Publications of Hal Brands    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

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%% Books   
@book{fds326875,
   Author = {Brands, H and Suri, J},
   Title = {The power of the past: History and statecraft},
   Pages = {1-328},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780815727149},
   Abstract = {© 2016 Hal Brands and Jeremi Suri. All rights reserved.
             Leading scholars and policymakers explore how history
             influences foreign policy and offer insights on how the
             study of the past can more usefully serve the present.
             History, with its insights, analogies, and narratives, is
             central to the ways that the United States interacts with
             the world. Historians and policymakers, however, rarely
             engage one another as effectively or fruitfully as they
             might. This book bridges that divide, bringing together
             leading scholars and policymakers to address the essential
             questions surrounding the history-policy relationship.
             Chapters include: Mark Lawrence on the numerous, and often
             contradictory, historical lessons that American observers
             have drawn from the Vietnam War. H. W. Brands on the role of
             analogies in U.S. policy during the Persian Gulf crisis and
             war of 1990-91. Jeremi Suri on Henry Kissinger’s powerful
             use of history. James Steinberg on how various forms of
             history informed U.S. responses to the Balkan wars of the
             1990s. Peter Feaver and William Inboden on the roles that
             historical knowledge and analogies played in several key
             policy initiatives undertaken during their time at the
             National Security Council from 2005 to 2007. Philip Zelikow,
             former executive director of the 9/11 Commission, offers a
             broad and rich discussion of what kinds of lessons history
             actually offers.},
   Key = {fds326875}
}

@book{fds289713,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {What Good is Grand Strategy? Power and Purpose in American
             Statecraft from Harry S. Truman to George W.
             Bush},
   Publisher = {Cornell University Press},
   Year = {2014},
   url = {http://books.google.com/books?id=Ck-nAgAAQBAJ&pg=PT10&lpg=PT10&dq=%22what+good+is+grand+strategy%22&source=bl&ots=nw17MmKJGW&sig=7WLENj06rRxbqycmfZkH7q_Q-34&hl=en&sa=X&ei=uXmrU6CTGY6yyATHzIDQDg&ved=0CDUQ6AEwAzgK#v=onepage&q=%22what},
   Key = {fds289713}
}

@book{fds289712,
   Author = {SARGENT, DANIEL and HASLAM, JONATHAN and FRIEDMAN, MAXPAUL and BRANDS, HAL},
   Title = {Online Roundtable: Hal Brands' Latin America's Cold War Hal
             Brands, Latin America's Cold War (Cambridge, MA: Harvard
             University Press, 2010, £21·80). Pp. 385. isbn 978 0 674
             05528 5.},
   Volume = {46},
   Pages = {408 pages},
   Publisher = {Harvard University Press},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {February},
   ISBN = {0674058437},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021875811001708},
   Abstract = {In this book, the first to take an international perspective
             on the postwar decades in the region, Hal Brands sets out to
             explain what exactly happened in Latin America during the
             Cold War, and why it was so traumatic.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0021875811001708},
   Key = {fds289712}
}

@book{fds178601,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Latin America's Cold War},
   Publisher = {Harvard University Press},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds178601}
}

@book{fds289711,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {From Berlin to Baghdad: America's Search for Purpose in the
             Post-Cold War World},
   Publisher = {University Press of Kentucky},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds289711}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds326688,
   Author = {Brands, H and Feaver, P},
   Title = {Was the Rise of ISIS Inevitable?},
   Journal = {Survival},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {7-54},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00396338.2017.1325595},
   Doi = {10.1080/00396338.2017.1325595},
   Key = {fds326688}
}

@article{fds326689,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {U.S. Grand Strategy in an Age of Nationalism: Fortress
             America and its Alternatives},
   Journal = {The Washington Quarterly},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {73-94},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0163660X.2017.1302740},
   Doi = {10.1080/0163660X.2017.1302740},
   Key = {fds326689}
}

