Kenneth A. Dodge

Publications of Kenneth A. Dodge    :chronological  alphabetical  combined  by tags listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds200470,
   Author = {Kusche, C.A. and Greenberg, M.T. and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Grade level PATHS (Grades1-2)},
   Publisher = {South Deerfield, MA: Channing-Bete Co.},
   Year = {2011},
   Keywords = {child maltreatment • problem behaviors},
   Key = {fds200470}
}

@book{fds200471,
   Author = {Kusche, C.A. and Greenberg, M.T. and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Grou},
   Title = {Grade level PATHS (Grades3-4)},
   Publisher = {South Deerfield, MA: Channing-Bete Co.},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds200471}
}

@book{fds200469,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Coleman, D.L.},
   Title = {Preventing child maltreatment: Community
             approaches},
   Publisher = {New York: Guilford},
   Year = {2011},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cfs.12019},
   Doi = {10.1111/cfs.12019},
   Key = {fds200469}
}

@book{fds184137,
   Author = {K.A. Dodge},
   Title = {Current directions in child psychopathology},
   Publisher = {Allyn & Bacon},
   Address = {Boston, MA},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://www.pearsonhighered.com/bookseller/product/Current-Directions-in-Child-Psychopathology-for-Abnormal-Psychology/9780205680139.page},
   Key = {fds184137}
}

@book{fds184138,
   Author = {Coleman, D.L. and Bradley, K.W. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Corporal Punishment: A Special Symposium
             Issue},
   Journal = {Law and Contemporary Problems},
   Volume = {73},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds184138}
}

@book{fds45886,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Dishion, T.J. and Lansford, J.E.},
   Title = {Deviant peer influences in programs for youth: Problems and
             solutions},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds45886}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds327710,
   Author = {Tolan, PH and Dodge, K and Rutter, M},
   Title = {Tracking the multiple pathways of parent and family
             influence on disruptive behavior disorders},
   Pages = {161-191},
   Booktitle = {Disruptive Behavior Disorders},
   Publisher = {Springer},
   Address = {New York},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781461475576},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7557-6_7},
   Doi = {10.1007/978-1-4614-7557-6_7},
   Key = {fds327710}
}

@misc{fds200022,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Processes in the prevention of crime and
             delinquency},
   Booktitle = {Controlling crime: Strategies and tradeoffs
             (pp.407-418)},
   Publisher = {Chicago: University of Chicago Press},
   Editor = {P. J. Cook and J. Ludwig and J. McCrary},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds200022}
}

@misc{fds200033,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Social information processing models of aggressive
             behavior},
   Booktitle = {Understanding and reducing aggression, violence, and their
             consequences (pp. 165-186)},
   Publisher = {Washington, DC: American Psychological Association},
   Editor = {M. Mikulncer and P.R. Shaver},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds200033}
}

@misc{fds186603,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The Fast Track Project: The prevention of severe conduct
             problems in school-age youth},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of clinical assessment and treatment of conduct
             problems in youth},
   Publisher = {Springer},
   Address = {New York},
   Editor = {R.C. Murrihy and A.D. Kidman and T.H. Ollendick},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds186603}
}

@misc{fds167328,
   Author = {Fontaine, R.G. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Social Information Processing and Aggressive Behavior: A
             Transactional Perspective},
   Booktitle = {The Transactional Model of Development: How Children and
             Contexts Shape Each Other},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association},
   Address = {Washington, DC},
   Editor = {Sameroff, A.J.},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds167328}
}

@misc{fds50943,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Sherrill, M.R.},
   Title = {The interaction of nature and nurture in antisocial
             behavior},
   Pages = {215-242},
   Booktitle = {The Cambridge Handbook of Violent Behavior},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Address = {New York},
   Editor = {D. Flannery and A. Vazonsyi and I. Waldman},
   Year = {2007},
   Key = {fds50943}
}

@misc{fds43115,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Coie, J.D. and Lynam, D.},
   Title = {Aggression and antisocial behavior in youth},
   Series = {6th edition},
   Pages = {719-788},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of Child Psychology, Vol. 3: Social, Emotional, and
             Personality Development},
   Publisher = {Wiley},
   Editor = {W. Damon (Series Ed.), and N. Eisenberg (Vol.
             Ed.)},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds43115}
}

@misc{fds44278,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group (K.A. Dodge,
             member)},
   Title = {The Fast Track Project: Toward the prevention of severe
             conduct problems in school-aged youth.},
   Pages = {439-477},
   Booktitle = {Strengthening families: different evidence-based approaches
             to support child mental health.},
   Publisher = {Psychotherapie Verlag},
   Editor = {N. Heinrichs and K. Hahlweg and M. Dopfner},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds44278}
}

@misc{fds18117,
   Author = {Bierman, K.L. and Bruschi, C. and Domitrovich, C. and Fang, G.Y. and Miller-Johnson, S. and the Conduct Problems Prevention
             Researach Group},
   Title = {Early disruptive behaviors associated with emerging
             antisocial behavior among girls},
   Pages = {137-161},
   Booktitle = {Aggression, antisocial behavior, and violence among girls: A
             developmental perspective},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Editor = {M Putallaz and K.L. Bierman},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {fds18117}
}

@misc{fds18114,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Public policy and the 'discovery' of girls' aggressive
             behavior},
   Pages = {302-311},
   Booktitle = {Aggression, antisocial behavior, and violence among girls: A
             developmental perspective},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Editor = {M. Putallaz and K.L. Bierman},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {fds18114}
}

@misc{fds13067,
   Author = {McMahon, R.J. and the Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {The Prevention of Conduct Problems Using Targeted and
             Universal Interventions: The FAST Track Program},
   Booktitle = {Prevention of Conduct Disorder},
   Publisher = {New York: Cambridge},
   Editor = {D. Offord},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds13067}
}

@misc{fds13038,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Mediation, Moderation, and Mechanisms in How Parenting
             Affects Children's Aggressive Behavior},
   Pages = {215-229},
   Booktitle = {Parenting and the Child's World},
   Publisher = {Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum},
   Editor = {J. Borkowski},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds13038}
}

@misc{fds13008,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Conduct Disorder},
   Series = {Second},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of Developmental Psychopathology},
   Publisher = {New York: Plenum Press},
   Editor = {Sameroff, A. and Lewis, M. and Miller, S.},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds13008}
}

@misc{fds13019,
   Author = {Lemerise, E.A. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {The Development of Anger and Hostile Interactions},
   Series = {2nd},
   Pages = {594-606},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of Emotions},
   Publisher = {New York: Guilford},
   Editor = {M. Lewis and J. M. Haviland-Jones},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds13019}
}

@misc{fds39026,
   Author = {Schwartz, D. and McFadyen-Ketchum, S.A. and Dodge. K.A. and Pettit, G.S. and Bates, J.E.},
   Title = {Peer group victimization as a predictor of children's
             behavior problems at home and in school(Abstract)},
   Booktitle = {Youth Update},
   Publisher = {Institute for Advanced Study of Antisocial Behavior in
             Youth, Etobicoke, Ontario},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds39026}
}

@misc{fds39724,
   Author = {Lemerise, E. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {The development of anger and hostile interactions},
   Pages = {537-546},
   Booktitle = {The handbook of emotion},
   Publisher = {New York: Guilford Press},
   Editor = {M. Lewis and J. Haviland},
   Year = {1993},
   Key = {fds39724}
}

@misc{fds39729,
   Author = {Garber, J. and Quiggle, N.L. and Panak, W. and Dodge,
             K.A.},
   Title = {Aggression and depression in children: Comorbidity,
             specificity, and cognitive processing},
   Pages = {225-264},
   Booktitle = {Rochester Symposium on Developmental Psychopathology, Vol.
             2: Internalizing and externalizing expressions of
             dysfunction},
   Publisher = {Hillsdale, N. J.: Lawrence Erlbaum},
   Editor = {D. Cicchetti and S. Toth},
   Year = {1991},
   Key = {fds39729}
}

@misc{fds39735,
   Author = {Kupersmidt, J. and Coie, J.D. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Predicting disorder from peer social problems},
   Pages = {274-338},
   Booktitle = {Peer rejection in childhood: Origins, consequences, and
             intervention},
   Publisher = {New York: Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {S.R. Asher and J.D. Coie},
   Year = {1990},
   Key = {fds39735}
}

@misc{fds39739,
   Author = {McFall, R.M. and McDonel, E.C. and Dodge, K.A. and Coie,
             J.D.},
   Title = {Social information processing and sexual
             aggression},
   Booktitle = {Proceedings of the NIMH Conference on assessment and
             treatment of sexual offenders},
   Publisher = {Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing
             Office.},
   Editor = {J. Breiling},
   Year = {1989},
   Key = {fds39739}
}

@misc{fds323951,
   Author = {COIE, JD and CHRISTOPOULOS, C and TERRY, R and DODGE, KA and LOCHMAN,
             JE},
   Title = {TYPES OF AGGRESSIVE RELATIONSHIPS, PEER REJECTION, AND
             DEVELOPMENTAL CONSEQUENCES},
   Journal = {SOCIAL COMPETENCE IN DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVE},
   Volume = {51},
   Pages = {223-237},
   Booktitle = {Social competence in development perspective},
   Publisher = {Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers},
   Editor = {B.H. Schneider and C. Attili and J. Nadel and R.
             Weissberg},
   Year = {1989},
   ISBN = {0-7923-0400-4},
   Key = {fds323951}
}

@misc{fds39748,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Social information processing variables in the development
             of aggression and altruism in children},
   Pages = {280-302},
   Booktitle = {The development of altruism and aggression: Social and
             biological origin},
   Publisher = {New York: Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {C. Zahn-Waxler and M. Cummings and M. Radke-Yarrow},
   Year = {1986},
   Key = {fds39748}
}

@misc{fds39749,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Attributional bias in aggressive children},
   Pages = {75-111},
   Booktitle = {Advances in cognitive-behavioral research and
             therapy},
   Publisher = {New York: Academic Press},
   Editor = {P. Kendall},
   Year = {1985},
   Key = {fds39749}
}

@misc{fds39752,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Murphy, R.R.},
   Title = {The assessment of social competence in adolescence},
   Pages = {61-96},
   Booktitle = {Adolescent behavior disorders: Current perspectives.
             Advances in child behavioral analysis and therapy,
             4},
   Publisher = {Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath and Company},
   Editor = {P. Karoly and J.J. Steffen},
   Year = {1984},
   Key = {fds39752}
}

@misc{fds152593,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Social information processing models of aggressive
             behavior},
   Booktitle = {Understanding and reducing aggression, violence, and their
             consequences},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association},
   Address = {Washington, DC},
   Editor = {M. Mikulincer and P.R. Shaver},
   Key = {fds152593}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds271913,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Fontaine, RG and Bates, JE and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Peer Rejection, Affiliation with Deviant Peers, Delinquency,
             and Risky Sexual Behavior},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1742-1751},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0047-2891},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-014-0175-y},
   Abstract = {© 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Risky
             sexual behavior poses significant health risks by increasing
             sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies.
             Previous research has documented many factors related to
             risky sexual behavior. This study adds to the literature by
             proposing a prospective, developmental model of peer factors
             related to risky sexual behavior. Developmental pathways to
             risky sexual behavior were examined in a sample of 517
             individuals (51 % female; 82 % European American, 16 %
             African American, 2 % other) followed from age 5–27.
             Structural equation models examined direct and indirect
             effects of peer rejection (assessed via peer nominations at
             ages 5, 6, 7, and 8), affiliation with deviant peers
             (assessed via self-report at ages 11 and 12), and
             delinquency (assessed via maternal report at ages 10 and 16)
             on risky sexual behavior (assessed via self-report at age
             27). More peer rejection during childhood, affiliation with
             deviant peers during pre- adolescence, and delinquency in
             childhood and adolescence predicted more risky sexual
             behavior through age 27, although delinquency at age 16 was
             the only risk factor that had a significant direct effect on
             risky sexual behavior through age 27 above and beyond the
             other risk factors. Peer rejection was related to subsequent
             risk factors for girls but not boys. Peer risk factors as
             early as age 5 shape developmental pathways through
             childhood and adolescence and have implications for risky
             sexual behavior into adulthood.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10964-014-0175-y},
   Key = {fds271913}
}

@article{fds271946,
   Author = {Petersen, IT and Bates, JE and D'Onofrio, BM and Coyne, CA and Lansford,
             JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Van Hulle and CA},
   Title = {Language ability predicts the development of behavior
             problems in children.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {122},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {542-557},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0021-843X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0031963},
   Abstract = {Prior studies have suggested, but not fully established,
             that language ability is important for regulating attention
             and behavior. Language ability may have implications for
             understanding attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
             (ADHD) and conduct disorders, as well as subclinical
             problems. This article reports findings from two
             longitudinal studies to test (a) whether language ability
             has an independent effect on behavior problems, and (b) the
             direction of effect between language ability and behavior
             problems. In Study 1 (N = 585), language ability was
             measured annually from ages 7 to 13 years by language
             subtests of standardized academic achievement tests
             administered at the children's schools. Inattentive-hyperactive
             (I-H) and externalizing (EXT) problems were reported
             annually by teachers and mothers. In Study 2 (N = 11,506),
             language ability (receptive vocabulary) and mother-rated I-H
             and EXT problems were measured biannually from ages 4 to 12
             years. Analyses in both studies showed that language ability
             predicted within-individual variability in the development
             of I-H and EXT problems over and above the effects of sex,
             ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), and performance in
             other academic and intellectual domains (e.g., math, reading
             comprehension, reading recognition, and short-term memory
             [STM]). Even after controls for prior levels of behavior
             problems, language ability predicted later behavior problems
             more strongly than behavior problems predicted later
             language ability, suggesting that the direction of effect
             may be from language ability to behavior problems. The
             findings suggest that language ability may be a useful
             target for the prevention or even treatment of attention
             deficits and EXT problems in children.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0031963},
   Key = {fds271946}
}

@article{fds328784,
   Author = {Makin-Byrd, K and Bierman, KL and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Individual and family predictors of the perpetration of
             dating violence and victimization in late
             adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {536-550},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-012-9810-7},
   Abstract = {Teen dating violence is a crime of national concern with
             approximately one-fourth of adolescents reporting
             victimization of physical, psychological, or sexual dating
             violence each year. The present study examined how
             aggressive family dynamics in both childhood and early
             adolescence predicted the perpetration of dating violence
             and victimization in late adolescence. Children (n = 401, 43
             % female) were followed from kindergarten entry to the age
             of 18 years. Early adolescent aggressive-oppositional
             problems at home and aggressive-oppositional problems at
             school each made unique predictions to the emergence of
             dating violence in late adolescence. The results suggest
             that aggressive family dynamics during childhood and early
             adolescence influence the development of dating violence
             primarily by fostering a child's oppositional-aggressive
             responding style initially in the home, which is then
             generalized to other contexts. Although this study is
             limited by weaknesses detailed in the discussion, the
             contribution of longitudinal evidence including parent,
             teacher, and adolescent reports from both boys and girls, a
             dual-emphasis on the prediction of perpetration and
             victimization, as well as an analysis of both relations
             between variables and person-oriented group comparisons
             combine to make a unique contribution to the growing
             literature on adolescent partner violence.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10964-012-9810-7},
   Key = {fds328784}
}

@article{fds271954,
   Author = {Witkiewitz, K and King, K and McMahon, RJ and Wu, J and Luk, J and Bierman,
             KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {Evidence for a multi-dimensional latent structural model of
             externalizing disorders.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {223-237},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22936218},
   Abstract = {Strong associations between conduct disorder (CD),
             antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and substance use
             disorders (SUD) seem to reflect a general vulnerability to
             externalizing behaviors. Recent studies have characterized
             this vulnerability on a continuous scale, rather than as
             distinct categories, suggesting that the revision of the
             Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
             (DSM-5) take into account the underlying continuum of
             externalizing behaviors. However, most of this research has
             not included measures of disorders that appear in childhood
             [e.g., attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or
             oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)], nor has it considered
             the full range of possibilities for the latent structure of
             externalizing behaviors, particularly factor mixture models,
             which allow for a latent factor to have both continuous and
             categorical dimensions. Finally, the majority of prior
             studies have not tested multidimensional models. Using
             lifetime diagnoses of externalizing disorders from
             participants in the Fast Track Project (n = 715), we
             analyzed a series of latent variable models ranging from
             fully continuous factor models to fully categorical mixture
             models. Continuous models provided the best fit to the
             observed data and also suggested that a two-factor model of
             externalizing behavior, defined as (1) ODD+ADHD+CD and (2)
             SUD with adult antisocial behavior sharing common variance
             with both factors, was necessary to explain the covariation
             in externalizing disorders. The two-factor model of
             externalizing behavior was then replicated using a
             nationally representative sample drawn from the National
             Comorbidity Survey-Replication data (n = 5,692). These
             results have important implications for the
             conceptualization of externalizing disorders in
             DSM-5.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-012-9674-z},
   Key = {fds271954}
}

@article{fds218849,
   Author = {Rabiner, D.L. and Carrig, M. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Attention problems and academic achievement: do persistent
             and earlier-emerging problems have more adverse long-term
             effects?},
   Journal = {Journal of Attention Disorders},
   Year = {2013},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1087054713507974},
   Doi = {10.1177/1087054713507974},
   Key = {fds218849}
}

@article{fds224095,
   Author = {Racz, S.J. and King, K.M. and Wu, J. and Witkiewitz, K. and McMahon, R.J. and Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {The predictive utility of a brief kindergarten screening
             measure of child behavior problems},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {81},
   Pages = {588-599},
   Year = {2013},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0032366},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0032366},
   Key = {fds224095}
}

