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Publications of Michael A. Wallach    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds254358,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Some Theories are Unfalsifiable: A Comment on
             Trafimow},
   Journal = {Theory & Psychology},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {703-706},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0959-3543},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000283291700006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Trafimow (2009) claims that there are no unfalsifiable
             theories: To test any theory, one must make auxiliary
             assumptions, and with sufficient creativity about auxiliary
             assumptions one could always arrive at reasonably risky
             predictions. We argue that a prediction from a theory plus a
             given set of auxiliary assumptions will not be risky for the
             theory when the initial level of confidence in the theory is
             greater than the initial level of confidence in one or more
             of the auxiliary assumptions. Some theories, we claim, are
             so basic that initial confidence in these theories will be
             greater than initial confidence in any set of auxiliary
             assumptions with which they could be tested, and such
             theories are unfalsifiable. We illustrate this with a
             principle that forms part of the theory of reasoned action.
             © 2010, SAGE Publications. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0959354310373676},
   Key = {fds254358}
}

@article{fds254338,
   Author = {Drake, RE and O'Neal, EL and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {A systematic review of psychosocial research on psychosocial
             interventions for people with co-occurring severe mental and
             substance use disorders.},
   Journal = {Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {123-138},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0740-5472},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000252002900013&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {This report reviews studies of psychosocial interventions
             for people with co-occurring substance use disorder and
             severe mental illness. We identified 45 controlled studies
             (22 experimental and 23 quasi-experimental) of psychosocial
             dual diagnosis interventions through several search
             strategies. Three types of interventions (group counseling,
             contingency management, and residential dual diagnosis
             treatment) show consistent positive effects on substance use
             disorder, whereas other interventions have significant
             impacts on other areas of adjustment (e.g., case management
             enhances community tenure and legal interventions increase
             treatment participation). Current studies are limited by
             heterogeneity of interventions, participants, methods,
             outcomes, and measures. Treatment of co-occurring severe
             mental illness and substance use disorder now has a large
             but heterogeneous evidence base that nevertheless supports
             several types of interventions. Future research will need to
             address methodological standardization, longitudinal
             perspectives, interventions for subgroups and stages,
             sequenced interventions, and the changing realities of
             treatment systems.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jsat.2007.01.011},
   Key = {fds254338}
}

@article{fds254359,
   Author = {Drake, RE and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Conceptual models of treatment for co-occurring substance
             use},
   Journal = {Mental Health and Substance Use},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {189-193},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17523280802275081},
   Doi = {10.1080/17523280802275081},
   Key = {fds254359}
}

@article{fds254360,
   Author = {Drake, RE and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Is comorbidity a psychological science?},
   Journal = {Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {20-22},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0969-5893},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000244418800003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {This commentary questions the current rush to reify
             comorbidity that a medical disease lexicon encourages. The
             emphasis on comorbidities has proceeded without clear
             evidence that true diseases are thereby identified. Its
             consequence is an obscuring of historical, sociopolitical,
             and environmental considerations that play a significant
             role in bringing comorbidities about. Comorbidities can in
             this way become in part a product of policy decisions made
             by professionals. We encourage psychologists to question
             these trends. © 2007 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1468-2850.2007.00058.x},
   Key = {fds254360}
}

@article{fds254329,
   Author = {Drake, RE and Wallach, MA and McGovern, MP},
   Title = {Future directions in preventing relapse to substance abuse
             among clients with severe mental illnesses},
   Journal = {Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.C.)},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1297-1302},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1075-2730},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000232470100018&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ps.56.10.1297},
   Key = {fds254329}
}

@article{fds254327,
   Author = {Drake, RE and Wallach, MA and Alverson, HS and Mueser,
             KT},
   Title = {Psychosocial aspects of substance abuse by clients with
             severe mental illness.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease},
   Volume = {190},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {100-106},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-3018},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000174190000006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {As the literature on co-occurring substance abuse in persons
             with severe mental illnesses has evolved, emphasis on
             biologic and pharmacologic factors has diverted attention
             from important psychosocial issues. The authors review
             recent research showing that a) psychosocial risk factors
             may explain consistently high rates of substance abuse by
             these persons, b) substance abuse is for most clients a
             socio-environmental phenomenon embedded in interpersonal
             activities, and c) both natural recovery processes and
             effective treatments rely on developing new relationships,
             activities, coping strategies, and identities. Thus,
             psychosocial issues are critical in our attempts to
             understand and address substance abuse in this
             population.},
   Doi = {10.1097/00005053-200202000-00006},
   Key = {fds254327}
}

