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Publications of Lynn Smith-Lovin    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds318988,
   Author = {Wisecup, AK and McPherson, M and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Recognition of Gender Identity and Task Performance},
   Volume = {22},
   Pages = {177-201},
   Publisher = {Emerald (MCB UP )},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {December},
   ISBN = {0762312238},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0882-6145(05)22007-6},
   Abstract = {Gender constitutes one of the fundamental distinctions that
             organize social interaction. It is a salient social
             distinction in all societies, is a core personal identity
             for social actors, and is often used to generate
             expectations for competence in task-focused mixed-sex
             groups. In this chapter, we explore the effect of
             androgynous (gender ambiguous) appearance on task
             performance of observers. We demonstrate that it takes
             longer for research participants to define the gender
             identity of such individuals. More importantly, we
             hypothesize that since androgynous individuals do not fit
             easily into gender schemas that people use to access
             information about interaction partners, the presence of an
             androgynous-looking person will slow performance on a
             cognitive task. An experimental study supports both
             hypotheses. We conclude with suggestions about how the
             presence of non-stereotypical interaction partners with
             ambiguous identities might influence group members' task
             performance, cognitive inferences about and affective
             responses to other group members. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All
             rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0882-6145(05)22007-6},
   Key = {fds318988}
}

@book{fds257496,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L and Heise, DR},
   Title = {Analyzing Social Interaction: Research Advances in Affect
             Control Theory},
   Publisher = {Gordon and Breach},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds257496}
}


%% Articles and Chapters   
@article{fds318979,
   Author = {Myers, DJ and Lipscomb, HJ and Epling, C and Hunt, D and Richardson, W and Smith-Lovin, L and Dement, JM},
   Title = {Surgical Team Stability and Risk of Sharps-Related Blood and
             Body Fluid Exposures During Surgical Procedures.},
   Journal = {Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {512-518},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ice.2016.12},
   Abstract = {To explore whether surgical teams with greater stability
             among their members (ie, members have worked together more
             in the past) experience lower rates of sharps-related
             percutaneous blood and body fluid exposures (BBFE) during
             surgical procedures.A 10-year retrospective cohort study.A
             single large academic teaching hospital.Surgical teams
             participating in surgical procedures (n=333,073) performed
             during 2001-2010 and 2,113 reported percutaneous BBFE were
             analyzed.A social network measure (referred to as the team
             stability index) was used to quantify the extent to which
             surgical team members worked together in the previous 6
             months. Poisson regression was used to examine the effect of
             team stability on the risk of BBFE while controlling for
             procedure characteristics and accounting for procedure
             duration. Separate regression models were generated for
             percutaneous BBFE involving suture needles and those
             involving other surgical devices. RESULTS The team stability
             index was associated with the risk of percutaneous BBFE
             (adjusted rate ratio, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.88-0.97]). However,
             the association was stronger for percutaneous BBFE involving
             devices other than suture needles (adjusted rate ratio, 0.92
             [95% CI, 0.85-0.99]) than for exposures involving suture
             needles (0.96 [0.88-1.04]).Greater team stability may reduce
             the risk of percutaneous BBFE during surgical procedures,
             particularly for exposures involving devices other than
             suture needles. Additional research should be conducted on
             the basis of primary data gathered specifically to measure
             qualities of relationships among surgical team
             personnel.},
   Doi = {10.1017/ice.2016.12},
   Key = {fds318979}
}

@article{fds318980,
   Author = {Clay-Warner, J and Robinson, DT and Smith-Lovin, L and Rogers, KB and James, KR},
   Title = {Justice Standard Determines Emotional Responses to
             Over-Reward},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {44-67},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0190272516628299},
   Abstract = {© 2016, © American Sociological Association 2016. How do
             people feel when they benefit from an unfair reward
             distribution? Equity theory predicts negative emotion in
             response to over-reward, but sociological research using
             referential standards of justice drawn from status-value
             theory repeatedly finds positive emotional responses to
             over-reward. Researchers have proposed methodological
             explanations for these different findings, but we propose a
             theoretical explanation—that over-reward based on local
             comparisons with an interaction partner creates guilt and
             other negative emotions, while over-reward relative to an
             abstract justice standard leads to more positive emotion. We
             describe two experiments that address methodological
             explanations for the status value findings: (1) lack of
             tangible rewards and (2) lack of sufficiently large
             over-rewards. We find that people who are over-rewarded
             relative to their referential expectations still report less
             negative emotion and more positive emotion than those who
             receive expected rewards. We report results from a third
             experiment that demonstrate support for our theoretical
             argument.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0190272516628299},
   Key = {fds318980}
}

@article{fds321468,
   Author = {Myers, DJ and Lipscomb, HJ and Epling, C and Hunt, D and Richardson, W and Smith-Lovin, L and Dement, JM},
   Title = {Surgical Procedure Characteristics and Risk of
             Sharps-Related Blood and Body Fluid Exposure.},
   Journal = {Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {80-87},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ice.2015.233},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE To use a unique multicomponent administrative data
             set assembled at a large academic teaching hospital to
             examine the risk of percutaneous blood and body fluid (BBF)
             exposures occurring in operating rooms. DESIGN A 10-year
             retrospective cohort design. SETTING A single large academic
             teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS All surgical procedures
             (n=333,073) performed in 2001-2010 as well as 2,113 reported
             BBF exposures were analyzed. METHODS Crude exposure rates
             were calculated; Poisson regression was used to analyze risk
             factors and account for procedure duration. BBF exposures
             involving suture needles were examined separately from those
             involving other device types to examine possible differences
             in risk factors. RESULTS The overall rate of reported BBF
             exposures was 6.3 per 1,000 surgical procedures (2.9 per
             1,000 surgical hours). BBF exposure rates increased with
             estimated patient blood loss (17.7 exposures per 1,000
             procedures with 501-1,000 cc blood loss and 26.4 exposures
             per 1,000 procedures with >1,000 cc blood loss), number of
             personnel working in the surgical field during the procedure
             (34.4 exposures per 1,000 procedures having ≥15 personnel
             ever in the field), and procedure duration (14.3 exposures
             per 1,000 procedures lasting 4 to <6 hours, 27.1 exposures
             per 1,000 procedures lasting ≥6 hours). Regression results
             showed associations were generally stronger for suture
             needle-related exposures. CONCLUSIONS Results largely
             support other studies found in the literature. However,
             additional research should investigate differences in risk
             factors for BBF exposures associated with suture needles and
             those associated with all other device types. Infect.
             Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):80-87.},
   Doi = {10.1017/ice.2015.233},
   Key = {fds321468}
}

@article{fds318981,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L and Thoits, PA},
   Title = {Introduction to the special section on the sociology of
             emotions},
   Journal = {Emotion Review},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {187-188},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1754073914524325},
   Doi = {10.1177/1754073914524325},
   Key = {fds318981}
}

@article{fds318982,
   Author = {Smith, JA and McPherson, M and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Social Distance in the United States: Sex, Race, Religion,
             Age, and Education Homophily among Confidants, 1985 to
             2004},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {432-456},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003122414531776},
   Abstract = {Homophily, the tendency for similar actors to be connected
             at a higher rate than dissimilar actors, is a pervasive
             social fact. In this article, we examine changes over a
             20-year period in two types of homophily-the actual level of
             contact between people in different social categories and
             the level of contact relative to chance. We use data from
             the 1985 and 2004 General Social Surveys to ask whether the
             strengths of five social distinctions-sex, race/ethnicity,
             religious affiliation, age, and education-changed over the
             past two decades in core discussion networks. Changes in the
             actual level of homophily are driven by the demographic
             composition of the United States. As the nation has become
             more diverse, cross-category contacts in race/ethnicity and
             religion have increased. After describing the raw homophily
             rates, we develop a case-control model to assess homophily
             relative to chance mixing. We find decreasing rates of
             homophily for gender but stability for race and age,
             although the young are increasingly isolated from older
             cohorts outside of the family. We also find some weak
             evidence for increasing educational and religious homophily.
             These relational trends may be explained by changes in
             demographic heterogeneity, institutional segregation,
             economic inequality, and symbolic boundaries. © American
             Sociological Association 2014.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0003122414531776},
   Key = {fds318982}
}

