Kenneth A. Dodge

Publications of Kenneth A. Dodge    :chronological  alphabetical  combined  by tags listing:

%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds271964,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Lansford, JE and Miller-Johnson, S and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Toward a dynamic developmental model of the role of parents
             and peers in early onset substance use},
   Pages = {104-132},
   Booktitle = {Families count: Effects on child and adolescent
             development},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {A. Clarke-Stewart and J. Dunn},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780511616259},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000299343800006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {© Cambridge University Press 2006 and 2010. Although most
             theories of deviant behavioral development explicitly
             acknowledge the roles of both parenting and peer relations,
             few theories, and even fewer empirical analyses, have
             articulated the manner in which these factors relate to each
             other and operate dynamically across childhood. The chapter
             by Collins and Roisman (Chapter 4 in this book) provides an
             excellent general overview of how these factors operate in
             adolescence. This chapter identifies aspects of parenting
             and peer relations across the life span that may play a role
             in the onset of illicit drug use in adolescence and the
             manner in which these factors may influence each other and
             operate in concert across development. The enormous social,
             psychological, and economic costs of substance use among
             adolescents in the United States over the past four decades
             (Kendall & Kessler, 2002; Kessler et al., 2001) have led to
             unprecedented attempts at interdiction, prosecution, and
             treatment, mostly without much success. Epidemiologic
             studies have directed attention toward prevention. This
             research has taken largely a risk-factor approach following
             from the methods of Rutter (Rutter & Garmezy, 1983), in
             which individual-difference variables in childhood are
             statistically linked to later substance use. Empirical
             research has identified several dozen factors in childhood
             that enhance risk for substance use during adolescence
             (reviewed by Hawkins, Catalano, & Miller, 1992; Weinberg,
             Rahdert, Colliver, & Glantz, 1998), but a laundry list of
             risk factors has not yet led to efficacious prevention
             programs.},
   Doi = {10.1017/CBO9780511616259.006},
   Key = {fds271964}
}

@misc{fds31451,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and McLoyd, V.C. and Lansford, J.E.},
   Title = {The cultural context of physically disciplining
             children},
   Pages = {245-263},
   Booktitle = {Emerging Issues in African American Family Life: Context,
             Adaptation, and Policy},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Editor = {V.C. McLoyd and N.E. Hill and K.A. Dodge},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds31451}
}

@misc{fds13038,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Mediation, Moderation, and Mechanisms in How Parenting
             Affects Children's Aggressive Behavior},
   Pages = {215-229},
   Booktitle = {Parenting and the Child's World},
   Publisher = {Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum},
   Editor = {J. Borkowski},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds13038}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds271936,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Mothers' and fathers' autonomy-relevant parenting:
             longitudinal links with adolescents' externalizing and
             internalizing behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1877-1889},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1573-6601},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24337705},
   Abstract = {The goal of this study was to advance the understanding of
             separate and joint effects of mothers' and fathers'
             autonomy-relevant parenting during early and middle
             adolescence. In a sample of 518 families, adolescents (49 %
             female; 83 % European American, 16 % African American,
             1 % other ethnic groups) reported on their mothers' and
             fathers' psychological control and knowledge about
             adolescents' whereabouts, friends, and activities at ages 13
             and 16. Mothers and adolescents reported on adolescents'
             externalizing and internalizing behaviors at ages 12, 14,
             15, and 17. Adolescents perceived their mothers as using
             more psychological control and having more knowledge than
             their fathers, but there was moderate concordance between
             adolescents' perceptions of their mothers and fathers. More
             parental psychological control predicted increases in boys'
             and girls' internalizing problems and girls' externalizing
             problems. More parental knowledge predicted decreases in
             boys' externalizing and internalizing problems. The
             perceived levels of behavior of mothers and fathers did not
             interact with one another in predicting adolescent
             adjustment. The results generalize across early and late
             adolescence and across mothers' and adolescents' reports of
             behavior problems. Autonomy-relevant mothering and fathering
             predict changes in behavior problems during early and late
             adolescence, but only autonomy-relevant fathering accounts
             for unique variance in adolescent behavior
             problems.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10964-013-0079-2},
   Key = {fds271936}
}

@article{fds271922,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Sharma, C and Malone, PS and Woodlief, D and Dodge, KA and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya,
             S and Tirado, LMU and Zelli, A and Al-Hassan, SM and Alampay, LP and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta and L},
   Title = {Corporal Punishment, Maternal Warmth, and Child Adjustment:
             A Longitudinal Study in Eight Countries},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the
             Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and
             Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association,
             Division 53},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {670-685},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1537-4416},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2014.893518},
   Abstract = {Two key tasks facing parents across cultures are managing
             children's behaviors (and misbehaviors) and conveying love
             and affection. Previous research has found that corporal
             punishment generally is related to worse child adjustment,
             whereas parental warmth is related to better child
             adjustment. This study examined whether the association
             between corporal punishment and child adjustment problems
             (anxiety and aggression) is moderated by maternal warmth in
             a diverse set of countries that vary in a number of
             sociodemographic and psychological ways. Interviews were
             conducted with 7- to 10-year-old children (N = 1,196; 51%
             girls) and their mothers in 8 countries: China, Colombia,
             Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Thailand, and the
             United States. Follow-up interviews were conducted 1 and 2
             years later. Corporal punishment was related to increases,
             and maternal warmth was related to decreases, in children's
             anxiety and aggression over time; however, these
             associations varied somewhat across groups. Maternal warmth
             moderated the effect of corporal punishment in some
             countries, with increases in anxiety over time for children
             whose mothers were high in both warmth and corporal
             punishment. The findings illustrate the overall association
             between corporal punishment and child anxiety and aggression
             as well as patterns specific to particular countries.
             Results suggest that clinicians across countries should
             advise parents against using corporal punishment, even in
             the context of parent-child relationships that are otherwise
             warm, and should assist parents in finding other ways to
             manage children's behaviors. © 2014 Copyright Taylor &
             Francis Group, LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374416.2014.893518},
   Key = {fds271922}
}

@article{fds271924,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Woodlief, D and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli,
             C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya, S and Tirado, LMU and Zelli,
             A and Al-Hassan, SM and Alampay, LP and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {A longitudinal examination of mothers' and fathers' social
             information processing biases and harsh discipline in nine
             countries},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {561-573},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579414000236},
   Abstract = {This study examined whether parents' social information
             processing was related to their subsequent reports of their
             harsh discipline. Interviews were conducted with mothers (n
             = 1,277) and fathers (n = 1,030) of children in 1,297
             families in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan,
             Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United
             States), initially when children were 7 to 9 years old and
             again 1 year later. Structural equation models showed that
             parents' positive evaluations of aggressive responses to
             hypothetical childrearing vignettes at Time 1 predicted
             parents' self-reported harsh physical and nonphysical
             discipline at Time 2. This link was consistent across
             mothers and fathers, and across the nine countries,
             providing support for the universality of the link between
             positive evaluations of harsh discipline and parents'
             aggressive behavior toward children. The results suggest
             that international efforts to eliminate violence toward
             children could target parents' beliefs about the
             acceptability and advisability of using harsh physical and
             nonphysical forms of discipline. © Cambridge University
             Press 2014.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579414000236},
   Key = {fds271924}
}

@article{fds272030,
   Author = {Appleyard, K and Berlin, LJ and Rosanbalm, KD and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Preventing early child maltreatment: implications from a
             longitudinal study of maternal abuse history, substance use
             problems, and offspring victimization.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science : the Official Journal of the Society for
             Prevention Research},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {139-149},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21240556},
   Abstract = {In the interest of improving child maltreatment prevention
             science, this longitudinal, community based study of 499
             mothers and their infants tested the hypothesis that
             mothers' childhood history of maltreatment would predict
             maternal substance use problems, which in turn would predict
             offspring victimization. Mothers (35% White/non-Latina, 34%
             Black/non-Latina, 23% Latina, 7% other) were recruited and
             interviewed during pregnancy, and child protective services
             records were reviewed for the presence of the participants'
             target infants between birth and age 26 months. Mediating
             pathways were examined through structural equation modeling
             and tested using the products of the coefficients approach.
             The mediated pathway from maternal history of sexual abuse
             to substance use problems to offspring victimization was
             significant (standardized mediated path [ab] = .07, 95%
             CI [.02, .14]; effect size = .26), as was the mediated
             pathway from maternal history of physical abuse to substance
             use problems to offspring victimization (standardized
             mediated path [ab] = .05, 95% CI [.01, .11]; effect
             size = .19). There was no significant mediated pathway
             from maternal history of neglect. Findings are discussed in
             terms of specific implications for child maltreatment
             prevention, including the importance of assessment and early
             intervention for maternal history of maltreatment and
             substance use problems, targeting women with maltreatment
             histories for substance use services, and integrating child
             welfare and parenting programs with substance use
             treatment.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-010-0193-2},
   Key = {fds272030}
}

