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Publications of Jorgianne I. Robinson    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds313402,
   Author = {Valentine, JC and Cooper, H and Patall, EA and Tyson, D and Robinson,
             JC},
   Title = {A method for evaluating research syntheses: The quality,
             conclusions, and consensus of 12 syntheses of the effects of
             after-school programs.},
   Journal = {Research Synthesis Methods},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {20-38},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1759-2879},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jrsm.3},
   Abstract = {Like all forms of empirical inquiry, research syntheses can
             be carried out in ways that lead to more or less valid
             inferences about the phenomenon under study. This synthesis
             of syntheses (a) examined the methods employed in the
             syntheses of the effects of after-school programs (ASPs) and
             determined how closely they conformed to what is defined as
             best practice for research synthesis, (b) compared the
             inferences drawn from the ASP research literature by each
             synthesis with the inferences that plausibly could be made
             from the data they covered, and (c) determined the points of
             consistency across the syntheses with regard to both
             potentially valid and potentially invalid conclusions. It
             was found that the 12 syntheses used highly divergent
             methods, varying in problem definitions, search strategies,
             inclusion criteria for individual studies, and techniques
             for drawing conclusions about the cumulative evidence.
             Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/jrsm.3},
   Key = {fds313402}
}

@article{fds313399,
   Author = {Patall, EA and Cooper, H and Robinson, JC},
   Title = {Parent involvement in homework: A research
             synthesis},
   Journal = {Review of Educational Research},
   Volume = {78},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1039-1101},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0034-6543},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/0034654308325185},
   Abstract = {New emphasis is being placed on the importance of parent
             involvement in children's education. In a synthesis of
             research on the effects of parent involvement in homework, a
             meta-analysis of 14 studies that manipulated parent training
             for homework involvement reveals that training parents to be
             involved in their child's homework results in (a) higher
             rates of homework completion, (b) fewer homework problems,
             and (c) possibly, improved academic performance among
             elementary school children. A meta-analysis of 22 samples
             from 20 studies correlating parent involvement and
             achievement-related outcomes reveals (a) positive
             associations for elementary school and high school students
             but a negative association for middle school students, (b) a
             stronger association for parent rule-setting compared with
             other involvement strategies, and (c) a negative association
             for mathematics achievement but a positive association for
             verbal achievement outcomes. The results suggest that
             different types of parent involvement in homework have
             different relationships to achievement and that the type of
             parent involvement changes as children move through the
             school grades. © 2008 AERA.},
   Doi = {10.3102/0034654308325185},
   Key = {fds313399}
}

@article{fds313400,
   Author = {Patall, EA and Cooper, H and Robinson, JC},
   Title = {The Effects of Choice on Intrinsic Motivation and Related
             Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis of Research Findings},
   Journal = {Psychological Bulletin},
   Volume = {134},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {270-300},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0033-2909},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.134.2.270},
   Abstract = {A meta-analysis of 41 studies examined the effect of choice
             on intrinsic motivation and related outcomes in a variety of
             settings with both child and adult samples. Results
             indicated that providing choice enhanced intrinsic
             motivation, effort, task performance, and perceived
             competence, among other outcomes. Moderator tests revealed
             the effect of choice on intrinsic motivation was stronger
             (a) for instructionally irrelevant choices compared to
             choices made between activities, versions of a task,
             rewards, and instructionally relevant options, (b) when 2 to
             4 successive choices were given, (c) when rewards were not
             given after the choice manipulation, (d) when participants
             given choice were compared to the most controlling forms of
             control groups, (e) for children compared to adults, (f) for
             designs that yoked choice and control conditions compared to
             matched designs in which choice was reduced or designs in
             which nonyoked, nonmatched controls were used, and (g) when
             the experiment was conducted in a laboratory embedded in a
             natural setting. Implications for future research and
             applications to real-world settings are discussed. © 2008
             American Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0033-2909.134.2.270},
   Key = {fds313400}
}

@article{fds313401,
   Author = {Cooper, H and Robinson, JC and Patall, EA},
   Title = {Does homework improve academic achievement? A synthesis of
             research, 1987-2003},
   Journal = {Review of Educational Research},
   Volume = {76},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-62},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0034-6543},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/00346543076001001},
   Abstract = {In this article, research conducted in the United States
             since 1987 on the effects of homework is summarized. Studies
             are grouped into four research designs. The authors found
             that all studies, regardless of type, had design flaws.
             However, both within and across design types, there was
             generally consistent evidence for a positive influence of
             homework on achievement. Studies that reported simple
             homework-achievement correlations revealed evidence that a
             stronger correlation existed (a) in Grades 7-12 than in K-6
             and (b) when students rather than parents reported time on
             homework. No strong evidence was found for an association
             between the homework-achievement link and the outcome
             measure (grades as opposed to standardized tests) or the
             subject matter (reading as opposed to math). On the basis of
             these results and others, the authors suggest future
             research.},
   Doi = {10.3102/00346543076001001},
   Key = {fds313401}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds39616,
   Author = {Cooper, H. and Robinson, J. C. and Dorr, N.},
   Title = {Conducting a meta-analysis},
   Series = {(2nd ed.)},
   Booktitle = {Psychology research handbook: A primer for graduate students
             and research assistants},
   Publisher = {Sage},
   Editor = {T. L. Leong and J. T.},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds39616}
}