@article{fds318983,
   Author = {Reynolds, WN and Salter, WJ and Farber, RM and Corley, C and Dowling,
             CP and Beeman, WO and Smith-Lovin, L and Choi, JN},
   Title = {Sociolect-based community detection},
   Journal = {Ieee Isi 2013 2013 Ieee International Conference on
             Intelligence and Security Informatics: Big Data, Emergent
             Threats, and Decision Making in Security
             Informatics},
   Pages = {221-226},
   Publisher = {IEEE},
   Editor = {Glass, K and Colbaugh, R and Sanfilippo, A and Kao, A and Gabbay, M and Corley, C and Li, J and Khan, L and Wynne, A and Coote, L and Mao, W and Zeng,
             D and Yaghoobi, A},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {September},
   ISBN = {9781467362115},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ISI.2013.6578823},
   Abstract = {'Sociolects' are specialized vocabularies used by social
             subgroups defined by common interests or origins. We applied
             methods to retrieve large quantities of Twitter data based
             on expert-identified sociolects and then applied and
             developed network-analysis methods to relate sociolect use
             to network (sub-) structure. We show that novel methods
             including consideration of node populations, as well as edge
             counts, provide substantially enhanced performance compared
             to standard assortativity. We explain these methods, show
             their utility in analyzing large corpora of social media
             data, and d iscuss their further extensions and potential
             applications. © 2013 IEEE.},
   Doi = {10.1109/ISI.2013.6578823},
   Key = {fds318983}
}

@article{fds257453,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Foy, S and Freeland, R and Miles, A and Rogers,
             KB},
   Title = {"Emotion and affect in the social psychology of
             inequality."},
   Booktitle = {Social Psychology of Inequality},
   Publisher = {SPRINGER},
   Editor = {Lawler, E and McLeod, J and Schwalbe, M},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds257453}
}

@article{fds257494,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Smith, JA and McPherson, M},
   Title = {"Social distance in the United States: Homophily on Race,
             Sex, Age, Education and Religion, 1985-2004"},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds257494}
}

@article{fds257495,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Thoits, P},
   Title = {"Culture, social structure and emotion in the sociology of
             emotion"},
   Journal = {Emotion Review},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds257495}
}

@article{fds318984,
   Author = {Rogers, KB and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Answering the call for a sociological perspective on the
             multilevel social construction of emotion: A Comment on
             Boiger and Mesquita},
   Journal = {Emotion Review},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {232-233},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1754073912439779},
   Abstract = {Boiger and Mesquita (2012) present a social constructionist
             perspective on emotion that argues for its multilevel
             contextualization through social interactions,
             relationships, and culture. The present comments offer a
             response to the authors' call for input from other
             disciplines. We provide a sociological perspective on
             emotion construction at each of the contextual levels
             discussed by Boiger and Mesquita, and discuss a model that
             can address interdependencies between these levels. Our
             remarks are intended to identify additional literature that
             can be brought to bear on multilevel emotion construction
             and to put forward some ideas for future research on the
             subject. © 2012 The Author(s).},
   Doi = {10.1177/1754073912439779},
   Key = {fds318984}
}

@article{fds318985,
   Author = {Rogers, KB and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Action, Interaction, and Groups},
   Pages = {119-138},
   Booktitle = {The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Sociology},
   Publisher = {JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {February},
   ISBN = {9781444330397},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781444347388.ch7},
   Doi = {10.1002/9781444347388.ch7},
   Key = {fds318985}
}

@article{fds257493,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Rogers, KB},
   Title = {"Answering the call for a sociological contribution to a
             multilevel social construction of emotion"},
   Journal = {Emotion Review},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {1-20},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {1754-0739},
   Key = {fds257493}
}

@article{fds257506,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Winkielman, P},
   Title = {The Social Psychologies of Emotion: A Bridge That Is Not Too
             Far},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {327-332},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0190-2725},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000285504300007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1177/0190272510389003},
   Key = {fds257506}
}

@article{fds257492,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Owens, TJ and Robinson, DT},
   Title = {"The Many Faces of Identity"},
   Journal = {Annual Review of Sociology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {477-499},
   Publisher = {ANNUAL REVIEWS},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev.soc.34.040507.134725},
   Abstract = {We review three traditions in research on identity. The
             first two traditions, which stress (a) the internalization
             of social positions and their meanings as part of the self
             structure and (b) the impact of cultural meanings and social
             situations on actors' identities, are closely intertwined.
             The third, the burgeoning literature on collective identity,
             has developed quite independently of the first two and
             focuses more on group-level processes. Unlike previous
             reviews of identity, which have focused on the sources of
             internalized identity (e.g., role relationship, group
             membership, or category descriptor), we focus here on the
             theoretical mechanisms underlying theories of identity. We
             organize our review by highlighting whether those mechanisms
             are located in the individual's self-structure, in the
             situation, or in the larger sociopolitical context. We
             especially attempt to draw connections between the social
             psychological literature on identity processes and the
             distinct, relatively independent literature on collective
             identity. © 2010 by Annual Reviews. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1146/annurev.soc.34.040507.134725},
   Key = {fds257492}
}

@article{fds257511,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and McPherson, M and Smith-Lovin, L and Brashears,
             ME},
   Title = {Models and marginals: Using survey evidence to study social
             networks},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {670-681},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0003-1224},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000268541800009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Fischer (2009) argues that our estimates of confidant
             network size in the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS), and
             therefore the trend in confidant network size from 1985 to
             2004, are implausible because they are (1) inconsistent with
             other data and (2) contain internal anomalies that call the
             data into question. In this note, we assess the evidence for
             a decrease in confidant network size from 1985 to 2004 in
             the GSS data. We conclude that any plausible modeling of the
             data shows a decided trend downward in confidant network
             size from 1985 to 2004. The features that Fischer calls
             anomalies are exactly the characteristics described by our
             models (Table 5) in the original article.},
   Doi = {10.1177/000312240907400409},
   Key = {fds257511}
}

@article{fds257515,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Mark, NP and Smith-Lovin, L and Ridgeway, CL},
   Title = {Why do nominal characteristics acquire status value? A
             minimal explanation for status construction.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Sociology},
   Volume = {115},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {832-862},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0002-9602},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20503743},
   Abstract = {Why do beliefs that attach different amounts of status to
             different categories of people become consensually held by
             the members of a society? We show that two microlevel
             mechanisms, in combination, imply a system-level tendency
             toward consensual status beliefs about a nominal
             characteristic. (1) Status belief diffusion: a person who
             has no status belief about a characteristic can acquire a
             status belief about that characteristic from interacting
             with one or more people who have that status belief. (2)
             Status belief loss: a person who has a status belief about a
             characteristic can lose that belief from interacting with
             one or more people who have the opposite status belief.
             These mechanisms imply that opposite status beliefs will
             tend to be lost at equal rates and will tend to be acquired
             at rates proportional to their prevalence. Therefore, if a
             status belief ever becomes more prevalent than its opposite,
             it will increase in prevalence until every person holds
             it.},
   Key = {fds257515}
}

@article{fds318986,
   Author = {McPherson, M and Brashears, ME and Smith-Lovin,
             L},
   Title = {Erratum: Social isolation in America: Changes in core
             discussion networks over two decades (American Sociological
             Review (2006) vol. 71 (353-375))},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1022},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {fds318986}
}

@article{fds257450,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Smith, JA and McPherson, M},
   Title = {"Social Isolation"},
   Booktitle = {Encyclopedia of Human Relationships},
   Editor = {Reis, H and Sprecher, S},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds257450}
}

@article{fds257451,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {"To thine own self be true? Social structural sources of
             self, situated identity and emotion."},
   Booktitle = {Within the Social World: Essays in Social
             Psychology},
   Publisher = {Allyn & Bacon/Longman},
   Editor = {Chin, J and Cardell, J},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds257451}
}

@article{fds257452,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {"Status, power and emotion: Commentary"},
   Pages = {13-20},
   Booktitle = {Social Structure and Emotion},
   Publisher = {Academic Press},
   Editor = {Clay-Warner, J and Robinson, DT},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds257452}
}

@article{fds257491,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and McPherson, M and Brashears,
             M},
   Title = {"Loosening the ties that bind"},
   Journal = {Contexts},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds257491}
}

