Kenneth A. Dodge

Publications of Kenneth A. Dodge    :chronological  alphabetical  combined  by tags listing:

%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds272008,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Giunta, LD and Deater-Deckard, K and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Tapanya, S and Tirado, LMU and Zelli, A and Al-Hassan,
             SM and Alampay, LP and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L},
   Title = {Boys' and Girls' Relational and Physical Aggression in Nine
             Countries},
   Journal = {Aggressive Behavior},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {298-308},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {0096-140X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ab.21433},
   Abstract = {Distinguishing between relational and physical aggression
             has become a key feature of many developmental studies in
             North America and Western Europe, but very little
             information is available on relational and physical
             aggression in more diverse cultural contexts. This study
             examined the factor structure of, associations between, and
             gender differences in relational and physical aggression in
             China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines,
             Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Children ages 7-10
             years (N = 1,410) reported on their relationally and
             physically aggressive behavior. Relational and physical
             aggression shared a common factor structure across
             countries. In all nine countries, relational and physical
             aggression were significantly correlated (average r = .49).
             Countries differed in the mean levels of both relational and
             physical aggression that children reported using and with
             respect to whether children reported using more physical
             than relational aggression or more relational than physical
             aggression. Boys reported being more physically aggressive
             than girls across all nine countries; no consistent gender
             differences emerged in relational aggression. Despite
             mean-level differences in relational and physical aggression
             across countries, the findings provided support for
             cross-country similarities in associations between
             relational and physical aggression as well as links between
             gender and aggression. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals,
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/ab.21433},
   Key = {fds272008}
}

@article{fds272026,
   Author = {Deater Deckard and K and Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Alampay, LP and Sorbring, E and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang,
             L and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Tapanya, S and Tirado, LMU and Zelli, A and Al Hassan,
             SM},
   Title = {The association between parental warmth and control in
             thirteen cultural groups},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {791-794},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {0893-3200},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0025120},
   Abstract = {The goal of the current study was to investigate potential
             cross-cultural differences in the covariation between two of
             the major dimensions of parenting behavior: control and
             warmth. Participants included 1,421 (51% female) 7- to
             10-year-old (M = 8.29, SD = .67 years) children and their
             mothers and fathers representing 13 cultural groups in nine
             countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and
             North and South America. Children and parents completed
             questionnaires and interviews regarding mother and father
             control and warmth. Greater warmth was associated with more
             control, but this association varied widely between cultural
             groups. © 2011 American Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0025120},
   Key = {fds272026}
}

@article{fds272044,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Dodge, KA and Chang, L and Chaudhary, N and Tapanya, S and Oburu, P and Deater-Deckard, K},
   Title = {Children's Perceptions of Maternal Hostility as a Mediator
             of the Link between Discipline and Children's Adjustment in
             Four Countries.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Development},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {452-461},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0165-0254},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165025409354933},
   Abstract = {Using data from 195 dyads of mothers and children (age range
             = 8-12 years; M = 10.63) in four countries (China, India,
             the Philippines, and Thailand), this study examined
             children's perceptions of maternal hostility as a mediator
             of the links between physical discipline and harsh verbal
             discipline and children's adjustment. Both physical
             discipline and harsh verbal discipline had direct effects on
             mothers' reports of children's anxiety and aggression; three
             of these four links were mediated by children's perceptions
             of maternal hostility. In contrast, there were no
             significant direct effects of physical discipline and harsh
             verbal discipline on children's reports of their own anxiety
             and aggression. Instead, both physical discipline and harsh
             verbal discipline had indirect effects on the outcomes
             through children's perceptions of maternal hostility. We
             identified a significant interaction between perceived
             normativeness and use of harsh verbal discipline on
             children's perception of maternal hostility, but children's
             perception of the normativeness of physical discipline did
             not moderate the relation between physical discipline and
             perceived maternal hostility. The effects of harsh verbal
             discipline were more adverse when children perceived that
             form of discipline as being nonnormative than when children
             perceived that form of discipline as being normative.
             Results are largely consistent with a theoretical model
             positing that the meaning children attach to parents'
             discipline strategies is important in understanding
             associations between discipline and children's adjustment,
             and that cultural context is associated with children's
             interpretations of their parents' behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0165025409354933},
   Key = {fds272044}
}