@misc{fds39614,
   Author = {Hoyle, R. H. and Robinson, J. C.},
   Title = {Mediated and moderated effects in social psychological
             research: Measurement, design, and analysis
             issues},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of methods in social psychology},
   Publisher = {Sage},
   Editor = {C. Sansone and C. Morf and A. T. Panter},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds39614}
}


%% Articles Submitted   
@article{fds39492,
   Author = {Robinson, J. C. and Hoyle, R. H. and Cooper, H. and Smith, R.
             H},
   Title = {Self-evaluative consequences of social comparisons of
             physical attractiveness: A meta-analytic
             review},
   Year = {2006},
   Abstract = {This research examined the existing empirical literature on
             the self-evaluative consequences of social comparisons of
             attractiveness through a meta-analysis of 37 studies. The
             analysis indicated that, in general, social comparisons of
             attractiveness create contrastive consequences for
             self-evaluation, producing a moderate effect across
             self-evaluative outcomes. Even in conditions in which
             assimilation might be expected, social comparisons of
             attractiveness produced outcomes indicative of contrast.
             Effects were similar for both men and women, contrary to
             prevailing assumptions about the greater role of physical
             attractiveness perceptions for women. Moderator analyses
             indicate a need for additional studies that include
             additional indices of perceptions of similarity,
             no-comparison control conditions, and both male and female
             participants.},
   Key = {fds39492}
}

@article{fds253611,
   Author = {Patall, EA and Cooper, H and Civey Robinson and J},
   Title = {Does parent-involvement improve students’
             academic},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds253611}
}


%% Other   
@misc{fds48803,
   Author = {J. Civey Robinson and R. H. Hoyle and H. Cooper and R. H.
             Smith},
   Title = {Self-evaluative consequences of social comparisons of
             physical attractiveness: A meta-analytic
             revew},
   Journal = {Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for
             the Psychological Study of Social Issues, Long Beach,
             CA},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds48803}
}

@misc{fds48802,
   Author = {Robinson, J. C. and Powell, J. A. J. and Smith, R.
             H.},
   Title = {Further Deconfounding the Sociometer: Examining the
             Relationship Between Ranking and Relational
             Evaluation},
   Journal = {Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society for
             Personality and Social Psychology, Palm Springs,
             CA},
   Year = {2006},
   Abstract = {The sociometer approach to understanding self-esteem
             presents that people’s feelings of self-worth serve as a
             barometer for how relationally-valued they are in the
             important groups to which they belong. There undoubtedly
             exists a natural confound between rank on valued attributes
             and the likelihood of being accepted by a group, however.
             One could argue that people who do not rank highly on at
             least one valued attribute remain vulnerable to experiencing
             relational devaluation. Furthermore, people who believe that
             they have no attribute that provides high ranking will feel
             like imposters even if group members accept them. We
             investigated the influence of inclusionary status on state
             self-esteem as a function of ranking status in two studies.
             In these studies, college student participants received
             false ranking feedback on academic and social intelligence
             tests. Then, they were either included or excluded by group
             members for a later activity. We predicted that inclusionary
             feedback would interact with ranking status such that
             high-ranking participants who were included would report the
             highest levels of state self-esteem. Moreover, low-ranking
             participants who were included despite their inferior status
             would evidence an “imposter” effect, reporting lower
             state self-esteem than excluded participants. Across both
             studies, state self-esteem was influenced by both ranking
             and inclusionary conditions. Though the predicted
             interaction effect was not revealed, rejection reduced the
             self-esteem of high-ranking participants and acceptance
             increased the self-esteem of low-ranking participants.
             Future studies will focus on the “imposter” effect by
             exploring how it may depend on performance expectations, and
             how it may be alleviated.},
   Key = {fds48802}
}

@misc{fds48796,
   Author = {Robinson, J. C. and Cooper, H.},
   Title = {Homework and achievement: A synthesis of recent
             research},
   Journal = {Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North Carolina
             Association for Research in Education, Chapel Hill,
             NC.},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {fds48796}
}

@misc{fds48795,
   Author = {Robinson, J. C. and Hoyle, R. H.},
   Title = {When your defenses are up: Domain-specific exclusion as a
             threat to self-worth},
   Journal = {Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society for
             Personality and Social Psychology, New Orleans,
             LA},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds48795}
}

@misc{fds48797,
   Author = {Robinson, J. C. and Hoyle, R. H.},
   Title = {Appearance-based exclusion as a threat to
             self-worth},
   Journal = {Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society for
             Personality and Social Psychology, Austin,
             TX},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds48797}
}

@misc{fds48798,
   Author = {Robinson, J. C. and Duvall, J. L. and Hoyle, R. H. and Pasatta, C.
             M.},
   Title = {Contingency of self-esteem on appearance, salience of
             appearance, and awareness of the public self},
   Journal = {Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society for
             Personality and Social Psychology, Los Angeles,
             CA},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds48798}
}

@misc{fds48799,
   Author = {Hoyle, R. H. and Robinson, J. C. and Park, H. and Pasatta, C. M. and Duvall, J. and L.},
   Title = {Contingency of self-esteem on inclusionary status moderates
             the effects of exclusion on affect},
   Journal = {Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society for
             Personality and Social Psychology, Los Angeles,
             CA},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds48799}
}


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