@article{fds271956,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Godwin, J and Gr, CPPR},
   Title = {Social-Information-Processing Patterns Mediate the Impact of
             Preventive Intervention on Adolescent Antisocial
             Behavior},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {456-465},
   Year = {2013},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23406610},
   Abstract = {In the study reported here, we tested the hypothesis that
             the Fast Track preventive intervention's positive impact on
             antisocial behavior in adolescence is mediated by its impact
             on social-cognitive processes during elementary school. Fast
             Track is the largest and longest federally funded preventive
             intervention trial for children showing aggressive behavior
             at an early age. Participants were 891 high-risk
             kindergarten children (69% male, 31% female; 49% ethnic
             minority, 51% ethnic majority) who were randomly assigned to
             an intervention or a control group by school cluster.
             Multiyear intervention addressed social-cognitive processes
             through social-skill training groups, parent groups,
             classroom curricula, peer coaching, and tutoring. Assigning
             children to the intervention decreased their mean
             antisocial-behavior score after Grade 9 by 0.16 standardized
             units (p < .01). Structural equation models indicated that
             27% of the intervention's impact on antisocial behavior was
             mediated by its impact on three social-cognitive processes:
             reducing hostile-attribution biases, increasing competent
             response generation to social problems, and devaluing
             aggression. These findings support a model of antisocial
             behavioral development mediated by social-cognitive
             processes, and they guide prevention planners to focus on
             these processes.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0956797612457394},
   Key = {fds271956}
}

@article{fds272008,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Di Giunta and L and Deater-Deckard, K and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Tapanya, S and Tirado, LMU and Zelli, A and Al-Hassan,
             SM and Alampay, LP and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L},
   Title = {Boys’ and Girls’ Relational and Physical Aggression in
             Nine Countries.},
   Journal = {Aggressive Behavior},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {298-308},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0096-140X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ab.21433},
   Abstract = {Distinguishing between relational and physical aggression
             has become a key feature of many developmental studies in
             North America and Western Europe, but very little
             information is available on relational and physical
             aggression in more diverse cultural contexts. This study
             examined the factor structure of, associations between, and
             gender differences in relational and physical aggression in
             China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines,
             Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Children ages
             7–10 years (N = 1,410) reported on their relationally and
             physically aggressive behavior. Relational and physical
             aggression shared a common factor structure across
             countries. In all nine countries, relational and physical
             aggression were significantly correlated (average r = .49).
             Countries differed in the mean levels of both relational and
             physical aggression that children reported using and with
             respect to whether children reported using more physical
             than relational aggression or more relational than physical
             aggression. Boys reported being more physically aggressive
             than girls across all nine countries; no consistent gender
             differences emerged in relational aggression. Despite
             mean-level differences in relational and physical aggression
             across countries, the findings provided support for
             cross-country similarities in associations between
             relational and physical aggression as well as links between
             gender and aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1002/ab.21433},
   Key = {fds272008}
}

@article{fds272010,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Wager, LB and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Forms of Spanking and Children's Externalizing
             Behaviors.},
   Journal = {Family Relations},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {224-236},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0197-6664},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22544988},
   Abstract = {Research suggests that corporal punishment is related to
             higher levels of child externalizing behavior, but there has
             been controversy regarding whether infrequent, mild spanking
             predicts child externalizing or whether more severe and
             frequent forms of corporal punishment account for the link.
             Mothers rated the frequency with which they spanked and
             whether they spanked with a hand or object when their child
             was 6, 7, and 8 years old. Mothers and teachers rated
             children's externalizing behaviors at each age. Analyses of
             covariance revealed higher levels of mother-reported
             externalizing behavior for children who experienced harsh
             spanking. Structural equation models for children who
             experienced no spanking or mild spanking only revealed that
             spanking was related to concurrent and prior, but not
             subsequent, externalizing. Mild spanking in one year was a
             risk factor for harsh spanking in the next year. Findings
             are discussed in the context of efforts to promote
             children's rights to protection.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1741-3729.2011.00700.x},
   Key = {fds272010}
}

@article{fds272024,
   Author = {Kupersmidt, JB and Stelter, R and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Development and validation of the social information
             processing application: a Web-based measure of social
             information processing patterns in elementary school-age
             boys.},
   Journal = {Psychological Assessment},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {834-847},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21534693},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric
             properties of an audio computer-assisted self-interviewing
             Web-based software application called the Social Information
             Processing Application (SIP-AP) that was designed to assess
             social information processing skills in boys in 3rd through
             5th grades. This study included a racially and ethnically
             diverse sample of 244 boys ages 8 through 12 (M = 9.4) from
             public elementary schools in 3 states. The SIP-AP includes 8
             videotaped vignettes, filmed from the first-person
             perspective, that depict common misunderstandings among
             boys. Each vignette shows a negative outcome for the victim
             and ambiguous intent on the part of the perpetrator. Boys
             responded to 16 Web-based questions representing the 5
             social information processing mechanisms, after viewing each
             vignette. Parents and teachers completed measures assessing
             boys' antisocial behavior. Confirmatory factor analyses
             revealed that a model positing the original 5 cognitive
             mechanisms fit the data well when the items representing
             prosocial cognitions were included on their own factor,
             creating a 6th factor. The internal consistencies for each
             of the 16 individual cognitions as well as for the 6
             cognitive mechanism scales were excellent. Boys with
             elevated scores on 5 of the 6 cognitive mechanisms exhibited
             more antisocial behavior than boys whose scores were not
             elevated. These findings highlight the need for further
             research on the measurement of prosocial cognitions or
             cognitive strengths in boys in addition to assessing
             cognitive deficits. Findings suggest that the SIP-AP is a
             reliable and valid tool for use in future research of social
             information processing skills in boys.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0023621},
   Key = {fds272024}
}

@article{fds272028,
   Author = {Latendresse, SJ and Bates, JE and Goodnight, JA and Lansford, JE and Budde, JP and Goate, A and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Dick,
             DM},
   Title = {Differential susceptibility to adolescent externalizing
             trajectories: examining the interplay between CHRM2 and peer
             group antisocial behavior.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1797-1814},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01640.x},
   Abstract = {The present study characterized prototypical patterns of
             development in self-reported externalizing behavior, between
             12 and 22 years of age, within a community sample of 452
             genotyped individuals. A Caucasian subset (n = 378) was then
             examined to determine whether their probabilities of
             displaying discrete trajectories were differentially
             associated with CHRM2, a gene implicated in self-regulatory
             processes across a range of externalizing behaviors, and if
             affiliating with antisocial peers moderated these
             associations. Findings indicate that relative to a normative
             "lower risk" externalizing trajectory, likelihood of
             membership in two "higher risk" trajectories increased with
             each additional copy of the minor allelic variant at CHRM2,
             and that this association was exacerbated among those
             exposed to higher levels of peer group antisocial
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01640.x},
   Key = {fds272028}
}

@article{fds272031,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Laird, RD and Shaw, DS and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Reciprocal relations between parents' physical discipline
             and children's externalizing behavior during middle
             childhood and adolescence.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {225-238},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21262050},
   Abstract = {Using data from two long-term longitudinal projects, we
             investigated reciprocal relations between maternal reports
             of physical discipline and teacher and self-ratings of child
             externalizing behavior, accounting for continuity in both
             discipline and externalizing over time. In Study 1, which
             followed a community sample of 562 boys and girls from age 6
             to 9, high levels of physical discipline in a given year
             predicted high levels of externalizing behavior in the next
             year, and externalizing behavior in a given year predicted
             high levels of physical discipline in the next year. In
             Study 2, which followed an independent sample of 290 lower
             income, higher risk boys from age 10 to 15, mother-reported
             physical discipline in a given year predicted child ratings
             of antisocial behavior in the next year, but child
             antisocial behavior in a given year did not predict parents'
             use of physical discipline in the next year. In neither
             sample was there evidence that associations between physical
             discipline and child externalizing changed as the child
             aged, and findings were not moderated by gender, race,
             socioeconomic status, or the severity of the physical
             discipline. Implications for the reciprocal nature of the
             socialization process and the risks associated with physical
             discipline are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579410000751},
   Key = {fds272031}
}

@article{fds272033,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The effects of the fast track preventive intervention on the
             development of conduct disorder across childhood.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {331-345},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000286986600021&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The impact of the Fast Track intervention on externalizing
             disorders across childhood was examined. Eight
             hundred-ninety-one early-starting children (69% male; 51%
             African American) were randomly assigned by matched sets of
             schools to intervention or control conditions. The 10-year
             intervention addressed parent behavior-management, child
             social cognitive skills, reading, home visiting, mentoring,
             and classroom curricula. Outcomes included psychiatric
             diagnoses after grades 3, 6, 9, and 12 for conduct disorder,
             oppositional defiant disorder, attention deficit
             hyperactivity disorder, and any externalizing disorder.
             Significant interaction effects between intervention and
             initial risk level indicated that intervention prevented the
             lifetime prevalence of all diagnoses, but only among those
             at highest initial risk, suggesting that targeted
             intervention can prevent externalizing disorders to promote
             the raising of healthy children.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01558.x},
   Key = {fds272033}
}

@article{fds272012,
   Author = {Wager, L and Lansford, JE and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Reasoning, denying privileges, yelling, and spanking: Ethnic
             differences and associations with child externalizing
             behavior},
   Journal = {Parenting: Science and Practice},
   Year = {2011},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15295192.2011.613727},
   Doi = {10.1080/15295192.2011.613727},
   Key = {fds272012}
}

@article{fds272034,
   Author = {Thomas, DE and Bierman, KL and Powers, CJ and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ},
   Title = {The influence of classroom aggression and classroom climate
             on the early development of aggressive-disruptive behavior
             problems in school},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {751-757},
   Year = {2011},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/7997 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272034}
}

@article{fds272014,
   Author = {Miller, S and Malone, PS and Dodge, KA and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Developmental trajectories of boys' and girls' delinquency:
             sex differences and links to later adolescent
             outcomes.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {1021-1032},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-010-9430-1},
   Abstract = {This study examined gender differences in trajectories of
             delinquent behaviors over a 6-year period in adolescence and
             differential outcomes of these diverse developmental
             pathways. Participants were 754 children who were part of a
             longitudinal study of the development of early starting
             conduct problems. Four trajectory patterns were identified
             across grades 7-12: increasing, desisting, chronic, and
             nonproblem groups. Although the proportion of boys and girls
             varied across the pathways, both genders were represented on
             these trajectories. Boys were more represented on the
             chronic and desisting trajectories; girls were more
             represented in the nonproblem group. However, the proportion
             of boys and girls was similar in the increasing trajectory.
             Trajectory membership significantly predicted age 19
             outcomes for partner violence, risky sexual behavior and
             depression, and the risk conferred on these negative
             adjustment outcomes did not vary by gender. The overall
             pattern was characterized by poor outcomes at age 19 for
             youth in both the chronic and the increasing trajectories.
             The major conclusion is that, other than base rate
             differences, developmental patterns and outcomes for girls
             mimic those previously found for boys.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-010-9430-1},
   Key = {fds272014}
}

@article{fds272039,
   Author = {Wu, J and Witkiewitz, K and McMahon, RJ and Dodge, KA and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {A parallel process growth mixture model of conduct problems
             and substance use with risky sexual behavior.},
   Journal = {Drug and Alcohol Dependence},
   Volume = {111},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {207-214},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0376-8716},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.04.013},
   Abstract = {Conduct problems, substance use, and risky sexual behavior
             have been shown to coexist among adolescents, which may lead
             to significant health problems. The current study was
             designed to examine relations among these problem behaviors
             in a community sample of children at high risk for conduct
             disorder. A latent growth model of childhood conduct
             problems showed a decreasing trend from grades K to 5.
             During adolescence, four concurrent conduct problem and
             substance use trajectory classes were identified (high
             conduct problems and high substance use, increasing conduct
             problems and increasing substance use, minimal conduct
             problems and increasing substance use, and minimal conduct
             problems and minimal substance use) using a parallel process
             growth mixture model. Across all substances (tobacco, binge
             drinking, and marijuana use), higher levels of childhood
             conduct problems during kindergarten predicted a greater
             probability of classification into more problematic
             adolescent trajectory classes relative to less problematic
             classes. For tobacco and binge drinking models, increases in
             childhood conduct problems over time also predicted a
             greater probability of classification into more problematic
             classes. For all models, individuals classified into more
             problematic classes showed higher proportions of early
             sexual intercourse, infrequent condom use, receiving money
             for sexual services, and ever contracting an STD.
             Specifically, tobacco use and binge drinking during early
             adolescence predicted higher levels of sexual risk taking
             into late adolescence. Results highlight the importance of
             studying the conjoint relations among conduct problems,
             substance use, and risky sexual behavior in a unified
             model.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.04.013},
   Key = {fds272039}
}

@article{fds272041,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Developmental cascades of peer rejection, social information
             processing biases, and aggression during middle
             childhood.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {593-602},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20576181},
   Abstract = {This study tested a developmental cascade model of peer
             rejection, social information processing (SIP), and
             aggression using data from 585 children assessed at 12 time
             points from kindergarten through Grade 3. Peer rejection had
             direct effects on subsequent SIP problems and aggression.
             SIP had direct effects on subsequent peer rejection and
             aggression. Aggression had direct effects on subsequent peer
             rejection. Each construct also had indirect effects on each
             of the other constructs. These findings advance the
             literature beyond a simple mediation approach by
             demonstrating how each construct effects changes in the
             others in a snowballing cycle over time. The progressions of
             SIP problems and aggression cascaded through lower liking,
             and both better SIP skills and lower aggression facilitated
             the progress of social preference. Findings are discussed in
             terms of the dynamic, developmental relations among social
             environments, cognitions, and behavioral
             adjustment.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579410000301},
   Key = {fds272041}
}

@article{fds272042,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Resear,
             CPP},
   Title = {Fast Track intervention effects on youth arrests and
             delinquency},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Criminology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {131-157},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1573-3750},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000295470600002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11292-010-9091-7},
   Key = {fds272042}
}

@article{fds272045,
   Author = {Edwards, AC and Dodge, KA and Latendresse, SJ and Lansford, JE and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Budde, JP and Goate, AM and Dick,
             DM},
   Title = {MAOA-uVNTR and early physical discipline interact to
             influence delinquent behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {679-687},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0021-9630},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=000272027300049&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the
             monoamine oxidizing gene monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) has been
             associated with behavioral sensitivity to adverse
             environmental conditions in multiple studies (e.g., Caspi et
             al. 2002; Kim-Cohen et al., 2006). The present study
             investigates the effects of genotype and early physical
             discipline on externalizing behavior. We expand on the
             current literature in our assessment of externalizing,
             incorporating information across multiple reporters and over
             a broad developmental time period, and in our understanding
             of environmental risk.This study uses data from the Child
             Development Project, an ongoing longitudinal study following
             a community sample of children beginning at age 5. Physical
             discipline before age 6 was quantified using a subset of
             questions from the Conflict Tactics Scale (Straus, 1979).
             Externalizing behavior was assessed in the male,
             European-American sub-sample (N = 250) by parent, teacher,
             and self-report using Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist,
             Teacher Report Form, and Youth Self-Report (Achenbach,
             1991), at 17 time points from ages 6 to 22. Regression
             analyses tested the influence of genotype, physical
             discipline, and their interaction on externalizing behavior,
             and its subscales, delinquency and aggression.We found a
             significant interaction effect between genotype and physical
             discipline on levels of delinquent behavior. Similar trends
             were observed for aggression and overall externalizing
             behavior, although these did not reach statistical
             significance. Main effects of physical discipline held for
             all outcome variables, and no main effects held for
             genotype.The adverse consequences of physical discipline on
             forms of externalizing behavior are exacerbated by an
             underlying biological risk conferred by MAOA
             genotype.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1469-7610.2009.02196.x},
   Key = {fds272045}
}

@article{fds272017,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Does physical abuse in early childhood predict substance use
             in adolescence and early adulthood?},
   Journal = {Child Maltreatment},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {190-194},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20019026},
   Abstract = {Prospective longitudinal data from 585 families were used to
             examine parents' reports of child physical abuse in the
             first 5 years of life as a predictor of substance use at
             ages 12, 16, and 24. Path analyses revealed that physical
             abuse in the first 5 years of life predicted subsequent
             substance use for females but not males. We found a direct
             effect of early physical abuse on girls'substance use at age
             12 and indirect effects on substance use at age 16 and age
             24 through substance use at age 12. For boys, age 12
             substance use predicted age 16 substance use, and age 16
             substance use predicted age 24 substance use, but physical
             abuse in the first 5 years of life was unrelated to
             subsequent substance use. These findings suggest that for
             females, a mechanism of influence of early physical abuse on
             substance use into early adulthood appears to be through
             precocious initiation of substance use in early
             adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1077559509352359},
   Key = {fds272017}
}

@article{fds272052,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and McCourt, SN},
   Title = {Translating models of antisocial behavioral development into
             efficacious intervention policy to prevent adolescent
             violence.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychobiology},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {277-285},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20175096},
   Abstract = {Adolescent chronic antisocial behavior is costly but
             concentrated in a relatively small number of individuals.
             The search for effective preventive interventions draws from
             empirical findings of three kinds of gene-by-environment
             interactions: (1) parenting behaviors mute the impact of
             genes; (2) genes alter the impact of traumatic environmental
             experiences such as physical abuse and peer social
             rejection; and (3) individuals and environments influence
             each other in a dynamic developmental cascade. Thus,
             environmental interventions that focus on high-risk youth
             may prove effective. The Fast Track intervention and
             randomized controlled trial are described. The intervention
             is a 10-year series of efforts to produce proximal change in
             parenting, peer relations, social cognition, and academic
             performance in order to lead to distal prevention of
             adolescent conduct disorder. Findings indicate that conduct
             disorder cases can be prevented, but only in the highest
             risk group of children. Implications for policy are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1002/dev.20440},
   Key = {fds272052}
}