@article{fds303991,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L and Brody, CJ},
   Title = {Interruptions in Group Discussions: The Effects of Gender
             and Group Composition.},
   Booktitle = {Interviewing II},
   Publisher = {Sage},
   Editor = {Fielding, N},
   Year = {2008},
   ISBN = {978-1-4129-2867-0},
   Key = {fds303991}
}

@article{fds318987,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Commentary},
   Pages = {11-19},
   Booktitle = {Social Structure and Emotion},
   Publisher = {Elsevier},
   Year = {2008},
   ISBN = {9780123740953},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/b978-0-12-374095-3.00001-x},
   Abstract = {Social structural positions, cultural meanings of those
             positions, and interactional situations that evoke them,
             influence the personal experience of emotion. This chapter
             highlights the interactional imbeddedness of emotional
             experience and attempts to describe the structural
             patterning of the interactional environment. A commentary is
             made on the position of status and power in the sociology of
             emotions. Status and power are the core of the sociological
             study of emotion. These relational features affect emotional
             responses that lead individuals to support or change social
             structures. Encounters that occur in dyadic relationships or
             small groups evoke emotions that depend on the groups'
             status and power structures. Actors experience emotions that
             are typical of their structural positions. Those emotions
             vary when there is loss or gain in status or power. Even the
             most structured of interactions evokes emotional responses
             that complicate and enrich group processes. Emotions are
             also involved in maintaining social order when people occupy
             different positions within the stratification system. ©
             2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/b978-0-12-374095-3.00001-x},
   Key = {fds318987}
}

@article{fds257497,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Do we need a public sociology?: It depends on what you mean
             by sociology},
   Pages = {124-134},
   Booktitle = {Public Sociology: Fifteen Eminent Sociologists Debate
             Politics and the Profession in the Twenty-first
             Century},
   Publisher = {University of California Press},
   Editor = {Dan Clawson and Robert Zussman and Joya Mizra and Naomi Gerstel and Randall Stokes and Douglas L. Anderton and Michael
             Burawoy},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {fds257497}
}

@article{fds51595,
   Title = {" The strength of weak identities: Social structural sources
             of self, situated identity and emotional
             experience"},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {fds51595}
}

@article{fds257507,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {The strength of weak identities: Social structural sources
             of self, situation and emotional experience},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {106-124},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0190-2725},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000247524600002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Modern societies are highly differentiated, with relatively
             uncorrected socially salient dimensions and a preponderance
             of weak, unidimensional (as opposed to strong, multiplex)
             ties. What are the implications of a society with fewer
             strong ties and more weak ties for the self? What do these
             changes mean for our emotional experience in everyday life?
             I outline a structural view of self, situated identity, and
             emotion. It is an ecological theory in which interpersonal
             encounters are the link between the macro-level community
             structure and the micro-level experience of self-conception,
             identity performance, and emotion. In this ecology of
             encounters, multiple-identity enactments (especially of
             salient self-identities) are quite rare. But where they
             occur, they are important indicators of potential social
             change.},
   Doi = {10.1177/019027250707000203},
   Key = {fds257507}
}

@article{fds257508,
   Author = {McPherson, M and Smith-Lovin, L and Brashears,
             ME},
   Title = {Social isolation in America: Changes in core discussion
             networks over two decades},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {71},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {353-375},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0003-1224},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000238812900001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Have the core discussion networks of Americans changed in
             the past two decades? In 1985, the General Social Survey
             (GSS) collected the first nationally representative data on
             the confidants with whom Americans discuss important
             matters. In the 2004 GSS the authors replicated those
             questions to assess social change in core network
             structures. Discussion networks are smaller in 2004 than in
             1985. The number of people saying there is no one with whom
             they discuss important matters nearly tripled. The mean
             network size decreases by about a third (one confidant),
             from 2.94 in 1985 to 2.08 in 2004. The modal respondent now
             reports having no confidant; the modal respondent in 1985
             had three confidants. Both kin and non-kin confidants were
             lost in the past two decades, but the greater decrease of
             non-kin ties leads to more confidant networks centered on
             spouses and parents, with fewer contacts through voluntary
             associations and neighborhoods. Most people have densely
             interconnected confidants similar to them. Some changes
             reflect the changing demographics of the U.S. population.
             Educational heterogeneity of social ties has decreased,
             racial heterogeneity has increased. The data may
             overestimate the number of social isolates, but these
             shrinking networks reflect an important social change in
             America.},
   Doi = {10.1177/000312240607100301},
   Key = {fds257508}
}

@article{fds257446,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Robinson, DT},
   Title = {"Control Theories of Identity, Action and
             Emotion."},
   Pages = {163-188},
   Booktitle = {Purpose, Meaning and Action: Control Systems Theories in
             Sociology},
   Publisher = {Palgrave Macmillan},
   Editor = {McClelland, KA and Fararo, TJ},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds257446}
}

@article{fds257447,
   Author = {Wisecup, A and Robinson, DT and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {"Sociology of Emotions"},
   Pages = {106-115},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of 21st Century Sociology},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Editor = {Peck, DL and Bryant, CD},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds257447}
}

@article{fds257448,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Robinson, DT and Wisecup, A},
   Title = {"Affect Control Theory"},
   Pages = {179-202},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of the Sociology of Emotions},
   Publisher = {SPRINGER},
   Editor = {Stets, JE and Turner, JH},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds257448}
}

@article{fds257449,
   Author = {McPherson, M and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Social Networks},
   Booktitle = {Youth Activism: An International Encyclopedia},
   Publisher = {Westport, CT: Greenwood Press},
   Editor = {Sherrod, LR},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds257449}
}

@inbook{fds257490,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Robinson, DT},
   Title = {"Affect Control Theory"},
   Pages = {137-64},
   Booktitle = {Contemporary Social Psychological Theories},
   Publisher = {Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.},
   Editor = {Burke, PJ},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds257490}
}

@article{fds257445,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {“Affect Control Theory.”},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of Social Theory},
   Publisher = {Sage},
   Editor = {Ritzer, G},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {fds257445}
}

@article{fds257489,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Wisecup, A and McPherson, M},
   Title = {"Gender Identity Recognition and Task Performance"},
   Journal = {Advances in Group Processes: Social Identification in
             Groups},
   Volume = {22},
   Pages = {177-201},
   Publisher = {Elsevier Ltd},
   Editor = {Thye, S and Lawler, E},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds257489}
}

@article{fds257502,
   Author = {Robinson, DT and Rogalin, CL and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {PHYSIOLOGICAL MEASURES OF THEORETICAL CONCEPTS: SOME IDEAS
             FOR LINKING DEFLECTION AND EMOTION TO PHYSICAL RESPONSES
             DURING INTERACTION},
   Journal = {Advances in Group Processes},
   Volume = {21},
   Pages = {77-115},
   Publisher = {Emerald (MCB UP )},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0882-6145},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0882-6145(04)21004-9},
   Abstract = {After a vigorous debate in the late 1970s, the sociology of
             emotion put aside most discussion of whether or not the
             physiological arousal associated with emotion labels is
             differentiated. Since this early period, scholars have made
             great progress on two fronts. First, theories about the
             interrelationship of identity, action and emotion have
             specified a family of new concepts related to emotion.
             Second, a large corpus of research on the physiological
             correlates of emotional experience emerged. In this chapter,
             we review the well-developed control theories of identity
             and emotion, and focus on the key concepts that might relate
             to different physiological states. We then review the
             general classes of physiological measures, discussing their
             reliability, intrusiveness and other features that might
             determine their usefulness for tracking responses to social
             interaction. We then offer a highly provisional mapping of
             physiological measures onto the concepts that they might
             potentially measure, given past research about how these
             physiological processes relate to environmental stimuli.
             While any linkage between concepts and measures must be
             speculative at this point, we hope that this review will
             serve as a stimulus to theoretically guided research that
             begins to assess the validity of these new measures for
             sociological use. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0882-6145(04)21004-9},
   Key = {fds257502}
}