@article{fds272029,
   Author = {Kam, C-M and Greenberg, MT and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Foster, ME and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Maternal depressive symptoms and child social preference
             during the early school years: mediation by maternal warmth
             and child emotion regulation.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {365-377},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21080053},
   Abstract = {This longitudinal study examined processes that mediate the
             association between maternal depressive symptoms and peer
             social preference during the early school years. Three
             hundred and fifty six kindergarten children (182 boys) and
             their mothers participated in the study. During
             kindergarten, mothers reported their level of depressive
             symptomatology. In first grade, teachers rated children's
             emotion regulation at school and observers rated the
             affective quality of mother-child interactions. During
             second grade, children's social preference was assessed by
             peer nomination. Results indicated that mothers' level of
             depressive symptomatology negatively predicted their child's
             social preference 2 years later, controlling for the family
             SES and teacher-rated social preference during kindergarten.
             Among European American families, the association between
             maternal depressive symptoms and social preference was
             partially mediated by maternal warmth and the child's
             emotion regulation. Although the relation between maternal
             depressive symptoms and children peer preference was
             stronger among African American families than Europrean
             American families, its mediation by the maternal warmth and
             child's emotion regulation was not found in African American
             families.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-010-9468-0},
   Key = {fds272029}
}

@article{fds272031,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Laird, RD and Shaw, DS and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Reciprocal relations between parents' physical discipline
             and children's externalizing behavior during middle
             childhood and adolescence.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {225-238},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21262050},
   Abstract = {Using data from two long-term longitudinal projects, we
             investigated reciprocal relations between maternal reports
             of physical discipline and teacher and self-ratings of child
             externalizing behavior, accounting for continuity in both
             discipline and externalizing over time. In Study 1, which
             followed a community sample of 562 boys and girls from age 6
             to 9, high levels of physical discipline in a given year
             predicted high levels of externalizing behavior in the next
             year, and externalizing behavior in a given year predicted
             high levels of physical discipline in the next year. In
             Study 2, which followed an independent sample of 290 lower
             income, higher risk boys from age 10 to 15, mother-reported
             physical discipline in a given year predicted child ratings
             of antisocial behavior in the next year, but child
             antisocial behavior in a given year did not predict parents'
             use of physical discipline in the next year. In neither
             sample was there evidence that associations between physical
             discipline and child externalizing changed as the child
             aged, and findings were not moderated by gender, race,
             socioeconomic status, or the severity of the physical
             discipline. Implications for the reciprocal nature of the
             socialization process and the risks associated with physical
             discipline are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579410000751},
   Key = {fds272031}
}

@article{fds191683,
   Author = {Berlin, L.J. and Appleyard, K. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Intergenerational continuity in child maltreatment:
             Mediating mechanisms and implications for
             prevention},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {162-176},
   Year = {2011},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01547.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01547.x},
   Key = {fds191683}
}

@article{fds272026,
   Author = {Deater Deckard and K and Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Alampay, LP and Sorbring, E and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang,
             L and Di Giunta and L and Dodge, KA and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Tapanya, S and Tirado, LMU and Zelli, A and Al Hassan,
             SM},
   Title = {The association between parental warmth and control in
             thirteen cultural groups},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {791-794},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {0893-3200},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0025120},
   Abstract = {The goal of the current study was to investigate potential
             cross-cultural differences in the covariation between two of
             the major dimensions of parenting behavior: control and
             warmth. Participants included 1,421 (51% female) 7- to
             10-year-old (M = 8.29, SD = .67 years) children and their
             mothers and fathers representing 13 cultural groups in nine
             countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and
             North and South America. Children and parents completed
             questionnaires and interviews regarding mother and father
             control and warmth. Greater warmth was associated with more
             control, but this association varied widely between cultural
             groups. © 2011 American Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0025120},
   Key = {fds272026}
}

@article{fds272044,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Dodge, KA and Chang, L and Chaudhary, N and Tapanya, S and Oburu, P and Deater-Deckard, K},
   Title = {Children's Perceptions of Maternal Hostility as a Mediator
             of the Link between Discipline and Children's Adjustment in
             Four Countries.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Development},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {452-461},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0165-0254},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165025409354933},
   Abstract = {Using data from 195 dyads of mothers and children (age range
             = 8-12 years; M = 10.63) in four countries (China, India,
             the Philippines, and Thailand), this study examined
             children's perceptions of maternal hostility as a mediator
             of the links between physical discipline and harsh verbal
             discipline and children's adjustment. Both physical
             discipline and harsh verbal discipline had direct effects on
             mothers' reports of children's anxiety and aggression; three
             of these four links were mediated by children's perceptions
             of maternal hostility. In contrast, there were no
             significant direct effects of physical discipline and harsh
             verbal discipline on children's reports of their own anxiety
             and aggression. Instead, both physical discipline and harsh
             verbal discipline had indirect effects on the outcomes
             through children's perceptions of maternal hostility. We
             identified a significant interaction between perceived
             normativeness and use of harsh verbal discipline on
             children's perception of maternal hostility, but children's
             perception of the normativeness of physical discipline did
             not moderate the relation between physical discipline and
             perceived maternal hostility. The effects of harsh verbal
             discipline were more adverse when children perceived that
             form of discipline as being nonnormative than when children
             perceived that form of discipline as being normative.
             Results are largely consistent with a theoretical model
             positing that the meaning children attach to parents'
             discipline strategies is important in understanding
             associations between discipline and children's adjustment,
             and that cultural context is associated with children's
             interpretations of their parents' behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0165025409354933},
   Key = {fds272044}
}

@article{fds272051,
   Author = {Yu, T and Pettit, GS and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {The Interactive Effects of Marital Conflict and Divorce on
             Parent-Adult Children's Relationships.},
   Journal = {Journal of Marriage and the Family},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {282-292},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0022-2445},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2010.00699.x},
   Abstract = {This study examines main effect and interactive models of
             the relations between marital conflict, divorce, and
             parent-adult child relationships, and gender differences in
             these relations. Data were drawn from a longitudinal study
             of a community sample (N = 585). Parental marital conflict
             and divorce were measured from age 5 through age 17.
             Mother-child and father-child relationship quality at age 22
             was assessed in terms of Closeness-Support and
             Conflict-Control. Results indicate that both marital
             conflict and divorce were associated with poorer quality of
             parent-adult child relationships. Divorce moderated the link
             between marital conflict and subsequent negativity in
             mother-child relationships, with the estimated effects being
             stronger in continuously married families than in divorced
             families, especially for women.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1741-3737.2010.00699.x},
   Key = {fds272051}
}

@article{fds272013,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, S and Bacchini, D and Bombi,
             AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta,
             L and Dodge, KA and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Runyan, DK and Skinner,
             AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya, S and Tirado, LMU and Zelli,
             A},
   Title = {Corporal punishment of children in nine countries as a
             function of child gender and parent gender.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Pediatrics},
   Volume = {2010},
   Pages = {672780},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20976255},
   Abstract = {Background. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a
             global perspective on corporal punishment by examining
             differences between mothers' and fathers' use of corporal
             punishment with daughters and sons in nine countries.
             Methods. Interviews were conducted with 1398 mothers, 1146
             fathers, and 1417 children (age range = 7 to 10 years) in
             China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines,
             Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Results. Across the
             entire sample, 54% of girls and 58% of boys had experienced
             mild corporal punishment, and 13% of girls and 14% of boys
             had experienced severe corporal punishment by their parents
             or someone in their household in the last month. Seventeen
             percent of parents believed that the use of corporal
             punishment was necessary to rear the target child. Overall,
             boys were more frequently punished corporally than were
             girls, and mothers used corporal punishment more frequently
             than did fathers. There were significant differences across
             countries, with reports of corporal punishment use lowest in
             Sweden and highest in Kenya. Conclusion. This work
             establishes that the use of corporal punishment is
             widespread, and efforts to prevent corporal punishment from
             escalating into physical abuse should be commensurately
             widespread.},
   Doi = {10.1155/2010/672780},
   Key = {fds272013}
}

@article{fds272036,
   Author = {Rosanbalm, KD and Dodge, KA and Murphy, R and O'Donnell, K and Christopoulos, C and Gibbs, SW and Appleyard, K and Daro,
             D},
   Title = {Evaluation of a Collaborative Community-Based Child
             Maltreatment Prevention Initiative.},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {8-23},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/7999 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272036}
}