@article{fds272054,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Domain specificity in relationship history,
             social-information processing, and violent behavior in early
             adulthood.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {98},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {190-200},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0017991},
   Abstract = {Using prospective longitudinal data, we tested 5 hypotheses:
             (a) that the relation between earlier developmental
             experiences (peer social rejection and victimization in a
             romantic relationship) and adult violent behavior toward
             peers and romantic partners is specific to relationship
             domain; (b) that the relation between social-information
             processing (SIP) biases and subsequent violence is also
             specific to relational domain (romantic partner vs. peer);
             (c) that the relation between developmental experiences and
             SIP biases is domain specific; (d) that domain-specific SIP
             mediates the impact of earlier developmental experiences on
             later violent behavior; and (e) that harsh parenting early
             in life is a domain-general predictor of SIP and later
             violent behavior. Harsh parenting was assessed through
             interviews with parents when their children were age 5
             years. Classroom sociometric assessments indexing peer
             rejection were completed in elementary school, and
             self-report of victimization by romantic partners was
             provided at age 18 years. SIP was assessed via interview at
             age 22 years, and violent behavior was measured via self-
             and partner report at ages 23 years and 24 years. Structural
             equation analyses revealed specificity in the relation
             between developmental experiences and violence and in the
             prediction to and from SIP in the peer domain, but not in
             the romantic-relationship domain. The impact of early harsh
             treatment on violence toward peers was mediated by SIP
             biases in the peer domain. These findings provide support
             for domain specificity in the peer domain but for
             cross-domain generality in the romantic relationship domain
             in the development of violent behavior in early
             adulthood.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0017991},
   Key = {fds272054}
}

@article{fds272015,
   Author = {Donahue, KL and D'Onofrio, BM and Bates, JE and Lansford, JE and Dodge,
             KA and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Early exposure to parents' relationship instability:
             Implications for sexual behavior and depression in
             adolescence},
   Journal = {Journal of Adolescent Health},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {547-554},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {1054-139X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.04.004},
   Abstract = {Purpose: Examine the effects of the timing of parents'
             relationship instability on adolescent sexual and mental
             health. Methods: We assessed whether the timing of parents'
             relationship instability predicted adolescents' history of
             sexual partnerships (SP) and major depressive episodes.
             Multivariate logistic regression analyses controlled for
             potential mediators related to parenting and the family,
             including parent knowledge of activities, parent-child
             relationship quality, number of parents' post-separation
             relationship transitions, and number of available
             caregivers. Participants were assessed annually from age 5
             through young adulthood as part of a multisite community
             sample (N = 585). Results: Participants who experienced
             parents' relationship instability before age 5 were more
             likely to report SP at age 16 (odds ratio [OR]adj = 1.58) or
             an episode of major depression during adolescence (ORadj =
             2.61). Greater parent knowledge at age 12 decreased the odds
             of SP at age 16, but none of the hypothesized parenting and
             family variables statistically mediated the association
             between early instability and SP or major depressive
             episode. Conclusions: These results suggest that
             experiencing parents' relationship instability in early
             childhood is associated with sexual behavior and major
             depression in adolescence, but these associations are not
             explained by the parenting and family variables included in
             our analyses. Limitations of the current study and
             implications for future research are discussed. © 2010
             Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.04.004},
   Key = {fds272015}
}

@article{fds272038,
   Author = {McMahon, RJ and Witkiewitz, K and Kotler, JS},
   Title = {Predictive validity of callous–unemotional traits measured
             in early adolescence with respect to multiple antisocial
             outcomes.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {119},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {752-763},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0020796},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0020796},
   Key = {fds272038}
}

@article{fds272040,
   Author = {Thomas, DE and Bierman, KL and Thompson, C and Powers, CJ and Coie,
             JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon,
             RJ},
   Title = {Double jeopardy: Child and school characteristics that
             undermine school readiness and predict disruptive behavior
             at school entry},
   Journal = {School Psychology Review},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/7998 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272040}
}

@article{fds272043,
   Author = {Lanza, and T, S and Rhoades, and L, B and Nix, and L, R and Greenberg, and T,
             M and Group, TCPPR},
   Title = {Modeling the interplay of multilevel risk factors for future
             academic and behavior problems: A person-centered
             approach},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {22},
   Pages = {313-335},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579410000088},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579410000088},
   Key = {fds272043}
}

@article{fds272047,
   Author = {Fontaine, RG and Yang, C and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Development of response evaluation and decision (RED) and
             antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Pages = {615-626},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0014142},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0014142},
   Key = {fds272047}
}

@article{fds272055,
   Author = {Jones, D and Godwin, J and Dodge, KA and Bierman, K and Coie, JD and Greenberg, M and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes,
             E},
   Title = {The impact of the Fast Track Prevention Trial on health
             services utilization by youth at risk for conduct
             problems},
   Journal = {Pediatrics},
   Volume = {125},
   Pages = {130-136},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-0322},
   Doi = {10.1542/peds.2009-0322},
   Key = {fds272055}
}

@article{fds272060,
   Author = {Erath, SA and Keiley, MK and Pettit, GS and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Behavioral predictors of mental health service utilization
             in childhood through adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics :
             Jdbp},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {481-488},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0196-206X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DBP.0b013e3181c35938},
   Abstract = {This study investigated predictors of mental health service
             utilization from age 5 through age 16.Data were collected on
             a community sample of 399 children, including 338 European
             Americans and 61 African Americans. Internalizing and
             externalizing behaviors were assessed by maternal and
             teacher reports in kindergarten. History of mental health
             service utilization was assessed by maternal reports when
             participants were 16 years old.On average, the probability
             of first-time mental health service utilization increased in
             early to middle childhood, stabilized, and then increased in
             early adolescence. Mother reports of internalizing behaviors
             (independent of teacher reports of externalizing behaviors)
             predicted an increased likelihood of service use among
             European American children but a decreased likelihood of
             service use among African American children. Externalizing
             behaviors (independent of internalizing behaviors) predicted
             a higher likelihood of first-time service use in middle
             childhood. The combination of elevated internalizing and
             externalizing behaviors predicted a higher likelihood of
             first-time service use in adolescence, mainly among European
             American children.This study provides evidence that elevated
             mother-reported internalizing behaviors are less likely to
             forecast mental health service utilization among African
             American children compared with European American children.
             To meet the mental health service needs of all children, it
             is critical to further examine reasons for service
             utilization and underutilization among children with
             internalizing problems.},
   Doi = {10.1097/DBP.0b013e3181c35938},
   Key = {fds272060}
}

@article{fds272078,
   Author = {Jones, DE and Foster, EM and Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {Service use patterns for adolescents with ADHD and comorbid
             conduct disorder.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Behavioral Health Services &
             Research},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {436-449},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11414-008-9133-3},
   Abstract = {Service use patterns and costs of youth diagnosed with
             attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid
             conduct disorder (CD) were assessed across adolescence (ages
             12 through 17). Featured service sectors include mental
             health, school services, and the juvenile justice system.
             Data are provided by three cohorts from the Fast Track
             evaluation and are based on parent report. Diagnostic groups
             are identified through a structured assessment. Results show
             that public costs for youth with ADHD exceed $40,000 per
             child on average over a 6-year period, more than doubling
             service expenditures for a non-ADHD group. Public costs for
             children with comorbid ADHD and CD double the costs of those
             with ADHD alone. Varying patterns by service sector,
             diagnosis, and across time indicate different needs for
             youth with different conditions and at different ages and
             can provide important information for prevention and
             treatment researchers.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11414-008-9133-3},
   Key = {fds272078}
}

@article{fds272066,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Dodge, KA and Shaw, DS and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Trajectories of physical discipline: early childhood
             antecedents and developmental outcomes.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {80},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1385-1402},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19765007},
   Abstract = {This study examined childhood antecedents and developmental
             outcomes associated with trajectories of mild and harsh
             parental physical discipline. Interview, questionnaire, and
             observational data were available from 499 children followed
             from ages 5 to 16 and from 258 children in an independent
             sample followed from ages 5 to 15. Analyses indicated
             distinct physical discipline trajectory groups that varied
             in frequency of physical discipline and rate of change. In
             both samples, family ecological disadvantage differentiated
             the trajectory groups; in the first sample, early child
             externalizing also differentiated the groups. Controlling
             for early childhood externalizing, the minimal/ceasing
             trajectory groups were associated with the lowest levels of
             subsequent adolescent antisocial behavior in both samples
             and with parent-adolescent positive relationship quality in
             the second sample.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01340.x},
   Key = {fds272066}
}

@article{fds272059,
   Author = {Erath, SA and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Who Dislikes Whom, and For Whom Does It Matter: Predicting
             Aggression in Middle Childhood.},
   Journal = {Social Development (Oxford, England)},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {577-596},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0961-205X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9507.2008.00497.x},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the role of mutual dislike dyads
             (MDDs) in the development of aggressive behavior across the
             middle childhood years. Of particular interest was whether
             involvement in MDDs predicted later aggression, and whether
             the magnitude of the association between MDDs and later
             aggression varied based on characteristics of target
             children and 'others' involved in their MDDs. Data were
             collected on a community sample of 453 children
             participating in an ongoing longitudinal study. Classroom
             peer nomination and rating-scale measures were collected in
             kindergarten through third grade; aggressive behavior
             problems were assessed via teacher ratings in the early
             elementary years (kindergarten and first grade) and late
             elementary years (fourth and fifth grade). MDD involvement
             in the middle elementary years (second and third grade) was
             associated with higher levels of aggression in the late
             elementary years among boys (but not girls), and these
             predictions held after controlling for group-level peer
             disliking in the middle elementary years, aggression in the
             early elementary years, and demographic variables. The
             association between MDD involvement and subsequent
             aggression was also qualified by the aggressiveness of
             others in children's MDDs: Having more MDDs predicted later
             aggression only among boys whose MDDs involved mostly
             non-aggressive others.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9507.2008.00497.x},
   Key = {fds272059}
}

@article{fds272061,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Mechanisms of Gene-Environment Interaction Effects in the
             Development of Conduct Disorder.},
   Journal = {Perspectives on Psychological Science : a Journal of the
             Association for Psychological Science},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {408-414},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1745-6916},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19779577},
   Abstract = {The gene-environment interaction effect in the development
             of conduct disorder is one of the most important discoveries
             of the past decade, but the mechanisms through which this
             effect operates remain elusive. I propose a model of these
             processes that focuses on the individual's response to a
             threatening stimulus in ongoing social interaction. The
             individual's response coordinates three interrelated
             systems: neural, autonomic, and information-processing. In
             each system, adaptive, evolutionarily selected response
             patterns characterize normal responding, but in
             psychopathology these patterns have gone awry. Antecedents
             of individual differences in these response patterns arise
             from genetic polymorphisms, adverse environmental
             experiences early in life, and their interaction. Programs
             of research are proposed to test hypotheses in the model
             through longitudinal, experimental, and clinical
             intervention methods. This model can serve as a template for
             inquiry in other forms of developmental psychopathology.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1745-6924.2009.01147.x},
   Key = {fds272061}
}

@article{fds272058,
   Author = {Fontaine, RG and Yang, C and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Development of Response Evaluation and Decision (RED) and
             antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {447-459},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0014142},
   Abstract = {Using longitudinal data on 585 youths (48% female; 17%
             African American, 2% other ethnic minority), the authors
             examined the development of social response evaluation and
             decision (RED) across childhood (Study 1; kindergarten
             through Grade 3) and adolescence (Study 2; Grades 8 and 11).
             Participants completed hypothetical-vignette-based RED
             assessments, and their antisocial behaviors were measured by
             multiple raters. Structural equation modeling and linear
             growth analyses indicated that children differentiate
             alternative responses by Grade 3, but these RED responses
             were not consistently related to antisocial behavior.
             Adolescent analyses provided support for a model of multiple
             evaluative domains of RED and showed strong relations
             between aggressive response evaluations, nonaggressive
             response evaluations, and antisocial behavior. Findings
             indicate that RED becomes more differential (or specific to
             response style) and is increasingly related to youths'
             antisocial conduct across development.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0014142},
   Key = {fds272058}
}

@article{fds272065,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Community intervention and public policy in the prevention
             of antisocial behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {194-200},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19220602},
   Abstract = {As academic clinical science moves to community intervention
             to achieve impact on population prevalence of antisocial
             behavior disorders, exciting potential is tempered by
             realistic caution. Three kinds of efforts are noted. First,
             individual evidence-based therapies are being implemented at
             scale. Difficulties in high-fidelity implementation are
             noted, and the unlikelihood of population impact is
             highlighted. Second, communities are receiving new resources
             to support individuals, although connecting community
             resources to highest-risk individuals is difficult. Third,
             community factors are being targeted for change through
             policy reform, with mixed results. As the field moves in
             this direction, the importance of adhering to principles of
             scientific rigor and empirical evidence is emphasized, to
             keep scientist-practitioners from overstepping their
             bounds.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01985.x},
   Key = {fds272065}
}

@article{fds167314,
   Author = {Jones, D. and Foster, E.M. and the Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Service use patterns for adolescents with ADHD and comorbid
             conduct disorder},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Health Service and
             Research},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {436-449},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11414-008-9133-3},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11414-008-9133-3},
   Key = {fds167314}
}

@article{fds272083,
   Author = {Fite, JE and Bates, JE and Holtzworth-Munroe, A and Dodge, KA and Nay,
             SY and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Social information processing mediates the intergenerational
             transmission of aggressiveness in romantic
             relationships.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {367-376},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0893-3200},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.22.3.367},
   Abstract = {This study explored the K. A. Dodge (1986) model of social
             information processing as a mediator of the association
             between interparental relationship conflict and subsequent
             offspring romantic relationship conflict in young adulthood.
             The authors tested 4 social information processing stages
             (encoding, hostile attributions, generation of aggressive
             responses, and positive evaluation of aggressive responses)
             in separate models to explore their independent effects as
             potential mediators. There was no evidence of mediation for
             encoding and attributions. However, there was evidence of
             significant mediation for both the response generation and
             response evaluation stages of the model. Results suggest
             that the ability of offspring to generate varied social
             responses and effectively evaluate the potential outcome of
             their responses at least partially mediates the
             intergenerational transmission of relationship
             conflict.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.22.3.367},
   Key = {fds272083}
}

@article{fds272085,
   Author = {Crozier, JC and Dodge, KA and Fontaine, RG and Lansford, JE and Bates,
             JE and Pettit, GS and Levenson, RW},
   Title = {Social information processing and cardiac predictors of
             adolescent antisocial behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {117},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {253-267},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0021-843X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18489202},
   Abstract = {The relations among social information processing (SIP),
             cardiac activity, and antisocial behavior were investigated
             in adolescents over a 3-year period (from ages 16 to 18) in
             a community sample of 585 (48% female, 17% African American)
             participants. Antisocial behavior was assessed in all 3
             years. Cardiac and SIP measures were collected between the
             first and second behavioral assessments. Cardiac measures
             assessed resting heart rate (RHR) and heart rate reactivity
             (HRR) as participants imagined themselves being victimized
             in hypothetical provocation situations portrayed via video
             vignettes. The findings were moderated by gender and
             supported a multiprocess model in which antisocial behavior
             is a function of trait-like low RHR (for male individuals
             only) and deviant SIP. In addition, deviant SIP mediated the
             effects of elevated HRR reactivity and elevated RHR on
             antisocial behavior (for male and female
             participants).},
   Doi = {10.1037/0021-843X.117.2.253},
   Key = {fds272085}
}

@article{fds272071,
   Author = {Stearns, E and Dodge, KA and Nicholson, M},
   Title = {Peer Contextual Influences on the Growth of
             Authority-Acceptance Problems in Early Elementary
             School.},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {208-231},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0272-930X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/mpq.2008.0018},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the effects of the peer social
             context and child characteristics on the growth of
             authority-acceptance behavior problems across first, second,
             and third grades, using data from the normative sample of
             the Fast Track Project. Three hundred sixty-eight European
             American and African American boys and girls (51% male; 46%
             African American) and their classmates were assessed in each
             grade by teacher ratings on the Teacher Observation of Child
             Adaptation-Revised. Children's growth in
             authority-acceptance behavior problems across time was
             partially attributable to the level of disruptive behavior
             in the class-room peer context into which they were placed.
             Peer-context influence, however, were strongest among
             same-gender peers. Findings held for both boys and girls,
             both European Americans and African Americans, and
             nondeviant, marginally deviant, and highly deviant children.
             Findings suggest that children learn and follow behavioral
             norms from their same-gender peers within the
             classroom.},
   Doi = {10.1353/mpq.2008.0018},
   Key = {fds272071}
}

@article{fds272084,
   Author = {Slough, NM and McMahon, RJ and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Foster, EM and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Preventing Serious Conduct Problems in School-Age Youths:
             The Fast Track Program.},
   Journal = {Cognitive and Behavioral Practice},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3-17},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1077-7229},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19890487},
   Abstract = {Children with early-starting conduct Problems have a very
             poor prognosis and exact a high cost to society. The Fast
             Track project is a multisite, collaborative research project
             investigating the efficacy of a comprehensive, long-term,
             multicomponent intervention designed to prevent the
             development of serious conduct problems in high-risk
             children. In this article, we (a) provide an overview of the
             development model that serves as the conceptual foundation
             for the Fast Track intervention and describe its integration
             into the intervention model; (b) outline the research design
             and intervention model, with an emphasis on the elementary
             school phase of the intervention; and (c) summarize findings
             to dale concerning intervention outcomes. We then provide a
             case illustration, and conclude with a discussion of
             guidelines for practitioners who work with children with
             conduct problems.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cbpra.2007.04.002},
   Key = {fds272084}
}

@article{fds151999,
   Author = {Dick, D.M. and Latendresse, S.J. and Lansford, J.E. and Budde, J.P. and Goate, A. and Dodge, K.A. and Pettit, G.S. and Bates,
             J.E.},
   Title = {The role of GABRA2 in trajectories of externalizing behavior
             across development and evidence of moderation by parental
             monitoring},
   Journal = {Archives of General Psychiatry},
   Volume = {66},
   Pages = {649-657.},
   Year = {2008},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2009.48},
   Doi = {10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2009.48},
   Key = {fds151999}
}

@article{fds272070,
   Author = {Schofield, and T, HL and Bierman, and L, K and Heinrichs, and B, and Nix, and L, R and Dodge, TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {Predicting early sexual activity with behavior problems
             exhibited at school entry and in preadolescence},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Pages = {1175-1188},
   Year = {2008},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-008-9252-6},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-008-9252-6},
   Key = {fds272070}
}

