Kenneth A. Dodge

Publications of Kenneth A. Dodge    :chronological  alphabetical  combined  by tags listing:

%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds272051,
   Author = {Yu, T and Pettit, GS and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {The Interactive Effects of Marital Conflict and Divorce on
             Parent-Adult Children's Relationships.},
   Journal = {Journal of Marriage and the Family},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {282-292},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0022-2445},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2010.00699.x},
   Abstract = {This study examines main effect and interactive models of
             the relations between marital conflict, divorce, and
             parent-adult child relationships, and gender differences in
             these relations. Data were drawn from a longitudinal study
             of a community sample (N = 585). Parental marital conflict
             and divorce were measured from age 5 through age 17.
             Mother-child and father-child relationship quality at age 22
             was assessed in terms of Closeness-Support and
             Conflict-Control. Results indicate that both marital
             conflict and divorce were associated with poorer quality of
             parent-adult child relationships. Divorce moderated the link
             between marital conflict and subsequent negativity in
             mother-child relationships, with the estimated effects being
             stronger in continuously married families than in divorced
             families, especially for women.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1741-3737.2010.00699.x},
   Key = {fds272051}
}

@article{fds272096,
   Author = {Erath, SA and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Michael Foster,
             E and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes,
             EE},
   Title = {Aggressive marital conflict, maternal harsh punishment, and
             child aggressive-disruptive behavior: Evidence for direct
             and mediated relations},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {217-226},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.20.2.217},
   Abstract = {Direct associations between aggressive marital conflict and
             child aggressive-disruptive behavior at home and school were
             explored in this cross-sectional study of 360 kindergarten
             children. In addition, mediated pathways linking aggressive
             marital conflict to maternal harsh punishment to child
             aggressive-disruptive behavior were examined. Moderation
             analyses explored how the overall frequency of marital
             disagreement might buffer or exacerbate the impact of
             aggressive marital conflict on maternal harsh punishment and
             child aggressive-disruptive behavior. Hierarchical
             regressions revealed direct pathways linking aggressive
             marital conflict to child aggressive-disruptive behavior at
             home and school and a partially mediated pathway linking
             aggressive marital conflict to child aggressive-disruptive
             behavior at home. Further analyses revealed that rates of
             marital disagreement moderated the association between
             aggressive marital conflict and child aggressive-disruptive
             behavior at home, with an attenuated association at high
             rates of marital disagreement as compared with low rates of
             marital disagreement. Copyright 2006 by the American
             Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.20.2.217},
   Key = {fds272096}
}

@article{fds272109,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Castellino, DR and Dodge, KA and Pettit,
             GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Trajectories of internalizing, externalizing, and grades for
             children who have and have not experienced their parents'
             divorce or separation.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {292-301},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0893-3200},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16756405},
   Abstract = {This study examined whether the occurrence and timing of
             parental separation or divorce was related to trajectories
             of academic grades and mother- and teacher-reported
             internalizing and externalizing problems. The authors used
             hierarchical linear models to estimate trajectories for
             children who did and did not experience their parents'
             divorce or separation in kindergarten through 10th grade (N
             = 194). A novel approach to analyzing the timing of
             divorce/separation was adopted, and trajectories were
             estimated from 1 year prior to the divorce/separation to 3
             years after the event. Results suggest that early parental
             divorce/separation is more negatively related to
             trajectories of internalizing and externalizing problems
             than is later divorce/separation, whereas later
             divorce/separation is more negatively related to grades. One
             implication of these findings is that children may benefit
             most from interventions focused on preventing internalizing
             and externalizing problems, whereas adolescents may benefit
             most from interventions focused on promoting academic
             achievement.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.20.2.292},
   Key = {fds272109}
}

@article{fds272113,
   Author = {Malone, PS and Lansford, JE and Castellino, DR and Berlin, LJ and Dodge,
             KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Divorce and Child Behavior Problems: Applying Latent Change
             Score Models to Life Event Data.},
   Journal = {Structural Equation Modeling : a Multidisciplinary
             Journal},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {401-423},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1070-5511},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20209039},
   Abstract = {Effects of parents' divorce on children's adjustment have
             been studied extensively. This article applies new advances
             in trajectory modeling to the problem of disentangling the
             effects of divorce on children's adjustment from related
             factors such as the child's age at the time of divorce and
             the child's gender. Latent change score models were used to
             examine trajectories of externalizing behavior problems in
             relation to children's experience of their parents' divorce.
             Participants included 356 boys and girls whose biological
             parents were married at kindergarten entry. The children
             were assessed annually through Grade 9. Mothers reported
             whether they had divorced or separated in each 12-month
             period, and teachers reported children's externalizing
             behavior problems each year. Girls' externalizing behavior
             problem trajectories were not affected by experiencing their
             parents' divorce, regardless of the timing of the divorce.
             In contrast, boys who were in elementary school when their
             parents divorced showed an increase in externalizing
             behavior problems in the year of the divorce. This increase
             persisted in the years following the divorce. Boys who were
             in middle school when their parents divorced showed an
             increase in externalizing behavior problems in the year of
             the divorce followed by a decrease to below baseline levels
             in the year after the divorce. This decrease persisted in
             the following years.},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15328007sem1103_6},
   Key = {fds272113}
}