@article{fds272015,
   Author = {Donahue, KL and D'Onofrio, BM and Bates, JE and Lansford, JE and Dodge,
             KA and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Early exposure to parents' relationship instability:
             Implications for sexual behavior and depression in
             adolescence},
   Journal = {Journal of Adolescent Health},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {547-554},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {1054-139X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.04.004},
   Abstract = {Purpose: Examine the effects of the timing of parents'
             relationship instability on adolescent sexual and mental
             health. Methods: We assessed whether the timing of parents'
             relationship instability predicted adolescents' history of
             sexual partnerships (SP) and major depressive episodes.
             Multivariate logistic regression analyses controlled for
             potential mediators related to parenting and the family,
             including parent knowledge of activities, parent-child
             relationship quality, number of parents' post-separation
             relationship transitions, and number of available
             caregivers. Participants were assessed annually from age 5
             through young adulthood as part of a multisite community
             sample (N = 585). Results: Participants who experienced
             parents' relationship instability before age 5 were more
             likely to report SP at age 16 (odds ratio [OR]adj = 1.58) or
             an episode of major depression during adolescence (ORadj =
             2.61). Greater parent knowledge at age 12 decreased the odds
             of SP at age 16, but none of the hypothesized parenting and
             family variables statistically mediated the association
             between early instability and SP or major depressive
             episode. Conclusions: These results suggest that
             experiencing parents' relationship instability in early
             childhood is associated with sexual behavior and major
             depression in adolescence, but these associations are not
             explained by the parenting and family variables included in
             our analyses. Limitations of the current study and
             implications for future research are discussed. © 2010
             Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.04.004},
   Key = {fds272015}
}

@article{fds272056,
   Author = {Coleman, D and Dodge, K and Campbell, S},
   Title = {Where and How to Draw the Line Between Reasonable Corporal
             Punishment and Abuse},
   Journal = {Law & Contemporary Problems},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {107-165},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {0023-9186},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/3756 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272056}
}

@article{fds272066,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Dodge, KA and Shaw, DS and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Trajectories of physical discipline: early childhood
             antecedents and developmental outcomes.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {80},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1385-1402},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19765007},
   Abstract = {This study examined childhood antecedents and developmental
             outcomes associated with trajectories of mild and harsh
             parental physical discipline. Interview, questionnaire, and
             observational data were available from 499 children followed
             from ages 5 to 16 and from 258 children in an independent
             sample followed from ages 5 to 15. Analyses indicated
             distinct physical discipline trajectory groups that varied
             in frequency of physical discipline and rate of change. In
             both samples, family ecological disadvantage differentiated
             the trajectory groups; in the first sample, early child
             externalizing also differentiated the groups. Controlling
             for early childhood externalizing, the minimal/ceasing
             trajectory groups were associated with the lowest levels of
             subsequent adolescent antisocial behavior in both samples
             and with parent-adolescent positive relationship quality in
             the second sample.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01340.x},
   Key = {fds272066}
}

@article{fds272020,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Criss, MM and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Developmental Trajectories and Antecedents of Distal
             Parental Supervision.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Early Adolescence},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {258-284},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0272-4316},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0272431608320123},
   Abstract = {Groups of adolescents were identified on the basis of
             developmental trajectories of their families' rules and
             their parents' knowledge of their activities.
             Characteristics of the adolescent, peer antisociality, and
             family context were tested as antecedents. In sum, 404
             parent-adolescent dyads provided data for adolescents aged
             10-16. Most adolescents were classified into groups
             characterized by low levels and reductions in family rules
             over time. However, low socioeconomic status and residence
             in unsafe neighborhoods increased membership in the group
             characterized by consistently high levels of family rules.
             Most adolescents were assigned membership in groups
             characterized by relatively stable moderate-to-high levels
             of parental knowledge of their activities. However, greater
             externalizing problems and peer antisociality, as well as
             residence in an unsafe neighborhood, increased membership in
             the group characterized by low and decreasing levels of
             knowledge. Results suggest that personal and contextual risk
             antecedes nonnormative decreases in parental knowledge,
             whereas contextual risk inhibits normative reductions in
             family rules.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0272431608320123},
   Key = {fds272020}
}

@article{fds272049,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, and S, and Gorman-Smith, and D, and Sullivan, and T, and Orpinas, and P, and Dodge, TM-SVPPKA and member},
   Title = {Parent and peer predictors of physical dating violence
             perpetration in early adolescence: Tests of moderation and
             gender differences},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent
             Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {535-550},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374410902976270},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374410902976270},
   Key = {fds272049}
}

@article{fds272069,
   Author = {Hurley, S and The Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group, and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Disentangling Ethnic and Contextual Influences Among Parents
             Raising Youth in High-Risk Communities.},
   Journal = {Applied Developmental Science},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {211-219},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1088-8691},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19777084},
   Abstract = {This article reports on analyses examining contextual
             influences on parenting with an ethnically and
             geographically diverse sample of parents (predominantly
             mothers) raising 387 children (49% ethnic minority; 51%
             male) in high-risk communities. Parents and children were
             followed longitudinally from first through tenth grades.
             Contextual influences included geographical location,
             neighborhood risk, SES, and family stress. The cultural
             variable was racial socialization. Parenting constructs
             created through the consensus decision-making of the
             Parenting Subgroup of the Study Group on Race, Culture, and
             Ethnicity (see Le et al., 2008) included Monitoring,
             Communication, Warmth, Behavioral Control and Parenting
             Efficacy. Hierarchical regressions on each parenting
             construct were conducted for each grade for which data were
             available. Analyses tested for initial ethnic differences
             and then for remaining ethnic differences once contextual
             influences were controlled. For each construct, some ethnic
             differences did remain (Monitoring, ninth grade; Warmth,
             third grade; Communication, kindergarten; Behavioral
             Control, eighth grade; and Parenting Efficacy, kindergarten
             through fifth grade). Ethnic differences were explained by
             contextual differences in the remaining years. Analyses
             examining the impact of cultural influences revealed a
             negative relation between racial socialization messages and
             Communication or Monitoring.},
   Doi = {10.1080/10888690802388151},
   Key = {fds272069}
}

@article{fds272080,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Erath, S and Yu, T and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {The developmental course of illicit substance use from age
             12 to 22: links with depressive, anxiety, and behavior
             disorders at age 18.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {877-885},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18564069},
   Abstract = {Previous theory and research suggest links between substance
             use and externalizing behavior problems, but links between
             substance use and internalizing problems are less clear. The
             present study sought to understand concurrent links among
             diagnoses of substance use disorders, internalizing
             disorders, and behavior disorders at age 18 as well as
             developmental trajectories of illicit substance use prior to
             and after this point.Using data from 585 participants in the
             Child Development Project, this study examined comorbidity
             among substance use, behavior, and internalizing disorders
             at age 18 and trajectories of growth in illicit substance
             use from age 12 to age 22.In this community sample, meeting
             diagnostic criteria for comorbid internalizing disorders, a
             behavioral disorder (conduct disorder or oppositional
             defiant disorder) alone, or both internalizing and
             behavioral disorders predicted higher concurrent substance
             use disorders (abuse, dependence, or withdrawal). Meeting
             diagnostic criteria for an anxiety disorder alone or
             depression alone did not predict higher concurrent substance
             use diagnoses. Over time, youths with behavioral disorders
             at age 18 showed a pattern of increasing substance use
             across early adolescence and higher levels of substance use
             than those with no diagnosis at age 18. Substance use
             declines from late adolescence to early adulthood were
             observed for all groups.Substance use disorders were more
             highly comorbid with behavior disorders than with
             internalizing disorders at age 18, and behavior disorder and
             comorbid behavior-internalizing disorders at age 18 were
             related to trajectories characterized by steep increases in
             illicit substance use during adolescence and high rates of
             illicit substance use over time.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01915.x},
   Key = {fds272080}
}