@article{fds272076,
   Author = {Goodnight, JA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Parents' campaigns to reduce their children's conduct
             problems: Interactions with temperamental resistance to
             control},
   Journal = {European Journal of Developmental Science},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {1/2},
   Pages = {100-119},
   Year = {2008},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/8000 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {Longitudinal studies have found associations between
             parenting and the development of conduct problems, and have
             found that resistant to control temperament moderates these
             associations. Intervention studies have found associations
             between intervention-induced changes in parenting and
             subsequent reductions in children’s conduct problems.
             However, no study to date has evaluated whether parents’
             self-initiated efforts to change their parenting practices
             affect children’s conduct problems and whether effects
             depend on children’s temperament. The current study asked
             whether parents’ concerted efforts, or campaigns, to
             increase their involvement and limit-setting were effective
             in reducing growth in conduct problems from late childhood
             to early adolescence. It also asked whether the effects of
             campaigns varied according to children’s levels of
             temperamental resistance to control. Analyses statistically
             controlled for parenting practices and conduct problems
             before the campaigns, socioeconomic status, gender, and
             ethnicity. Results indicated that campaigns that included
             increased involvement and limit-setting were beneficial only
             for youths who were rated in early childhood as
             temperamentally resistant to control. © 2008 Vandenhoeck &
             Ruprecht GmbH & Co. KG, Göttingen 2008.},
   Doi = {10.3233/DEV-2008-21207},
   Key = {fds272076}
}

@article{fds272094,
   Author = {Caprara, GV and Dodge, KA and Pastorelli, C and Zelli,
             A},
   Title = {How Marginal Deviations Sometimes Grow Into Serious
             Aggression.},
   Journal = {Child Development Perspectives},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {33-39},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1750-8592},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000207179600006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {We offer a theory of marginal deviations that articulates
             the processes through which initial behavior that is only
             slightly deviant from the norm gets transformed into more
             serious antisocial outcomes. We present evidence that, of
             the one third of the population that is marginally deviant,
             about one fourth (or 8% of the total population) becomes
             seriously deviant over time. Hypothesized factors in this
             transformation involve the child actor, peer
             observer-judges, and social transactions between them in
             processes that derive from self-fulfilling prophecies and
             dynamic systems theory. Hypotheses and studies are proposed
             to address the circumstances and processes that determine
             whether a marginal deviation will be bought back to the norm
             (through assimilation and attenuation) or accelerated to
             severe deviance (through accommodation and
             amplification).},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1750-8606.2007.00007.x},
   Key = {fds272094}
}

@article{fds272090,
   Author = {Hillemeier, and M, and Foster, and M, E and Heinrichs, and B, and Heier, and B, and Dodge, TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {Racial differences in the measurement of
             attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
             behaviors},
   Journal = {Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics},
   Volume = {28},
   Pages = {353-361},
   Year = {2007},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DBP.0b013e31811ff8b8},
   Doi = {10.1097/DBP.0b013e31811ff8b8},
   Key = {fds272090}
}

@article{fds272107,
   Author = {Fontaine, RG and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Real-Time Decision Making and Aggressive Behavior in Youth:
             A Heuristic Model of Response Evaluation and Decision
             (RED).},
   Journal = {Aggressive Behavior},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {604-624},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20802851},
   Abstract = {Considerable scientific and intervention attention has been
             paid to judgment and decision-making systems associated with
             aggressive behavior in youth. However, most empirical
             studies have investigated social-cognitive correlates of
             stable child and adolescent aggressiveness, and less is
             known about real-time decision making to engage in
             aggressive behavior. A model of real-time decision making
             must incorporate both impulsive actions and rational
             thought. The present paper advances a process model
             (response evaluation and decision; RED) of real-time
             behavioral judgments and decision making in aggressive
             youths with mathematic representations that may be used to
             quantify response strength. These components are a heuristic
             to describe decision making, though it is doubtful that
             individuals always mentally complete these steps. RED
             represents an organization of social-cognitive operations
             believed to be active during the response decision step of
             social information processing. The model posits that RED
             processes can be circumvented through impulsive responding.
             This article provides a description and integration of
             thoughtful, rational decision making and nonrational
             impulsivity in aggressive behavioral interactions.},
   Doi = {10.1002/ab.20150},
   Key = {fds272107}
}

@article{fds272126,
   Author = {Raine, A and Dodge, K and Loeber, R and Gatzke-Kopp, L and Lynam, D and Reynolds, C and Stouthamer-Loeber, M and Liu, J},
   Title = {The reactive–proactive aggression questionnaire:
             differential correlates of reactive and proactive aggression
             in adolescent boys},
   Journal = {Aggressive Behavior},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {159-171},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0096-140X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ab.20115},
   Abstract = {This study reports the development of the Reactive-Proactive
             Aggression Questionnaire (RPQ), and the differential
             correlates of these two forms of aggression. Antisocial,
             psychosocial and personality measures were obtained at ages
             7 and 16 years in schoolboys, while the RPQ was administered
             to 334 of the boys at age 16 years. Confirmatory factor
             analysis indicated a significant fit for a two-factor
             proactive-reactive model that replicated from one
             independent subsample to another. Proactive aggression was
             uniquely characterized at age 7 by initiation of fights,
             strong-arm tactics, delinquency, poor school motivation,
             poor peer relationships, single-parent status, psychosocial
             adversity, substance-abusing parents, and hyperactivity, and
             at age 16 by a psychopathic personality, blunted affect,
             delinquency, and serious violent offending. Reactive
             aggression was uniquely characterized at age 16 by
             impulsivity, hostility, social anxiety, lack of close
             friends, unusual perceptual experiences, and ideas of
             reference. Findings confirm and extend the differential
             correlates of proactive-reactive aggression, and demonstrate
             that this brief but reliable and valid self-report
             instrument can be used to assess proactive and reactive
             aggression in child and adolescent samples. © 2006
             Wiley-Liss, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/ab.20115},
   Key = {fds272126}
}

@article{fds272121,
   Author = {Milan, S and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Family instability and child maladjustment trajectories
             during elementary school.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {43-56},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-005-9007-6},
   Abstract = {This study examines the relation between family instability
             and child maladjustment over a 6-year period in 369 children
             from four communities. Measures were collected annually from
             kindergarten through fifth grade. In associative growth
             curve models, family instability trajectories predicted
             children's externalizing and internalizing behavior
             trajectories during this time period. High levels of family
             instability also incrementally predicted the likelihood of
             meeting criteria for a DSM IV diagnosis during elementary
             school, above and beyond prediction from earlier measures of
             maladjustment. However, the timing of family instability had
             a different effect on externalizing versus internalizing
             disorders. In general, stronger relations were found between
             family instability and externalizing behaviors relative to
             internalizing behaviors, although children with comorbid
             disorders experienced the highest levels of family
             instability.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-005-9007-6},
   Key = {fds272121}
}

@article{fds272082,
   Author = {Henry, and B, D and Miller-Johnson, and S, and Simon, and R, T and Schoeny, and E, M and Dodge, TM-SVPPKA and member},
   Title = {Validity of teacher ratings in selecting influential
             aggressive adolescents for a targeted preventive
             intervention},
   Journal = {Prevention Science},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {31-41},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds272082}
}

@article{fds272110,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Translational science in action: hostile attributional style
             and the development of aggressive behavior
             problems.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {791-814},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17152401},
   Abstract = {A model of the development of hostile attributional style
             and its role in children's aggressive behavior is proposed,
             based on the translation of basic science in ethology,
             neuroscience, social psychology, personality psychology, and
             developmental psychology. Theory and findings from these
             domains are reviewed and synthesized in the proposed model,
             which posits that (a) aggressive behavior and hostile
             attributions are universal human characteristics, (b)
             socialization leads to the development of benign
             attributions, (c) individual differences in attributional
             style account for differences in aggressive behavior, and
             (d) interventions to change attributions have the potential
             to alter antisocial development. Challenges for future
             research are described.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579406060391},
   Key = {fds272110}
}

@article{fds272122,
   Author = {Thomas, DE and Bierman, KL and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {The impact of classroom aggression on the development of
             aggressive behavior problems in children.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {471-487},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579406060251},
   Abstract = {Prior research suggests that exposure to elementary
             classrooms characterized by high levels of student
             aggression may contribute to the development of child
             aggressive behavior problems. To explore this process in
             more detail, this study followed a longitudinal sample of
             4,907 children and examined demographic factors associated
             with exposure to high-aggression classrooms, including
             school context factors (school size, student poverty levels,
             and rural vs. urban location) and child ethnicity (African
             American, European American). The developmental impact of
             different temporal patterns of exposure (e.g., primacy,
             recency, chronicity) to high-aggression classrooms was
             evaluated on child aggression. Analyses revealed that
             African American children attending large, urban schools
             that served socioeconomically disadvantaged students were
             more likely than other students to be exposed to
             high-aggressive classroom contexts. Hierarchical regressions
             demonstrated cumulative effects for temporal exposure,
             whereby children with multiple years of exposure showed
             higher levels of aggressive behavior after 3 years than
             children with primacy, less recent, and less chronic
             exposure, controlling for initial levels of aggression.
             Implications are discussed for developmental research and
             preventive interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579406060251},
   Key = {fds272122}
}

@article{fds272105,
   Author = {Ingoldsby, and M, E and Kohl, and O, G and McMahon, and J, R and Lengua, and L, and Dodge, TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {Conduct problems, depressive symptomatology and their
             co-occurring presentation in childhood as predictors of
             adjustment in early adolescence},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {603-621},
   Year = {2006},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-006-9044-9},
   Abstract = {The present study investigated patterns in the development
             of conduct problems (CP), depressive symptoms, and their
             co-occurrence, and relations to adjustment problems, over
             the transition from late childhood to early adolescence.
             Rates of depressive symptoms and CP during this
             developmental period vary by gender; yet, few studies
             involving non-clinical samples have examined co-occurring
             problems and adjustment outcomes across boys and girls. This
             study investigates the manifestation and change in CP and
             depressive symptom patterns in a large, multisite,
             gender-and ethnically-diverse sample of 431 youth from 5th
             to 7th grade. Indicators of CP, depressive symptoms, their
             co-occurrence, and adjustment outcomes were created from
             multiple reporters and measures. Hypotheses regarding gender
             differences were tested utilizing both categorical (i.e.,
             elevated symptom groups) and continuous analyses (i.e.,
             regressions predicting symptomatology and adjustment
             outcomes). Results were partially supportive of the dual
             failure model (Capaldi, 1991, 1992), with youth with
             co-occurring problems in 5th grade demonstrating
             significantly lower academic adjustment and social
             competence two years later. Both depressive symptoms and CP
             were risk factors for multiple negative adjustment outcomes.
             Co-occurring symptomatology and CP demonstrated more
             stability and was associated with more severe adjustment
             problems than depressive symptoms over time. Categorical
             analyses suggested that, in terms of adjustment problems,
             youth with cooccurring symptomatology were generally no
             worse off than those with CP-alone, and those with
             depressive symptomsalone were similar over time to those
             showing no symptomatology at all. Few gender differences
             were noted in the relations among CP, depressive symptoms,
             and adjustment over time. © Springer Science+Business
             Media, LLC 2006.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-006-9044-9},
   Key = {fds272105}
}

@article{fds272287,
   Author = {Jaffee, SR and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Dodge, KA and Rutter, M and Taylor, A and Tully, LA},
   Title = {Nature X nurture: genetic vulnerabilities interact with
             physical maltreatment to promote conduct
             problems.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {67-84},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15971760},
   Abstract = {Maltreatment places children at risk for psychiatric
             morbidity, especially conduct problems. However, not all
             maltreated children develop conduct problems. We tested
             whether the effect of physical maltreatment on risk for
             conduct problems was strongest among those who were at high
             genetic risk for these problems using data from the E-risk
             Study, a representative cohort of 1,116 5-year-old British
             twin pairs and their families. Children's conduct problems
             were ascertained via parent and teacher interviews. Physical
             maltreatment was ascertained via parent report. Children's
             genetic risk for conduct problems was estimated as a
             function of their co-twin's conduct disorder status and the
             pair's zygosity. The effect of maltreatment on risk for
             conduct problems was strongest among those at high genetic
             risk. The experience of maltreatment was associated with an
             increase of 2% in the probability of a conduct disorder
             diagnosis among children at low genetic risk for conduct
             disorder but an increase of 24% among children at high
             genetic risk. Prediction of behavioral pathology can attain
             greater accuracy if both pathogenic environments and genetic
             risk are ascertained. Certain genotypes may promote
             resistance to trauma. Physically maltreated children whose
             first-degree relatives engage in antisocial behavior warrant
             priority for therapeutic intervention.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579405050042},
   Key = {fds272287}
}

@article{fds272118,
   Author = {Nix, and L, R and Pinderhughes, and E, E and Bierman, and L, K and Maples, and J, J and Group, TCPPR},
   Title = {Decoupling the relation between risk factors for conduct
             problems and the receipt of intervention services:
             Participation across multiple components of a prevention
             program},
   Journal = {Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {3-4},
   Pages = {307-325},
   Year = {2005},
   ISSN = {0091-0562},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10464-005-8628-9},
   Abstract = {This study examined whether the link between risk factors
             for conduct problems and low rates of participation in
             mental health treatment could be decoupled through the
             provision of integrated prevention services in multiple
             easily-accessible contexts. It included 445 families of
             first-grade children (55% minority), living in four diverse
             communities, and selected for early signs of conduct
             problems. Results indicated that, under the right
             circumstances, these children and families could be enticed
             to participate at high rates in school-based services,
             therapeutic groups, and home visits. Because different sets
             of risk factors were related to different profiles of
             participation across the components of the prevention
             program, findings highlight the need to offer services in
             multiple contexts to reach all children and families who
             might benefit from them. © 2005 Springer Science+Business
             Media, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10464-005-8628-9},
   Key = {fds272118}
}

@article{fds272119,
   Author = {Foster, and M, E and Jones, and E, D and Dodge, TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {The high costs of aggression: Public expenditures resulting
             from conduct disorder},
   Journal = {American Journal of Public Health},
   Volume = {95},
   Pages = {1767-1772},
   Year = {2005},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2004.061424},
   Doi = {10.2105/AJPH.2004.061424},
   Key = {fds272119}
}

@article{fds272288,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Peer relationship antecedents of delinquent behavior in late
             adolescence: Is there evidence of demographic group
             differences in developmental processes?},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-18},
   Year = {2005},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579405050078},
   Abstract = {A longitudinal prospective design was used to test the
             generalizability of low levels of social preference and high
             levels of antisocial peer involvement as risk factors for
             delinquent behavior problems to African American (AA) and
             European American (EA) boys and girls (N = 384). Social
             preference scores were computed from peer reports in middle
             childhood (ages 6-9). Parents and adolescents reported
             antisocial peer involvement in early adolescence (ages
             13-16) and adolescents reported on their own delinquent
             behavior in late adolescence (ages 17 and 18). Analyses
             tested for differences across four groups (AA boys, EA boys,
             AA girls, EA girls) in construct measurement, mean levels,
             and associations among variables. Few measurement
             differences were found. Mean-level differences were found
             for social preference and delinquent behavior. AA boys were
             least accepted by peers and reported the highest level of
             delinquent behavior. EA girls were most accepted by peers
             and reported the lowest level of delinquent behavior.
             Associations among peer experiences and delinquent behavior
             were equivalent across groups, with lower levels of social
             preference and higher levels of antisocial peer involvement
             associated with more delinquent behavior. Person-centered
             analyses showed the risk associated with low social
             preference and high antisocial peer involvement to be
             similar across groups, providing further evidence of the
             generalizability of the peer relationship experiences as
             risk factors for subsequent delinquent behavior problems.
             Copyright © 2005 Cambridge University Press.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579405050078},
   Key = {fds272288}
}

@article{fds272289,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Foster, EM and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The effects of the fast track program on serious problem
             outcomes at the end of elementary school.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the
             Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and
             Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association,
             Division 53},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {650-661},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1537-4416},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15498733},
   Abstract = {This study examines the effects of the Fast Track program,
             which is a multicomponent, intensive intervention for
             children with early-onset conduct problems and continues
             from 1st grade through high school. Prior research has shown
             that Fast Track produces small positive effect sizes on
             children's social and behavioral outcomes at the end of 1st
             and 3rd grades in comparison to control children. This study
             addresses the important question of whether this
             intervention reduces cases of serious problems that can
             occur during the 4th- and 5th-grade years. Fast Track did
             have a significant but modest influence on children's rates
             of social competence and social cognition problems, problems
             with involvement with deviant peers, and conduct problems in
             the home and community, compared to children in the control
             condition. There was no evidence of intervention impact on
             children's serious problems in the school setting at Grades
             4 and 5. This evaluation indicates that Fast Track has
             continued to influence certain key areas of children's
             adjustment throughout the elementary school years, reducing
             children's likelihood of emerging as cases with problems in
             their social, peer, or home functioning. The stage is set to
             examine potential prevention effects on these youths'
             serious antisocial behaviors during adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15374424jccp3304_1},
   Key = {fds272289}
}

@article{fds272283,
   Author = {Hill, LG and Coie, JD and Lochman, JE and Greenberg,
             MT},
   Title = {Effectiveness of early screening for externalizing problems:
             issues of screening accuracy and utility.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {809-820},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15482039},
   Abstract = {Accurate, early screening is a prerequisite for indicated
             interventions intended to prevent development of
             externalizing disorders and delinquent behaviors. Using the
             Fast Track longitudinal sample of 396 children drawn from
             high-risk environments, the authors varied assumptions about
             base rates and examined effects of multiple-time-point and
             multiple-rater screening procedures. The authors also
             considered the practical import of various levels of
             screening accuracy in terms of true and false positive rates
             and their potential costs and benefits. Additional research
             is needed to determine true costs and benefits of early
             screening. However, the results indicate that 1st grade
             single- and multiple-rater screening models effectively
             predicted externalizing behavior and delinquent outcomes in
             4th and 5th grades and that early screening is
             justified.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-006X.72.5.809},
   Key = {fds272283}
}