@article{fds257504,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Self, identity, and interaction in an ecology of
             identities},
   Journal = {ADVANCES IN IDENTITY THEORY AND RESEARCH},
   Pages = {167-178},
   Booktitle = {Advances in Identity Theory and Research},
   Publisher = {New York: Kluwer/Plenum},
   Editor = {Burke, Peter J. and Owens, Tim J. and Thoits, Peggy A and Serpe,
             Richard},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {Summer},
   ISBN = {0-306-47741-6},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000189476200012&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1007/978-1-4419-9188-1_12},
   Key = {fds257504}
}

@article{fds257444,
   Author = {Okamoto, DG and Rashotte, L and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Measuring interruptions: Structural versus contextual
             approaches},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {38-55},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3090167},
   Doi = {10.2307/3090167},
   Key = {fds257444}
}

@article{fds257501,
   Author = {McPherson, M and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Cohesion and membership duration: Linking groups, relations
             and individuals in an ecology of affiliation},
   Journal = {Advances in Group Processes},
   Volume = {19},
   Pages = {1-36},
   Publisher = {Emerald (MCB UP )},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0882-6145},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0882-6145(02)19002-3},
   Abstract = {The study of group cohesion has a rich but confused history.
             Cohesion was originally a group-level concept, referring to
             the degree to which a group tends to maintain a stable,
             committed membership over time. As a largely psychological
             literature developed, however, an increasing focus on
             interpersonal attraction translated into the
             individual-level study of liking and interdependence. Recent
             advances in both psychology (Hogg, 1992) and sociology
             (Lawler & Yoon, 1996) usefully reassert the central role of
             social structure in determining a group's cohesiveness. We
             argue, however, that current approaches have enriched our
             understanding of intraindividual processing at the expense
             of the sociological understanding of the coevolution of
             groups and their members' networks within a larger community
             structure. We review the literature on this ecology of
             affiliation to draw inferences about both group cohesiveness
             and members' attachment to the group. Then we extend a
             theoretical simulation of these ecological processes to show
             how system-level properties of communities can influence
             group cohesion. © 2002.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0882-6145(02)19002-3},
   Key = {fds257501}
}

@article{fds340306,
   Author = {Okamoto, DG and Rashotfe, LS and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Measuring interruption: Syntactic and contextual methods of
             coding conversation},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {38-55},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/3090167},
   Abstract = {In this paper we focus on a long-standing debate surrounding
             the measurement of interruptions in conversational behavior.
             This debate has implications for conversational analysts
             interested in turn-taking structures, researchers interested
             in close relationships who interpret them as an exercise of
             power, and group processes researchers studying
             status-organizing structures. We explore two different
             measurements of interruptions: (1) a syntactic measurement
             that operationalizes an interruption as simultaneous talk
             initiated more than two syllables from the end of a current
             speaker's sentence, and (2) a more contextual measurement
             that takes into account situational factors such as the
             current speaker's intentions and the content of what both
             speakers say when judging whether a speech act is an
             interruption. We coded transcripts from 86 task group
             discussions using West and Zimmerman's (1983) syntactic
             criteria and Murray's (1985) context-sensitive method for
             identifying interruptions. Factor analyses found a
             one-factor solution, an indication that both measurements
             capture the same underlying construct. Confirmatory factor
             analyses identified more subtle variations, however,
             suggesting that gender and subcultural differences affect
             how coders construe interruptions.},
   Doi = {10.2307/3090167},
   Key = {fds340306}
}

@article{fds257443,
   Author = {Robinson, D and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Getting a Laugh: A Look at Humor in Task Group
             Discussions},
   Journal = {Social Forces},
   Volume = {80},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {123-58},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds257443}
}

@article{fds3728,
   Author = {Dina Okamoto},
   Title = {“Changing the Subject: Gender, Status and the Dynamics of
             Topic Transitions”},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {66},
   Pages = {852-73},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds3728}
}

@article{fds257442,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {“Role-identities, action and emotion: parallel processing
             and the production of mixed emotions”},
   Journal = {Self and Identity: Personal, Social, and
             Symbolic},
   Pages = {125-144},
   Publisher = {New York: Erlbaum},
   Editor = {Kashima, Y and Foddy, M and Platow, M},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds257442}
}

@article{fds257488,
   Author = {Tsoudis, O and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Defining the Situation: Emotional Display and Construals
             about Crime},
   Journal = {Sociological Spectrum},
   Volume = {21},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds257488}
}

@article{fds257505,
   Author = {Okamoto, DG and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Changing the subject: Gender, status, and the dynamics of
             topic change},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {66},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {852-873},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0003-1224},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000173290300004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Social scientists have devoted a great deal of attention to
             how much people talk, but have paid little attention to what
             they talk about. Research in the tradition of conversation
             analysis suggests that transitions between topics of
             conversation are accomplished in a systematic, structured
             way, and that social status can affect whose topics are
             developed and whose are lost. The authors use insights from
             conversation analysis to develop a systematic coding system
             for identifying topic shifts in task-oriented discussions.
             Hypotheses from the literature on group processes predict
             who will suggest topic changes in a task-oriented group and
             whose topics will be lost. Event history methods model the
             dynamics of topic change in two data sets: a study of
             six-person laboratory task groups and a replication study of
             dyads. Topic changes in these task-oriented discussions are
             more sensitive to status structures that develop within the
             conversation than to a relatively weak status characteristic
             like gender. Some of the sequential mechanisms that
             conversation analysts have studied in the context of less
             structured, more wide ranging talk may be generalizable to
             this more constrained conversational environment.},
   Doi = {10.2307/3088876},
   Key = {fds257505}
}

@article{fds257513,
   Author = {McPherson, M and Smith-Lovin, L and Cook, JM},
   Title = {Birds of a feather: Homophily in social networks},
   Journal = {Annual Review of Sociology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {415-444},
   Publisher = {ANNUAL REVIEWS},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0360-0572},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000170748100017&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Similarity breeds connection. This principle - the homophily
             principle - structures network ties of every type, including
             marriage, friendship, work, advice, support, information
             transfer, exchange, comembership, and other types of
             relationship. The result is that people's personal networks
             are homogeneous with regard to many sociodemographic,
             behavioral, and intrapersonal characteristics. Homophily
             limits people's social worlds in a way that has powerful
             implications for the information they receive, the attitudes
             they form, and the interactions they experience. Homophily
             in race and ethnicity creates the strongest divides in our
             personal environments, with age, religion, education,
             occupation, and gender following in roughly that order.
             Geographic propinquity, families, organizations, and
             isomorphic positions in social systems all create contexts
             in which homophilous relations form. Ties between nonsimilar
             individuals also dissolve at a higher rate, which sets the
             stage for the formation of niches (localized positions)
             within social space. We argue for more research on: (a) the
             basic ecological processes that link organizations,
             associations, cultural communities, social movements, and
             many other social forms; (b) the impact of multiplex ties on
             the patterns of homophily; and (c) the dynamics of network
             change over time through which networks and other social
             entities co-evolve. Copyright © 2001 by Annual Reviews. All
             rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1146/annurev.soc.27.1.415},
   Key = {fds257513}
}

@article{fds318989,
   Author = {Robinson, DT and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Getting a laugh: Gender, status, and humor in task
             discussions},
   Journal = {Social Forces; a Scientific Medium of Social Study and
             Interpretation},
   Volume = {80},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {123-158},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/sof.2001.0085},
   Abstract = {Humor is a quintessentially social phenomenon, since every
             joke requires both a teller and an audience. Here we ask how
             humor operates in task-oriented group discussions. We use
             theories about the functions of humor to generate hypotheses
             about who jokes, when and in what situations. Then we use
             event history techniques to analyze humor attempts and
             successes in six-person groups. Our results combine to
             suggest an image of joking as a status-related activity,
             with men, high participators, frequent interrupters, and
             those who are frequently interrupted all showing
             status-related patterns of humor use. We find substantial
             time dependence in humor use, in which humor may serve to
             form a status hierarchy early in a group's development and
             to dissipate task-related tension later in the discussion.
             We use these results, in conjunction with core insights on
             status and emotion from the group processes literature, to
             develop a new theory of humor use in task-oriented groups.
             The new theory generates predictions about the content of
             humor episodes, which we examine with additional data from
             our group discussions. Consistent with the theory, we find
             that a higher proportion of men's humor is differentiating,
             while a higher proportion of women's humor is
             cohesion-building. We find the same general pattern with our
             other status variable, participation. © 2001 University of
             North Carolina Press.},
   Doi = {10.1353/sof.2001.0085},
   Key = {fds318989}
}