@article{fds254362,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {A response on concepts, laws and measurement in social
             psychology},
   Journal = {Theory & Psychology},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {489-494},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0959-3543},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000170444400004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {While appreciating Kimble's (2001) praise of our paper
             (Wallach & Wallach, 2001), we argue against his reduction of
             mental states to behavioral dispositions. Crandall and
             Schaller (2001) make five points in criticism of our
             argument that much research in social psychology is plagued
             by circularity. We show that their first point is based on a
             misunderstanding, that their third point is irrelevant, and
             that their last two points do not attempt to answer our
             argument. This leaves their second point as Crandall and
             Schaller's only actual counterargument—namely that
             confidence in a measure for a construct is independent of
             confidence in the construct's relationships to other
             constructs. We show this claim of independence to be false.
             © 2001, Sage Publications. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0959354301114004},
   Key = {fds254362}
}

@article{fds254363,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Experiments in social psychology: Science or
             self-deception?},
   Journal = {Theory & Psychology},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {451-473},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0959-3543},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000170444400001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Criticisms of the very idea of experimentation in social
             psychology are longstanding; a focal claim recently has been
             that social psychological hypotheses are non-empirical. We
             contest this claim, but argue that many experiments in
             social psychology are pointless nonetheless because they are
             fundamentally circular. Testing hypotheses requires
             operationalization; operationalization requires assumptions;
             and in social psychology, we argue, the necessary
             assumptions often already imply that the hypotheses can be
             confirmed. Confirmability of the hypotheses of a number of
             experiments recently reported in the Journal of Experimental
             Social Psychology is shown to be implied by two illustrative
             truistic principles central to theories assumed in any tests
             of these hypotheses. We suggest that research aimed at
             finding specifically social psychological laws may only
             yield unfalsifiable truisms, while useful social
             psychological research aims elsewhere. © 2001, Sage
             Publications. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0959354301114001},
   Key = {fds254363}
}

@article{fds254361,
   Author = {Drake, RE and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Dual diagnosis: 15 years of progress.},
   Journal = {Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.C.)},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1126-1129},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {1075-2730},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000089105100007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ps.51.9.1126},
   Key = {fds254361}
}

@article{fds254323,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Why is experimentation in psychology often
             senseless?},
   Journal = {Scandinavian Journal of Psychology},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {4 SUPPL.},
   Pages = {103-106},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0036-5564},
   Key = {fds254323}
}

@article{fds254332,
   Author = {WALLACH, LISE and WALLACH, MICHAELA},
   Title = {Why is experimentation in psychology often
             senseless?},
   Journal = {Scandinavian Journal of Psychology},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {S1},
   Pages = {103-106},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0036-5564},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000084574100024&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9450.1999.tb01457.x},
   Key = {fds254332}
}

@article{fds254325,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, L},
   Title = {When Experiments Serve Little Purpose: Misguided Research in
             Mainstream Psychology},
   Journal = {Theory & Psychology},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {183-194},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0959-3543},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000073414400005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {This paper attempts further to explicate and justify the
             belief, held by a number of critics of mainstream
             psychology, that much customary empirical research tells one
             little that could not have been known without it. Apart from
             questions of tautology or indeterminate relations to
             observation, many hypotheses are derivable from propositions
             that are unfalsifiable because they cannot be tested without
             relying on conceptualizations which imply the propositions
             themselves. Experiments that serve no purpose beyond the
             operationalization of such hypotheses are a misguided
             enterprise. © 1998, Sage Publications. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0959354398082005},
   Key = {fds254325}
}

@article{fds254347,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, L},
   Title = {Of Surrogacy, Circularity, Causality and Near-Tautologies: A
             Response},
   Journal = {Theory & Psychology},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {213-217},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0959-3543},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000073414400008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Gigerenzer (1998) agrees with our critique of mainstream
             work (Wallach & Wallach, 1994, 1998). However, while he
             views near-tautologies as an additional species of
             surrogates for theory, we believe near-tautologies are
             implied by entrenched and uncontested proto-theories that
             are not without function, but pointless to subject to
             empirical test. Schaller and Crandall (1998) seem to have
             backed down from Schaller, Crandall, Stangor and Neuberg's
             (1995) earlier position that the concept of near-tautologies
             as developed by Wallach and Wallach (1994, 1998) is itself
             misguided. Instead, Schaller and Crandall now seek to
             distinguish ‘strong-form’ and ‘weak-form’
             near-tautologies, and claim that our argument against the
             usefulness of testing hypotheses derivable from
             near-tautologies holds only for the ‘strong’ form while
             the ‘weak’ form occurs in our derivations. We show here
             that their distinction is problematic and that supposed
             ‘weak-form’ as well as ‘strong-form’
             near-tautologies are unfalsifiable. © 1998, Sage
             Publications. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0959354398082008},
   Key = {fds254347}
}

@article{fds254324,
   Author = {Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Family and human development across cultures: A view from
             the other side - Kagitcibasi,C},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology: a Journal of Reviews},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {787-788},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0010-7549},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1997XU92900003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254324}
}