@article{fds272113,
   Author = {Malone, PS and Lansford, JE and Castellino, DR and Berlin, LJ and Dodge,
             KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Divorce and Child Behavior Problems: Applying Latent Change
             Score Models to Life Event Data.},
   Journal = {Structural Equation Modeling : a Multidisciplinary
             Journal},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {401-423},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1070-5511},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20209039},
   Abstract = {Effects of parents' divorce on children's adjustment have
             been studied extensively. This article applies new advances
             in trajectory modeling to the problem of disentangling the
             effects of divorce on children's adjustment from related
             factors such as the child's age at the time of divorce and
             the child's gender. Latent change score models were used to
             examine trajectories of externalizing behavior problems in
             relation to children's experience of their parents' divorce.
             Participants included 356 boys and girls whose biological
             parents were married at kindergarten entry. The children
             were assessed annually through Grade 9. Mothers reported
             whether they had divorced or separated in each 12-month
             period, and teachers reported children's externalizing
             behavior problems each year. Girls' externalizing behavior
             problem trajectories were not affected by experiencing their
             parents' divorce, regardless of the timing of the divorce.
             In contrast, boys who were in elementary school when their
             parents divorced showed an increase in externalizing
             behavior problems in the year of the divorce. This increase
             persisted in the years following the divorce. Boys who were
             in middle school when their parents divorced showed an
             increase in externalizing behavior problems in the year of
             the divorce followed by a decrease to below baseline levels
             in the year after the divorce. This decrease persisted in
             the following years.},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15328007sem1103_6},
   Key = {fds272113}
}

@article{fds272280,
   Author = {Rabiner, DL and Malone, PS and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {The impact of tutoring on early reading achievement for
             children with and without attention problems.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {273-284},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/b:jacp.0000026141.20174.17},
   Abstract = {This study examined whether the benefits of reading tutoring
             in first grade were moderated by children's level of
             attention problems. Participants were 581 children from the
             intervention and control samples of Fast Track, a
             longitudinal multisite investigation of the development and
             prevention of conduct problems. Standardized reading
             achievement measures were administered after kindergarten
             and 1st grade, and teacher ratings of attention problems
             were obtained during 1st grade. During 1st grade,
             intervention participants received three 30-min tutoring
             sessions per week to promote the development of initial
             reading skills. Results replicated prior findings that
             attention problems predict reduced 1st grade reading
             achievement, even after controlling for IQ and earlier
             reading ability. Intervention was associated with modest
             reading achievement benefits for inattentive children
             without early reading difficulties, and substantial benefits
             for children with early reading difficulties who were not
             inattentive. It had no discernible impact, however, for
             children who were both inattentive and poor early readers.
             Results underscore the need to develop effective academic
             interventions for inattentive children, particularly for
             those with co-occurring reading difficulties.},
   Doi = {10.1023/b:jacp.0000026141.20174.17},
   Key = {fds272280}
}

@article{fds272128,
   Author = {McCarty, CA and McMahon, RJ and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Mediators of the relation between maternal depressive
             symptoms and child internalizing and disruptive behavior
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {545-556},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0893-3200},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.17.4.545},
   Abstract = {Drawing on a normative sample of 224 youth and their
             biological mothers, this study tested 4 family variables as
             potential mediators of the relationship between maternal
             depressive symptoms in early childhood and child
             psychological outcomes in preadolescence. The mediators
             examined included mother-child communication, the quality of
             the mother-child relationship, maternal social support, and
             stressful life events in the family. The most parsimonious
             structural equation model suggested that having a more
             problematic mother-child relationship mediated disruptive
             behavior-disordered outcomes for youths, whereas less
             maternal social support mediated the development of
             internalizing disorders. Gender and race were tested as
             moderators, but significant model differences did not emerge
             between boys and girls or between African American and
             Caucasian youths.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.17.4.545},
   Key = {fds272128}
}

@article{fds272131,
   Author = {Chang, L and Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and McBride-Chang,
             C},
   Title = {Harsh parenting in relation to child emotion regulation and
             aggression.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {598-606},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0893-3200},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.17.4.598},
   Abstract = {This study presents a model of harsh parenting that has an
             indirect effect, as well as a direct effect, on child
             aggression in the school environment through the mediating
             process of child emotion regulation. Tested on a sample of
             325 Chinese children and their parents, the model showed
             adequate goodness of fit. Also investigated were interaction
             effects between parents' and children's gender. Mothers'
             harsh parenting affected child emotion regulation more
             strongly than fathers', whereas harsh parenting emanating
             from fathers had a stronger effect on child aggression.
             Fathers' harsh parenting also affected sons more than
             daughters, whereas there was no gender differential effect
             with mothers' harsh parenting. These results are discussed
             with an emphasis on negative emotionality as a potentially
             common cause of family perturbations, including parenting
             and child adjustment problems.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.17.4.598},
   Key = {fds272131}
}

@article{fds272284,
   Author = {Flanagan, KS and Bierman, KL and Kam, C-M},
   Title = {Identifying at-risk children at school entry: the usefulness
             of multibehavioral problem profiles.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the
             Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and
             Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association,
             Division 53},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {396-407},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15374424JCCP3203_08},
   Abstract = {Found that 1st-grade teacher ratings of aggressive,
             hyperactive-inattentive, and low levels of prosocial
             behaviors made unique contributions to the prediction of
             school outcomes (measured 2 years later) for 755 children.
             Person-oriented analyses compared the predictive utility of
             5 screening strategies based on child problem profiles to
             identify children at risk for school problems. A broad
             screening strategy, in which children with elevations in any
             1 of the 3 behavior problem dimensions were identified as
             "at-risk," showed lower specificity but superior
             sensitivity, odds ratios, and overall accuracy in the
             prediction of school outcomes than the other screening
             strategies that were more narrowly focused or were based on
             a total problem score. Results are discussed in terms of
             implications for the screening and design of preventive
             interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1207/S15374424JCCP3203_08},
   Key = {fds272284}
}

@article{fds272133,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Friendship Quality, Peer Group Affiliation, and Peer
             Antisocial Behavior as Moderators of the Link Between
             Negative Parenting and Adolescent Externalizing
             Behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Research on Adolescence},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {161-184},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1050-8392},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20209019},
   Abstract = {Quality of peer relationships and perceived peer antisocial
             behavior were examined as moderators of the link between
             negative parenting and externalizing behavior problems in
             school from middle childhood to early adolescence. Data on
             negative parenting (i.e., unilateral parental decision
             making, low supervision and awareness, and harsh discipline)
             were collected from 362 parents in the summer preceding the
             adolescents' entry into Grade 6. Adolescent reports of
             positive peer relationships and peer antisocial behavior
             were assessed in the winter of Grade 7. The outcome measure
             was teacher report of adolescent externalizing behavior in
             the spring of Grade 7, controlling for externalizing
             behavior in Grade 5. High levels of friendship quality and
             peer group affiliation attenuated the association between
             unilateral parental decision making and adolescent
             externalizing behavior in school; this was particularly true
             when adolescents associated with peers perceived to be low
             in antisocial behavior. In addition, having low-quality peer
             relationships and having peers perceived to be highly
             antisocial further amplified the association between
             unilateral parental decision making and adolescent
             externalizing behavior problems. Finally, high levels of
             friend and peer group antisocial behavior exacerbated the
             predictiveness of harsh discipline for adolescents'
             externalizing behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1532-7795.1302002},
   Key = {fds272133}
}

@article{fds272137,
   Author = {Ellis, BJ and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Fergusson, DM and Horwood, LJ and Pettit, GS and Woodward, L},
   Title = {Does father absence place daughters at special risk for
             early sexual activity and teenage pregnancy?},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {801-821},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00569},
   Abstract = {The impact of father absence on early sexual activity and
             teenage pregnancy was investigated in longitudinal studies
             in the United States (N = 242) and New Zealand (N = 520), in
             which community samples of girls were followed prospectively
             from early in life (5 years) to approximately age 18.
             Greater exposure to father absence was strongly associated
             with elevated risk for early sexual activity and adolescent
             pregnancy. This elevated risk was either not explained (in
             the US. study) or only partly explained (in the New Zealand
             study) by familial, ecological, and personal disadvantages
             associated with father absence. After controlling for
             covariates, there was stronger and more consistent evidence
             of effects of father absence on early sexual activity and
             teenage pregnancy than on other behavioral or mental health
             problems or academic achievement. Effects of father absence
             are discussed in terms of life-course adversity,
             evolutionary psychology, social learning, and behavior
             genetic models.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00569},
   Key = {fds272137}
}

@article{fds272138,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {A biopsychosocial model of the development of chronic
             conduct problems in adolescence.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {349-371},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12661890},
   Abstract = {A biopsychosocial model of the development of adolescent
             chronic conduct problems is presented and supported through
             a review of empirical findings. This model posits that
             biological dispositions and sociocultural contexts place
             certain children at risk in early life but that life
             experiences with parents, peers. and social institutions
             increment and mediate this risk. A transactional
             developmental model is best equipped to describe the
             emergence of chronic antisocial behavior across time.
             Reciprocal influences among dispositions, contexts, and life
             experiences lead to recursive iterations across time that
             exacerbate or diminish antisocial development. Cognitive and
             emotional processes within the child, including the
             acquisition of knowledge and social-information-processing
             patterns, mediate the relation between life experiences and
             conduct problem outcomes. Implications for prevention
             research and public policy are noted.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0012-1649.39.2.349},
   Key = {fds272138}
}

@article{fds272139,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Lansford, JE and Burks, VS and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Fontaine, R and Price, JM},
   Title = {Peer rejection and social information-processing factors in
             the development of aggressive behavior problems in
             children.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {374-393},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12705561},
   Abstract = {The relation between social rejection and growth in
             antisocial behavior was investigated. In Study 1,259 boys
             and girls (34% African American) were followed from Grades 1
             to 3 (ages 6-8 years) to Grades 5 to 7 (ages 10-12 years).
             Early peer rejection predicted growth in aggression. In
             Study 2,585 boys and girls (16% African American) were
             followed from kindergarten to Grade 3 (ages 5-8 years), and
             findings were replicated. Furthermore, early aggression
             moderated the effect of rejection, such that rejection
             exacerbated antisocial development only among children
             initially disposed toward aggression. In Study 3, social
             information-processing patterns measured in Study 1 were
             found to mediate partially the effect of early rejection on
             later aggression. In Study 4, processing patterns measured
             in Study 2 replicated the mediation effect. Findings are
             integrated into a recursive model of antisocial
             development.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.7402004},
   Key = {fds272139}
}

@article{fds272141,
   Author = {Beyers, JM and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Neighborhood structure, parenting processes, and the
             development of youths' externalizing behaviors: a multilevel
             analysis.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {35-53},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0091-0562},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1023018502759},
   Abstract = {Associations among neighborhood structure, parenting
             processes, and the development of externalizing behavior
             problems were investigated in a longitudinal sample of early
             adolescents (from age 11 to 13). Mothers' reports of
             parental monitoring (at age 11), mothers' and youths'
             reports of the amount of youths' unsupervised time (at age
             11), and youths' reports of positive parental involvement
             (at age 12) were used to predict initial levels (at age 11)
             and growth rates in youths' externalizing behavior as
             reported by teachers. Census-based measures of neighborhood
             structural disadvantage, residential instability, and
             concentrated affluence were expected to moderate the effects
             of parenting processes (e.g., parental monitoring) on
             externalizing behavior. Hierarchical linear modeling results
             revealed that less parental monitoring was associated with
             more externalizing behavior problems at age 11, and more
             unsupervised time spent out in the community (vs.
             unsupervised time in any context) and less positive parental
             involvement were associated with increases in externalizing
             behavior across time. Furthermore, the decrease in
             externalizing levels associated with more parental
             monitoring was significantly more pronounced when youths
             lived in neighborhoods with more residential
             instability.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1023018502759},
   Key = {fds272141}
}

@article{fds272135,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Change in parents' monitoring knowledge: Links with
             parenting, relationship quality, adolescent beliefs, and
             antisocial behavior},
   Journal = {Social Development},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {401-419},
   Year = {2003},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9507.00240},
   Abstract = {A longitudinal prospective design was used to examine
             antisocial behavior, two aspects of the parent-child
             relationship, inept parenting, and adolescents 'beliefs in
             the appropriateness of monitoring as predictors of parents'
             monitoring and change in monitoring during the high school
             years. A total of 426 adolescents provided reports of their
             parents 'monitoring knowledge during four yearly assessments
             beginning the summer before entering grade 9. Greater
             concurrent levels of monitoring knowledge were associated
             with less antisocial behavior, more parent-reported
             relationship enjoy-ment, adolescents and parents spending
             more time together, and adolescents reporting stronger
             beliefs in the appropriateness of parental monitoring.
             Weaker knowledge beliefs predicted increases in monitoring
             knowledge over time. More antisocial behavior problems were
             linked to lower levels of knowledge through less enjoyable
             parent-adolescent relationships, parents and adolescents
             spending less time together, and adolescents reporting
             weaker monitoring beliefs. Discussion focuses on processes
             linking antisocial behavior problems with low levels of
             monitoring knowledge.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-9507.00240},
   Key = {fds272135}
}

@article{fds272147,
   Author = {Farmer, AD and Bierman, KL and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Predictors and consequences of aggressive-withdrawn problem
             profiles in early grade school.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the
             Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and
             Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association,
             Division 53},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {299-311},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2791964/},
   Abstract = {Identified first-grade children who exhibited 4 different
             behavior problem profiles from an initial sample of 754:
             aggressive-withdrawn (n = 63.8%) aggressive only (n = 165,
             22%), withdrawn only (n = 94, 12%), and nonproblem (n = 432,
             57%). Group comparisons revealed that children who became
             aggressive-withdrawn in first grade exhibited deficits in
             attention and social skills in kindergarten. Furthermore,
             these kindergarten deficits contributed to the emergence of
             their aggressive-withdrawn behavior problems in first grade,
             after accounting for kindergarten levels of aggressive and
             withdrawn behaviors. In later grades, aggressive-withdrawn
             first-grade children were more likely than children in any
             other group to demonstrate poor peer relations and poor
             academic performance. In addition, kindergarten skill
             deficits added to first-grade aggressive and withdrawn
             behavior problems to predict third-grade social and academic
             adjustment difficulties. The results document the key role
             of early inattention and social skill deficits in the
             prediction of aggressive-withdrawn problem profiles,
             validate the significance of this problem profile at school
             entry, and identify potential developmental mechanisms that
             have implications for preventive interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15374424jccp3103_02},
   Key = {fds272147}
}

@article{fds272149,
   Author = {Criss, MM and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Lapp,
             AL},
   Title = {Family adversity, positive peer relationships, and
             children's externalizing behavior: a longitudinal
             perspective on risk and resilience.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1220-1237},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00468},
   Abstract = {Peer acceptance and friendships were examined as moderators
             in the link between family adversity and child externalizing
             behavioral problems. Data on family adversity (i.e.,
             ecological disadvantage, violent marital conflict, and harsh
             discipline) and child temperament and social information
             processing were collected during home visits from 585
             families with 5-year-old children. Children's peer
             acceptance, friendship, and friends' aggressiveness were
             assessed with sociometric methods in kindergarten and grade
             1. Teachers provided ratings of children's externalizing
             behavior problems in grade 2. Peer acceptance served as a
             moderator for all three measures of family adversity, and
             friendship served as a moderator for harsh discipline.
             Examination of regression slopes indicated that family
             adversity was not significantly associated with child
             externalizing behavior at high levels of positive peer
             relationships. These moderating effects generally were not
             qualified by child gender, ethnicity, or friends'
             aggressiveness, nor were they accounted for by child
             temperament or social information-processing patterns. The
             need for process-oriented studies of risk and protective
             factors is stressed.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00468},
   Key = {fds272149}
}

@article{fds272142,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, S and Coie, JD and Maumary-Gremaud, A and Bierman, K and Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Peer rejection and aggression and early starter models of
             conduct disorder.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {217-230},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12041708},
   Abstract = {Peer rejection and aggression in the early school years were
             examined for their relevance to early starting conduct
             problems. The sample of 657 boys and girls from 4
             geographical locations was followed from 1st through 4th
             grades. Peer rejection in 1st grade added incrementally to
             the prediction of early starting conduct problems in 3rd and
             4th grades, over and above the effects of aggression. Peer
             rejection and aggression in 1st grade were also associated
             with the impulsive and emotionally reactive behaviors found
             in older samples. Being rejected by peers subsequent to 1st
             grade marginally added to the prediction of early starting
             conduct problems in 3rd and 4th grades, controlling for 1st
             grade ADHD symptoms and aggression. Furthermore, peer
             rejection partially mediated the predictive relation between
             early ADHD symptoms and subsequent conduct problems. These
             results support the hypothesis that the experience of peer
             rejection in the early school years adds to the risk for
             early starting conduct problems.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1015198612049},
   Key = {fds272142}
}

@article{fds272144,
   Author = {Kaplow, JB and Curran, PJ and Dodge, KA and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Child, parent, and peer predictors of early-onset substance
             use: a multisite longitudinal study.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {199-216},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12041707},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this study was to identify kindergarten-age
             predictors of early-onset substance use from demographic,
             environmental, parenting, child psychological, behavioral,
             and social functioning domains. Data from a longitudinal
             study of 295 children were gathered using
             multiple-assessment methods and multiple informants in
             kindergarten and 1st grade. Annual assessments at ages 10,
             11, and 12 reflected that 21% of children reported having
             initiated substance use by age 12. Results from longitudinal
             logistic regression models indicated that risk factors at
             kindergarten include being male, having a parent who abused
             substances, lower levels of parental verbal reasoning,
             higher levels of overactivity, more thought problems, and
             more social problem solving skills deficits. Children with
             no risk factors had less than a 10% chance of initiating
             substance use by age 12, whereas children with 2 or more
             risk factors had greater than a 50% chance of initiating
             substance use. Implications for typology, etiology, and
             prevention are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1015183927979},
   Key = {fds272144}
}