@article{fds272013,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, S and Bacchini, D and Bombi,
             AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta,
             L and Dodge, KA and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Runyan, DK and Skinner,
             AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya, S and Tirado, LMU and Zelli,
             A},
   Title = {Corporal punishment of children in nine countries as a
             function of child gender and parent gender.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Pediatrics},
   Volume = {2010},
   Pages = {672780},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20976255},
   Abstract = {Background. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a
             global perspective on corporal punishment by examining
             differences between mothers' and fathers' use of corporal
             punishment with daughters and sons in nine countries.
             Methods. Interviews were conducted with 1398 mothers, 1146
             fathers, and 1417 children (age range = 7 to 10 years) in
             China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines,
             Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Results. Across the
             entire sample, 54% of girls and 58% of boys had experienced
             mild corporal punishment, and 13% of girls and 14% of boys
             had experienced severe corporal punishment by their parents
             or someone in their household in the last month. Seventeen
             percent of parents believed that the use of corporal
             punishment was necessary to rear the target child. Overall,
             boys were more frequently punished corporally than were
             girls, and mothers used corporal punishment more frequently
             than did fathers. There were significant differences across
             countries, with reports of corporal punishment use lowest in
             Sweden and highest in Kenya. Conclusion. This work
             establishes that the use of corporal punishment is
             widespread, and efforts to prevent corporal punishment from
             escalating into physical abuse should be commensurately
             widespread.},
   Doi = {10.1155/2010/672780},
   Key = {fds272013}
}

@article{fds272053,
   Author = {Gershoff, ET and Grogan Kaylor and A and Lansford, JE and Chang, L and Zelli, A and Deater Deckard and K and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Parent discipline practices in an international sample:
             Associations with child behaviors and moderation by
             perceived normativeness},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {81},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {480-495},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01409.x},
   Abstract = {This study examined the associations of 11 discipline
             techniques with children's aggressive and anxious behaviors
             in an international sample of mothers and children from 6
             countries and determined whether any significant
             associations were moderated by mothers' and children's
             perceived normativeness of the techniques. Participants
             included 292 mothers and their 8- to 12-year-old children
             living in China, India, Italy, Kenya, Philippines, and
             Thailand. Parallel multilevel and fixed effects models
             revealed that mothers' use of corporal punishment,
             expressing disappointment, and yelling were significantly
             related to more child aggression symptoms, whereas giving a
             time-out, using corporal punishment, expressing
             disappointment, and shaming were significantly related to
             greater child anxiety symptoms. Some moderation of these
             associations was found for children's perceptions of
             normativeness. © 2010, the Author(s).},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01409.x},
   Key = {fds272053}
}

@article{fds272069,
   Author = {Hurley, S and The Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group, and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Disentangling Ethnic and Contextual Influences Among Parents
             Raising Youth in High-Risk Communities.},
   Journal = {Applied Developmental Science},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {211-219},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1088-8691},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19777084},
   Abstract = {This article reports on analyses examining contextual
             influences on parenting with an ethnically and
             geographically diverse sample of parents (predominantly
             mothers) raising 387 children (49% ethnic minority; 51%
             male) in high-risk communities. Parents and children were
             followed longitudinally from first through tenth grades.
             Contextual influences included geographical location,
             neighborhood risk, SES, and family stress. The cultural
             variable was racial socialization. Parenting constructs
             created through the consensus decision-making of the
             Parenting Subgroup of the Study Group on Race, Culture, and
             Ethnicity (see Le et al., 2008) included Monitoring,
             Communication, Warmth, Behavioral Control and Parenting
             Efficacy. Hierarchical regressions on each parenting
             construct were conducted for each grade for which data were
             available. Analyses tested for initial ethnic differences
             and then for remaining ethnic differences once contextual
             influences were controlled. For each construct, some ethnic
             differences did remain (Monitoring, ninth grade; Warmth,
             third grade; Communication, kindergarten; Behavioral
             Control, eighth grade; and Parenting Efficacy, kindergarten
             through fifth grade). Ethnic differences were explained by
             contextual differences in the remaining years. Analyses
             examining the impact of cultural influences revealed a
             negative relation between racial socialization messages and
             Communication or Monitoring.},
   Doi = {10.1080/10888690802388151},
   Key = {fds272069}
}