@article{fds254346,
   Author = {Drake, RE and Mueser, KT and Clark, RE and Wallach,
             MA},
   Title = {The course, treatment, and outcome of substance disorder in
             persons with severe mental illness.},
   Journal = {The American Journal of Orthopsychiatry},
   Volume = {66},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {42-51},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0002-9432},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996TU17300005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Individuals with co-occurring substance abuse and severe
             mental illness are particularly vulnerable to negative
             outcomes. This paper reviews findings on the longitudinal
             course of dual disorders in traditional treatment systems,
             which provide separate mental health and substance-abuse
             programs; describes the movement toward programs that
             integrate both types of treatment at the clinical level;
             reviews evidence related to outcomes in integrated treatment
             programs; and discusses health-care policy changes that
             would encourage effective treatments.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0080153},
   Key = {fds254346}
}

@article{fds254348,
   Author = {Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Escape from freedom (2nd edition) - Fromm,E},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology: a Journal of Reviews},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {7-11},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0010-7549},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996TN64300001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254348}
}

@article{fds254341,
   Author = {BARTELS, SJ and DRAKE, RE and WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {LONG-TERM COURSE OF SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS AMONG PATIENTS
             WITH SEVERE MENTAL-ILLNESS},
   Journal = {Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.C.)},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {248-251},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1075-2730},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1995QP07700007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254341}
}

@article{fds254355,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Gergen Versus the Mainstream: Are Hypotheses in Social
             Psychology Subject to Empirical Test?},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {233-242},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1994PC24500005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {K. J. Gergen's (1982) argument that hypotheses in social
             psychology are not empirical propositions is critically
             examined and shown to be erroneous. Nevertheless, this
             article demonstrates that, without necessarily appearing
             obvious, some hypotheses can be derived from propositions
             that are like tautologies and that their confirmation as
             such is of little interest. An analysis of hypotheses in
             recent articles in the Journal of Experimental Social
             Psychology and the Journal of Personality and Social
             Psychology suggests that hypotheses derivable from
             propositions very much like tautologies may not be
             infrequent. Implications are considered for what kinds of
             social psychology experiments are of value to
             perform.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-3514.67.2.233},
   Key = {fds254355}
}

@article{fds254352,
   Author = {DRAKE, RE and WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {MODERATE DRINKING AMONG PEOPLE WITH SEVERE
             MENTAL-ILLNESS},
   Journal = {Hospital and Community Psychiatry},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {780-782},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0022-1597},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1993LP77900015&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254352}
}

@article{fds254333,
   Author = {WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {HEURISTIC RESEARCH - DESIGN, METHODOLOGY, AND APPLICATIONS -
             MOUSTAKAS,C},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology: a Journal of Reviews},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1075-1076},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0010-7549},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1992JU79100064&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1037/031506},
   Key = {fds254333}
}

@article{fds254353,
   Author = {WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {PSYCHOANALYSIS AND ETHICS - WALLWORK,E},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology: a Journal of Reviews},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1041-1042},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0010-7549},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1992JU79100038&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254353}
}

@article{fds254342,
   Author = {DRAKE, RE and WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {MENTAL-PATIENTS ATTRACTION TO THE HOSPITAL - CORRELATES OF
             LIVING PREFERENCE},
   Journal = {Community Mental Health Journal},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {5-12},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0010-3853},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1992HC41400001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF00756697},
   Key = {fds254342}
}

@article{fds254336,
   Author = {WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {PRIVATE TERROR PUBLIC-LIFE - PSYCHOSIS AND THE POLITICS OF
             COMMUNITY - GLASS,JM},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology: a Journal of Reviews},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {26-27},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0010-7549},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1992GY38800011&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254336}
}

@article{fds254345,
   Author = {Drake, RE and Osher, FC and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Homelessness and dual diagnosis.},
   Journal = {American Psychologist},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1149-1158},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0003-066X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1991GP06700007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {People who are dually diagnosed with severe mental illness
             and substance use disorders constitute 10%-20% of homeless
             persons. They are a heterogeneous and extremely vulnerable
             subgroup with complex, poorly understood needs. In this
             article recent research on the epidemiology, subject
             characteristics, and service needs of the dually diagnosed
             homeless population is reviewed. Also, the range of evolving
             approaches to providing social services, housing, and mental
             health and substance-abuse treatments; the relevant system
             issues and legal issues; and problems with current research,
             as well as future research directions, are discussed. The
             importance of the distinction between providing appropriate
             living environments and mental health treatments emerges
             throughout.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0003-066x.46.11.1149},
   Key = {fds254345}
}

@article{fds254356,
   Author = {WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {ART, MIND, AND EDUCATION - RESEARCH FROM PROJECT ZERO -
             GARDNER,H, PERKINS,DN},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology: a Journal of Reviews},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {340-341},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0010-7549},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1991FF15100053&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254356}
}

@article{fds325041,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Why Altruism, even though it Exists, Cannot be Demonstrated
             by Social Psychological Experiments},
   Journal = {Psychological Inquiry},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {153-155},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15327965pli0202_15},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15327965pli0202_15},
   Key = {fds325041}
}