@article{fds272148,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Laird, R and Lochman, JE and Zelli, A and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Multidimensional latent-construct analysis of children's
             social information processing patterns: correlations with
             aggressive behavior problems.},
   Journal = {Psychological Assessment},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {60-73},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1040-3590},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11911050},
   Abstract = {Social information processing (SIP) patterns were
             conceptualized in orthogonal domains of process and context
             and measured through responses to hypothetical vignettes in
             a stratified sample of 387 children (50% boys; 49% minority)
             from 4 geographical sites followed from kindergarten through
             3rd grade. Multidimensional, latent-construct, confirmatory
             factor analyses supported the within-construct internal
             consistency, cross-construct discrimination, and
             multidimensionality of SIP patterns. Contrasts among nested
             structural equation models indicated that SIP constructs
             significantly predicted children's aggressive behavior
             problems as measured by later teacher reports. The findings
             support the multidimensional construct validity of
             children's social cognitive patterns and the relevance of
             SIP patterns in children's aggressive behavior
             problems.},
   Doi = {10.1037//1040-3590.14.1.60},
   Key = {fds272148}
}

@article{fds272153,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Evaluation of the first 3 years of the Fast Track prevention
             trial with children at high risk for adolescent conduct
             problems.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {19-35},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1014274914287},
   Abstract = {Fast Track is a conduct-problem prevention trial that
             derives its intervention from longitudinal research on how
             serious and chronic adolescent problem behaviors develop.
             Over 9,000 kindergarten children at 4 sites in 3 cohorts
             were screened, and 891 were identified as high risk and then
             randomly assigned to intervention or control groups.
             Beginning in Grade 1, high-risk children and their parents
             were asked to participate in a combination of social skills
             and anger-control training, academic tutoring, parent
             training, and home visiting. A multiyear universal classroom
             program was delivered to the core schools attended by these
             high-risk children. By the end of third grade, 37% of the
             intervention group was determined to be free of serious
             conduct-problem dysfunction, in contrast with 27% of the
             control group. Teacher ratings of conduct problems and
             official records of use of special education resources gave
             modest effect-size evidence that the intervention was
             preventing conduct problem behavior at school. Parent
             ratings provided additional support for prevention of
             conduct problems at home. Parenting behavior and children's
             social cognitive skills that had previously emerged as
             proximal outcomes at the end of the 1st year of intervention
             continued to show positive effects of the intervention at
             the end of third grade.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1014274914287},
   Key = {fds272153}
}

@article{fds13046,
   Author = {Lansford, J.E. and Dodge, K.A. and Pettit, G.S. and Bates, J.E. and Crozier, J. and Kaplow, J.},
   Title = {A 12-Year Prospective Study of the Long-Term Effects of
             Early Child Physical Maltreatment and Psychological
             Behavioral, and Academic Problems in Adolescence},
   Journal = {Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine},
   Volume = {156},
   Pages = {824-830},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds13046}
}

@article{fds272146,
   Author = {Fontaine, RG and Burks, VS and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Response decision processes and externalizing behavior
             problems in adolescents.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {107-122},
   Year = {2002},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11893088},
   Abstract = {Externalizing behavior problems of 124 adolescents were
             assessed across Grades 7-11. In Grade 9, participants were
             also assessed across social-cognitive domains after
             imagining themselves as the object of provocations portrayed
             in six videotaped vignettes. Participants responded to
             vignette-based questions representing multiple processes of
             the response decision step of social information processing.
             Phase 1 of our investigation supported a two-factor model of
             the response evaluation process of response decision
             (response valuation and outcome expectancy). Phase 2 showed
             significant relations between the set of these response
             decision processes, as well as response selection, measured
             in Grade 9 and (a) externalizing behavior in Grade 9 and (b)
             externalizing behavior in Grades 10-11, even after
             controlling externalizing behavior in Grades 7-8. These
             findings suggest that on-line behavioral judgments about
             aggression play a crucial role in the maintenance and growth
             of aggressive response tendencies in adolescence.},
   Key = {fds272146}
}

@article{fds272150,
   Author = {Group, CPPR},
   Title = {Using the Fast Track Randomiized Prevention Trial to Test
             the Early-Starter Model of the Development of Serious
             Conduct Problems},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {927-945},
   Year = {2002},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12549710},
   Abstract = {The Fast Track prevention trial was used to test hypotheses
             from the Early-Starter Model of the development of chronic
             conduct problems. We randomly assigned 891 high-risk
             first-grade boys and girls (51% African American) to receive
             the long-term Fast Track prevention or not. After 4 years,
             outcomes were assessed through teacher ratings, parent
             ratings, peer nominations, and child self-report. Positive
             effects of assignment to intervention were evident in
             teacher and parent ratings of conduct problems, peer social
             preference scores, and association with deviant peers.
             Assessments of proximal goals of intervention (e.g., hostile
             attributional bias, problem-solving skill, harsh parental
             discipline, aggressive and prosocial behavior at home and
             school) collected after grade 3 were found to partially
             mediate these effects. The findings are interpreted as
             consistent with developmental theory.},
   Key = {fds272150}
}

@article{fds272116,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Jordan, KY and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Peer rejection in childhood, involvement with antisocial
             peers in early adolescence, and the development of
             externalizing behavior problems.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {337-354},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579401002085},
   Abstract = {A longitudinal, prospective design was used to examine the
             roles of peer rejection in middle childhood and antisocial
             peer involvement in early adolescence in the development of
             adolescent externalizing behavior problems. Both early
             starter and late starter pathways were considered. Classroom
             sociometric interviews from ages 6 through 9 years,
             adolescent reports of peers' behavior at age 13 years, and
             parent, teacher, and adolescent self-reports of
             externalizing behavior problems from age 5 through 14 years
             were available for 400 adolescents. Results indicate that
             experiencing peer rejection in elementary school and greater
             involvement with antisocial peers in early adolescence are
             correlated but that these peer relationship experiences may
             represent two different pathways to adolescent externalizing
             behavior problems. Peer rejection experiences, but not
             involvement with antisocial peers. predict later
             externalizing behavior problems when controlling for
             stability in externalizing behavior. Externalizing problems
             were most common when rejection was experienced repeatedly.
             Early externalizing problems did not appear to moderate the
             relation between peer rejection and later problem behavior.
             Discussion highlights multiple pathways connecting
             externalizing behavior problems from early childhood through
             adolescence with peer relationship experiences in middle
             childhood and early adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579401002085},
   Key = {fds272116}
}

@article{fds272213,
   Author = {Keiley, MK and Howe, TR and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Petti,
             GS},
   Title = {The timing of child physical maltreatment: a cross-domain
             growth analysis of impact on adolescent externalizing and
             internalizing problems.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {891-912},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1005122814723},
   Abstract = {In a sample of 578 children assessed in kindergarten through
             the eighth grade, we used growth modeling to determine the
             basic developmental trajectories of mother-reported and
             teacher-reported externalizing and internalizing behaviors
             for three physical maltreatment groups of
             children-early-harmed (prior to age 5 years), later-harmed
             (age 5 years and over), and nonharmed--controlling for SES
             and gender. Results demonstrated that the earlier children
             experienced harsh physical treatment by significant adults,
             the more likely they were to experience adjustment problems
             in early adolescence. Over multiple domains, early physical
             maltreatment was related to more negative sequelae than the
             same type of maltreatment occurring at later periods. In
             addition, the fitted growth models revealed that the
             early-harmed group exhibited someswhat higher initial levels
             of teacher-reported externalizing problems in kindergarten
             and significantly different rates of change in these problem
             behaviors than other children, as reported by mothers over
             the 9 years of this study. The early-harmed children were
             also seen by teachers, in kindergarten, as exhibiting higher
             levels of internalizing behaviors. The later-harmed children
             were seen by their teachers as increasing their
             externalizing problem behaviors more rapidly over the 9
             years than did the early- or nonharmed children. These
             findings indicate that the timing of maltreatment is a
             salient factor in examining the developmental effects of
             physical harm.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1005122814723},
   Key = {fds272213}
}

@article{fds272164,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Merging universal and indicated prevention programs: the
             Fast Track model. Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {Addictive Behaviors},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {913-927},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0306-4603(00)00120-9},
   Abstract = {Fast Track is a multisite, multicomponent preventive
             intervention for young children at high risk for long-term
             antisocial behavior. Based on a comprehensive developmental
             model, this intervention includes a universal-level
             classroom program plus social-skill training, academic
             tutoring, parent training, and home visiting to improve
             competencies and reduce problems in a high-risk group of
             children selected in kindergarten. The theoretical
             principles and clinical strategies utilized in the Fast
             Track Project are described to illustrate the interplay
             between basic developmental research, the understanding of
             risk and protective factors, and a research-based model of
             preventive intervention that integrates universal and
             indicated models of prevention.},
   Doi = {10.1016/s0306-4603(00)00120-9},
   Key = {fds272164}
}

@article{fds272182,
   Author = {Kohl, GO and Lengua, LJ and McMahon, RJ},
   Title = {Parent Involvement in School Conceptualizing Multiple
             Dimensions and Their Relations with Family and Demographic
             Risk Factors},
   Journal = {Journal of School Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {501-523},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/8003 Duke open
             access},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0022-4405(00)00050-9},
   Key = {fds272182}
}

@article{fds272159,
   Author = {Stormshak, EA and Bierman, KL and McMahon, RJ and Lengua,
             LJ},
   Title = {Parenting practices and child disruptive behavior problems
             in early elementary school. Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child Psychology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {17-29},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2764296/},
   Abstract = {Examined the hypothesis that distinct parenting practices
             may be associated with type and profile of a child's
             disruptive behavior problems (e.g., oppositional,
             aggressive, hyperactive). Parents of 631 behaviorally
             disruptive children described the extent to which they
             experienced warm and involved interactions with their
             children and the extent to which their discipline strategies
             were inconsistent and punitive and involved spanking and
             physical aggression. As expected from a developmental
             perspective, parenting practices that included punitive
             interactions were associated with elevated rates of all
             child disruptive behavior problems. Low levels of warm
             involvement were particularly characteristic of parents of
             children who showed elevated levels of oppositional
             behaviors. Physically aggressive parenting was linked more
             specifically with child aggression. In general, parenting
             practices contributed more to the prediction of oppositional
             and aggressive behavior problems than to hyperactive
             behavior problems, and parenting influences were fairly
             consistent across ethnic groups and sex.},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15374424jccp2901_3},
   Key = {fds272159}
}

@article{fds272165,
   Author = {Bellanti, and J, C and Bierman, and L, K and Group,
             TCPPR},
   Title = {Disentangling the Impact of Low Cognitive Ability and
             Inattention on Social Behavior and Peer Relations},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child Psychology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {66-75},
   Year = {2000},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2767167/},
   Abstract = {Examined the shared and unique contributions of low
             cognitive ability and inattention to the development of
             social behavior problems and peer relationships of children
             at the time of school entry. Kindergarten andfirst-grade
             assessments of cognitive ability, inattention and prosocial
             and aggressive behavior were collected for a multisite,
             normative sample. Sociometric assessments of peer
             relationships were collected at the end of first grade.
             Cognitive ability and inattention both contributed to the
             prediction of social behavior and peer relationships. Low
             cognitive ability was particularly predictive of prosocial
             skill deficits, and social behavior mediated the relation
             between cognitive ability and social preference. Inattention
             predicted both prosocial skill deficits and elevated
             aggressive-disruptive behavior problems. Behavior problems
             partially mediated the relation between inattention and
             social preference. Identified subgroups of children with
             elevated levels of inattention or low cognitive ability
             showed different patterns of peer problems, with low
             acceptance characteristic of the low cognitive ability
             (only) group and high dislike ratings characteristic of the
             inattentive and inattentive/low-ability group. Implications
             are discussed for the design of early intervention and
             prevention programs.},
   Doi = {10.1207/S15374424jccp2901_7},
   Key = {fds272165}
}

@article{fds272290,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Cillessen, AH and Dodge, KA and Hubbard, JA and Schwartz,
             D and Lemerise, EA and Bateman, H},
   Title = {It takes two to fight: a test of relational factors and a
             method for assessing aggressive dyads.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1179-1188},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10493644},
   Abstract = {Observations of aggressive interactions in boys' laboratory
             play groups were used to evaluate the relative importance of
             relational and individual factors in accounting for
             aggressive acts. A classroom peer-rating method for
             identifying mutually aggressive dyads was validated in 11
             5-session play groups, composed of 2 mutually aggressive
             boys and 4 randomly selected male classmates from 11
             predominately African American 3rd-grade classrooms. When
             the social relations model was used, relationship effects
             accounted for equally as much of the variance in total
             aggression and proactive aggression as either actor or
             target effects. Mutually aggressive dyads displayed twice as
             much total aggression as randomly selected dyads. Members of
             mutually aggressive dyads attributed greater hostile
             intentions toward each other than did randomly selected
             dyads, which may serve to explain their greater aggression
             toward each other. The importance of studying relational
             factors, including social histories and social-cognitive
             processes, is discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0012-1649.35.5.1179},
   Key = {fds272290}
}

@article{fds272175,
   Author = {Ellis, BJ and McFadyen-Ketchum, S and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Quality of early family relationships and individual
             differences in the timing of pubertal maturation in girls: a
             longitudinal test of an evolutionary model.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {77},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {387-401},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-3514.77.2.387},
   Abstract = {In an 8-year prospective study of 173 girls and their
             families, the authors tested predictions from J. Belsky, L.
             Steinberg, and P. Draper's (1991) evolutionary model of
             individual differences in pubertal timing. This model
             suggests that more negative-coercive (or less
             positive-harmonious) family relationships in early childhood
             provoke earlier reproductive development in adolescence.
             Consistent with the model, fathers' presence in the home,
             more time spent by fathers in child care, greater
             supportiveness in the parental dyad, more father-daughter
             affection, and more mother-daughter affection, as assessed
             prior to kindergarten, each predicted later pubertal timing
             by daughters in 7th grade. The positive dimension of family
             relationships, rather than the negative dimension, accounted
             for these relations. In total, the quality of fathers'
             investment in the family emerged as the most important
             feature of the proximal family environment relative to
             daughters' pubertal timing.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.77.2.387},
   Key = {fds272175}
}

@article{fds272169,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and McFadyen-Ketchum, S and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Early behavior problems as a predictor of later peer group
             victimization: moderators and mediators in the pathways of
             social risk.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {191-201},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1021948206165},
   Abstract = {This study is a prospective investigation of the predictive
             association between early behavior problems (internalizing,
             externalizing, hyperactivity-impulsiveness,
             immaturity-dependency) and later victimization in the peer
             group. Teacher ratings of the behavioral adjustment of 389
             kindergarten and 1st-grade children (approximate age range
             of 5 to 6 years-old) were obtained, using standardized
             behavior problem checklists. These ratings predicted peer
             nomination scores for victimization, obtained 3 years later,
             even after the prediction associated with concurrent
             behavior problems was statistically controlled. Further
             analyses suggested that the relation between early behavior
             problems and later victimization is mediated by peer
             rejection and moderated by children's dyadic friendships.
             Behavior problems appear to play an important role in
             determining victimization within the peer group, although
             the relevant pathways are complex and influenced by other
             aspects of children's social adjustment.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1021948206165},
   Key = {fds272169}
}

@article{fds272170,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Meece,
             DW},
   Title = {The impact of after-school peer contact on early adolescent
             externalizing problems is moderated by parental monitoring,
             perceived neighborhood safety, and prior
             adjustment.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {768-778},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00055},
   Abstract = {Unsupervised peer contact in the after-school hours was
             examined as a risk factor in the development of
             externalizing problems in a longitudinal sample of early
             adolescents. Parental monitoring, neighborhood safety, and
             adolescents' preexisting behavioral problems were considered
             as possible moderators of the risk relation. Interviews with
             mothers provided information on monitoring, neighborhood
             safety, and demographics. Early adolescent (ages 12-13
             years) after-school time use was assessed via a telephone
             interview in grade 6 (N = 438); amount of time spent with
             peers when no adult was present was tabulated. Teacher
             ratings of externalizing behavior problems were collected in
             grades 6 and 7. Unsupervised peer contact, lack of
             neighborhood safety, and low monitoring incrementally
             predicted grade 7 externalizing problems, after controlling
             for family background factors and grade 6 problems. The
             greatest risk was for those unsupervised adolescents living
             in low-monitoring homes and comparatively unsafe
             neighborhoods. The significant relation between unsupervised
             peer contact and problem behavior in grade 7 held only for
             those adolescents who already were high in problem behavior
             in grade 6. These findings point to the need to consider
             individual, family, and neighborhood factors in evaluating
             risks associated with young adolescents' after-school care
             experiences.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00055},
   Key = {fds272170}
}

@article{fds272168,
   Author = {Stormshak, EA and Bierman, KL and Bruschi, C and Dodge, KA and Coie,
             JD},
   Title = {The relation between behavior problems and peer preference
             in different classroom contexts. Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {169-182},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00013},
   Abstract = {This study tested two alternative hypotheses regarding the
             relations between child behavior and peer preference. The
             first hypothesis is generated from the person-group
             similarity model, which predicts that the acceptability of
             social behaviors will vary as a function of peer group
             norms. The second hypothesis is generated by the social
             skill model, which predicts that behavioral skill
             deficiencies reduce and behavioral competencies enhance peer
             preference. A total of 2895 children in 134 regular
             first-grade classrooms participated in the study.
             Hierarchical linear modeling was used to compare four
             different behaviors as predictors of peer preference in the
             context of classrooms with varying levels of these behavior
             problems. The results of the study supported both predictive
             models, with the acceptability of aggression and withdrawal
             varying across classrooms (following a person-group
             similarity model) and the effects of inattentive/hyperactive
             behavior (in a negative direction) and prosocial behavior
             (in a positive direction) following a social skill model and
             remaining constant in their associations with peer
             preference across classrooms. Gender differences also
             emerged, with aggression following the person-group
             similarity model for boys more strongly than for girls. The
             effects of both child behaviors and the peer group context
             on peer preference and on the trajectory of social
             development are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00013},
   Key = {fds272168}
}