@article{fds318990,
   Author = {Tsoudis, O and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Criminal identity: The key to situational construals in mock
             criminal court cases},
   Journal = {Sociological Spectrum},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3-31},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02732170120383},
   Abstract = {A number of researchers have explored legal decision making,
             attempting to predict factors that influence sentencing. For
             example, Dunning (1986) focused on one major factor, the
             decision maker’s construal of the crime. Dunning’s
             research demonstrated the importance of construals (filling
             in of information) in sentencing decisions; however, he was
             unable to identify what predicts these construals. Here we
             apply affect control theory to predict construals. Study 1
             focuses on mock jurors’ sentencing of a guilty offender;
             it tests hypotheses generated from affect control theory
             that link emotion displays to construals through inferences
             about the criminal’s identity. Path analyses demonstrate
             that construals can be explained by inferences about the
             criminal’s identity. Study 2 introduces concrete
             information about prior record. Results suggest that
             identity inferences still remain important in forming
             construals when prior record information is available. These
             studies provide more evidence for the importance of social
             perceptions in legal decision making. © 2001 Taylor &
             Francis.},
   Doi = {10.1080/02732170120383},
   Key = {fds318990}
}

@article{fds4336,
   Title = {“Simplicity, uncertainty and the power of generative
             theories.”},
   Journal = {Contemporary Sociology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {300-5},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds4336}
}

@article{fds257509,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Simplicity, uncertainty, and the power of generative
             theories},
   Journal = {Contemporary Sociology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {300-306},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0094-3061},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000086601300004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2654384},
   Key = {fds257509}
}

@article{fds257441,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {“Social psychology.”},
   Booktitle = {Blackwell Companion to Sociology},
   Publisher = {Malden, Mass.: Blackwell},
   Editor = {Blau, J},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds257441}
}

@article{fds257512,
   Author = {Robinson, DT and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Emotion display as a strategy for identity
             negotiation},
   Journal = {Motivation and Emotion},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {73-104},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0146-7239},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000083047300002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1021325011770},
   Key = {fds257512}
}

@article{fds257439,
   Author = {Ridgeway, C and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Interaction in the gender system: Theory and
             research},
   Journal = {Annual Review of Sociology},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {191-216},
   Publisher = {ANNUAL REVIEWS},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev.soc.25.1.191},
   Abstract = {The gender system includes processes that both define males
             and females as different in socially significant ways and
             justify inequality on the basis of that difference. Gender
             is different from other forms of social inequality in that
             men and women interact extensively within families and
             households and in other role relations. This high rate of
             contact between men and women raises important questions
             about how interaction creates experiences that confirm, or
             potentially could undermine, the beliefs about gender
             difference and inequality that underlie the gender system.
             Any theory of gender difference and inequality must
             accommodate three basic findings from research on
             interaction, (a). People perceive gender differences to be
             pervasive in interaction, (b). Studies of interaction among
             peers with equal power and status show few gender
             differences in behavior, (c). Most interactions between men
             and women occur in the structural context of roles or status
             relationships that are unequal. These status and power
             differences create very real interaction effects, which are
             often confounded with gender. Beliefs about gender
             difference combine with structurally unequal relationships
             to perpetuate status beliefs, leading men and women to
             recreate the gender system in everyday interaction. Only
             peer interactions that are not driven by cultural beliefs
             about the general competence of men and women or
             interactions in which women are status- or power-advantaged
             over men are likely to undermine the gender system.
             Copyright © 1999 by Annual Reviews. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1146/annurev.soc.25.1.191},
   Key = {fds257439}
}

@article{fds257440,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {“Sociology of emotions.”},
   Booktitle = {Encyclopedia of Human Emotions},
   Publisher = {New York: Macmillan},
   Editor = {Levinson, D and Ponzetti, J and Jorgensen, P},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds257440}
}

@article{fds257503,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Core concepts and common ground: The relational basis of our
             discipline},
   Journal = {Social Forces; a Scientific Medium of Social Study and
             Interpretation},
   Volume = {78},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-23},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0037-7732},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000083433400001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The core of sociology is the key thing that we share as
             sociologists - the basic way of viewing social life that
             makes us distinctive as a discipline. This core is the
             content that we have to communicate to a larger public.
             largue that the disciplinary form that best develops a core
             is a structure in which there are a high density of positive
             network ties within the discipline, relatively weak
             subdivisions within the discipline, and a lower density of
             ties linking us to outside institutions. I use structural
             and social psychological theory to talk about the
             interactional dynamics that weaken this optimal disciplinary
             structure. The hope is that these theoretical insights will
             help us deal productively with some of the major social
             changes that are occurring within our field. I end with
             eight theoretically derived propositions to guide our
             behavior toward these ends. © The University of North
             Carolina Press.},
   Doi = {10.1093/sf/78.1.1},
   Key = {fds257503}
}

@article{fds257438,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L and Ridgeway, C},
   Title = {Gender and interaction},
   Pages = {247-274},
   Booktitle = {Handbook on the Sociology of Gender},
   Publisher = {Plenum},
   Editor = {Chafetz, JS},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds257438}
}

@article{fds257435,
   Author = {McPherson, JM and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {A Comparative Ecology of Five Nations},
   Pages = {85-110},
   Booktitle = {Ecological Models of Organizations},
   Publisher = {Ballinger},
   Editor = {Carroll, GR},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds257435}
}

@article{fds257436,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {“Emotion Management as Emotional Labor.”},
   Booktitle = {Required Reading: Sociology’s Most Influential
             Books},
   Publisher = {Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press},
   Editor = {Clawson, D},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds257436}
}

@article{fds257437,
   Author = {Tsoudis, O and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {How Bad Was It? Identity and Emotion Display in Mock Jury
             Deliberations},
   Journal = {Social Forces},
   Volume = {77},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {695-722},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {1998},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sf/77.2.695},
   Abstract = {Affect control theory is a general model of how emotions,
             identities and actions are related in social interaction. In
             this study, we used affect control theory to predict how the
             emotions displayed by a perpetrator and a victim during
             their criminal trial statements influence a juror's
             judgments about their identities. We then asked how these
             identity judgments about the perpetrator and victim affect
             the recommended sentence for the perpetrator. An experiment
             used undergraduates' reactions in a mock jury setting to
             test the theory's predictions. Maximum likelihood structural
             equation models show the influence of both criminal and
             victim emotion displays in affecting identity inferences
             about the participants in the crime scene. These identity
             inferences, as well as inferences about the severity of the
             criminal behavior itself, determine the sentence recommended
             for the perpetrator, supporting affect control
             theory.},
   Doi = {10.1093/sf/77.2.695},
   Key = {fds257437}
}

@article{fds257500,
   Author = {Munch, A and McPherson, JM and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Gender, children, and social contact: The effects of
             childrearing for men and women},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {509-520},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2657423},
   Abstract = {We investigate the impact of childrearing on men's and
             women's social networks, using a probability sample of
             residents of 10 Great Plains towns. Data support the
             hypotheses that social network size, contact volume, and
             composition vary with the age of the youngest child in a
             family. Childrearing reduces women's network size and
             contact volume, while it alters the composition of men's
             networks. Effects are most pronounced when the youngest
             child is around three years old. These results suggest the
             possibility that sex differences in structural location (in
             the sense of embeddedness in social networks) explain sex
             differences in outcomes over the life course. The
             gender-specific effects of this life stage may accrue
             because childrearing places men and women in separate social
             worlds; childbearing and childrearing thus may be a crucial
             phase in the process by which gender differences are created
             and maintained.},
   Doi = {10.2307/2657423},
   Key = {fds257500}
}

@article{fds257433,
   Author = {Ibarra, H and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Alternative Routes: A Social Network Perspective on Gender
             and Careers},
   Pages = {359-84},
   Booktitle = {Creating Tomorrow’s Organizations},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Editor = {Cooper, C and Jackson, S},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds257433}
}

