLACH, LISE and WALLACH, MICHAELA},
   Title = {Why is experimentation in psychology often
             senseless?},
   Journal = {Scandinavian Journal of Psychology},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {S1},
   Pages = {103-106},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0036-5564},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9450.1999.tb01457.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9450.1999.tb01457.x},
   Key = {fds254294}
}

@article{fds254293,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {A response on concepts, laws and measurement in social
             psychology},
   Journal = {Theory & Psychology},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {489-494},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0959-3543},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0959354301114004},
   Abstract = {While appreciating Kimble's (2001) praise of our paper
             (Wallach & Wallach, 2001), we argue against his reduction of
             mental states to behavioral dispositions. Crandall and
             Schaller (2001) make five points in criticism of our
             argument that much research in social psychology is plagued
             by circularity. We show that their first point is based on a
             misunderstanding, that their third point is irrelevant, and
             that their last two points do not attempt to answer our
             argument. This leaves their second point as Crandall and
             Schaller's only actual counterargument—namely that
             confidence in a measure for a construct is independent of
             confidence in the construct's relationships to other
             constructs. We show this claim of independence to be false.
             © 2001, Sage Publications. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0959354301114004},
   Key = {fds254293}
}

@article{fds208203,
   Author = {L. Wallach and M. A. Wallach},
   Title = {Some theories are unfalsifiable},
   Journal = {Theory and Psychology},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {703-706},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds208203}
}


%% Reprinted Articles   
@article{fds26774,
   Author = {Wallach, L. and Wall, A.J. and Anderson, L.},
   Title = {Number conservation: The roles of reversibility,
             addition-subtraction, and misleading preceptual
             cues},
   Booktitle = {Logical thinking in children: Research based on Piaget's
             theory},
   Publisher = {New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winstron},
   Editor = {I.E. Sigel and F. H. Hooper},
   Year = {1968},
   Key = {fds26774}
}

@article{fds26775,
   Author = {Wallach, L. and Wall, A.J. and Anderson, L.},
   Title = {Number conservation: The roles of reversibility,
             addition-subtraction, and misleading perceptual
             cues},
   Booktitle = {Readings in child behavior and development},
   Publisher = {New York: Harcourt, Brace, & Jovanovich},
   Editor = {C.S. Lavatelli and F. Stendler},
   Year = {1972},
   Key = {fds26775}
}

@article{fds26795,
   Author = {Wallach, M.A. and Wallach, L.},
   Title = {How psychology sanctions the cult of the
             self},
   Pages = {9-16},
   Booktitle = {Personal growth and behavior 89/90},
   Publisher = {Guilford, Conn.: The Duschkin Publishing
             Group},
   Editor = {K.G. Duffy},
   Year = {1989},
   Key = {fds26795}
}

@article{fds208204,
   Author = {L. Wallach},
   Title = {When experiments serve little purpose: Misguided research in
             mainstream psychology},
   Volume = {2},
   Booktitle = {Theoretical Psychology: Contemporary Readings},
   Publisher = {Sage},
   Editor = {H. Stam},
   Year = {2012},
   Key = {fds208204}
}


%% Other   
@manual{fds26781,
   Author = {Wallach, L. and Wallach, M.A.},
   Title = {The Teaching All Children to Read Kit},
   Publisher = {Chicago: University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1976},
   Key = {fds26781}
}

@misc{fds325851,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, LA},
   Title = {Teaching All Children to Read},
   Pages = {352 pages},
   Booktitle = {Psychology and the problems of today},
   Publisher = {Glenview, IL: Scott Foresman},
   Editor = {M. Wertheimer and L. Rappoport},
   Year = {1979},
   Month = {October},
   ISBN = {0226871673},
   Key = {fds325851}
}

@misc{fds26792,
   Author = {Wallach, M.A. and Wallach, L.},
   Title = {Autonomy, self-growth defended},
   Journal = {American Psychological Association Monitor},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {5},
   Year = {1984},
   Key = {fds26792}
}

@misc{fds26794,
   Author = {Wallach, M.A. and Wallach, L.},
   Title = {How psychology sanctions the cult of the
             self},
   Journal = {Swarthmore College Bulletin},
   Volume = {84},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {6-11},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds26794}
}


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