@article{fds39755,
   Author = {Schwartz, D. and McFadyen-Ketchum, S.A. and Dodge. K.A. and Pettit, G.S. and Bates, J.E.},
   Title = {Peer group victimization as a predictor of children's
             behavior problems at home and in school(Abstract)},
   Journal = {Clinician’s Research Digest: Briefings in Behavioral
             Science},
   Volume = {17},
   Year = {1999},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9524809},
   Key = {fds39755}
}

@article{fds272171,
   Author = {Orrell Valente and JK and Pinderhughes, EE and Valente, E and Laird, RD and The Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group,
             EE},
   Title = {If It's Offered, Will They Come? Influences on Parents'
             Participation in a Community-Based Conduct Problems
             Prevention Program},
   Journal = {American Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {27},
   Pages = {757-787},
   Year = {1999},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2791966/},
   Key = {fds272171}
}

@article{fds272172,
   Author = {Nix, RL and Pinderhughes, EE and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and McFadyen-Ketchum, SA},
   Title = {The relation between mothers' hostile attribution tendencies
             and children's externalizing behavior problems: The
             mediating role of mothers' harsh discipline
             practices},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {896-909},
   Year = {1999},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00065},
   Abstract = {This study examined relations among mothers' hostile
             attribution tendencies regarding their children's ambiguous
             problem behaviors, mothers' harsh discipline practices, and
             children's externalizing behavior problems. A community
             sample of 277 families (19% minority representation) living
             in three geographic regions of the United States was
             followed for over 4 years. Mothers' hostile attribution
             tendencies were assessed during the summer prior to
             children's entry into kindergarten through their responses
             to written vignettes. Mothers' harsh discipline practices
             were assessed concurrently through ratings by interviewers
             and reports by spouses. Children's externalizing behavior
             problems were assessed concurrently through written
             questionnaires by mothers and fathers and in the spring of
             kindergarten and first, second, and third grades through
             reports by teachers and peer sociometric nominations.
             Results of structural equations models demonstrated that
             mothers' hostile attribution tendencies predicted children's
             future externalizing behavior problems at school and that a
             large proportion of this relation was mediated by mothers'
             harsh discipline practices. These results remained virtually
             unchanged when controlling for initial levels of children's
             prekindergarten externalizing behavior problems at
             home.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00065},
   Key = {fds272172}
}

@article{fds272176,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Cost-Effectiveness of Psychotherapy for Child Agression:
             First is There Effectiveness?},
   Journal = {Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice},
   Volume = {3},
   Pages = {1-4},
   Year = {1999},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/1089-2699.3.4.275},
   Doi = {10.1037/1089-2699.3.4.275},
   Key = {fds272176}
}

@article{fds272180,
   Author = {Burks, VS and Laird, RD and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Knowledge structures, social information processing, and
             children's aggressive behavior},
   Journal = {Social Development},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {220-235},
   Year = {1999},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9507.00092},
   Abstract = {Although a multitude of factors may be involved in the
             development of children's violent behavior, the actual
             aggressive act is preceded by a decision-making process that
             serves as the proximal control mechanism. The primary goal
             of this longitudinal study was to understand the nature of
             this proximal control mechanism involved in children's
             aggressive acts by focusing on two aspects of social
             cognitions: social information processing and stored
             knowledge (i.e., internal knowledge structures that are the
             latent memories of past events). It was hypothesized that:
             (1) children with hostile knowledge structures will display
             more biased patterns of aggressive social information
             processing than children whose knowledge structures are less
             hostile and negative; (2) children who display hostile
             knowledge structures will behave in chronically aggressive
             ways; and (3) the development of hostile knowledge
             structures and hostile patterns of social information
             processing contribute to the stability of aggressive
             behavior and thus partially mediate the relation between
             early and later aggressive behavior. 585 boys and girls (19%
             African-American) were followed from kindergarten through
             eighth grade. Results from this investigation support the
             hypotheses and are discussed in terms of the significance of
             the inclusion of knowledge structures in our theories of the
             mental processes involved in children's violent
             behaviour.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-9507.00092},
   Key = {fds272180}
}

@article{fds272181,
   Author = {Burks, VS and Dodge, KA and Price, JM and Laird, RD},
   Title = {Internal representational models of peers: implications for
             the development of problematic behavior.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {802-810},
   Year = {1999},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.35.3.802},
   Abstract = {The authors investigated the relation between children's
             knowledge structures for peers and externalizing behavior
             problems. Initial levels of aggression were evaluated in 135
             boys and 124 girls (Grades 1-3; 40% African American, 60%
             Caucasian) in Year 1 and again in Years 6 and 9. In Year 6,
             3 aspects of their social knowledge structures were
             assessed: quality, density, and appropriateness. Results
             indicate that knowledge structures are related to children's
             concurrent levels of externalizing behaviors and that
             knowledge structures are related to children's concurrent
             levels of externalizing behaviors and predict externalizing
             behaviors 3 years later even after controlling for current
             levels of behavior. In addition, knowledge structures in
             Year 6 mediate the relation between aggression in Year 1 and
             externalizing behaviors in Year 9. The role of knowledge
             structures in the maintenance and growth of children's
             antisocial behavior is discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.35.3.802},
   Key = {fds272181}
}

@article{fds39023,
   Author = {McFadyen-Ketchum, S.A. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Problems in social relationships},
   Series = {2nd edition},
   Pages = {338-365},
   Booktitle = {Treatment of childhood disorders},
   Publisher = {New York: Guilford},
   Editor = {E.J. Mash and R.A. Barkley},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds39023}
}

@article{fds272214,
   Author = {Stormshak, and A, E and Bierman, and L, K and Group,
             TCPPR},
   Title = {The implications of different developmental patterns of
             disruptive behavior problems for school adjustment},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {451-468},
   Year = {1998},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2762115/},
   Abstract = {Based upon developmental models of disruptive behavior
             problems, this study examined the hypothesis that the nature
             of a child's externalizing problems at home may be important
             in predicting the probability of and nature of school
             adjustment problems at school entry. Parent ratings were
             collected for a sample of 631 behaviorally disruptive
             children using the Child Behavior Checklist. Confirmatory
             factor analyses revealed differentiated ratings of
             oppositional, aggressive, and hyperactive/inattentive
             behaviors at home. Teacher and peer nominations assessed
             school adjustment at the end of first grade. As expected
             from a developmental perspective, aggressive behaviors
             indicated more severe dysfunction and were more likely to
             generalize to the school setting than were oppositional
             behaviors. Hyperactive/inattentive behaviors at home led to
             more classroom disruption than did aggressive or
             oppositional behaviors. Co-occurring patterns of
             oppositional/aggressive and hyperactive/inattentive
             behaviors were more common than were single-problem
             patterns, and were associated with broad dysfunction in the
             social and classroom contexts. The results were interpreted
             within a developmental framework, in which oppositional,
             aggressive, and hyperactive/inattentive behaviors may
             reflect distinct (as well as shared) developmental processes
             that have implications for the home-to-school generalization
             of behavior problems and subsequent school
             adjustment.},
   Key = {fds272214}
}

@article{fds272215,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and McFadyen-Ketchum, SA and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Peer group victimization as a predictor of children's
             behavior problems at home and in school},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {87-99},
   Year = {1998},
   Abstract = {This study reports a short-term prospective investigation of
             the role of peer group victimization in the development of
             children's behavior problems, at home and in school.
             Sociometric interviews were utilized to assess aggression,
             victimization by peers, and peer rejection, for 330 children
             who were in either the third or fourth grade (approximate
             mean ages of 8-9 years old). Behavior problems were assessed
             using standardized behavior checklists completed by mothers
             and teachers. A follow-up assessment of behavior problems
             was completed 2 years later, when the children were in
             either the fifth or sixth grade (approximate mean ages of
             10-11 years old). Victimization was both concurrently and
             prospectively associated with externalizing, attention
             dysregulation, and immature/dependent behavior.
             Victimization also predicted increases in these difficulties
             over time, and incremented the prediction in later behavior
             problems associated with peer rejection and aggression. The
             results of this investigation demonstrate that victimization
             in the peer group is an important predictor of later
             behavioral maladjustment.},
   Key = {fds272215}
}

@article{fds272220,
   Author = {Deater-Deckard, K and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Multiple risk factors in the development of externalizing
             behavior problems: Group and individual differences},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {469-493},
   Year = {1998},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2776047/},
   Abstract = {The aim of this study was to test whether individual risk
             factors as well as the number of risk factors (cumulative
             risk) predicted children's externalizing behaviors over
             middle childhood. A sample of 466 European American and 100
             African American boys and girls from a broad range of
             socioeconomic levels was followed from age 5 to 10 years.
             Twenty risk variables from four domains (child,
             sociocultural, parenting, and peer-related) were measured
             using in-home interviews at the beginning of the study, and
             annual assessments of externalizing behaviors were
             conducted. Consistent with past research, individual
             differences in externalizing behavior problems were stable
             over time and were related to individual risk factors as
             well as the number of risk factors present. Particular risks
             accounted for 36% to 45% of the variance, and the number of
             risks present (cumulative risk status) accounted for 19% to
             32% of the variance, in externalizing outcomes. Cumulative
             risk was related to subsequent externalizing even after
             initial levels of externalizing had been statistically
             controlled. All four domains of risk variables made
             significant unique contributions to this statistical
             prediction, and there were multiple clusters of risks that
             led to similar outcomes. There was also evidence that this
             prediction was moderated by ethnic group status, most of the
             prediction of externalizing being found for European
             American children. However, this moderation effect varied
             depending on the predictor and outcome variables included in
             the model.},
   Key = {fds272220}
}

@article{fds39005,
   Author = {Coie, J.D. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Aggression and antisocial behavior},
   Pages = {779-862},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of child psychology, fifth edition. Vol. 3: Social,
             emotional, and personality development},
   Publisher = {New York: Wiley},
   Editor = {W. Damon (N. Eisenberg and Vol. Ed.)},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds39005}
}

@article{fds39010,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Schwartz, D.},
   Title = {Social information-processing mechanisms in aggressive
             behavior},
   Pages = {171-180},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of antisocial behavior},
   Publisher = {New York: Wiley},
   Editor = {D. Stoff and J. Breiling and J. Masur},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds39010}
}

@article{fds272226,
   Author = {Harrist, AW and Zaia, AF and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Subtypes of social withdrawal in early childhood:
             Sociometric status and social-cognitive differences across
             four years},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {68},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {332-348},
   Year = {1997},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.ep9706130499},
   Abstract = {From a sample of 567 kindergartners observed during free
             play, 150 children were classified as socially withdrawn and
             followed over 4 years. A cluster analysis involving teacher
             ratings was used to identify subtypes of withdrawn children.
             Four clusters were identified, 3 fitting profiles found in
             the literature and labeled unsociable (n = 96),
             passive-anxious (n = 23), and active-isolate (n = 19), and 1
             typically not discussed, labeled sad/depressed (n = 12).
             Sociometric ratings indicated that unsociable children had
             elevated rates of sociometric neglect, active-isolates had
             higher than expected levels of rejection, and sad/depressed
             children had elevated rates of both neglect and rejection.
             Subtypes also differed in social information-processing
             patterns, with active-isolate children displaying the least
             competent skills. The findings that some subtypes experience
             more difficulty than others might account for the ambiguity
             in extant studies regarding whether or not social withdrawal
             is a risk factor in psychosocial development, because
             withdrawal has most often been treated as a unitary
             construct in the past.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.ep9706130499},
   Key = {fds272226}
}

@article{fds272229,
   Author = {Deater Deckard and K and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Externalizing behavior problems and discipline revisited:
             Nonlinear effects and variation by culture, context, and
             gender},
   Journal = {Psychological Inquiry},
   Volume = {8},
   Pages = {161-175},
   Year = {1997},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15327965pli0803_1},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15327965pli0803_1},
   Key = {fds272229}
}

@article{fds38996,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Biopsychosocial perspectives on the development of conduct
             disorder},
   Booktitle = {Proceedings of the Fifth National Prevention Research
             Conference},
   Publisher = {Washington, DC: National Institute of Mental
             Health},
   Editor = {J.A. Linney},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds38996}
}

@article{fds272235,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {The legacy of Hobbs and Gray: Research on the development
             and prevention of conduct problems},
   Journal = {Peabody Journal of Education},
   Volume = {71},
   Pages = {86-98},
   Year = {1996},
   url = {http://www.jstor.org/stable/1493186},
   Key = {fds272235}
}

@article{fds272239,
   Author = {Lochman, JE},
   Title = {Screening of child behavior problems for prevention programs
             at school entry. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {549-559},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-006x.63.4.549},
   Abstract = {Targeted programs designed to prevent conduct problems in
             childhood and adolescence rely on screening systems to
             identify high-risk individuals. This study examines the
             proximal usefulness of a multiple-gating approach to
             screening, using teacher and parent ratings in a 2-step
             procedure with a sample of 382 kindergarten children. The
             study explored differences in the accuracy of the 2 steps of
             screening information and whether parents' reports of
             parenting practices augments the prediction of negative
             outcomes. The 2-step screening system was found to
             effectively predict negative behavior outcomes over 1 year
             later, although some false-positive and false-negative
             predictions were evident. The Parenting Practices Screen did
             not substantially add to prediction accuracy. The discussion
             emphasizes the potential contributions and problems of using
             screening measures.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-006x.63.4.549},
   Key = {fds272239}
}

@article{fds38983,
   Author = {Bates, J.E. and Pettit, G.S. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Family and child factors in stability and change in
             children's aggressiveness in elementary school},
   Pages = {124-138},
   Booktitle = {Coercion and punishment in long-term perspectives},
   Publisher = {New York: Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {J. McCord},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds38983}
}

@article{fds272238,
   Author = {McMahon, and J, R and Greenberg, and T, M and Dodge, TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {The FAST Track Program: A developmentally focused
             intervention for children with conduct problems},
   Journal = {Clinician'S Research Digest},
   Volume = {13},
   Pages = {1-2},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds272238}
}

@article{fds272241,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Valente,
             E},
   Title = {Social Information-Processing Patterns Partially Mediate the
             Effect of Early Physical Abuse on Later Conduct
             Problems},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {104},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {632-643},
   Year = {1995},
   ISSN = {0021-843X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0021-843X.104.4.632},
   Abstract = {The authors tested the hypothesis that early physical abuse
             is associated with later externalizing behavior outcomes and
             that this relation is mediated by the intervening
             development of biased social information-processing
             patterns. They assessed 584 randomly selected boys and girls
             from European American and African American backgrounds for
             the lifetime experience of physical abuse through clinical
             interviews with mothers prior to the child's matriculation
             in kindergarten. Early abuse increased the risk of
             teacher-rated externalizing outcomes in Grades 3 and 4 by
             fourfold, and this effect could not be accounted for by
             confounded ecological or child factors. Abuse was associated
             with later processing patterns (encoding errors, hostile
             attributional biases, accessing of aggressive responses, and
             positive evaluations of aggression), which, in turn,
             predicted later externalizing outcomes. © 1995 American
             Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0021-843X.104.4.632},
   Key = {fds272241}
}

@article{fds272261,
   Author = {DeRosier, ME and Cillessen, AH and Coie, JD and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Group social context and children's aggressive
             behavior.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1068-1079},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7956465},
   Abstract = {Very little is known about the influence of the
             social-psychological context on children's aggressive
             behavior. The purpose of this research was to examine the
             interrelations of group contextual factors and the
             occurrence of aggressive behavior in 22 experimental play
             groups of 7- and 9-year-old African-American boys. Group
             context was examined before, during, and after an aggressive
             act as well as during nonaggressive periods. The results
             showed that there are dimensions of group context (i.e.,
             negative affect, high aversive behavior, high activity
             level, low group cohesion, competitiveness) that were
             related to the occurrence of aggressive behavior between 2
             children in the group. Group context influenced how children
             reacted to aggression between its members (e.g., siding with
             the victim), which in turn influenced the quality of the
             postaggression group atmosphere. This study suggests that
             individual-within-context information be incorporated into
             theories of aggression among children.},
   Doi = {10.2307/1131305},
   Key = {fds272261}
}

@article{fds272244,
   Author = {Strassberg, Z and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Spanking in the home and children's subsequent aggression
             toward kindergarten peers},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {6},
   Pages = {445-462},
   Year = {1994},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579400006040},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400006040},
   Key = {fds272244}
}

@article{fds272245,
   Author = {Sinclair, JJ and Pettit, GS and Harrist, AW and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Encounters with aggressive peers in early childhood:
             Frequency, age differences, and correlates of risk for
             behavior problems},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Development},
   Volume = {17},
   Pages = {675-696},
   Year = {1994},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/016502549401700407},
   Doi = {10.1177/016502549401700407},
   Key = {fds272245}
}

@article{fds272249,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Socialization mediators of the relation between
             socioeconomic status and child conduct problems},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {2 Spec No},
   Pages = {1385-1398},
   Year = {1994},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8013245},
   Abstract = {The goal was to examine processes in socialization that
             might account for an observed relation between early
             socioeconomic status and later child behavior problems. A
             representative sample of 585 children (n = 51 from the
             lowest socioeconomic class) was followed from preschool to
             grade 3. Socioeconomic status assessed in preschool
             significantly predicted teacher-rated externalizing problems
             and peer-rated aggressive behavior in kindergarten and
             grades 1, 2, and 3. Socioeconomic status was significantly
             negatively correlated with 8 factors in the child's
             socialization and social context, including harsh
             discipline, lack of maternal warmth, exposure to aggressive
             adult models, maternal aggressive values, family life
             stressors, mother's lack of social support, peer group
             instability, and lack of cognitive stimulation. These
             factors, in turn, significantly predicted teacher-rated
             externalizing problems and peer-nominated aggression and
             accounted for over half of the total effect of socioeconomic
             status on these outcomes. These findings suggest that part
             of the effect of socioeconomic status on children's
             aggressive development may be mediated by status-related
             socializing experiences.},
   Doi = {10.2307/1131407},
   Key = {fds272249}
}