@article{fds272081,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Cultural Norms for Adult Corporal Punishment of Children and
             Societal Rates of Endorsement and Use of
             Violence.},
   Journal = {Parenting, Science and Practice},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {257-270},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1529-5192},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19898651},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that societal rates of
             corporal punishment of children predict societal levels of
             violence, using "culture" as the unit of analysis. DESIGN:
             Data were retrieved from the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample
             of anthropological records, which includes 186 cultural
             groups, to represent the world's 200 provinces based on
             diversity of language, economy, political organization,
             descent, and historical time. Independent coders rated the
             frequency and harshness of corporal punishment of children,
             inculcation of aggression in children, warfare,
             interpersonal violence among adults, and demographic,
             socioeconomic, and parenting covariates. RESULTS: More
             frequent use of corporal punishment was related to higher
             rates of inculcation of aggression in children, warfare, and
             interpersonal violence. These relations held for inculcation
             of aggression in children and warfare after controlling for
             demographic, socioeconomic, and parenting confounds.
             CONCLUSION: More frequent use of corporal punishment is
             related to higher prevalence of violence and endorsement of
             violence at a societal level. The findings are consistent
             with theories that adult violence becomes more prevalent in
             contexts in which corporal punishment is frequent, that the
             use of corporal punishment increases the probability that
             children will engage in violent behaviors during adulthood,
             and that violence in one social domain tends to influence
             behavior in other domains. If corporal punishment leads to
             higher levels of societal violence, then reducing parents'
             use of corporal punishment should lead to reductions in
             societal violence manifested in other ways.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15295190802204843},
   Key = {fds272081}
}

@article{fds272086,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Criss, MM and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Parents' monitoring knowledge attenuates the link between
             antisocial friends and adolescent delinquent
             behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {299-310},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-007-9178-4},
   Abstract = {Developmental trajectories of parents' knowledge of their
             adolescents' whereabouts and activities were tested as
             moderators of transactional associations between friends'
             antisociality and adolescent delinquent behavior. 504
             adolescents (50% female) provided annual reports (from ages
             12 to 16) of their parents' knowledge and (from ages 13 to
             16) their own delinquent behavior and their friends'
             antisociality. Parents also reported the adolescents'
             delinquent behavior. Growth mixture modeling was used to
             identify two sub-groups based on their monitoring knowledge
             growth trajectories. Adolescents in the sub-group
             characterized by decreasing levels of parents' knowledge
             reported more delinquent behavior and more friend
             antisociality in early adolescence, and reported greater
             increases in delinquent behavior and friend antisociality
             from early to middle adolescence compared to adolescents in
             the sub-group characterized by increasing levels of parents'
             knowledge. Transactional associations consistent with social
             influence and social selection processes also were
             suppressed in the increasing knowledge sub-group as compared
             to the decreasing knowledge sub-group.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-007-9178-4},
   Key = {fds272086}
}

@article{fds151999,
   Author = {Dick, D.M. and Latendresse, S.J. and Lansford, J.E. and Budde, J.P. and Goate, A. and Dodge, K.A. and Pettit, G.S. and Bates,
             J.E.},
   Title = {The role of GABRA2 in trajectories of externalizing behavior
             across development and evidence of moderation by parental
             monitoring},
   Journal = {Archives of General Psychiatry},
   Volume = {66},
   Pages = {649-657.},
   Year = {2008},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2009.48},
   Doi = {10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2009.48},
   Key = {fds151999}
}

@article{fds272019,
   Author = {Nix, and L, R and Bierman, and L, K and McMahon, and J, R and Dodge,
             TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {How attendance and quality of therapeutic engagement affect
             treatment response in parent behavior management
             training},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {77},
   Pages = {429-438},
   Year = {2008},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0015028.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0015028.},
   Key = {fds272019}
}

@article{fds272076,
   Author = {Goodnight, JA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Parents' campaigns to reduce their children's conduct
             problems: Interactions with temperamental resistance to
             control},
   Journal = {European Journal of Developmental Science},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {1/2},
   Pages = {100-119},
   Year = {2008},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/8000 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {Longitudinal studies have found associations between
             parenting and the development of conduct problems, and have
             found that resistant to control temperament moderates these
             associations. Intervention studies have found associations
             between intervention-induced changes in parenting and
             subsequent reductions in children’s conduct problems.
             However, no study to date has evaluated whether parents’
             self-initiated efforts to change their parenting practices
             affect children’s conduct problems and whether effects
             depend on children’s temperament. The current study asked
             whether parents’ concerted efforts, or campaigns, to
             increase their involvement and limit-setting were effective
             in reducing growth in conduct problems from late childhood
             to early adolescence. It also asked whether the effects of
             campaigns varied according to children’s levels of
             temperamental resistance to control. Analyses statistically
             controlled for parenting practices and conduct problems
             before the campaigns, socioeconomic status, gender, and
             ethnicity. Results indicated that campaigns that included
             increased involvement and limit-setting were beneficial only
             for youths who were rated in early childhood as
             temperamentally resistant to control. © 2008 Vandenhoeck &
             Ruprecht GmbH & Co. KG, Göttingen 2008.},
   Doi = {10.3233/DEV-2008-21207},
   Key = {fds272076}
}

@article{fds272095,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Keiley, MK and Laird, RD and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Predicting the developmental course of mother-reported
             monitoring across childhood and adolescence from early
             proactive parenting, child temperament, and parents'
             worries.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {206-217},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0893-3200},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.21.2.206},
   Abstract = {Change in mothers' reported monitoring and awareness of
             their children's activities and companions across Grades 5,
             6, 8, and 11 were examined with the use of latent factor
             growth modeling. Proactive parenting and
             resistant-to-control (RTC) child temperament assessed prior
             to kindergarten, as well as parents' worries about their
             children's behavior in Grades 5 and 8, were tested as
             factors associated with change in monitoring over time.
             Higher proactive parenting, lower RTC temperament, and the
             mounting of a successful campaign to change their children's
             behavior were associated with higher monitoring scores
             overall. Monitoring levels decreased across time, but the
             rate of decline was steeper among mothers with high RTC
             children and slower among mothers who mounted a campaign and
             judged it to be effective. These findings shed light on
             factors contributing to continuity and change across
             development in a key domain of parenting.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.21.2.206},
   Key = {fds272095}
}

@article{fds272117,
   Author = {Orrell-Valente, JK and Hill, LG and Brechwald, WA and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {"Just three more bites": an observational analysis of
             parents' socialization of children's eating at
             mealtime.},
   Journal = {Appetite},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {37-45},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0195-6663},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2006.06.006},
   Abstract = {The objective of this study was to describe comprehensively
             the structure and process of the childhood mealtime
             environment. A socioeconomically diverse sample of 142
             families of kindergarteners (52% females) was observed at
             dinnertime using a focused-narrative observational system.
             Eighty-five percent of parents tried to get children to eat
             more, 83% of children ate more than they might otherwise
             have, with 38% eating moderately to substantially more. Boys
             were prompted to eat as often as girls and children were
             prompted to eat as many times in single- as in two-parent
             households. Children were very rarely restricted in their
             mealtime intake. High-SES parents used reasoning, praise,
             and food rewards significantly more often than low-SES
             families. Mothers used different strategies than fathers:
             fathers used pressure tactics with boys and mothers praised
             girls for eating. Future research should examine the
             meanings children ascribe to their parents' communications
             about food intake and how perceived parental messages
             influence the development of long-term dietary patterns.
             Interpreted alongside the evidence for children's energy
             self-regulation and the risk of disruption of these innate
             processes, it may be that parents are inadvertently
             socializing their children to eat past their internal
             hunger/satiety cues. These data reinforce current
             recommendations that parents should provide nutritious foods
             and children, not parents, should decide what and how much
             of these foods they eat.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.appet.2006.06.006},
   Key = {fds272117}
}

@article{fds272109,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Castellino, DR and Dodge, KA and Pettit,
             GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Trajectories of internalizing, externalizing, and grades for
             children who have and have not experienced their parents'
             divorce or separation.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {292-301},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0893-3200},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16756405},
   Abstract = {This study examined whether the occurrence and timing of
             parental separation or divorce was related to trajectories
             of academic grades and mother- and teacher-reported
             internalizing and externalizing problems. The authors used
             hierarchical linear models to estimate trajectories for
             children who did and did not experience their parents'
             divorce or separation in kindergarten through 10th grade (N
             = 194). A novel approach to analyzing the timing of
             divorce/separation was adopted, and trajectories were
             estimated from 1 year prior to the divorce/separation to 3
             years after the event. Results suggest that early parental
             divorce/separation is more negatively related to
             trajectories of internalizing and externalizing problems
             than is later divorce/separation, whereas later
             divorce/separation is more negatively related to grades. One
             implication of these findings is that children may benefit
             most from interventions focused on preventing internalizing
             and externalizing problems, whereas adolescents may benefit
             most from interventions focused on promoting academic
             achievement.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.20.2.292},
   Key = {fds272109}
}