@article{fds272090,
   Author = {Hillemeier, and M, and Foster, and M, E and Heinrichs, and B, and Heier, and B, and Dodge, TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {Racial differences in the measurement of
             attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
             behaviors},
   Journal = {Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics},
   Volume = {28},
   Pages = {353-361},
   Year = {2007},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DBP.0b013e31811ff8b8},
   Doi = {10.1097/DBP.0b013e31811ff8b8},
   Key = {fds272090}
}

@article{fds271983,
   Author = {Caprara, GV and Dodge, KA and Pastorelli, C and Zelli,
             A},
   Title = {The effects of marginal deviations on behavioral
             development},
   Journal = {European Psychologist},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {79-89},
   Year = {2006},
   ISSN = {1016-9040},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1016-9040.11.2.79},
   Abstract = {This investigation was conceptually framed within the theory
             of marginal deviations (Caprara & Zimbardo, 1996) and
             sought evidence for the general hypothesis that some
             children who initially show marginal behavioral problems
             may, over time, develop more serious problems depending
             partly on other personal and behavioral characteristics. To
             this end, the findings of two studies conducted,
             respectively, with American elementary school children and
             Italian middle school students are reviewed. These two
             studies show that hyperactivity, cognitive difficulties, low
             social preference, and lack of prosocial behavior increase a
             child's risk for growth in aggressive behavior over several
             school years. More importantly, they also show that
             equivalent levels of these risk factors have a greater
             impact on the development of children who, early on, were
             marginally aggressive. © 2006 Hogrefe & Huber
             Publishers.},
   Doi = {10.1027/1016-9040.11.2.79},
   Key = {fds271983}
}

@article{fds272123,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Chang, L and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Palmérus, K and Bacchini, D and Pastorelli, C and Bombi, AS and Zelli,
             A and Tapanya, S and Chaudhary, N and Deater-Deckard, K and Manke, B and Quinn, N},
   Title = {Physical discipline and children's adjustment: cultural
             normativeness as a moderator.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {76},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1234-1246},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16274437},
   Abstract = {Interviews were conducted with 336 mother-child dyads
             (children's ages ranged from 6 to 17 years; mothers' ages
             ranged from 20 to 59 years) in China, India, Italy, Kenya,
             the Philippines, and Thailand to examine whether
             normativeness of physical discipline moderates the link
             between mothers' use of physical discipline and children's
             adjustment. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that
             physical discipline was less strongly associated with
             adverse child outcomes in conditions of greater perceived
             normativeness, but physical discipline was also associated
             with more adverse outcomes regardless of its perceived
             normativeness. Countries with the lowest use of physical
             discipline showed the strongest association between mothers'
             use and children's behavior problems, but in all countries
             higher use of physical discipline was associated with more
             aggression and anxiety.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2005.00847.x},
   Key = {fds272123}
}

@article{fds272114,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Deater-Deckard, K and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Ethnic differences in the link between physical discipline
             and later adolescent externalizing behaviors.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {801-812},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0021-9630},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15056311},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Parents' use of physical discipline has
             generated controversy related to concerns that its use is
             associated with adjustment problems such as aggression and
             delinquency in children. However, recent evidence suggests
             that there are ethnic differences in associations between
             physical discipline and children's adjustment. This study
             examined race as a moderator of the link between physical
             discipline and adolescent externalizing behavior problems,
             extending previous research beyond childhood into
             adolescence and considering physical discipline at multiple
             points in time. METHODS: A representative community sample
             of 585 children was followed from pre-kindergarten (age 5)
             through grade 11 (age 16). Mothers reported on their use of
             physical discipline in the child's first five years of life
             and again during grades 6 (age 11) and 8 (age 13). Mothers
             and adolescents reported on a variety of externalizing
             behaviors in grade 11 including aggression, violence, and
             trouble at school and with the police. RESULTS: A series of
             hierarchical linear regressions controlling for parents'
             marital status, socioeconomic status, and child temperament
             revealed significant interactions between physical
             discipline during the child's first five years of life and
             race in the prediction of 3 of the 7 adolescent
             externalizing outcomes assessed and significant interactions
             between physical discipline during grades 6 and 8 and race
             in the prediction of all 7 adolescent externalizing
             outcomes. Regression slopes showed that the experience of
             physical discipline at each time point was related to higher
             levels of subsequent externalizing behaviors for European
             American adolescents but lower levels of externalizing
             behaviors for African American adolescents. CONCLUSIONS:
             There are race differences in long-term effects of physical
             discipline on externalizing behaviors problems. Different
             ecological niches may affect the manner in which parents use
             physical discipline, the meaning that children attach to the
             experience of physical discipline, and its effects on the
             adjustment of children and adolescents.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1469-7610.2004.00273.x},
   Key = {fds272114}
}

