Kenneth A. Dodge

Publications of Kenneth A. Dodge    :chronological  alphabetical  combined  by tags listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds200470,
   Author = {Kusche, C.A. and Greenberg, M.T. and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Grade level PATHS (Grades1-2)},
   Publisher = {South Deerfield, MA: Channing-Bete Co.},
   Year = {2011},
   Keywords = {child maltreatment • problem behaviors},
   Key = {fds200470}
}

@book{fds200471,
   Author = {Kusche, C.A. and Greenberg, M.T. and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Grou},
   Title = {Grade level PATHS (Grades3-4)},
   Publisher = {South Deerfield, MA: Channing-Bete Co.},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds200471}
}

@book{fds200469,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Coleman, D.L.},
   Title = {Preventing child maltreatment: Community
             approaches},
   Publisher = {New York: Guilford},
   Year = {2011},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cfs.12019},
   Doi = {10.1111/cfs.12019},
   Key = {fds200469}
}

@book{fds184137,
   Author = {K.A. Dodge},
   Title = {Current directions in child psychopathology},
   Publisher = {Allyn & Bacon},
   Address = {Boston, MA},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://www.pearsonhighered.com/bookseller/product/Current-Directions-in-Child-Psychopathology-for-Abnormal-Psychology/9780205680139.page},
   Key = {fds184137}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds271945,
   Author = {Berlin, LJ and Dodge, KA and Reznick, JS},
   Title = {Examining pregnant women's hostile attributions about
             infants as a predictor of offspring maltreatment.},
   Journal = {Jama Pediatrics},
   Volume = {167},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {549-553},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {2168-6203},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000319829700010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Child maltreatment is a serious public health problem that
             disproportionately affects infants and toddlers. In the
             interest of informing prevention and intervention efforts,
             this study examined pregnant women's attributions about
             infants as a risk factor for child maltreatment and harsh
             parenting during their children's first and second years. We
             also provide specific methods for practitioners to assess
             hostile attributions.To evaluate pregnant women's hostile
             attributions about infants as a risk factor for early child
             maltreatment and harsh parenting.Prospective longitudinal
             study.A small Southeastern city and its surrounding county.A
             diverse, community-based sample of 499 pregnant
             women.Official records of child maltreatment and
             mother-reported harsh parenting behaviors. Hostile
             attributions were examined in terms of women's beliefs about
             infants' negative intentions (eg, the extent to which
             infants purposefully dirty their diapers).Mothers' hostile
             attributions increased the likelihood that their child would
             be maltreated by the age of 26 months (adjusted odds ratio,
             1.26 [90% CI, 1.02-1.56]). Mothers who made more hostile
             attributions during pregnancy reported engaging in more
             harsh parenting behaviors when their children were toddlers
             (β = 0.14, P < .05). Both associations were robust to the
             inclusion of 7 psychosocial covariates.AND RELEVANCE: A
             pregnant woman's hostile attributions about infant's
             intentions signal risk for maltreatment and harsh parenting
             of her child during the first years of life. Practitioners'
             attention to women's hostile attributions may help identify
             those in need of immediate practitioner input and/or
             referral to parenting services.},
   Doi = {10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.1212},
   Key = {fds271945}
}

@article{fds271951,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {The link between harsh home environments and negative
             academic trajectories is exacerbated by victimization in the
             elementary school peer group.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {305-316},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000314193900010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {This article presents a prospective investigation focusing
             on the moderating role of peer victimization on associations
             between harsh home environments in the preschool years and
             academic trajectories during elementary school. The
             participants were 388 children (198 boys, 190 girls) who we
             recruited as part of an ongoing multisite longitudinal
             investigation. Preschool home environment was assessed with
             structured interviews and questionnaires completed by
             parents. Peer victimization was assessed with a peer
             nomination inventory that was administered when the average
             age of the participants was approximately 8.5 years. Grade
             point averages (GPAs) were obtained from reviews of school
             records, conducted for 7 consecutive years. Indicators of
             restrictive punitive discipline and exposure to violence
             were associated with within-subject declines in academic
             functioning over 7 years. However, these effects were
             exacerbated for those children who had also experienced
             victimization in the peer group during the intervening
             years.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0028249},
   Key = {fds271951}
}