@article{fds254344,
   Author = {Bartels, SJ and Drake, RE and Wallach, MA and Freeman,
             DH},
   Title = {Characteristic hostility in schizophrenic
             outpatients.},
   Journal = {Schizophrenia Bulletin},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {163-171},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0586-7614},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1991FC44500015&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {In this study of 133 schizophrenic outpatients, we assessed
             characteristic hostility and correlates of hostility over a
             6-month period. Results showed that 13 percent of the study
             group were characteristically violent, 18 percent were
             characteristically threatening, and another 21 percent were
             irritable and argumentative. About half (48%) were without
             hostility. A multiple regression model identified six
             variables--housing instability, hallucinations or delusions,
             schizoaffective diagnosis, lack of depression, alcohol use,
             and bizarre behavior--that together accounted for over 50
             percent of the variance in observed characteristic
             hostility. Hostility also predicted rehospitalization and
             total inpatient days during 1-year followup. Implications of
             these findings for assessment and future research are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1093/schbul/17.1.163},
   Key = {fds254344}
}

@article{fds254339,
   Author = {DRAKE, RE and WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {SUBSTANCE ABUSE AMONG THE CHRONIC MENTALLY-ILL},
   Journal = {Hospital and Community Psychiatry},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1041-1046},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0022-1597},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1989AT89500010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254339}
}

@article{fds254330,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {How best to critique egoism?},
   Journal = {Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {726-727},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0140-525X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1989AY40900062&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0140525X00025590},
   Key = {fds254330}
}

@article{fds254357,
   Author = {Drake, RE and Wallach, MA and Hoffman, JS},
   Title = {Housing instability and homelessness among aftercare
             patients of an urban state hospital.},
   Journal = {Hospital and Community Psychiatry},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {46-51},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-1597},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2536352},
   Abstract = {Homelessness as a dimensional concept reflecting instability
             of community living arrangements was examined in an urban
             state hospital's sample of 187 aftercare patients with
             chronic mental illness. According to ratings by outreach
             clinicians, 17 percent of the patients were predominantly
             homeless, and 10 percent were occasionally homeless over the
             six months before evaluation. Younger, male patients were
             more likely to be homeless. Homelessness was strongly
             associated with abuse of alcohol and street drugs, treatment
             noncompliance, and a variety of psychosocial problems and
             psychiatric symptoms. Homeless patients were viewed by their
             primary clinicians as attracted to the hospital as a living
             alternative and, during prospective one-year follow-up, had
             a much higher rate of rehospitalization.},
   Key = {fds254357}
}

@article{fds254337,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, L},
   Title = {The Part Played by Psychology in Promoting Selfishness: A
             Response},
   Journal = {Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {43-50},
   Publisher = {Guilford Publications},
   Year = {1985},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0736-7236},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1985ARZ2500008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1521/jscp.1985.3.1.43},
   Key = {fds254337}
}

@article{fds254328,
   Author = {WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {PERSONAL QUALITIES AND COLLEGE ADMISSIONS - WILLINGHAM,WW,
             BRELAND,HM},
   Journal = {American Journal of Education},
   Volume = {91},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {279-282},
   Year = {1983},
   ISSN = {0195-6744},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1983RA75400014&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1086/443691},
   Key = {fds254328}
}

@article{fds254340,
   Author = {WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {CITATION CLASSIC - MODES OF THINKING IN YOUNG-CHILDREN -
             STUDY OF THE CREATIVITY-INTELLIGENCE DISTINCTION},
   Number = {13},
   Pages = {14-14},
   Year = {1980},
   ISSN = {0092-6361},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1980JK09200001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254340}
}

@article{fds254354,
   Author = {PENNINGTON, BF and WALLACH, L and WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {NON-CONSERVER USE AND UNDERSTANDING OF NUMBER AND
             ARITHMETIC},
   Journal = {Genetic psychology monographs},
   Volume = {101},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {231-243},
   Year = {1980},
   ISSN = {0016-6677},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1980JU55800005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254354}
}

@article{fds254335,
   Author = {DRAKE, RE and WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {WILL MENTAL-PATIENTS STAY IN THE COMMUNITY - SOCIAL
             PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {285-294},
   Year = {1979},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1979GU01400008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254335}
}

@article{fds254343,
   Author = {DORVAL, B and WALLACH, L and WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {FIELD EVALUATION OF A TUTORIAL READING PROGRAM EMPHASIZING
             PHONEME IDENTIFICATION SKILLS},
   Journal = {The Reading teacher},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {784-790},
   Year = {1978},
   ISSN = {0034-0561},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1978EU40300011&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254343}
}