@article{fds257434,
   Author = {Rashotte, LS},
   Title = {“Who Benefits from Being Bold: The Interactive Effects of
             Task Cues and Status Characteristics on Influence in Mock
             Jury Groups”},
   Journal = {Advances in Group Processes},
   Volume = {14},
   Publisher = {JAI Press},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds257434}
}

@article{fds257499,
   Author = {Ridgeway, CL and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Gender and Social Interaction},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {173-175},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0190-2725},
   Key = {fds257499}
}

@article{fds257432,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {"The Sociology of Affect and Emotion."},
   Pages = {118-48},
   Booktitle = {Sociological Perspectives on Social Psychology},
   Publisher = {Boston: Allyn and Bacon},
   Editor = {Cook, K and Fine, G and House, J},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds257432}
}

@article{fds257487,
   Author = {Mayhew, B and McPherson, M and Rotolo, T},
   Title = {"Sex and Race Heterogeneity in Face-to-Face
             Groups"},
   Journal = {Social Forces},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {15-52},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {1995},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sf/74.1.15},
   Abstract = {We generate a number of hypotheses about face-to-face groups
             using the energy distribution principle: the frequency of an
             event is inversely related to the amount of energy expended
             in that event. The principle predicts that (1) the size of
             groups will be inversely related to the frequency of their
             occurrence; (2) at any group size, the composition of social
             positions will be less heterogeneous than chance; and, (3)
             as group size increases, observed compositional homogeneity
             will decline at a slower rate than chance. We test these
             hypotheses using data on more than 100, 000 naturally
             occurring, public, face-to-face groups gathered in sampling
             sweeps through two communities over a three-year period. The
             data support the hypotheses and yield interesting
             differences in the strength of sex and race heterogeneity.
             We discuss the findings as they relate to the general energy
             distribution principle and to other sociological
             perspectives. © 1995 The University of North Carolina
             Press.},
   Doi = {10.1093/sf/74.1.15},
   Key = {fds257487}
}

@article{fds257485,
   Author = {Robinson, DT and Tsoudis, O},
   Title = {"Heinous Crime or Unfortunate Accident: Emotion Displays and
             Reactions to Vignettes of Criminal Confessions"},
   Journal = {Social Forces},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {175-90},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {1994},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sf/73.1.175},
   Abstract = {Affect control theory provides a rigorous, testable model of
             emotion. We use simulations based on this theory to develop
             predictions about the impact of emotion displays on identity
             attributions and subsequent sentencing recommendations in
             the context of criminal confessions. We then test these
             predictions with an experimental study using vignettes of
             criminal confessions. Students responded to mock criminal
             confessions by drivers responsible for vehicular
             manslaughter who either appeared to be remorseful or showed
             no signs of remorse. Path analyses supported the predictions
             that displays of remorse have an indirect effect on severity
             of sentence recommendation through impact on identity
             assessment. © 1994 The University of North Carolina
             Press.},
   Doi = {10.1093/sf/73.1.175},
   Key = {fds257485}
}

@article{fds257486,
   Author = {Ridgeway, C},
   Title = {"Structure, Culture and Interaction: A Comparison of Affect
             Control Theory and Expectations States Theory"},
   Journal = {Advances in Group Processes},
   Volume = {11},
   Publisher = {JAI Press},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds257486}
}

@article{fds340138,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Can Emotionality and Rationality be Reconciled?: A Comment
             on Collins, Frank, Hirshleifer, and Jasso},
   Journal = {Rationality and Society},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {283-293},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1043463193005002008},
   Abstract = {Economists invoke emotions narrowly to solve commitment
             problems; sociologists view emotions as a more pervasive
             basic feature of social life. A complete approach to
             integrating emotionality and choice requires attention to
             the interactional sources of emotions and examination of the
             role that emotions play in directing attention to different
             domains of comparison and choice. Systematic analysis of the
             situational determinants of emotional response will allow us
             to see how both interaction structures and emotional
             responses are selected by the social environment. © 1993,
             SAGE Periodicals Press. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1043463193005002008},
   Key = {fds340138}
}

@article{fds257431,
   Author = {McPherson, M and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {You Are Who You Know: A Network Perspective on
             Gender},
   Pages = {223-241},
   Booktitle = {Theory on Gender/Feminism on Theory.},
   Publisher = {New York: Aldine},
   Editor = {England, P},
   Year = {1993},
   Key = {fds257431}
}

@article{fds257427,
   Author = {Robinson, D and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Gender and Conversational Dynamics},
   Pages = {122-56},
   Booktitle = {Gender and Interaction},
   Publisher = {Springer Verlag},
   Editor = {Ridgeway, C},
   Year = {1992},
   Key = {fds257427}
}

@article{fds257428,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {"An Affect Control View of Cognition and
             Emotion."},
   Pages = {143-69},
   Booktitle = {Self and Society: A Social Cognition Approach},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {Howard, J and Callero, P},
   Year = {1992},
   Key = {fds257428}
}

@article{fds257429,
   Author = {Robinson, D},
   Title = {“Selective interaction as a strategy for identity
             maintenance: An affect control model.”},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {12-28},
   Year = {1992},
   Key = {fds257429}
}

@article{fds257430,
   Author = {Douglas, WT and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {An affect control analysis of two religious
             subcultures},
   Pages = {217-247},
   Booktitle = {Social Perspectives on Emotion},
   Publisher = {JAI Press},
   Editor = {Franks, D and Gecas, V},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {Fall},
   Key = {fds257430}
}

@article{fds257484,
   Author = {Gilbert, EVRIGN},
   Title = {Researching Social Life},
   Publisher = {London: Sage},
   Year = {1992},
   Key = {fds257484}
}

@article{fds257425,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {"Emotion as Confirmation and Disconfirmation of Identity: An
             Affect Control Model."},
   Pages = {238-270},
   Booktitle = {Research Agendas in Emotions,},
   Publisher = {New York: SUNY Press},
   Editor = {Kemper, TD},
   Year = {1990},
   Key = {fds257425}
}

@article{fds257426,
   Author = {Robinson, D and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {The Timing of Interruptions in Group Discussions},
   Series = {Vol. 7},
   Pages = {45-74},
   Booktitle = {Advances in Group Processes},
   Publisher = {JAI Press},
   Editor = {Lawler, EJ and Ridgeway, C and Walker, H and Markovsky,
             B},
   Year = {1990},
   Key = {fds257426}
}

@article{fds257482,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {"Affect, Sentiment and Emotion."},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {52},
   Pages = {5-9},
   Year = {1989},
   Key = {fds257482}
}

@article{fds257483,
   Author = {Brody, CJ},
   Title = {"Interruptions in Group Discussions: The Effects of Gender
             and Group Composition."},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {54},
   Pages = {424-35},
   Year = {1989},
   Key = {fds257483}
}

@article{fds257479,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Affect control theory: An assessment},
   Journal = {The Journal of Mathematical Sociology},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {171-192},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-250X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0022250X.1987.9990031},
   Abstract = {This paper reviews affect control theory's major strengths,
             the contributions of recent work to its growth, and the most
             promising avenues for future work. Affect control theory's
             strengths include (1) the precision of its mathematical
             statement and empirical base (especially when compared with
             earlier interpretive sociologies), (2) its ability to link
             the internal processing that generates social action to the
             socio-cultural system upon which that action is based, and
             (3) the generality that allows a parsimonious explanation of
             a wide range of processes and previous research findings.
             Recent advances provide (1) new, more accurate
             impression-change formulas, (2) the expansion of the theory
             to encompass settings, emotions, and traits, (3) new
             dictionaries of evaluation, potency and acitivity meanings
             and (4) tests of the theory using likelihood judgments,
             verbal scenarios and actual behavior of naive experimental
             subjects. Further work must include links to cognitive
             structures that will further delineate definition of
             situation and behavior selection processes. In addition,
             integration of affect control theory with new sociological
             work on the development of shared social knowledge and on
             institutionalized production systems expand the theory in
             useful ways. Finally, new work must find innovative and
             convincing ways to test simulation outcomes using both
             verbal accounts and behavior. © 1987 Gordon and Breach
             Science Publishers S.A. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1080/0022250X.1987.9990031},
   Key = {fds257479}
}