@article{fds322160,
   Author = {Brands, H and Feaver, P},
   Title = {Stress-Testing American Grand Strategy},
   Journal = {Survival},
   Volume = {58},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {93-120},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00396338.2016.1257199},
   Doi = {10.1080/00396338.2016.1257199},
   Key = {fds322160}
}

@article{fds323145,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Barack Obama and the Dilemmas of American Grand
             Strategy},
   Journal = {The Washington Quarterly},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {101-125},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0163660X.2016.1261557},
   Doi = {10.1080/0163660X.2016.1261557},
   Key = {fds323145}
}

@article{fds289699,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Fools Rush Out? The Flawed Logic of Offshore
             Balancing},
   Journal = {The Washington Quarterly},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {7-28},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0163-660X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0163660X.2015.1064705},
   Doi = {10.1080/0163660X.2015.1064705},
   Key = {fds289699}
}

@article{fds323146,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Before the Tilt: The Carter Administration Engages Saddam
             Hussein},
   Journal = {Diplomacy and Statecraft},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {103-123},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09592296.2015.999628},
   Doi = {10.1080/09592296.2015.999628},
   Key = {fds323146}
}

@article{fds289715,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Saddam Hussein, the United States, and the invasion of Iran:
             Was there a green light?},
   Journal = {Cold War History},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {319-343},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {1468-2745},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14682745.2011.564612},
   Abstract = {Since the Iraqi invasion of Iran in 1980, numerous observers
             and scholars have alleged that the United States
             green-lighted Saddam Hussein's decision to go to war. This
             article scrutinises the green light thesis by examining US
             and Iraqi documents that have recently become available to
             scholars. These records reveal that the green light thesis
             has more basis in myth than in reality. Preoccupied with
             issues such as the Iran hostage crisis and the implications
             of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, Carter administration
             officials neither expected nor welcomed Saddam's attack on
             Iran. The Iraqi dictator, for his part, believed that
             Washington would oppose rather than support his war. © 2012
             Taylor and Francis.},
   Doi = {10.1080/14682745.2011.564612},
   Key = {fds289715}
}

@article{fds289716,
   Author = {Brands, H and Palkki, D},
   Title = {"Conspiring Bastards": Saddam Hussein's Strategic View of
             the United States},
   Journal = {Diplomatic History},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {625-659},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {0145-2096},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7709.2012.01045.x},
   Abstract = {This article uses captured Iraqi regime records to trace
             Saddam Hussein's strategic view of the United States from
             the time of his political ascendancy in the 1970s to his
             invasion of Kuwait in 1990. What is remarkable about
             Saddam's view of the United States is how consistently and
             virulently hostile it was. From early on, Saddam believed
             that the United States was unalterably opposed to his
             Baathist project and that Washington was seeking to
             marginalize and weaken Iraq. These sentiments were rooted in
             Baathist ideology and the key personality traits that shaped
             Saddam's worldview, but they were repeatedly reinforced by
             Washington's policies in the Middle East. Tacit U.S. support
             for Baghdad during the Iran-Iraq war aided Saddam's war
             effort but did little to ameliorate his fears. By the late
             1980s and 1990, Saddam worried that American operatives were
             trying to assassinate him, and he saw the United States (and
             its ally, Israel) as the foreign powers most dangerous to
             his regime. This view of U.S. policy, in turn, seems to have
             had an important influence on Saddam's decision to invade
             Kuwait. © 2012 The Society for Historians of American
             Foreign Relations (SHAFR).},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-7709.2012.01045.x},
   Key = {fds289716}
}

@article{fds289719,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Why Did Saddam Invade Iran? New Evidence on Motives,
             Complexity, and the Israel Factor},
   Journal = {Journal of Military History},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {Summer},
   Key = {fds289719}
}