@article{fds272121,
   Author = {Milan, S and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Family instability and child maladjustment trajectories
             during elementary school.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {43-56},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-005-9007-6},
   Abstract = {This study examines the relation between family instability
             and child maladjustment over a 6-year period in 369 children
             from four communities. Measures were collected annually from
             kindergarten through fifth grade. In associative growth
             curve models, family instability trajectories predicted
             children's externalizing and internalizing behavior
             trajectories during this time period. High levels of family
             instability also incrementally predicted the likelihood of
             meeting criteria for a DSM IV diagnosis during elementary
             school, above and beyond prediction from earlier measures of
             maladjustment. However, the timing of family instability had
             a different effect on externalizing versus internalizing
             disorders. In general, stronger relations were found between
             family instability and externalizing behaviors relative to
             internalizing behaviors, although children with comorbid
             disorders experienced the highest levels of family
             instability.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-005-9007-6},
   Key = {fds272121}
}

@article{fds272096,
   Author = {Erath, SA and Bierman, KL},
   Title = {Aggressive marital conflict, maternal harsh punishment, and
             child aggressive-disruptive behavior: Evidence for direct
             and mediated relations.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {217-226},
   Year = {2006},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.20.2.217},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.20.2.217},
   Key = {fds272096}
}

@article{fds272120,
   Author = {Nix, and L, R and Dodge, TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {Improving parental involvement: Evaluating treatment effects
             in the Fast Track Program},
   Journal = {The Evaluation Exchange},
   Volume = {X},
   Pages = {5},
   Year = {2006},
   url = {http://www.hfrp.org/var/hfrp/storage/original/application/66deb326cc2a3844f386c49d98e18758.pdf},
   Key = {fds272120}
}

@article{fds272112,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Berlin, LJ and Epstein, M and Spitz-Roth, A and O'Donnell,
             K and Kaufman, M and Amaya-Jackson, L and Rosch, J and Christopoulos,
             C},
   Title = {The Durham Family Initiative: a preventive system of
             care.},
   Journal = {Child Welfare},
   Volume = {83},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {109-128},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0009-4021},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15068214},
   Abstract = {This article describes the Durham Family Initiative (DFI),
             an innovative effort to bring together child welfare and
             juvenile justice systems to reach DFI's goal of reducing the
             child abuse rate in Durham, North Carolina, by 50% within
             the next 10 years. DFI will follow principles of a
             preventive system of care (PSoC), which focuses on nurturing
             the healthy parent-child relationship. A community
             collaborative of government agency directors has signed a
             memorandum of agreement to implement the PSoC principles.
             The researchers will use multiple methods to evaluate DFI's
             efficacy.},
   Key = {fds272112}
}

@article{fds272185,
   Author = {Hill, NE and Lansford, J and Castellino, DR and Nowlin, P and Dodge, KA and Bates, J and Petit, G},
   Title = {Parent-academic involvement as related to school behavior,
             achievement and aspirations: Demographic variations across
             adolescence},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {75},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1491-1509},
   Year = {2004},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15369527},
   Abstract = {A longitudinal model of parent academic involvement,
             behavioral problems, achievement, and aspirations was
             examined for 463 adolescents, followed from 7th
             (approximately 12 years old) through 11th (approximately 16
             years old) grades. Parent academic involvement in 7th grade
             was negatively related to 8th-grade behavioral problems and
             positively related to 11th-grade aspirations. There were
             variations across parental education levels and ethnicity:
             Among the higher parental education group, parent academic
             involvement was related to fewer behavioral problems, which
             were related to achievement and then aspirations. For the
             lower parental education group, parent academic involvement
             was related to aspirations but not to behavior or
             achievement. Parent academic involvement was positively
             related to achievement for African Americans but not for
             European Americans. Parent academic involvement may be
             interpreted differently and serve different purposes across
             sociodemographic backgrounds.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2004.00753.x},
   Key = {fds272185}
}

@article{fds272294,
   Author = {Smith, EP and Gorman-Smith, D and Quinn, WH and Rabiner, DL and Tolan,
             PH and Winn, D-M},
   Title = {Community-based multiple family groups to prevent and reduce
             violent and aggressive behavior: The GREAT Families
             Program},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {1 SUPPL.},
   Pages = {39-47},
   Year = {2004},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2003.09.018},
   Abstract = {This paper describes the targeted intervention component of
             GREAT Schools and Families. The intervention - GREAT
             Families - is composed of 15 weekly multiple family group
             meetings (e.g., 4-6 families per group) and addresses
             parenting practices (discipline, monitoring), family
             relationship characteristics (communication, support,
             cohesion), parental involvement and investment in their
             child's schooling, parent and school relationship building,
             and planning for the future. High-risk youth and their
             families - students identified by teachers as aggressive and
             socially influential among their peers - were targeted for
             inclusion in the intervention. The paper describes the
             theoretical model and development of the intervention.
             Approaches to recruitment, engagement, staff training, and
             sociocultural sensitivity in work with families in
             predominantly poor and challenging settings are described.
             The data being collected throughout the program will aid in
             examining the theoretical and program processes that can
             potentially mediate and moderate effects on families. This
             work can inform us about necessary approaches and procedures
             to engage and support families in efforts to reduce
             individual and school grade-level violence and
             aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.amepre.2003.09.018},
   Key = {fds272294}
}

@article{fds272128,
   Author = {McCarty, CA and McMahon, RJ and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Mediators of the relation between maternal depressive
             symptoms and child internalizing and disruptive behavior
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {545-556},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0893-3200},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.17.4.545},
   Abstract = {Drawing on a normative sample of 224 youth and their
             biological mothers, this study tested 4 family variables as
             potential mediators of the relationship between maternal
             depressive symptoms in early childhood and child
             psychological outcomes in preadolescence. The mediators
             examined included mother-child communication, the quality of
             the mother-child relationship, maternal social support, and
             stressful life events in the family. The most parsimonious
             structural equation model suggested that having a more
             problematic mother-child relationship mediated disruptive
             behavior-disordered outcomes for youths, whereas less
             maternal social support mediated the development of
             internalizing disorders. Gender and race were tested as
             moderators, but significant model differences did not emerge
             between boys and girls or between African American and
             Caucasian youths.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.17.4.545},
   Key = {fds272128}
}

@article{fds272131,
   Author = {Chang, L and Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and McBride-Chang,
             C},
   Title = {Harsh parenting in relation to child emotion regulation and
             aggression.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {598-606},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0893-3200},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.17.4.598},
   Abstract = {This study presents a model of harsh parenting that has an
             indirect effect, as well as a direct effect, on child
             aggression in the school environment through the mediating
             process of child emotion regulation. Tested on a sample of
             325 Chinese children and their parents, the model showed
             adequate goodness of fit. Also investigated were interaction
             effects between parents' and children's gender. Mothers'
             harsh parenting affected child emotion regulation more
             strongly than fathers', whereas harsh parenting emanating
             from fathers had a stronger effect on child aggression.
             Fathers' harsh parenting also affected sons more than
             daughters, whereas there was no gender differential effect
             with mothers' harsh parenting. These results are discussed
             with an emphasis on negative emotionality as a potentially
             common cause of family perturbations, including parenting
             and child adjustment problems.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.17.4.598},
   Key = {fds272131}
}

@article{fds272130,
   Author = {Deater-Deckard, K and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {The development of attitudes about physical punishment: an
             8-year longitudinal study.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {351-360},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.17.3.351},
   Abstract = {We examined young adolescents' endorsement of parental use
             of corporal punishment to elucidate processes underlying the
             intergenerational transmission of discipline strategies. The
             community sample was ethnically and socioeconomically
             diverse. Mothers completed interviews and questionnaires
             when the target children were entering kindergarten (n =
             566) and in 6th and 8th grades. Adolescents completed
             questionnaires when they were in 8th grade (n = 425).
             Adolescents' attitudes about corporal punishment varied
             widely. Those adolescents who had been spanked by their own
             mothers were more approving of this discipline method,
             regardless of the overall frequency, timing, or chronicity
             of physical discipline they had received. However, there was
             no correlation among adolescents for whom physical
             maltreatment in early or middle childhood was
             suspected.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.17.3.351},
   Key = {fds272130}
}

@article{fds272129,
   Author = {Keiley, MK and Lofthouse, N and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Differential risks of covarying and pure components in
             mother and teacher reports of externalizing and
             internalizing behavior across ages 5 to 14.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {267-283},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1023277413027},
   Abstract = {In a sample of 585 children assessed in kindergarten through
             8th grade, we fit a confirmatory factor model to both
             mother- and teacher-reported symptoms on the Achenbach
             checklists (CBCL, TRF) and determined that a covariation
             factor of externalizing and internalizing behaviors existed,
             in addition to the pure-form factors of externalizing and
             internalizing for each reporter. In 3 structural equation
             models, between 8 and 67% of the variance in these 6 latent
             factors was accounted for by a set of antecedent child,
             sociocultural, parenting, and peer risk variables. Each of
             the 6 latent factors, taken 2 at a time, was predicted by a
             unique set of risk variables; however, there were some
             patterns that held for both mother- and teacher-report
             symptom factors: Child temperamental unadaptability and
             female gender were predictors of higher internalizing
             symptoms; child temperamental resistance to control,
             parental harsh punishment, male gender, low SES, and peer
             rejection were related to higher externalizing symptoms
             whereas child temperamental unadaptability was related to
             lower externalizing symptoms; and peer rejection and family
             stress were also related to the covarying,
             externalizing-plus-internalizing component of both mother
             and teacher reports.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1023277413027},
   Key = {fds272129}
}