@article{fds254350,
   Author = {WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {GIFTED AND CREATIVE - 50-YEAR PERSPECTIVE - STANLEY,JC,
             GEORGE,WC, SOLANO,CH},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology: a Journal of Reviews},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {616-617},
   Year = {1978},
   ISSN = {0010-7549},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1978FP98200004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254350}
}

@article{fds254351,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA and Dozier, MG and Kaplan,
             NE},
   Title = {Poor children learning to read do not have trouble with
             auditory discrimination but do have trouble with phoneme
             recognition},
   Journal = {Journal of Educational Psychology},
   Volume = {69},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {36-39},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1977},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-0663},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1977CW05000006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The present study confirms the hypothesis, derived from the
             research of M. A. Wallach and L. Wallach (1976) and L.
             Wallach and M. A. Wallach (1976), on teaching disadvantaged
             children to read, that the troubles poor children frequently
             have with sounds stem not from deficiencies in auditory
             discrimination but from inadequate skill in phonemic
             analysis. Almost all of 76 disadvantaged and 70 middle-class
             kindergarten-age Ss could readily hear phoneme differences
             in words, as indicated by their ability to respond
             differentially to words that differed only in single
             phonemes, which were similar. On the other hand, almost all
             of the disadvantaged Ss, but almost none of the middle-class
             Ss, did very poorly on tasks involving phonemic analysis of
             words (e.g., indicating whether given sounded phonemes
             occurred in various spoken words). (22 ref) (PsycINFO
             Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). © 1977
             American Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-0663.69.1.36},
   Key = {fds254351}
}

@article{fds254331,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Bordeaux, J},
   Title = {Children's construction of the human figure},
   Journal = {Perceptual and Motor Skills},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {439-446},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1976},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0031-5125},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1976CL23100019&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Is there evidence for 'syncretism' or 'juxtaposition of
             parts' in the development of children's ability to represent
             the human image graphically? Syncretism refers to an
             inability to organize the parts of the human image into a
             structurally coherent figure despite knowledge of the
             representational meaning of those parts and sufficient motor
             skill to perform the task. This study agrees with Golomb's
             criticism of earlier work for inferring the occurrence of
             syncretism on the basis of inadequacies in children's
             drawings but questions the sufficiency of the evidence used
             by Golomb for denying that syncretism occurs. To obtain
             evidence of a more definitive kind, a procedure involving
             manikin assembly was devised that would permit independent
             assessment of a child's understanding of the
             representational significance of the manikin parts and a
             child's ability to assemble those parts into a plausible
             figure. Research using this procedure, conducted with 142
             children across the age range of 2 to 4 yr., yielded no
             syncretism; knowledge of the meaning of the parts was a
             sufficient condition for successful figural
             assembly.},
   Doi = {10.2466/pms.1976.43.2.439},
   Key = {fds254331}
}

@article{fds254326,
   Author = {WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {TESTS TELL US LITTLE ABOUT TALENT},
   Journal = {American Scientist},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {57-63},
   Year = {1976},
   ISSN = {0003-0996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1976BD52700008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254326}
}

@article{fds254334,
   Author = {WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {MESSAGES OF BODY - SPIEGEL,JP AND MACHOTKA,P},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology: a Journal of Reviews},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {353-354},
   Year = {1975},
   ISSN = {0010-7549},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1975W290900048&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds254334}
}

@article{fds254322,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Martin, ML},
   Title = {Effects of social class on children's motoric
             expression},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {106-113},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1970},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0029410},
   Abstract = {From a consideration of middle-class vs. lower-class
             child-rearing practices, 2 contradictory types of
             predictions were formulated concerning possible effects of
             social class on children's motoric constriction-expansiveness.
             Middle-class permissiveness compared to lower-class
             restrictiveness regarding parental sanctions for child
             behavior implies the outcome of greater motoric
             expansiveness for middle-class than for lower-class
             children. However, the relative dominance of verbal forms of
             expression in the middle class compared to nonverbal forms
             of expression in the lower class implies the outcome of
             greater motoric expansiveness for lower-class than for
             middle-class children. With 283 white 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 6th
             grade children as Ss, greater motoric expansiveness, as
             measured in terms of design drawing activity, was
             consistently found for lower-class than for middle-class Ss
             of both sexes at each grade level. Thus, the latter rather
             than the former theoretical perspective concerning social
             class effects was supported. (PsycINFO Database Record (c)
             2006 APA, all rights reserved). © 1970 American
             Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0029410},
   Key = {fds254322}
}