@article{fds289723,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Evaluating Brazilian Grand Strategy under
             Lula},
   Journal = {Comparative Strategy},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {28-49},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {Spring},
   ISSN = {0149-5933},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01495933.2011.545686},
   Abstract = {This article analyzes Brazilian grand strategy under
             President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. During Lula's eight
             years in office, he pursued a multitiered grand strategy
             aimed at hastening the transition from U.S. and Western
             hegemony to a multipolar order more favorable to Brazilian
             interests. Lula did so by emphasizing three diplomatic
             strategies: soft balancing, coalition building, and seeking
             to position Brazil as the leader of a more united South
             America. During Lula's time in office, this strategy
             successfully raised Brazil's profile and increased its
             diplomatic flexibility, but the country still faces several
             potent strategic dilemmas that could complicate or undermine
             its geopolitical ascent. © 2011 Taylor & Francis Group,
             LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1080/01495933.2011.545686},
   Key = {fds289723}
}

@article{fds289717,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Making the conspiracy theorist a prophet: Covert action and
             the contours of United States-Iraq relations},
   Journal = {International History Review},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {381-408},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {0707-5332},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07075332.2011.595169},
   Abstract = {Convert action is an inherently fraught undertaking. It can
             produce important diplomatic or strategic gains at a
             relatively low price, but it can also result in substantial
             "blowback" when it fails to remain covert. This article
             traces the impact of two covert operations-US support for a
             Kurdish rebellion in northern Iraq in the 1970s, and US arms
             sales to Iran during the Iran-Iraq war-on Saddam Hussein's
             strategic perceptions of the United States. It argues that
             revelations of US covert action interacted symbiotically
             with Saddam's preexisting suspicions of the United States,
             helping to forge a legacy of mistrust and hostility that did
             much to shape his views of the relationship. Saddam's
             personality and worldview inclined him toward conspiratorial
             thinking; US policies made this outlook seem prophetic. ©
             2011 Taylor & Francis.},
   Doi = {10.1080/07075332.2011.595169},
   Key = {fds289717}
}

@article{fds289718,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Saddam and Israel: What do the new Iraqi records
             reveal?},
   Journal = {Diplomacy and Statecraft},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {500-520},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {0959-2296},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09592296.2011.599658},
   Abstract = {This article uses newly available Iraqi records to examine
             Saddam Hussein's strategic view of Israel, from the time of
             his political ascendancy in the late 1970s to the Persian
             Gulf War of 1990-1991. It sheds light on a variety of
             issues: the sources and motives of Saddam's bitter hostility
             to Israel, his desire for a bloody war of attrition against
             the "Zionist entity," the role of Israel in motivating the
             Iraqi nuclear programme, Iraq-Israel relations during the
             Iran-Iraq War, Saddam's fears of an Israeli strike in the
             run-up to the invasion of Kuwait in 1990, and his motives
             for attacking Israel with SCUD missiles in 1991. © Taylor
             & Francis Group, LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1080/09592296.2011.599658},
   Key = {fds289718}
}

@article{fds289720,
   Author = {Brands, H and Palkki, D},
   Title = {Saddam, Israel, and the bomb: Nuclear alarmism
             justified?},
   Journal = {International Security},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {133-166},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {Summer},
   ISSN = {0162-2889},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/ISEC_a_00047},
   Doi = {10.1162/ISEC_a_00047},
   Key = {fds289720}
}

@article{fds289721,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Reform, democratization, and counter-insurgency: Evaluating
             the us experience in cold war-era Latin America},
   Journal = {Small Wars and Insurgencies},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {290-321},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {Summer},
   ISSN = {0959-2318},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09592318.2011.573410},
   Abstract = {Current debate on US counter-insurgency doctrine is
             dominated by the notion that promoting 'legitimacy' and
             'good governance' constitutes a central strategic
             imperative. This idea is hardly new; during the Cold War US
             officials often sought to encourage democratization and
             socio-economic reform as antidotes to revolution in Latin
             America. This article reviews four such cases - Venezuela
             during the first half of the 1960s, Guatemala throughout the
             1960s, Nicaragua during the late 1970s, and El Salvador
             during the 1980s. The purpose is to bring a historical
             perspective to bear on current debates about the feasibility
             of US counter-insurgency strategy by evaluating the
             effectiveness of previous campaigns to promote improved
             governance in developing societies wracked by guerrilla
             violence. Keywords: Insurgency; governance; Latin America;
             Cold War; democratization; legitimacy; guerrillas; Alliance
             for Progress. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.},
   Doi = {10.1080/09592318.2011.573410},
   Key = {fds289721}
}