@article{fds257480,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {The affective control of events within settings},
   Journal = {The Journal of Mathematical Sociology},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {71-101},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-250X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0022250X.1987.9990027},
   Abstract = {This paper develops an affect control model of how behavior
             changes as actors move from setting to setting. After a
             review of other theoretical approaches to the problem, the
             affective meanings of settings are examined. Then,
             impression change equations are developed to assess how
             sentiments toward actors, behaviors and object-persons are
             affected by the setting in which interaction occurs. The
             tempo or characteristic activity level of a behavior setting
             appears to have the most impact on impression formation.
             Settings that are lively and fast-paced lead social actors
             and behaviors to be evaluated more favorably and make them
             seem more expressive. Actors also seem more admirable when
             they match their activity level to that of the setting. The
             current data provide the first effort to understand changes
             in impressions about settings themselves. Generally, the
             most important factor influencing how people feel about a
             setting after an event is the act that is committed there.
             Places are defiled by violent, aggressive behaviors, but
             seem nicer when conciliatory, inquisitive acts have
             occurred. Finally, the usual affect control theory
             assumption — that people act to minimize affective
             deflections — is employed along with the new
             impression-change formulas to analyze some interactions in
             which people might alter their behavior because of their
             location. © 1987 Gordon and Breach Science Publishers S.A.
             All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1080/0022250X.1987.9990027},
   Key = {fds257480}
}

@article{fds257481,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Impressions from events},
   Journal = {The Journal of Mathematical Sociology},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {35-70},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-250X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0022250X.1987.9990026},
   Abstract = {A large study of event stimuli developed new equations for
             describing how people react to events. Exploratory work
             found several new interaction terms affecting the impression
             formation process. To demonstrate the generality of the
             impression formation process across subject populations and
             study procedures, the results from the current study were
             compared to four others: two earlier studies on U.S. college
             undergraduates, a study of Belfast, Northern Ireland, high
             school students, and an Arabic study of well-educated
             Egyptians and Lebanese. Striking similarities in evaluation
             dynamics appeared in all studies. All English-speakers had
             similar potency and activity dynamics, while the Arabic
             study showed subtantial differences in the processing of
             these dimensions. © 1987 Gordon and Breach Science
             Publishers S.A. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1080/0022250X.1987.9990026},
   Key = {fds257481}
}

@article{fds318991,
   Author = {McPherson, JM and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Homophily in voluntary organizations: status distance and
             the composition of face-to-face groups.},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {370-379},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2095356},
   Abstract = {Recent work on the organized sources of network ties and on
             the social structural determinants of association are
             synthesized to produce several hypotheses about homophily.
             Friends are more similar on status dimensions than chance
             and this homophily is produced both by the restricted
             opportunity structure offered by the group and by
             homophilous choices made within the group. -from
             Authors},
   Doi = {10.2307/2095356},
   Key = {fds318991}
}

@article{fds15704,
   Author = {J. Miller McPherson},
   Title = {"Homophily in Voluntary Organizations."},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {52},
   Pages = {370-79},
   Year = {1987},
   Key = {fds15704}
}

@article{fds257478,
   Author = {McPherson, JM},
   Title = {"Homophily in Voluntary Organizations."},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {52},
   Pages = {370-79},
   Year = {1987},
   Key = {fds257478}
}

@article{fds257476,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L and Skvoretz, JV and Hudson, CG},
   Title = {Status and participation in six-person groups: A test of
             skvoretz’s comparative status model},
   Journal = {Social Forces; a Scientific Medium of Social Study and
             Interpretation},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {992-1005},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0037-7732},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sf/64.4.992},
   Abstract = {A mathematical model of participation in n-person groups,
             derived from expectation states theory by Skvoretz (a), was
             tested in six-person task-oriented groups with
             systematically varying sex compositions. The groups of
             undergraduate subjects performed a task modeled after that
             used by Fisek. Videotapes were made of group interactions
             and later coded for participation, interruptions, and
             conversational overlaps. The Skvoretz model fits the
             participation data poorly (as measured by a Chi-square
             goodness-of-fit test), primarily because there was much more
             variation in participation within statuses (male and female)
             than predicted by the model. A revised model which
             represents the groups' status structure as differentiated
             along a primary status dimension, sex, and then
             differentiated along secondary status dimensions within
             members of the same sex is suggested for a better fit to the
             participation data. © 1986 The University of North Carolina
             Press.},
   Doi = {10.1093/sf/64.4.992},
   Key = {fds257476}
}

@article{fds257477,
   Author = {McPherson, JM},
   Title = {"Sex Segregation in Voluntary Associations."},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {51},
   Pages = {61-79},
   Year = {1986},
   Key = {fds257477}
}

@article{fds257465,
   Author = {FILLENBAUM, GG},
   Title = {WOMENS RETIREMENT - POLICY IMPLICATIONS OF RECENT RESEARCH -
             SZINOVACZ,M},
   Journal = {Journal of Gerontology},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {124-125},
   Year = {1984},
   ISSN = {0022-1422},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1984RZ03700027&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds257465}
}

@article{fds303992,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L and Tickamyer, AR},
   Title = {Fertility and patterns of labor force participation among
             married women.},
   Journal = {Social Biology},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {81-95},
   Year = {1983},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0037-766X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7348449},
   Key = {fds303992}
}

@article{fds257498,
   Author = {Wilson, KL and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Scaling the prestige, authority, and income potential of
             college curricula},
   Journal = {Social Science Research},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {159-186},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {1983},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0049-089X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0049-089X(83)90004-2},
   Abstract = {This paper develops the concept of "targeted education," a
             theoretical ranking of college curricula, into a
             multidimensional framework. The new scales, based on the
             traditional stratification dimensions, prestige, authority,
             and income, are then used in a study of sex differences in
             the process of occupational achievement among men and women
             with college degrees. The targeted education scales predict
             occupational prestige and wages 7 years after the college
             degree, and they point out interesting differences between
             male and female attainment processes. In general, targeted
             education has a greater quantitative impact for men's
             occupational outcomes than for women's prestige and income,
             but results also suggest significant qualitative differences
             between men and women. A large proportion of women target
             their education toward, and end up in, an under-employed
             labor pool for the primary and secondary school system. ©
             1983.},
   Doi = {10.1016/0049-089X(83)90004-2},
   Key = {fds257498}
}

@article{fds257424,
   Author = {Heise, DR and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {A Structural Equation Model of Impression
             Formation},
   Booktitle = {Multivariate Methods in the Social Sciences},
   Publisher = {L. Erlbaum},
   Editor = {Hirschberg, CIN and Humphries, L},
   Year = {1982},
   Key = {fds257424}
}

@article{fds257464,
   Author = {Szinovacz, ROM},
   Title = {Women’s Retirement: Policy Implications of Recent
             Research, Vol. 6.},
   Journal = {Sage Yearbooks in Women’s Policy Studies.},
   Publisher = {(Beverly Hills: Sage,), Sex Roles},
   Year = {1982},
   Key = {fds257464}
}

@article{fds257474,
   Author = {Tickamyer, AR},
   Title = {"Models of Women’s Work and Fertility"},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {47},
   Pages = {461-66},
   Year = {1982},
   Key = {fds257474}
}

@article{fds257475,
   Author = {McPherson, JM},
   Title = {"Women and Weak Ties: Differences by Sex in the Size of
             Voluntary Organizations."},
   Journal = {American Journal of Sociology},
   Volume = {87},
   Pages = {883-904},
   Year = {1982},
   Key = {fds257475}
}

@article{fds257473,
   Author = {Heise, DR},
   Title = {"Impressions of Goodness, Powerfulness and Liveliness from
             Discerned Social Events."},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {44},
   Pages = {93-106},
   Year = {1981},
   Key = {fds257473}
}

@article{fds257472,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L and Wilson, KL},
   Title = {On the Practical Value of Causal Modeling II. Educational
             Attainment and the Measurement of Conceptual
             Variables},
   Journal = {The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {547-565},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1980},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0021-8863},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/002188638001600410},
   Doi = {10.1177/002188638001600410},
   Key = {fds257472}
}