@article{fds38959,
   Author = {Quiggle, N. and Panak, W.F. and Garber, J. and Dodge,
             K.A},
   Title = {Social information processing in aggressive and depressed
             children(Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {Annual Progress in Child Psychiatry and Child
             Development},
   Publisher = {New York: Wiley},
   Editor = {M.E. Herteig and E.A. Farber},
   Year = {1993},
   Key = {fds38959}
}

@article{fds38915,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Coie, J.D.},
   Title = {Social information processing factors in reactive and
             proactive aggression in children's peer groups
             (Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {Aggression: Its causes, consequences, and
             control.},
   Publisher = {New York: McGraw-Hill},
   Editor = {L. Berkowitz},
   Year = {1993},
   Key = {fds38915}
}

@article{fds39033,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Attributional bias in aggressive children},
   Booktitle = {Social and personality development},
   Publisher = {Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole Publishing},
   Editor = {D. Shaffer},
   Year = {1993},
   Key = {fds39033}
}

@article{fds272259,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Social-cognitive mechanisms in the development of conduct
             disorder and depression},
   Journal = {Annual Review of Psychology},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {559-584},
   Year = {1993},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev.ps.44.020193.003015},
   Doi = {10.1146/annurev.ps.44.020193.003015},
   Key = {fds272259}
}

@article{fds272262,
   Author = {Wehby, and H, J and Dodge, and A, K and Valente, and E, and Jr, and Group,
             TCPPR},
   Title = {School behavior of first-grade children identified as
             at-risk for development of conduct problems},
   Journal = {Behavioral Disorders},
   Volume = {18},
   Pages = {67-78},
   Year = {1993},
   Key = {fds272262}
}

@article{fds272268,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {The future of research on the treatment of conduct
             disorder},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {5},
   Pages = {309-317},
   Year = {1993},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579400004405},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400004405},
   Key = {fds272268}
}

@article{fds272269,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Family interaction patterns and children's conduct problems
             at home and school: A longitudinal perspective},
   Journal = {School Psychology Review},
   Volume = {22},
   Pages = {401-418},
   Year = {1993},
   Key = {fds272269}
}

@article{fds272256,
   Author = {Weiss, B and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Some consequences of early harsh discipline: child
             aggression and a maladaptive social information processing
             style.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1321-1335},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1446555},
   Abstract = {Although a number of studies have reported a relation
             between abusive parental behavior and later aggressive
             behavior in the victim, many of these investigations have
             had methodological limitations that make precise
             interpretation of their results problematic. In the present
             study, we attempted to determine whether harsh parental
             discipline occurring early in life was associated with later
             aggression and internalizing behavior in children, using a
             prospective design with randomly selected samples to avoid
             some of these methodological difficulties. Structural
             equation modeling indicated a consistent relation between
             harsh discipline and aggression in 2 separate cohorts of
             children. This relation did not appear to be due to possible
             confounding factors such as child temperament, SES, and
             marital violence, although there was some indication in our
             data that the latter variables were related to child
             aggression. In addition, our analyses suggested that the
             effect of harsh discipline on child aggression may be
             mediated at least in part by maladaptive social information
             processing patterns that develop in response to the harsh
             discipline.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1992.tb01697.x},
   Key = {fds272256}
}

@article{fds272275,
   Author = {Quiggle, NL and Garber, J and Panak, WF and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Social information processing in aggressive and depressed
             children.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1305-1320},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1446554},
   Abstract = {Social information processing patterns of children who were
             identified as being aggressive or depressed, both, or
             neither were compared in order to address the issue of
             specificity and to explore whether children who are comorbid
             show a unique processing style. Subjects were 220 children
             in the third through sixth grade. Peer nomination and
             teacher ratings were used to assess level of aggression, and
             the Children's Depression Inventory was used to measure
             level of depression. Aggressive children showed a hostile
             attributional bias, were more likely to report that they
             would engage in aggressive behavior, and indicated that
             aggression would be easy for them. Depressed children
             similarly showed a hostile attributional bias, although they
             were more likely to attribute negative situations to
             internal, stable, and global causes. Depressed children also
             reported that they would be less likely to use assertive
             responses and that they expected that assertive behavior
             would lead to more negative and fewer positive outcomes.
             Children who were comorbid generally showed patterns similar
             to both aggressive and depressed children.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1992.tb01696.x},
   Key = {fds272275}
}

@article{fds272258,
   Author = {BIERMAN, KL and COIE, JD and DODGE, KA and GREENBERG, MT and LOCHMAN,
             JE and MCMAHON, RJ},
   Title = {A developmental and clinical model for the prevention of
             conduct disorder: The FAST Track Program},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {04},
   Pages = {509-509},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1992KG60800003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400004855},
   Key = {fds272258}
}

@article{fds272270,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Terry, R and Wright, V},
   Title = {The role of aggression in peer relations: an analysis of
             aggression episodes in boys' play groups.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {812-826},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1935345},
   Abstract = {Although aggression is frequently cited as a major cause of
             peer social rejection, no more than half of all aggressive
             children are rejected. Aggressive episode data from
             experimental play groups of 7- and 9-year-old black males
             were coded to examine whether qualitative aspects of
             aggressive behavior, as well as frequency of aggression,
             determine the relation between aggressiveness and peer
             rejection. Reactive aggression and bullying were related to
             peer status among 9-year-olds, but not 7-year-olds, whereas
             instrumental aggression was characteristic of highly
             aggressive, rejected boys at both ages. Qualitative features
             of aggressive interaction suggested a greater level of
             hostility toward peers and a tendency to violate norms for
             aggressive exchange among rejected, aggressive boys at both
             ages in contrast to other groups of boys. The descriptive
             data provide a distinctive picture of reactive,
             instrumental, and bullying aggression as well as differing
             social norms for target and aggressor behavior in each of
             these 3 types of aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1991.tb01571.x},
   Key = {fds272270}
}

@article{fds272271,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Coie, JD and Pettit, GS and Price, JM},
   Title = {Peer status and aggression in boys' groups: developmental
             and contextual analyses.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1289-1309},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2245725},
   Abstract = {The social transactions of popular, rejected, neglected, and
             average first- and third-grade boys were examined during
             their initial encounters with peers. 23 groups of 5 or 6
             boys each were observed for 45-min free-play sessions
             conducted on 5 consecutive days, with sociometric interviews
             following each session. Social preference in the play groups
             correlated significantly with classroom social preference
             after the third and subsequent play sessions for the third
             graders, and after the fourth and subsequent sessions for
             the first graders. The observational coding system
             distinguished 4 types of aggressive behavior that were
             hypothesized to relate to peer status in different ways. The
             first, rough play, was not related to peer status. However,
             rejected boys at both ages displayed significantly higher
             rates of angry reactive aggression and instrumental
             aggression than average boys. The relation between bullying
             and peer status varied with the age of the child. Popular
             first graders engaged in more bullying than average first
             graders, but popular third graders did not differ from
             average in bullying. Other questions concerned the temporal
             relation between play group behaviors and social preference
             scores within the group. Socially interactive behaviors
             anteceded high preference by peers, and low preference in
             turn led to social isolation in subsequent
             sessions.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1990.tb02862.x},
   Key = {fds272271}
}

@article{fds272260,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Crick, NR},
   Title = {The social information processing bases of aggressive
             behavior in children},
   Journal = {Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
   Volume = {16},
   Pages = {8-22},
   Year = {1990},
   Key = {fds272260}
}

@article{fds272263,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Nature Versus Nurture in Childhood Conduct Disorder: It Is
             Time to Ask a Different Question},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {698-701},
   Year = {1990},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   Abstract = {Lytton (1990, this issue) offers a lucid review of factors
             in the development of conduct disorder in children that
             focuses on the question of the "relative strength" of child
             effects versus environmental effects. This question ignores
             the fact that such estimates are a function of the
             subpopulation being assessed and the context in which
             measurement occurs. These estimates pit nature versus
             nurture in a way that detracts from an emphasis on the
             interaction of factors that characterizes most human
             behavioral development. This perspective also assumes that
             "child effects," "environmental effects," and "conduct
             disorder" are homogeneous constructs, but these are more
             likely aggregations of heterogeneous phenomena that have
             been grouped together only for heuristic reasons. It is
             recommended that instead of focusing on the relative sizes
             of effects, researchers should focus on the questions of
             which mechanisms operate and how they interact during
             transactional development.},
   Key = {fds272263}
}

@article{fds272264,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Price, JM and Bachorowski, J-A and Newman,
             JP},
   Title = {Hostile Attributional Biases in Severely Aggressive
             Adolescents},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {99},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {385-392},
   Year = {1990},
   ISSN = {0021-843X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0021-843X.99.4.385},
   Abstract = {Adolescent boys (N = 128) from a maximum security prison for
             juvenile offenders were administered a task to assess
             hostile attributional biases. As hypothesized, these biases
             were positively correlated with undersocialized aggressive
             conduct disorder (as indicated by high scores on
             standardized scales and by psychiatric diagnoses), with
             reactive-aggressive behavior, and with the number of
             interpersonally violent crimes committed. Hostile
             attributional biases were found not to relate to nonviolent
             crimes or to socialized aggressive behavior disorder. These
             findings held even when race and estimates of intelligence
             and socioeconomic status were controlled. These findings
             suggest that within a population of juvenile offenders,
             attributional biases are implicated specifically in
             interpersonal reactive aggression that involves anger and
             not in socialized delinquency.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0021-843X.99.4.385},
   Key = {fds272264}
}

@article{fds272279,
   Author = {DODGE, KA and PRICE, JM and COIE, JD and CHRISTOPOULOS,
             C},
   Title = {ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF AGGRESSIVE DYADIC RELATIONSHIPS IN
             BOYS PEER GROUPS},
   Journal = {Human development},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {4-5},
   Pages = {260-270},
   Year = {1990},
   ISSN = {0018-716X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1990DQ90900005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1159/000276523},
   Key = {fds272279}
}

@article{fds272251,
   Author = {Strassberg, Z and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Identification of discriminative stimuli for aggressive
             behavior in children},
   Journal = {The Behavior Therapist},
   Volume = {12},
   Pages = {195-199},
   Year = {1989},
   Key = {fds272251}
}

@article{fds272252,
   Author = {Price, JM and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Reactive and proactive aggression in childhood: Relations to
             peer status and social context dimensions},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {455-471},
   Year = {1989},
   Abstract = {Although there has been an accumulation of evidence to
             suggest a link between peer-directed aggression and social
             rejection, little attention has been given to the relations
             between specific subtypes of aggressive behavior and social
             rejection. The purpose of this investigation was to examine
             the relations between two subtypes of aggressive behavior
             (reactive and proactive aggression) and children's classroom
             peer status. The reciprocity of each of these subtypes of
             aggressive behavior and the social contexts in which these
             behaviors occur were also examined. Assessments of each of
             these forms of aggression among 70 boys (ages 5 and 6) were
             conducted using direct observations and teacher ratings. In
             general, directing reactive aggressive behavior towards
             peers was associated with social rejection, while
             utilization of instrumental aggression was positively
             related to peer status. The findings also indicated that
             directing proactive forms of aggression toward peers was
             related to being the target of proactive aggression.
             Finally, among older boys, both subtypes of aggression were
             more likely to occur during rough play than during any other
             type of play activity.},
   Key = {fds272252}
}

@article{fds272098,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Social-information-processing factors in reactive and
             proactive aggression in children's peer groups.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1146-1158},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3694454},
   Abstract = {We examined social-information-processing mechanisms (e.g.,
             hostile attributional biases and intention-cue detection
             deficits) in chronic reactive and proactive aggressive
             behavior in children's peer groups. In Study 1, a
             teacher-rating instrument was developed to assess these
             behaviors in elementary school children (N = 259). Reactive
             and proactive scales were found to be internally consistent,
             and factor analyses partially supported convergent and
             discriminant validities. In Study 2, behavioral correlates
             of these forms of aggression were examined through
             assessments by peers (N = 339). Both types of aggression
             related to social rejection, but only proactively aggressive
             boys were also viewed as leaders and as having a sense of
             humor. In Study 3, we hypothesized that reactive aggression
             (but not proactive aggression) would occur as a function of
             hostile attributional biases and intention-cue detection
             deficits. Four groups of socially rejected boys (reactive
             aggressive, proactive aggressive, reactive-proactive
             aggressive, and nonaggressive) and a group of average boys
             were presented with a series of hypothetical videorecorded
             vignettes depicting provocations by peers and were asked to
             interpret the intentions of the provocateur (N = 117). Only
             the two reactive-aggressive groups displayed biases and
             deficits in interpretations. In Study 4, attributional
             biases and deficits were found to be positively correlated
             with the rate of reactive aggression (but not proactive
             aggression) displayed in free play with peers (N = 127).
             These studies supported the hypothesis that attributional
             biases and deficits are related to reactive aggression but
             not to proactive aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.53.6.1146},
   Key = {fds272098}
}

@article{fds272194,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Tomlin, A},
   Title = {Cue utilization as a mechanism of attributional bias in
             aggressive children},
   Journal = {Social Cognition},
   Volume = {5},
   Pages = {280-300},
   Year = {1987},
   Key = {fds272194}
}

@article{fds272195,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Somberg, DR},
   Title = {Hostile attributional biases among aggressive boys are
             exacerbated under conditions of threats to the
             self.},
   Journal = {Child development},
   Volume = {58},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {213-224},
   Year = {1987},
   Abstract = {Previous studies have found a tendency for aggressive boys
             to display hostile attributional biases and social cue
             interpretation deficits. It was hypothesized that these
             biases and deficits would be exaggerated under conditions of
             social anxiety and threat. Aggressive and nonaggressive boys
             aged 8 - 10 (total N = 65) were administered tests of
             attributional tendencies and social cue interpretation
             skills (via videorecorded stimuli) under relaxed and
             threatening conditions. It was found that, relative to
             normal boys, aggressive boys displayed a bias toward
             attributing hostile intentions to peers, a deficit in
             interpreting accurately others' intentions, and a deficit in
             linking interpretations to behavioral responses. The
             hypothesis that these biases and deficits would be
             exaggerated under conditions of threat was also supported.
             Findings were interpreted as consistent with theories of
             preemptive processing and emotional vulnerability in
             aggressive boys.},
   Key = {fds272195}
}

@article{fds272206,
   Author = {Milich, R and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Social information processing in child psychiatric
             populations},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {471-490},
   Year = {1984},
   Key = {fds272206}
}

@article{fds272208,
   Author = {Steinberg, MD and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Attributional bias in aggressive adolescent boys and
             girls},
   Journal = {Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {1},
   Pages = {312-321},
   Year = {1983},
   Key = {fds272208}
}

@article{fds272209,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Frame, CL},
   Title = {Social cognitive biases and deficits in aggressive
             boys.},
   Journal = {Child development},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {620-635},
   Year = {1982},
   Abstract = {3 studies are reported which assess the nature and limits of
             a known bias on the part of aggressive boys to overattribute
             hostile intentions to peers. The first study determined that
             this bias is restricted to attributions of a peer's behavior
             toward an aggressive boy, and not to attributions of a
             peer's behavior toward a second peer. Biased attributions
             were implicated as a direct precedent to aggressive
             responses. The second study assessed the role of selective
             attention to and recall of hostile social cues in the
             formation of a biased attribution. It was found that
             selective recall of hostile cues did lead to a biased
             attribution, but that selective recall did not fully account
             for the attributional differences between aggressive and
             nonaggressive boys. Also, specific deficits in recall by
             aggressive boys were identified. The third study involved
             naturalistic observation of the peer-directed aggressive
             behaviors of boys in a controlled setting. It was found that
             the biased attributions of aggressive boys may have some
             basis in their experience, in that they were frequently the
             targets of peers' aggressive behavior. Their own aggressive
             behavior toward peers, however, occurred at a much higher
             rate than the rate at which they were the targets of
             aggression. These findings led to the formation of a
             social-information-processing model of aggressive
             behavior.},
   Key = {fds272209}
}

@article{fds272199,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Newman, JP},
   Title = {Biased decision-making processes in aggressive
             boys},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {90},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {375-379},
   Year = {1981},
   ISSN = {0021-843X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0021-843X.90.4.375},
   Abstract = {Recent evidence has suggested that aggressive boys
             demonstrate a bias toward attributing hostility to peers in
             unwarranted circumstances. The present study explored 2
             aspects of cognitive processing that might be related to
             attributional bias: speed of decision making and selective
             recall of hostile cues. 81 aggressive and nonaggressive boys
             at 3 age levels (kindergarten-2st grade, 2nd-3rd, and
             4th-5th) participated in a detective game in which the task
             was to accumulate evidence to decide whether or not a peer
             had acted with benevolence or hostility. Aggressive boys
             were found to respond more quickly and with less attention
             to available social cues. They also overattributed hostility
             to peers in unwarranted circumstances, but only when they
             responded quickly. This restriction suggests that training
             aggressive boys to respond more slowly could lead to fewer
             biased attributions on their part. Selective recall was also
             related to biased attributions for both groups of boys. This
             suggests that training boys to recall all cues
             nonselectively could reduce the frequency of their biased
             attributions. Results are discussed in terms of a cognitive
             model of aggressive behavior. (16 ref) (PsycINFO Database
             Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). © 1981 American
             Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0021-843X.90.4.375},
   Key = {fds272199}
}

@article{fds272200,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Social cognition and children's aggressive
             behavior.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {162-170},
   Year = {1980},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1980.tb02522.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1980.tb02522.x},
   Key = {fds272200}
}


%% Book Reviews   
@article{fds219663,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Book review: The Handbook of Clinical Child Neuropsychology,
             3rd edition},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Psychiatry},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {726},
   Editor = {Edited by Cecil R. Reynolds and Elaine Fletcher-Janzen},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds219663}
}

@article{fds39732,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {The structure and function of reactive and proactive
             aggression},
   Pages = {201-218},
   Booktitle = {The development and treatment of childhood
             aggression},
   Publisher = {Hillsdale, N. J.: Lawrence Erlbaum},
   Editor = {D.J. Pepler and K.H. Rubin},
   Year = {1991},
   Key = {fds39732}
}