@article{fds289722,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Crime, Irregular Warfare, and Institutional Failure in Latin
             America: Guatemala as a Case Study},
   Journal = {Studies in Conflict Terrorism},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {228-247},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {1057-610X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1057610X.2011.545937},
   Abstract = {This article examines the current crisis in Guatemala as a
             case study in the phenomenon of criminal insurgency in Latin
             America. Since the close of Guatemala's civil war in 1996,
             crime-especially violent crime-has increased dramatically,
             to the point that drug traffickers, organized crime
             syndicates, and youth gangs are effectively waging a form of
             irregular warfare against the state. The police, the
             judiciary, and entire local and departmental governments are
             rife with criminal infiltrators; murder statistics have
             surpassed civil-war levels in recent years; criminal
             operatives assassinate government officials and troublesome
             members of the political class; and chunks of territory are
             now effectively under the control of criminal groups. All
             this has led to growing civic disillusion and eroded the
             authority and legitimacy of the government. Rampant crime is
             causing a crisis of the democratic state. © Taylor &
             Francis Group, LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1080/1057610X.2011.545937},
   Key = {fds289722}
}

@article{fds289724,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Inside the Iraqi state records: Saddam Hussein, 'Irangate',
             and the United States},
   Journal = {Journal of Strategic Studies},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {95-118},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {0140-2390},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01402390.2011.541767},
   Abstract = {This article uses captured Iraqi state records to examine
             Saddam Hussein's reaction to US arms to sales to Iran during
             the Iran-Iraq War (the Iran/ Contra scandal). These records
             show that 'Irangate' marked a decisive departure in Saddam's
             relations with the United States. Irangate reinforced
             Saddam's preexisting suspicions of US policy, convincing him
             that Washington was a strategic enemy that could not be
             trusted. Saddam concealed his anger to preserve a working
             relationship with the Reagan administration, but this
             episode nevertheless cemented his negative views of the
             United States and forged a legacy of hostility and mistrust
             that would inform his strategic calculus for years to come.
             © 2011 Taylor & Francis.},
   Doi = {10.1080/01402390.2011.541767},
   Key = {fds289724}
}

@article{fds305685,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Evaluating Brazilian grand strategy under
             lula},
   Journal = {Comparative Strategy: an international journal},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {28-49},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {0149-5933},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01495933.2011.545686},
   Abstract = {This article analyzes Brazilian grand strategy under
             President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. During Lula's eight
             years in office, he pursued a multitiered grand strategy
             aimed at hastening the transition from U.S. and Western
             hegemony to a multipolar order more favorable to Brazilian
             interests. Lula did so by emphasizing three diplomatic
             strategies: soft balancing, coalition building, and seeking
             to position Brazil as the leader of a more united South
             America. During Lula's time in office, this strategy
             successfully raised Brazil's profile and increased its
             diplomatic flexibility, but the country still faces several
             potent strategic dilemmas that could complicate or undermine
             its geopolitical ascent. © 2011 Taylor & Francis Group,
             LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1080/01495933.2011.545686},
   Key = {fds305685}
}