@article{fds272133,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Friendship Quality, Peer Group Affiliation, and Peer
             Antisocial Behavior as Moderators of the Link Between
             Negative Parenting and Adolescent Externalizing
             Behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Research on Adolescence},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {161-184},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1050-8392},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20209019},
   Abstract = {Quality of peer relationships and perceived peer antisocial
             behavior were examined as moderators of the link between
             negative parenting and externalizing behavior problems in
             school from middle childhood to early adolescence. Data on
             negative parenting (i.e., unilateral parental decision
             making, low supervision and awareness, and harsh discipline)
             were collected from 362 parents in the summer preceding the
             adolescents' entry into Grade 6. Adolescent reports of
             positive peer relationships and peer antisocial behavior
             were assessed in the winter of Grade 7. The outcome measure
             was teacher report of adolescent externalizing behavior in
             the spring of Grade 7, controlling for externalizing
             behavior in Grade 5. High levels of friendship quality and
             peer group affiliation attenuated the association between
             unilateral parental decision making and adolescent
             externalizing behavior in school; this was particularly true
             when adolescents associated with peers perceived to be low
             in antisocial behavior. In addition, having low-quality peer
             relationships and having peers perceived to be highly
             antisocial further amplified the association between
             unilateral parental decision making and adolescent
             externalizing behavior problems. Finally, high levels of
             friend and peer group antisocial behavior exacerbated the
             predictiveness of harsh discipline for adolescents'
             externalizing behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1532-7795.1302002},
   Key = {fds272133}
}

@article{fds272134,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Parents' monitoring-relevant knowledge and adolescents'
             delinquent behavior: evidence of correlated developmental
             changes and reciprocal influences.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {752-768},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00566},
   Abstract = {Links between parental knowledge and adolescent delinquent
             behavior were tested for correlated rates of developmental
             change and reciprocal associations. For 4 years beginning at
             age 14, adolescents (N = 396) reported on their delinquent
             behavior and on their parents' knowledge of their
             whereabouts and activities. Parents completed measures of
             their adolescents' delinquent behavior. Knowledge was
             negatively correlated with delinquent behaviors at baseline,
             and increases over time in knowledge were negatively
             correlated with increases in parent-reported delinquent
             behavior. Reciprocal associations indicate that low levels
             of parental knowledge predict increases in delinquent
             behavior and that high levels of delinquent behavior predict
             decreases in knowledge. Discussion considers both
             youth-driven and parent-driven processes that may account
             for the correlated developmental changes and reciprocal
             associations.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00566},
   Key = {fds272134}
}

@article{fds272141,
   Author = {Beyers, JM and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Neighborhood structure, parenting processes, and the
             development of youths' externalizing behaviors: a multilevel
             analysis.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {35-53},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0091-0562},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1023018502759},
   Abstract = {Associations among neighborhood structure, parenting
             processes, and the development of externalizing behavior
             problems were investigated in a longitudinal sample of early
             adolescents (from age 11 to 13). Mothers' reports of
             parental monitoring (at age 11), mothers' and youths'
             reports of the amount of youths' unsupervised time (at age
             11), and youths' reports of positive parental involvement
             (at age 12) were used to predict initial levels (at age 11)
             and growth rates in youths' externalizing behavior as
             reported by teachers. Census-based measures of neighborhood
             structural disadvantage, residential instability, and
             concentrated affluence were expected to moderate the effects
             of parenting processes (e.g., parental monitoring) on
             externalizing behavior. Hierarchical linear modeling results
             revealed that less parental monitoring was associated with
             more externalizing behavior problems at age 11, and more
             unsupervised time spent out in the community (vs.
             unsupervised time in any context) and less positive parental
             involvement were associated with increases in externalizing
             behavior across time. Furthermore, the decrease in
             externalizing levels associated with more parental
             monitoring was significantly more pronounced when youths
             lived in neighborhoods with more residential
             instability.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1023018502759},
   Key = {fds272141}
}

@article{fds272135,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Change in parents' monitoring knowledge: Links with
             parenting, relationship quality, adolescent beliefs, and
             antisocial behavior},
   Journal = {Social Development},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {401-419},
   Year = {2003},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9507.00240},
   Abstract = {A longitudinal prospective design was used to examine
             antisocial behavior, two aspects of the parent-child
             relationship, inept parenting, and adolescents 'beliefs in
             the appropriateness of monitoring as predictors of parents'
             monitoring and change in monitoring during the high school
             years. A total of 426 adolescents provided reports of their
             parents 'monitoring knowledge during four yearly assessments
             beginning the summer before entering grade 9. Greater
             concurrent levels of monitoring knowledge were associated
             with less antisocial behavior, more parent-reported
             relationship enjoy-ment, adolescents and parents spending
             more time together, and adolescents reporting stronger
             beliefs in the appropriateness of parental monitoring.
             Weaker knowledge beliefs predicted increases in monitoring
             knowledge over time. More antisocial behavior problems were
             linked to lower levels of knowledge through less enjoyable
             parent-adolescent relationships, parents and adolescents
             spending less time together, and adolescents reporting
             weaker monitoring beliefs. Discussion focuses on processes
             linking antisocial behavior problems with low levels of
             monitoring knowledge.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-9507.00240},
   Key = {fds272135}
}

@article{fds272149,
   Author = {Criss, MM and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Lapp,
             AL},
   Title = {Family adversity, positive peer relationships, and
             children's externalizing behavior: a longitudinal
             perspective on risk and resilience.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1220-1237},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00468},
   Abstract = {Peer acceptance and friendships were examined as moderators
             in the link between family adversity and child externalizing
             behavioral problems. Data on family adversity (i.e.,
             ecological disadvantage, violent marital conflict, and harsh
             discipline) and child temperament and social information
             processing were collected during home visits from 585
             families with 5-year-old children. Children's peer
             acceptance, friendship, and friends' aggressiveness were
             assessed with sociometric methods in kindergarten and grade
             1. Teachers provided ratings of children's externalizing
             behavior problems in grade 2. Peer acceptance served as a
             moderator for all three measures of family adversity, and
             friendship served as a moderator for harsh discipline.
             Examination of regression slopes indicated that family
             adversity was not significantly associated with child
             externalizing behavior at high levels of positive peer
             relationships. These moderating effects generally were not
             qualified by child gender, ethnicity, or friends'
             aggressiveness, nor were they accounted for by child
             temperament or social information-processing patterns. The
             need for process-oriented studies of risk and protective
             factors is stressed.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00468},
   Key = {fds272149}
}

@article{fds272183,
   Author = {Pinderhughes, EE and Nix, R and Foster, EM and Jones,
             D},
   Title = {Parenting in Context: Impact of Neighborhood Poverty,
             Residential Stability, Public Services, Social Networks, and
             Danger on Parental Behaviors},
   Journal = {Journal of Marriage and the Family},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {941-953},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2001.00941.x},
   Abstract = {This prospective longitudinal study examined the unique and
             combined effects of neighborhood characteristics on parental
             behaviors in the context of more distal and more proximal
             influences. With a sample of 368 mothers from high-risk
             communities in 4 parts of the United States, this study
             examined relations between race (African American or
             European American), locality (urban or rural), neighborhood
             characteristics, family context, and child problem
             behaviors, and parental warmth, appropriate and consistent
             discipline, and harsh interactions. Analyses testing
             increasingly proximal influences on parenting revealed that
             initial race differences in warmth and consistent discipline
             disappeared when neighborhood influences were considered.
             Although generally culture and context did not moderate
             other relations found between neighborhood characteristics,
             family context, and child behaviors, the few interactions
             found highlight the complex influences on
             parenting.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1741-3737.2001.00941.x},
   Key = {fds272183}
}