@article{fds254321,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Mabli, J},
   Title = {Information versus conformity in the effects of group
             discussion on risk taking},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {149-156},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1970},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0028775},
   Abstract = {To test whether the information that a more risky position
             is represented in a group will constitute a more powerful
             determinant of opinion change than conformity to majority
             views, 3-person groups were composed of either a
             conservative minority and risky majority (11 all-male and 8
             all-female groups) or a conservative majority and risky
             minority (7 all-male and 10 all-female groups). Effects of
             group discussion on risk taking were assessed by measuring
             shifts from initial decisions to group consensus decisions
             and from initial decisions to postconsensus personal
             decisions for conservatives and for risk takers of both
             sexes under the 2 kinds of majority conditions. As predicted
             by the informational in contrast to the conformity
             interpretation, (a) conservatives showed strong and similar
             shifts toward greater risk taking as a result of discussion
             whether they constituted a minority or a majority of the
             group membership, (b) risk takers showed essentially no
             shift as a result of discussion whether they constituted a
             minority or a majority, and (c) these generalizations held
             for females and males. (18 ref.) (PsycINFO Database Record
             (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). © 1970 American
             Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0028775},
   Key = {fds254321}
}

@article{fds254320,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wing, CW},
   Title = {IS RISK A VALUE?},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {101-106},
   Year = {1968},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0025719},
   Abstract = {PROVIDES EVIDENCE SUPPORTING AN INTERPRETATION OF THE
             GROUP-INDUCED RISKY-SHIFT PHENOMENON IN WHICH RISK
             REPRESENTS MORE OF A CULTURAL VALUE THAN DOES CONSERVATISM,
             SO THAT PEOPLE BELIEVE THEMSELVES TO BE GREATER RISK TAKERS
             THAN THEIR PEERS. THE DISCUSSION PROCESS PROVIDES
             INFORMATION ABOUT THE RISK-TAKING VIEWS OF OTHERS, INDUCING
             UPWARD REVISIONS IN ESTIMATES OF HOW HIGH A RISK LEVEL IS
             ACCEPTABLE TO EXPRESS ONE'S VALUE FOR RISK. IT REMAINED TO
             BE ESTABLISHED THAT PERSONS MAKE A STRONG AND PERVASIVE
             ERROR TOWARD BELIEVING THEMSELVES TO BE GREATER RISK TAKERS
             THAN THEIR PEERS. THE EXISTENCE OF A SYSTEMATIC ERROR OF
             THIS KIND IS DEMONSTRATED TO HOLD WITH A VERY HIGH DEGREE OF
             STATISTICAL SIGNIFICANCE FOR THE 292 MALES AND 195 FEMALES
             IN THIS STUDY. (19 REF.) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006
             APA, all rights reserved). © 1968 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0025719},
   Key = {fds254320}
}

@article{fds254319,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Kogan, N and Burt, RB},
   Title = {Are risk takers more persuasive than conservatives in group
             discussion?},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {76-88},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {1968},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-1031},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0022-1031(68)90051-6},
   Abstract = {This study investigated whether the phenomenon of shifts
             toward greater risk taking following discussion of
             risk-related materials can be attributed to greater general
             persuasiveness exerted by risk takers than by conservatives.
             Its procedure was to discover whether risk takers would be
             judged more persuasive than conservatives following
             discussion of risk-neutral materials. In the case of female
             discussion groups risk takers were judged slightly more
             persuasive than conservatives, but not at all in the case of
             male groups. Our conclusion was that the risky-shift
             phenomenon cannot be attributed to greater persuasiveness as
             a general characteristic of high-risk takers in male groups,
             and that this factor can play no more than a small role in
             female groups. © 1968.},
   Doi = {10.1016/0022-1031(68)90051-6},
   Key = {fds254319}
}

@article{fds254318,
   Author = {Stagner, R and Cohen, R and Borgatta, EF and Bobrnstedt, GW and Wallach,
             MA and Kogan, N and Rossi, AS and Glenn, ND and Quarantelli, EL and Polsky,
             N},
   Title = {Feedback from our readers},
   Journal = {Society},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {61-64},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {1967},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0147-2011},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02804521},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF02804521},
   Key = {fds254318}
}

@article{fds325042,
   Author = {Kogan, N and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Group risk taking as a function of members' anxiety and
             defensiveness levels.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {50-63},
   Year = {1967},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6494.1967.tb01415.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-6494.1967.tb01415.x},
   Key = {fds325042}
}

@article{fds254317,
   Author = {Kogan, N and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Risky-shift phenomenon in small decision-making groups: A
             test of the information-exchange hypothesis},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {75-84},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {1967},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-1031},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0022-1031(67)90038-8},
   Abstract = {To determine the relative contribution of group interaction
             and information exchange to the risky-shift effect, female
             undergraduates were assigned either to interacting or to
             listening groups. Tape recordings of discussions of risk
             dilemmas were derived from the interacting groups. These
             taped discussions comprised the stimulus material for the
             listening groups. Thus, information was held fairly constant
             for interacting-listening pairs. Individual levels of risk
             taking measured prior to and after group discussion were
             used to assess the magnitude of the risky-shift effect.
             Although both group types manifested significant risky
             shifts, the interacting groups significantly exceeded the
             listening groups in extent of shift. We concluded that
             informational processes alone could not fully account for
             the risky-shift phenomenon. © 1967.},
   Doi = {10.1016/0022-1031(67)90038-8},
   Key = {fds254317}
}