@article{fds289725,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {The United States and the Peruvian challenge,
             1968-1975},
   Journal = {Diplomacy and Statecraft},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {471-490},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {0959-2296},
   url = {http://pdfserve.informaworld.com/269293_731198561_926959723.pdf},
   Abstract = {This article explores United States-Peruvian relations
             during the rule of General Juan Velasco Alvarado
             (1968-1975). Velasco pursued a sharply nationalistic foreign
             policy, leading to repeated diplomatic dust-ups with the
             United States. Peruvian officials generally acquitted
             themselves quite well in these episodes, in part because of
             their own diplomatic acumen, and in part because broader
             geopolitical trends of the period undermined traditional
             sources of United States leverage in Latin America. The
             United States would ultimately have to wait for a change of
             government to recoup some of the influence it had lost in
             Peru under Velasco. © Taylor & Francis Group,
             LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1080/09592296.2010.508418},
   Key = {fds289725}
}

@article{fds289734,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Los Zetas: Inside Mexico's Most Dangerous Drug
             Gang},
   Journal = {Air and Space Power Journal (Spanish Edition)},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds289734}
}

@article{fds289726,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Economic Development and the Contours of U.S. Foreign
             Policy: The Nixon Administration's Approach to Latin
             America, 1969–1974},
   Journal = {Peace & Change},
   Volume = {33},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-0130.2008.00491.x/pdf},
   Key = {fds289726}
}

@article{fds289729,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Third world politics in an age of global turmoil: The Latin
             American challenge to U.S. and Western Hegemony,
             1965-1975},
   Journal = {Diplomatic History},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {105-138},
   Year = {2008},
   ISSN = {0145-2096},
   url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-7709.2007.00669.x/pdf},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-7709.2007.00669.x},
   Key = {fds289729}
}

@article{fds289733,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Richard Nixon and Economic Nationalism in Latin America: The
             Problem of Expropriations, 1969-1974},
   Journal = {Diplomacy & Statecraft},
   Volume = {17},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds289733}
}

@article{fds289728,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Non-proliferation and the dynamics of the middle cold war:
             The superpowers, the MLF, and the NPT},
   Journal = {Cold War History},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {389-423},
   Year = {2007},
   ISSN = {1468-2745},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14682740701474857},
   Abstract = {During the 1960s, the United States and the Soviet Union
             contended both with one another and with the members of
             their respective alliances in attempting to deal with the
             issues raised by nuclear proliferation. These negotiations,
             which covered a number of matters but centred on the
             conflict between a non-proliferation agreement and NATO
             plans for nuclear sharing, illustrate in microcosm some of
             the most important geopolitical trends of the middle Cold
             War. This episode was in certain diplomatic and conceptual
             respects an important precursor to détente. It also
             illuminated the declining ability of the United States and
             the Soviet Union to manage their respective European
             alliances, as well as the degree to which Russo-American
             cooperation further strained these partnerships. Finally,
             the negotiations and their aftermath showed that, in
             geostrategic terms, Moscow and Washington had much in common
             during the 1960s. © 2007 Taylor & Francis.},
   Doi = {10.1080/14682740701474857},
   Key = {fds289728}
}

@article{fds289735,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Rethinking Nonproliferation: LBJ, the Gilpatric Committee,
             and U.S. National Security Policy},
   Journal = {Journal of Cold War Studies},
   Volume = {8},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {Spring},
   Key = {fds289735}
}

@article{fds289727,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Progress unseen: U.S. arms control policy and the origins of
             Détente, 1963-1968},
   Journal = {Diplomatic History},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {253-285},
   Year = {2006},
   ISSN = {0145-2096},
   url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-7709.2006.00549.x/pdf},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-7709.2006.00549.x},
   Key = {fds289727}
}

@article{fds289731,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {The emperor's new clothes: American views of Hirohito after
             World War II},
   Journal = {The Historian},
   Volume = {68},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-28},
   Year = {2006},
   ISSN = {0018-2370},
   Key = {fds289731}
}