@article{fds272158,
   Author = {Colwell, MJ and Pettit, GS and Meece, D and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Cumulative Risk and Continuity in Nonparental Care from
             Infancy to Early Adolescence.},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {207-234},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/mpq.2001.0009},
   Abstract = {Variations in amounts of nonparental care across infancy,
             preschool, early elementary school, and early adolescence
             were examined in a longitudinal sample (N = 438). Of
             interest was (a) continuity in use of the different
             arrangements, (b) whether the arrangements were additively
             and cumulatively associated with children's externalizing
             behavior problems, and (c) whether predictive relations were
             accounted for by social-ecological (socioeconomic status,
             mothers' employment status, marital status) and
             social-experiential (parenting quality, exposure to
             aggressive peers) factors. Correlations among overall
             amounts of care provided little evidence of cross-time
             continuity. Consistent with the cumulative risk perspective,
             Grade 1 self-care and Grade 6 unsupervised peer contact
             incrementally predicted Grade 6 externalizing problems. Most
             of the predictive associations were accounted for by family
             background and social relationship factors.},
   Doi = {10.1353/mpq.2001.0009},
   Key = {fds272158}
}

@article{fds272154,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Laird, RD and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Criss,
             MM},
   Title = {Antecedents and behavior-problem outcomes of parental
             monitoring and psychological control in early
             adolescence.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {583-598},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2766099/},
   Abstract = {The early childhood antecedents and behavior-problem
             correlates of monitoring and psychological control were
             examined in this prospective, longitudinal, multi-informant
             study. Parenting data were collected during home visit
             interviews with 440 mothers and their 13-year-old children.
             Behavior problems (anxiety/depression and delinquent
             behavior) were assessed via mother, teacher, and/or
             adolescent reports at ages 8 through 10 years and again at
             ages 13 through 14. Home-interview data collected at age 5
             years were used to measure antecedent parenting
             (harsh/reactive, positive/proactive), family background
             (e.g., socioeconomic status), and mother-rated child
             behavior problems. Consistent with expectation, monitoring
             was anteceded by a proactive parenting style and by
             advantageous family-ecological characteristics, and
             psychological control was anteceded by harsh parenting and
             by mothers' earlier reports of child externalizing problems.
             Consistent with prior research, monitoring was associated
             with fewer delinquent behavior problems. Links between
             psychological control and adjustment were more complex: High
             levels of psychological control were associated with more
             delinquent problems for girls and for teens who were low in
             preadolescent delinquent problems, and with more
             anxiety/depression for girls and for teens who were high in
             preadolescent anxiety/depression.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00298},
   Key = {fds272154}
}

@article{fds272182,
   Author = {Kohl, GO and Lengua, LJ and McMahon, RJ},
   Title = {Parent Involvement in School Conceptualizing Multiple
             Dimensions and Their Relations with Family and Demographic
             Risk Factors},
   Journal = {Journal of School Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {501-523},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/8003 Duke open
             access},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0022-4405(00)00050-9},
   Key = {fds272182}
}

@article{fds272159,
   Author = {Stormshak, EA and Bierman, KL and McMahon, RJ and Lengua,
             LJ},
   Title = {Parenting practices and child disruptive behavior problems
             in early elementary school. Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child Psychology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {17-29},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2764296/},
   Abstract = {Examined the hypothesis that distinct parenting practices
             may be associated with type and profile of a child's
             disruptive behavior problems (e.g., oppositional,
             aggressive, hyperactive). Parents of 631 behaviorally
             disruptive children described the extent to which they
             experienced warm and involved interactions with their
             children and the extent to which their discipline strategies
             were inconsistent and punitive and involved spanking and
             physical aggression. As expected from a developmental
             perspective, parenting practices that included punitive
             interactions were associated with elevated rates of all
             child disruptive behavior problems. Low levels of warm
             involvement were particularly characteristic of parents of
             children who showed elevated levels of oppositional
             behaviors. Physically aggressive parenting was linked more
             specifically with child aggression. In general, parenting
             practices contributed more to the prediction of oppositional
             and aggressive behavior problems than to hyperactive
             behavior problems, and parenting influences were fairly
             consistent across ethnic groups and sex.},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15374424jccp2901_3},
   Key = {fds272159}
}

@article{fds272160,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Friendship as a moderating factor in the pathway between
             early harsh home environment and later victimization in the
             peer group. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {646-662},
   Year = {2000},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000089047400010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Two prospective investigations of the moderating role of
             dyadic friendship in the developmental pathway to peer
             victimization are reported. In Study 1, the preschool home
             environments (i.e., harsh discipline, marital conflict,
             stress, abuse, and maternal hostility) of 389 children were
             assessed by trained interviewers. These children were then
             followed into the middle years of elementary school, with
             peer victimization, group social acceptance, and friendship
             assessed annually with a peer nomination inventory. In Study
             2, the home environments of 243 children were assessed in
             the summer before 1st grade, and victimization, group
             acceptance, and friendship were assessed annually over the
             next 3 years. In both studies, early harsh, punitive, and
             hostile family environments predicted later victimization by
             peers for children who had a low number of friendships.
             However, the predictive associations did not hold for
             children who had numerous friendships. These findings
             provide support for conceptualizations of friendship as a
             moderating factor in the pathways to peer group
             victimization.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0012-1649.36.5.646},
   Key = {fds272160}
}

@article{fds272162,
   Author = {Pinderhughes, EE and Zelli, A and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Discipline Responses: Direct and Mediated Influences of SES,
             Ethnic Group Status, Parenting Beliefs, Stress, and Parent
             Cognitive-Emotional Processes},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {380-400},
   Year = {2000},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2759998/},
   Abstract = {Direct and indirect precursors to parents' harsh discipline
             responses to hypothetical vignettes about child misbehavior
             were studied with data from 978 parents (59% mothers; 82%
             European American and 16% African American) of 585
             kindergarten-aged children. SEM analyses showed that
             parents' beliefs about spanking and child aggression and
             family stress mediated a negative relation between
             socioeconomic status and discipline. In turn, perception of
             the child and cognitive-emotional processes (hostile
             attributions, emotional upset, worry about child's future,
             available alternative disciplinary strategies, and available
             preventive strategies) mediated the effect of stress on
             discipline. Similar relations between ethnicity and
             discipline were found (African Americans reported harsher
             discipline), especially among low-income parents. Societally
             based experiences may lead some parents to rely on
             accessible and coherent goals in their discipline, whereas
             others are more reactive.},
   Key = {fds272162}
}

@article{fds272170,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Meece,
             DW},
   Title = {The impact of after-school peer contact on early adolescent
             externalizing problems is moderated by parental monitoring,
             perceived neighborhood safety, and prior
             adjustment.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {768-778},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00055},
   Abstract = {Unsupervised peer contact in the after-school hours was
             examined as a risk factor in the development of
             externalizing problems in a longitudinal sample of early
             adolescents. Parental monitoring, neighborhood safety, and
             adolescents' preexisting behavioral problems were considered
             as possible moderators of the risk relation. Interviews with
             mothers provided information on monitoring, neighborhood
             safety, and demographics. Early adolescent (ages 12-13
             years) after-school time use was assessed via a telephone
             interview in grade 6 (N = 438); amount of time spent with
             peers when no adult was present was tabulated. Teacher
             ratings of externalizing behavior problems were collected in
             grades 6 and 7. Unsupervised peer contact, lack of
             neighborhood safety, and low monitoring incrementally
             predicted grade 7 externalizing problems, after controlling
             for family background factors and grade 6 problems. The
             greatest risk was for those unsupervised adolescents living
             in low-monitoring homes and comparatively unsafe
             neighborhoods. The significant relation between unsupervised
             peer contact and problem behavior in grade 7 held only for
             those adolescents who already were high in problem behavior
             in grade 6. These findings point to the need to consider
             individual, family, and neighborhood factors in evaluating
             risks associated with young adolescents' after-school care
             experiences.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00055},
   Key = {fds272170}
}

@article{fds39018,
   Author = {Bates, J.E. and Pettit, G.S. and Dodge, K.A. and Ridge,
             B.},
   Title = {Interaction of temperamental resistance to control and
             restrictive parenting in the development of externalizing
             behavior(Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {Annual Progress in Child Psychiatry and Child
             Development},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds39018}
}

@article{fds272171,
   Author = {Orrell Valente and JK and Pinderhughes, EE and Valente, E and Laird, RD and The Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group,
             EE},
   Title = {If It's Offered, Will They Come? Influences on Parents'
             Participation in a Community-Based Conduct Problems
             Prevention Program},
   Journal = {American Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {27},
   Pages = {757-787},
   Year = {1999},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2791966/},
   Key = {fds272171}
}