@article{fds257470,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Individual Political Participation: The Effects of Social
             Structure and Communication Behavior},
   Journal = {Sociological Perspectives},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {23-50},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1979},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0731-1214},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/1388894},
   Abstract = {Although researchers attempting to quantify theories of
             individual political participation have assumed that mass
             media use is a recursive cause of such participation, an
             argument could be made for a return effect of political
             activity on media use. The “uses and gratifications”
             tradition in communication research, for example, views
             media use as purposive behavior that is influenced by the
             users social situation. In this paper the possibilty of a
             bidirectional relationship between mass media use and
             political participation is examined using the Two-Stage
             Least Squares technique. The data used to estimate model
             parameters are from a 1971 statewide survey of North
             Carolina. Separate analyses were conducted for male and
             female respondents to explore sex differences in the
             processes leading to individual political participation.
             Mass media use is shown to have an effect on participation
             in both the male and female subsamples. Political activity
             has a positive return effect on media use in the female
             subsample, but there is no significant return effect in the
             male subsample. Generally, the results indicate that models
             which specify media use as a unidirectional cause of
             participation behavior may be incorrect and wider use of
             techniques which allow the investigation of non-recursive
             relationships is recommended. © 1979, Pacific Sociological
             Association. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.2307/1388894},
   Key = {fds257470}
}

@article{fds257471,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {"Behavioral Settings and Impressions Formed from Social
             Scenarios."},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {42},
   Pages = {31-42},
   Year = {1979},
   Key = {fds257471}
}

@article{fds257514,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L and Tickamyer, AR},
   Title = {Nonrecursive models of labor force participation, fertility
             behavior and sex role attitudes.},
   Journal = {American Sociological Review},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {541-557},
   Year = {1978},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0003-1224},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/707913},
   Key = {fds257514}
}

@article{fds257469,
   Author = {Ogan, C and Plymale, I and Turpin, W and Shaw, D},
   Title = {"The Changing Front Page of the New York
             Times."},
   Journal = {Journalism Quarterly},
   Volume = {52},
   Pages = {340-44},
   Year = {1976},
   Key = {fds257469}
}

@article{fds257423,
   Author = {Bishop, ME and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {The Young Moderns: Correlates of Communication Behavior
             among Appalachian (U.S.) College Students},
   Pages = {215-24},
   Booktitle = {Der Anteil Der Massenmediem Bei Der Herausbildung Des
             Besussteinss In Der Sich Wanderlunden Welt},
   Publisher = {Leipzig, D.D.R.: Karl Marx Universtat},
   Year = {1974},
   Key = {fds257423}
}


%% Book Reviews   
@article{fds257468,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Review- Symbolic Interactionism as Affect Control (SUNY,
             1994) by Neil MacKinnon},
   Journal = {Social Forces},
   Volume = {75},
   Pages = {1489-91},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds257468}
}

@article{fds257467,
   Author = {Lewis, ROM and Haviland, JM},
   Title = {Handbook of Emotions (New York: Guilford,
             1993)},
   Journal = {Contemporary Sociology},
   Volume = {24},
   Pages = {298-300},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds257467}
}

@article{fds257466,
   Author = {Mott, ROF},
   Title = {The Employment Revolution. (MIT Press, 1982)},
   Journal = {Social Forces},
   Volume = {63},
   Pages = {302-3},
   Year = {1984},
   Key = {fds257466}
}

@article{fds4505,
   Author = {Review of M. Szinovacz},
   Title = {Women's Retirement: Policy Implications of Recent
             Research, Vol. 6.},
   Journal = {Sage Yearbooks in Women's Policy Studies.},
   Publisher = {(Beverly Hills: Sage,), Sex Roles},
   Year = {1982},
   Key = {fds4505}
}

@article{fds4506,
   Author = {Review of M. Szinovacz},
   Title = {Women's Retirement: Policy Implications of Recent
             Research, Vol. 6.},
   Journal = {Sage Yearbooks in Women's Policy Studies.},
   Publisher = {(Beverly Hills: Sage,), Sex Roles},
   Year = {1982},
   Key = {fds4506}
}

@article{fds257463,
   Author = {Rokeach, ROM},
   Title = {Understanding Human Values, Individual and
             Societal.},
   Journal = {Social Forces},
   Volume = {59},
   Pages = {1330-32},
   Year = {1981},
   Key = {fds257463}
}

@article{fds257462,
   Author = {Scanzoni, ROJH},
   Title = {Life Styles and Childbearing (New York: Free Press, 1975),
             and D. Gill, Illegitimacy, Sexuality and the Status of
             Women. (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1977)},
   Journal = {American Journal of Sociology},
   Volume = {86},
   Pages = {227-31},
   Year = {1980},
   Key = {fds257462}
}

@article{fds257461,
   Author = {Richmond-Abbott, ROM},
   Title = {The American Woman: Her Past, Her Present and Her Future.
             (New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston)},
   Journal = {Sex Roles},
   Volume = {6},
   Pages = {879-81},
   Year = {1976},
   Key = {fds257461}
}


%% Other   
@misc{fds257455,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Podcast},
   Journal = {Thomson Reuters "Sciencewatch"},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds257455}
}

@misc{fds257510,
   Author = {Smith Lovin and L},
   Title = {Introduction of Karen S. Cook: Recipient of the 2004
             Cooley-Mead Award},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {68},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-3},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0190-2725},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000229515200001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1177/019027250506800101},
   Key = {fds257510}
}

@misc{fds257420,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Foreword},
   Volume = {21},
   Pages = {263-264},
   Booktitle = {The Sociology of Emotions},
   Publisher = {Stanford University Press},
   Editor = {Turner, JH and Stets, JE},
   Year = {2005},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/11663081.2011.9736665},
   Doi = {10.1080/11663081.2011.9736665},
   Key = {fds257420}
}

@misc{fds257419,
   Author = {Molm, L},
   Title = {“Introduction to special issue on the state of
             sociological social psychology at the millennium.”},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {281-3},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds257419}
}

@misc{fds257418,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {“Introduction: David R. Heise, Cooley-Mead Award
             Winner.”},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-3},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds257418}
}

@misc{fds257416,
   Author = {McPherson, M and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Some Disintegrating Thoughts on Structure and Agency: Reply
             to Molm},
   Series = {Aldine},
   Booktitle = {Theory on Gender/Feminism on Theory},
   Publisher = {Aldine},
   Editor = {England, P},
   Year = {1993},
   Key = {fds257416}
}

@misc{fds257417,
   Author = {McPherson, M and Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Eliminating Choice: Reply to Folbre},
   Series = {Aldine},
   Booktitle = {Theory on Gender/Feminism on Theory},
   Publisher = {Aldine},
   Editor = {England, P},
   Year = {1993},
   Key = {fds257417}
}

@misc{fds257454,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {"Introduction: Joseph Berger, Cooley-Mead Award
             Winner."},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-4},
   Year = {1992},
   Key = {fds257454}
}


%% Reprints   
@misc{fds151360,
   Author = {Miller McPherson and Matthew Brashears},
   Title = {"Social Isolation in America: Changes in core discussion
             networks over two decades"},
   Booktitle = {Social Pathology: An Introduction},
   Publisher = {ICFAI Research Center},
   Address = {Kolkata, India},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds151360}
}

@misc{fds257460,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Brody, CJ},
   Title = {Interruptions in Group Discussions: The Effects of Gender
             and Group Composition.},
   Booktitle = {Interviewing II},
   Publisher = {Sage},
   Editor = {Fielding, N},
   Year = {2008},
   ISBN = {978-1-4129-2867-0},
   Key = {fds257460}
}


%% Work In Progress   
@misc{fds257459,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Moskovitz, C},
   Title = {A Very Short Guide to Writing in Sociology},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (under contract)},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds257459}
}

@misc{fds303990,
   Author = {Smith-Lovin, L},
   Title = {Podcast},
   Journal = {Thomson Reuters "Sciencewatch"},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds303990}
}

@misc{fds257456,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and McPherson, M},
   Title = {Book manuscript, Networks and Niches in an Ecology of
             Affiliation},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds257456}
}

@misc{fds257457,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Robinson, DT},
   Title = {Book manuscript, Identity, Interaction and
             Emotion},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds257457}
}

@misc{fds257458,
   Author = {L. Smith-Lovin and Smith-Lovin, L and Clay-Warner, J and Robinson,
             DT},
   Title = {Emotional Reactions to Over-Reward},
   Journal = {Social Psychology Quarterly},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds257458}
}


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