@article{fds289732,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Who saved the emperor? The MacArthur myth and U.S. policy
             toward Hirohito and the Japanese imperial institution,
             1942-1946},
   Journal = {Pacific Historical Review},
   Volume = {75},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {271-305},
   Year = {2006},
   ISSN = {0030-8684},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/phr.2006.75.2.271},
   Abstract = {The dominant school of literature on the occupation of Japan
             stresses the role of Supreme Commander Douglas MacArthur in
             "saving" Hirohito and the imperial institution from the
             harsh policy intended by officials in Washington and the
             American public. MacArthur's role in emperor policy was
             actually much less influential than is commonly believed.
             Washington's choice to retain Hirohito and the imperial
             institution evolved out of a wartime assumption that the
             emperor was central to U.S. plans for postwar Japan and East
             Asia. Rather than a flash of inspiration from the supreme
             commander, American policy toward the emperor represented a
             confluence of motivations that crystallized in the early
             days of the occupation. © 2006 by the Pacific Coast Branch,
             American Historical Association. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1525/phr.2006.75.2.271},
   Key = {fds289732}
}

@article{fds289737,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Rhetoric, Public Opinion, and Policy in the American Debate
             over the Japanese Emperor during World War
             II},
   Journal = {Rhetoric & Public Affairs},
   Volume = {8},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {fds289737}
}

@article{fds289736,
   Author = {Brands, H},
   Title = {Wartime recruiting practices, martial identity and
             post-World War II demobilization in colonial
             Kenya},
   Journal = {Journal of African History},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {103-125},
   Year = {2005},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021853704000428},
   Abstract = {After World War II, African ex-servicemen in Kenya sought to
             maintain the socioeconomic gains they had accrued through
             service in the King's African Rifles (KAR). Looking for
             middle-class employment and social privileges, they
             challenged existing relationships within the colonial state.
             For the most part, veterans did not participate in national
             politics, believing that their goals could be achieved
             within the confines of colonial society. The postwar actions
             of KAR veterans are best explained by an examination of
             their initial perceptions of colonial military service.
             Indeed, the social and economic connotations of KAR service,
             combined with the massive wartime expansion of Kenyan
             defense forces, created a new class of Africans with
             distinctive characteristics and interests. These
             socioeconomic perceptions proved powerful after the war,
             often informing ex-askari action. © 2005 Cambridge
             University Press.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0021853704000428},
   Key = {fds289736}
}

@article{fds289730,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Lyndon Johnson and Chinese Representation Policy in the
             United Nations},
   Journal = {American Diplomacy},
   Volume = {9},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {August},
   Key = {fds289730}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds326874,
   Author = {Brands, H and Suri, J},
   Title = {Introduction: Thinking about history and foreign
             policy},
   Pages = {1-24},
   Booktitle = {The Power of the Past: History and Statecraft},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780815727149},
   Key = {fds326874}
}

@misc{fds289704,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {"Diplomatic Milestones, 1992-2000: Dilemmas of the Post-Cold
             War Era"},
   Volume = {II},
   Pages = {503-516},
   Booktitle = {U.S. Foreign Policy: A Diplomatic History},
   Publisher = {CQ Press},
   Editor = {Robert J. McMahon and Thomas W. Zeiler},
   Year = {2012},
   Key = {fds289704}
}


%% Op-eds   
@misc{fds178628,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Gangs and the New Insurgency in Latin America},
   Journal = {World Politics Review},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds178628}
}

@misc{fds178629,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Mexico's Narco-Insurgency},
   Journal = {World Politics Review},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds178629}
}

@misc{fds178630,
   Author = {H. Brands},
   Title = {Lo que no funcionará de nuevo},
   Journal = {El Universal},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds178630}
}

@misc{fds178631,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {U.S. Plan to Fight Drugs in Mexico Bound to Falter Without
             Changes},
   Journal = {San Jose Mercury News, LA Progressive, Tri-Cities Herald,
             Delaware State News, and other media outlets},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds178631}
}

@misc{fds178632,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {The War on Terror Has Fizzled},
   Journal = {Hartford Courant},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds178632}
}

@misc{fds183878,
   Author = {H. Brands},
   Title = {The Rise of the Center in Latin America},
   Journal = {World Politics Review},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {fds183878}
}