@article{fds272144,
   Author = {Kaplow, JB and Curran, PJ and Dodge, KA and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Child, parent, and peer predictors of early-onset substance
             use: a multisite longitudinal study.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {199-216},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12041707},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this study was to identify kindergarten-age
             predictors of early-onset substance use from demographic,
             environmental, parenting, child psychological, behavioral,
             and social functioning domains. Data from a longitudinal
             study of 295 children were gathered using
             multiple-assessment methods and multiple informants in
             kindergarten and 1st grade. Annual assessments at ages 10,
             11, and 12 reflected that 21% of children reported having
             initiated substance use by age 12. Results from longitudinal
             logistic regression models indicated that risk factors at
             kindergarten include being male, having a parent who abused
             substances, lower levels of parental verbal reasoning,
             higher levels of overactivity, more thought problems, and
             more social problem solving skills deficits. Children with
             no risk factors had less than a 10% chance of initiating
             substance use by age 12, whereas children with 2 or more
             risk factors had greater than a 50% chance of initiating
             substance use. Implications for typology, etiology, and
             prevention are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1015183927979},
   Key = {fds272144}
}

@article{fds272174,
   Author = {Greenberg, MT and Lengua, LJ and Coie, JD and Pinderhughes,
             EE},
   Title = {Predicting developmental outcomes at school entry using a
             multiple-risk model: Four American communities},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {403-417},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000078828100008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.35.2.403},
   Key = {fds272174}
}

@article{fds272219,
   Author = {Hope, and D, T and Bierman, and L, K and Dodge, TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {Developmental patterns of home and school behavior in rural
             and urban settings},
   Journal = {Journal of School Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Pages = {45-58},
   Year = {1998},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19834584},
   Key = {fds272219}
}

@article{fds38995,
   Author = {Deater-Deckard, K. and Dodge, K.A. and Bates, J.E. and Pettit,
             G.S.},
   Title = {Physical discipline among African-American and
             European-American mothers: Links to children's externalizing
             behaviors(Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {E.L.I.T.E. Library: Extended Library Individualized to
             Education},
   Publisher = {Guilford, CT: Dushkin Publishing},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds38995}
}

@article{fds272229,
   Author = {Deater Deckard and K and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Externalizing behavior problems and discipline revisited:
             Nonlinear effects and variation by culture, context, and
             gender},
   Journal = {Psychological Inquiry},
   Volume = {8},
   Pages = {161-175},
   Year = {1997},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15327965pli0803_1},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15327965pli0803_1},
   Key = {fds272229}
}

@article{fds272236,
   Author = {Deater-Deckard, K and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Physical discipline among African American and European
             American mothers: Links to children's externalizing
             behaviors},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1065-1072},
   Year = {1996},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.32.6.1065},
   Abstract = {The aim of this study was to test whether the relation
             between physical discipline and child aggression was
             moderated by ethnic-group status. A sample of 466 European
             American and 100 African American children from a broad
             range of socioeconomic levels were followed from
             kindergarten through 3rd grade. Mothers reported their use
             of physical discipline in interviews and questionnaires, and
             mothers, teachers, and peers rated children's externalizing
             problems annually. The interaction between ethnic status and
             discipline was significant for teacher- and peer-rated
             externalizing scores; physical discipline was associated
             with higher externalizing scores, but only among European
             American children. These findings provide evidence that the
             link between physical punishment and child aggression may be
             culturally specific. Copyright 1996 by the American
             Psychological Association, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.32.6.1065},
   Key = {fds272236}
}