@article{fds325043,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Kogan, N},
   Title = {A new look at the creativity-intelligence
             distinction.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {348-369},
   Year = {1965},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6494.1965.tb01391.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-6494.1965.tb01391.x},
   Key = {fds325043}
}

@article{fds325044,
   Author = {KOGAN, N and WALLACH, MA},
   Title = {PERSONALITY AND SITUATIONAL DETERMINANTS OF JUDGMENTAL
             CONFIDENCE AND EXTREMITY.},
   Journal = {The British journal of social and clinical
             psychology},
   Volume = {4},
   Pages = {25-34},
   Year = {1965},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8260.1965.tb00437.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.2044-8260.1965.tb00437.x},
   Key = {fds325044}
}

@article{fds254315,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Kogan, N},
   Title = {The roles of information, discussion, and consensus in group
             risk taking},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-19},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {1965},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-1031},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0022-1031(65)90034-X},
   Abstract = {What situational elements can account for the enhanced risk
             taking typical of group relative to individual decision
             making? The three elements investigated were provision of
             information about the risk-taking levels favored by peers,
             with the implication of judgmental comparison; group
             discussion, with the affective involvement it can generate;
             and achievement of consensus, with its possible centering of
             commitment upon the group. The Ss were 360 undergraduates,
             180 of each sex, randomly assigned within sex to one of
             three experimental conditions, all involving five-person
             groups. The group members in the respective conditions
             reached decisions concerning matters of risk through
             discussion to a consensus, through achievement of consensus
             without discussion, or through discussion without the
             requirement of consensus. For both male and female groups,
             discussion with or without consensus produced substantial
             shifts toward greater risk taking, while consensus without
             discussion yielded an averaging effect. Hence, the
             occurrence of group discussion is both necessary and
             sufficient for generating the risky shift effect. ©
             1965.},
   Doi = {10.1016/0022-1031(65)90034-X},
   Key = {fds254315}
}

@article{fds254316,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Kogan, N and Burt, RB},
   Title = {Can group members recognize the effects of group discussion
             upon risk taking?},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {379-395},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {1965},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-1031},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0022-1031(65)90016-8},
   Doi = {10.1016/0022-1031(65)90016-8},
   Key = {fds254316}
}

@article{fds254314,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Kogan, N and Bem, DJ},
   Title = {Diffusion of responsibility and level of risk taking in
             groups},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {68},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {263-274},
   Year = {1964},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0096-851X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0042190},
   Abstract = {This study reports evidence supporting the following
             propositions: (a) Group discussion and consensus concerning
             decisions that involve actual risks and payoffs lead to
             greater risk taking than occurs in the absence of such
             discussion and consensus. (b) The mechanism that underlies
             this group-induced shift toward greater risk taking consists
             of a diffusion or spreading of responsibility. Using risks
             and payoffs based on monetary gain and loss for problem
             solving performance, the above propositions received strong
             confirmation for male college Ss. The results of various
             experimental manipulations provided positive support for
             viewing diffusion of responsibility as the causal factor at
             work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights
             reserved). © 1964 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0042190},
   Key = {fds254314}
}

@article{fds325046,
   Author = {WALLACH, MA and THOMAS, HL},
   Title = {GRAPHIC CONSTRICTION AND EXPANSIVENESS AS A FUNCTION OF
             INDUCED SOCIAL ISOLATION AND SOCIAL INTERACTION:
             EXPERIMENTAL MANIPULATIONS AND PERSONALITY
             EFFECTS.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality},
   Volume = {31},
   Pages = {491-509},
   Year = {1963},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6494.1963.tb01315.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-6494.1963.tb01315.x},
   Key = {fds325046}
}

@article{fds254313,
   Author = {Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Perceptual recognition of approximations to English in
             relation to spelling achievement},
   Journal = {Journal of Educational Psychology},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {57-62},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1963},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-0663},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0048056},
   Abstract = {In an experimnet with 55 5th-grade children, ease of
             perceptual recognition was determined for nonsense words
             which resemble English and for nonsense words which do not.
             With all children being equated in recogniton accuracy for
             the latter words, good spellers were found to recognize the
             former words much more readily than poor spellers. These and
             further results permitted the conclusion that good spellers
             show much greater transfer of training than poor
             spellers-whether the basis for this transfer rests on the
             learning of the sequential probability structure of letters,
             on phonetic generalization, or on both. (PsycINFO Database
             Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). © 1963 American
             Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0048056},
   Key = {fds254313}
}