%% Monographs   
@misc{fds289706,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {The Promise and Pitfalls of Grand Strategy},
   Publisher = {Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College},
   Year = {2012},
   url = {http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?pubID=1121},
   Key = {fds289706}
}

@misc{fds289707,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {Crime, Violence, and the Crisis in Guatemala: A Case Study
             in the Erosion of the State},
   Publisher = {Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pdffiles/PUB986.pdf},
   Key = {fds289707}
}

@misc{fds289708,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {Dilemmas of Brazilian Grand Strategy},
   Publisher = {Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pdffiles/PUB1017.pdf},
   Key = {fds289708}
}

@misc{fds178622,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Political Ferment in Latin America: The Populist Resurgence,
             the Rise of the Center, and Implications for U.S.
             Policy},
   Publisher = {Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds178622}
}

@misc{fds289709,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {Dealing the Political Ferment in Latin America: The Populist
             Revival, the Emergence of the Center, and Implications for
             U.S. Policy},
   Publisher = {Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pdffiles/PUB943.pdf},
   Key = {fds289709}
}

@misc{fds289710,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {Mexico's Narco-Insurgency and U.S. Counter-Drug
             Policy},
   Publisher = {Strategic Studies Institute, Army War College},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pdffiles/pub918.pdf},
   Key = {fds289710}
}


%% Published Policy Briefs and Comments   
@misc{fds289705,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {Breaking Down Obama's Grand Strategy},
   Journal = {National Interest},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://nationalinterest.org/feature/breaking-down-obamas-grand-strategy-10719},
   Key = {fds289705}
}

@misc{fds289702,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {The Enduring Dilemmas of Democracy Promotion},
   Journal = {The National Interest},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://nationalinterest.org/commentary/the-enduring-dilemmas-democracy-promotion-10042},
   Key = {fds289702}
}

@misc{fds289701,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {Ronald Reagan's Subtle Grand Strategy},
   Journal = {The National Interest},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://nationalinterest.org/commentary/ronald-reagans-subtle-grand-strategy-10000},
   Key = {fds289701}
}

@misc{fds289700,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {Seeking Fiscal Safety, U.S. Defense Cuts Raise Geopolitical
             Risk},
   Journal = {World Politics Review},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {fds289700}
}

@misc{fds289703,
   Author = {Brands, HS},
   Title = {Archives and the Study of Nuclear Politics},
   Publisher = {H-Diplo/ISSF},
   Year = {2014},
   url = {http://issforum.org/forums/2-what-we-talk-about-when-we-talk-about-nuclear-weapons},
   Key = {fds289703}
}

@misc{fds193873,
   Author = {Hal Brands and David Palkki},
   Title = {Why Did Saddam Want the Bomb? The Israel Factor and the
             Iraqi Nuclear Program},
   Journal = {Foreign Policy Research Institute E-Notes},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {August},
   Key = {fds193873}
}

@misc{fds178624,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {El renacimiento populista, el crecimiento del centro, y la
             politica de los Estados Unidos en Latinoamerica},
   Journal = {Air and Space Power Journal (Spanish Edition)},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds178624}
}

@misc{fds178625,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Los Zetas and Mexico's Transnational Drug
             War},
   Journal = {World Politics Review},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds178625}
}

@misc{fds178608,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Third Generation Gangs and Criminal Insurgency in Latin
             America},
   Journal = {Small Wars Journal},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {fds178608}
}


%% Reports   
@misc{fds212296,
   Author = {H. Brands and P. Feaver},
   Title = {Common Fallacies and Uncommon Fixes in the American Grand
             Strategy Debate},
   Publisher = {RAND Corporation Working Paper},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds212296}
}

@misc{fds179556,
   Author = {Hal Brands},
   Title = {Criminal Fiefdoms in Latin America: Understanding the
             Problem of Alternatively Governed Spaces},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds179556}
}

Hal Brands