@article{fds272172,
   Author = {Nix, RL and Pinderhughes, EE and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and McFadyen-Ketchum, SA},
   Title = {The relation between mothers' hostile attribution tendencies
             and children's externalizing behavior problems: The
             mediating role of mothers' harsh discipline
             practices},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {896-909},
   Year = {1999},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00065},
   Abstract = {This study examined relations among mothers' hostile
             attribution tendencies regarding their children's ambiguous
             problem behaviors, mothers' harsh discipline practices, and
             children's externalizing behavior problems. A community
             sample of 277 families (19% minority representation) living
             in three geographic regions of the United States was
             followed for over 4 years. Mothers' hostile attribution
             tendencies were assessed during the summer prior to
             children's entry into kindergarten through their responses
             to written vignettes. Mothers' harsh discipline practices
             were assessed concurrently through ratings by interviewers
             and reports by spouses. Children's externalizing behavior
             problems were assessed concurrently through written
             questionnaires by mothers and fathers and in the spring of
             kindergarten and first, second, and third grades through
             reports by teachers and peer sociometric nominations.
             Results of structural equations models demonstrated that
             mothers' hostile attribution tendencies predicted children's
             future externalizing behavior problems at school and that a
             large proportion of this relation was mediated by mothers'
             harsh discipline practices. These results remained virtually
             unchanged when controlling for initial levels of children's
             prekindergarten externalizing behavior problems at
             home.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00065},
   Key = {fds272172}
}

@article{fds272221,
   Author = {Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Ridge,
             B},
   Title = {Interaction of temperamental resistance to control and
             restrictive parenting in the development of externalizing
             behavior.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {982-995},
   Year = {1998},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.34.5.982},
   Abstract = {Child temperament and parental control were studied as
             interacting predictors of behavior outcomes in 2
             longitudinal samples. In Sample 1, data were ratings of
             resistant temperament and observed restrictive control in
             infancy-toddlerhood and ratings of externalizing behavior at
             ages 7 to 10 years; in Sample 2, data were retrospective
             ratings of temperament in infancy-toddlerhood, observed
             restrictive control at age 5 years, and ratings of
             externalizing behavior at ages 7 to 11 years. Resistance
             more strongly related to externalizing in low-restriction
             groups than in high-restriction groups. This was true in
             both samples and for both teacher- and mother-rated
             outcomes. Several Temperament x Environment interaction
             effects have been reported previously, but this is one of
             very few replicated effects.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.34.5.982},
   Key = {fds272221}
}

@article{fds272225,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Supportive parenting, ecological context, and children’s
             adjustment},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {68},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {908-923},
   Year = {1997},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1997.tb01970.x},
   Abstract = {Two major questions regarding the possible impact of early
             supportive parenting (SP) on children's school adjustment
             were addressed: (1) Does SP assessed prekindergarten predict
             grade 6 adjustment after controlling for early harsh
             parenting (HP)? (2) Does SP moderate (buffer) the impact of
             early family adversity on grade 6 adjustment? Parenting and
             family adversity data were drawn from home-visit interviews
             with 585 mothers conducted prekindergarten. Four SP measures
             were derived: mother-to-child warmth, proactive teaching,
             inductive discipline, and positive involvement. HP was
             indexed as the use of harsh, physical discipline. Family
             adversity indicators were socioeconomic disadvantage, family
             stress, and single parenthood. Children's adjustment
             (behavior problems, social skills, and academic performance)
             in kindergarten and grade 6 was assessed via teacher ratings
             and school records. SP predicted adjustment in grade 6, even
             after controlling for kindergarten adjustment and HP. High
             levels of SP mitigated the effects of family adversity on
             later behavior problems. These findings implicate both
             direct (main effect) and indirect (moderator of adversity)
             processes in the linkage between positive and supportive
             aspects of parenting and children's school
             adjustment.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1997.tb01970.x},
   Key = {fds272225}
}

@article{fds272228,
   Author = {Deater Deckard and K and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Spare the rod, spoil the authors: Emerging themes in
             research on parenting and child development},
   Journal = {Psychological Inquiry},
   Volume = {8},
   Pages = {230-235},
   Year = {1997},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15327965pli0803_13},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15327965pli0803_13},
   Key = {fds272228}
}

@article{fds38991,
   Author = {Bierman, K.L. and Greenberg, M.T. and the Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group (K.A. Dodge and member)},
   Title = {Integrating social skill training interventions with parent
             training and family-focused support to prevent conduct
             disorder in high risk populations: The FAST Track Multi-Site
             Demonstration Project},
   Pages = {256-264},
   Booktitle = {Understanding aggressive behavior in children},
   Publisher = {New York, NY: Annals of the New York Academy of
             Sciences},
   Editor = {C.F. Ferris and T. Grisso},
   Year = {1996},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1996.tb32526.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1749-6632.1996.tb32526.x},
   Key = {fds38991}
}

@article{fds272232,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Clawson, MA and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Stability and change in peer-rejected status: The role of
             child behavior, parenting, and family ecology},
   Journal = {Merrill-Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {267-294},
   Year = {1996},
   url = {http://www.jstor.org/stable/23087880},
   Abstract = {Antecedents and correlates of peer rejection in kindergarten
             and first grade were examined. Interviews with 585 mothers
             provided data on parenting and family ecology. Child
             behavior was indexed by peer and teacher ratings. Children
             were classified as sociometrically accepted in both grades,
             rejected in only one grade, or rejected in both grades.
             Compared to accepted children, rejected children were more
             likely to come from lower SES families in which restrictive
             discipline occurred at a high rate, and were more aggressive
             and less socially and academically skilled. Children
             rejected in both grades were more aggressive than children
             rejected in one grade. Decreases in aggression and increases
             in academic performance were shown by children whose status
             improved across grades, with the opposite pattern shown by
             children whose status worsened. Findings are discussed in
             terms of the etiology and maintenance of peer rejection in
             the early school years.},
   Key = {fds272232}
}

@article{fds272233,
   Author = {McFadyen-Ketchum, SA and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Patterns of Change in Early Childhood Aggressive-Disruptive
             Behavior: Gender Differences in Predictions from Early
             Coercive and Affectionate Mother-Child Interactions},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {2417-2433},
   Year = {1996},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9022248},
   Abstract = {The present study focused on mother-child interaction
             predictors of initial levels and change in child aggressive
             and disruptive behavior at school from kindergarten to third
             grade. Aggression-disruption was measured via annual reports
             from teachers and peers. Ordinary least-squares regression
             was used to identify 8 separate child aggression
             trajectories, 4 for each gender: high initial levels with
             increases in aggression, high initial levels with decreases
             in aggression, low initial levels with increases in
             aggression, and low initial levels with decreases in
             aggression. Mother-child interaction measures of coercion
             and nonaffection collected prior to kindergarten were
             predictive of initial levels of aggression-disruption in
             kindergarten in both boys and girls. However, boys and girls
             differed in how coercion and nonaffection predicted change
             in aggression-disruption across elementary school years. For
             boys, high coercion and nonaffection were particularly
             associated with the high-increasing-aggression trajectory,
             but for girls, high levels of coercion and nonaffection were
             associated with the high-decreasing-aggression trajectory.
             This difference is discussed in the context of Patterson et
             al.'s coercion training theory, and the need for
             gender-specific theories of aggressive development is
             noted.},
   Key = {fds272233}
}

@article{fds272248,
   Author = {Harrist, AW and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Dyadic synchrony in mother-child interaction: Relations with
             children's subsequent kindergarten adjustment},
   Journal = {Family Relations},
   Volume = {43},
   Pages = {417-424},
   Year = {1994},
   url = {http://www.jstor.org/stable/585373},
   Key = {fds272248}
}

@article{fds272269,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Family interaction patterns and children's conduct problems
             at home and school: A longitudinal perspective},
   Journal = {School Psychology Review},
   Volume = {22},
   Pages = {401-418},
   Year = {1993},
   Key = {fds272269}
}

@article{fds272257,
   Author = {Strassberg, Z and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {The relation between parental conflict strategies and
             children's standing in kindergarten},
   Journal = {Merrill-Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {38},
   Pages = {477-493},
   Year = {1992},
   url = {http://www.jstor.org/stable/23087323},
   Key = {fds272257}
}

@article{fds272202,
   Author = {Gurwitz, SB and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Adults' evaluations of a child as a function of sex of adult
             and sex of child},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {822-828},
   Year = {1975},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-3514.32.5.822},
   Abstract = {26 male and 26 female undergraduates watched a videotape of
             a 3-yr-old child who was identified as either a girl or a
             boy; they then rated the child on a number of personality
             and ability measures. Males' ratings on many of the measures
             were more favorable for the "girl" than for the "boy,"
             whereas females' ratings were more favorable for the "boy"
             than for the "girl." There was also a main effect for sex of
             S, with females rating the child more favorably than males.
             (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights
             reserved). © 1975 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.32.5.822},
   Key = {fds272202}
}