%% Books   
@book{fds254312,
   Author = {Wallach, L and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Seven views of mind},
   Pages = {1-116},
   Publisher = {PSYCHOLOGY PRESS},
   Address = {New York},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780203103876},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203103876},
   Abstract = {© 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. This book examines
             seven different answers to the question, “What are we
             talking about when we talk about the mind?” It begins by
             considering the dualistic view, frequently taken for granted
             by students, that words like “belief,” “anger,” and
             “jealousy” refer to a realm quite distinct from the
             physical world, and notes the difficulties associated with
             this view as well as why many find it compelling. The book
             then describes six further major views of mind alternative
             to dualism that have been developed by psychologists,
             philosophers, and neuroscientists: Some claim that such
             words are just about behavior. Some claim that such words
             are theoretical constructs, like “quarks“ in physics.
             Some identify the mind with the brain or with a kind of
             program in the brain like the software in a computer. Some
             think there is nothing to which such words refer. Some think
             mental talk reflects nothing but convention.Students in
             psychology learn about different views of mind in various
             courses, but they tend to be left on their own to deal with
             the conflicts among them. How to conceive of mind is usually
             addressed in the context not of psychology but of
             philosophy, where it tends to be treated in ways that may
             seem esoteric to psychology students. Seldom discussed in
             one place, this book presents all seven views and the
             reasons for and against each in a relatively nontechnical,
             informal manner designed to appeal to psychology students
             and their instructors, permitting comparisons and possible
             resolutions.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203103876},
   Key = {fds254312}
}

@book{fds325207,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, L},
   Title = {Rethinking Goodness},
   Pages = {156 pages},
   Publisher = {SUNY Press},
   Year = {1990},
   ISBN = {0791402991},
   Abstract = {Arguing that a psychological basis for ethics can be found
             in human motivation, Rethinking Goodness proposes a
             naturalistic ethics that transcends the conflict between
             liberalism and authoritarianism the conflict between freedom
             at the ...},
   Key = {fds325207}
}

@book{fds325208,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, L},
   Title = {Psychology's Sanction for Selfishness The Error of Egoism in
             Theory and Therapy},
   Pages = {307 pages},
   Year = {1983},
   ISBN = {0716714655},
   Key = {fds325208}
}

@book{fds325333,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wallach, LA},
   Title = {Teaching All Children to Read},
   Pages = {352 pages},
   Year = {1979},
   Month = {October},
   ISBN = {0226871673},
   Key = {fds325333}
}

@book{fds325334,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wing, CW},
   Title = {College admissions and the psychology of
             talent},
   Pages = {1-165},
   Publisher = {Holt, Rinehart and Winston},
   Year = {1971},
   ISBN = {0030849721},
   Key = {fds325334}
}

@book{fds325335,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Wing, CW},
   Title = {The Talented Student: A Validation of the
             Creativity-Intelligence Distinction},
   Pages = {1-142},
   Publisher = {Holt, Rinehart and Winston},
   Year = {1969},
   ISBN = {0030798000},
   Key = {fds325335}
}

@book{fds325336,
   Author = {Wallach, MA and Kogan, N},
   Title = {Modes of Thinking in Young Children: A Study of the
             Creativity-Intelligence Distinction},
   Publisher = {Holt, Reinhart and Winston},
   Year = {1965},
   ISBN = {0313232490},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1520-6807(196604)3:2<190::AID-PITS2310030226>3.0.CO;},
   Doi = {10.1002/1520-6807(196604)3:2<190::AID-PITS2310030226>3.0.CO;},
   Key = {fds325336}
}

@book{fds325045,
   Author = {Kogan, N and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Risk Taking. A Study in Cognition and Personality, Nathan
             Kogan,... Michael A. Wallach,....},
   Pages = {278 pages},
   Year = {1964},
   Key = {fds325045}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds254349,
   Author = {Mueser, KT and Drake, RE and Wallach, MA},
   Title = {Dual diagnosis: a review of etiological theories.},
   Journal = {Addictive Behaviors},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {717-734},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0306-4603},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000076041900002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The etiology of the high prevalence of substance use
             disorders in patients with severe mental illness
             (schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) is unclear. We review
             the evidence of different theories of increased comorbidity,
             organized according to four general models: common factor
             models, secondary substance use disorder models, secondary
             psychiatric disorder models, and bidirectional models. Among
             common factor models, evidence suggests that antisocial
             personality disorder accounts for some increased
             comorbidity. Among secondary substance use disorder models,
             there is support for the supersensitivity model, which
             posits that biological vulnerability of psychiatric
             disorders results in sensitivity to small amounts of alcohol
             and drugs, leading to substance use disorders. There is
             minimal support for the self-medication model, but the
             accumulation of multiple risk factors related to mental
             illness, including dysphoria, may increase the risk of
             substance use disorder. Secondary psychiatric disorder
             models remain to be convincingly demonstrated. Bidirectional
             models have not been systematically examined. Further
             clarification of etiologic factors, including the
             identification of subtypes of dual diagnosis, may have
             implications for developing more effective prevention
             efforts and treatment.},
   Doi = {10.1016/s0306-4603(98)00073-2},
   Key = {fds254349}
}


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