@article{fds272021,
   Author = {Putnick, DL and Bornstein, MH and Lansford, JE and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta and L and Gurdal, S and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring,
             E and Tapanya, S and Uribe Tirado and LM and Zelli, A and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, SM and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS},
   Title = {Agreement in Mother and Father Acceptance-Rejection, Warmth,
             and Hostility/Rejection/Neglect of Children across Nine
             Countries.},
   Journal = {Cross Cultural Research : Official Journal of the Society
             for Cross Cultural Research},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {191-223},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {1069-3971},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1069397112440931},
   Abstract = {We assessed whether mothers' and fathers' self-reports of
             acceptance-rejection, warmth, and hostility/rejection/neglect
             (HRN) of their pre-adolescent children differ
             cross-nationally and relative to the gender of the parent
             and child in 10 communities in 9 countries, including China,
             Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Sweden,
             Thailand, and the United States (N = 998 families). Mothers
             and fathers in all countries reported a high degree of
             acceptance and warmth, and a low degree of HRN, but
             countries also varied. Mothers reported greater acceptance
             of children than fathers in China, Italy, Sweden, and the
             United States, and these effects were accounted for by
             greater self-reported warmth in mothers than fathers in
             China, Italy, the Philippines, Sweden, and Thailand and less
             HRN in mothers than fathers in Sweden. Fathers reported
             greater warmth than mothers in Kenya. Mother and father
             acceptance-rejection were moderately correlated. Relative
             levels of mother and father acceptance and rejection appear
             to be country specific.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1069397112440931},
   Key = {fds272021}
}

@article{fds272010,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Wager, LB and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Forms of Spanking and Children's Externalizing
             Behaviors.},
   Journal = {Family Relations},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {224-236},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0197-6664},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22544988},
   Abstract = {Research suggests that corporal punishment is related to
             higher levels of child externalizing behavior, but there has
             been controversy regarding whether infrequent, mild spanking
             predicts child externalizing or whether more severe and
             frequent forms of corporal punishment account for the link.
             Mothers rated the frequency with which they spanked and
             whether they spanked with a hand or object when their child
             was 6, 7, and 8 years old. Mothers and teachers rated
             children's externalizing behaviors at each age. Analyses of
             covariance revealed higher levels of mother-reported
             externalizing behavior for children who experienced harsh
             spanking. Structural equation models for children who
             experienced no spanking or mild spanking only revealed that
             spanking was related to concurrent and prior, but not
             subsequent, externalizing. Mild spanking in one year was a
             risk factor for harsh spanking in the next year. Findings
             are discussed in the context of efforts to promote
             children's rights to protection.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1741-3729.2011.00700.x},
   Key = {fds272010}
}

@article{fds272030,
   Author = {Appleyard, K and Berlin, LJ and Rosanbalm, KD and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Preventing early child maltreatment: implications from a
             longitudinal study of maternal abuse history, substance use
             problems, and offspring victimization.},
   Journal = {Prev Sci},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {139-149},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21240556},
   Abstract = {In the interest of improving child maltreatment prevention
             science, this longitudinal, community based study of 499
             mothers and their infants tested the hypothesis that
             mothers' childhood history of maltreatment would predict
             maternal substance use problems, which in turn would predict
             offspring victimization. Mothers (35% White/non-Latina, 34%
             Black/non-Latina, 23% Latina, 7% other) were recruited and
             interviewed during pregnancy, and child protective services
             records were reviewed for the presence of the participants'
             target infants between birth and age 26 months. Mediating
             pathways were examined through structural equation modeling
             and tested using the products of the coefficients approach.
             The mediated pathway from maternal history of sexual abuse
             to substance use problems to offspring victimization was
             significant (standardized mediated path [ab] = .07, 95%
             CI [.02, .14]; effect size = .26), as was the mediated
             pathway from maternal history of physical abuse to substance
             use problems to offspring victimization (standardized
             mediated path [ab] = .05, 95% CI [.01, .11]; effect
             size = .19). There was no significant mediated pathway
             from maternal history of neglect. Findings are discussed in
             terms of specific implications for child maltreatment
             prevention, including the importance of assessment and early
             intervention for maternal history of maltreatment and
             substance use problems, targeting women with maltreatment
             histories for substance use services, and integrating child
             welfare and parenting programs with substance use
             treatment.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-010-0193-2},
   Key = {fds272030}
}

@article{fds272031,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Laird, RD and Shaw, DS and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Reciprocal relations between parents' physical discipline
             and children's externalizing behavior during middle
             childhood and adolescence.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {225-238},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21262050},
   Abstract = {Using data from two long-term longitudinal projects, we
             investigated reciprocal relations between maternal reports
             of physical discipline and teacher and self-ratings of child
             externalizing behavior, accounting for continuity in both
             discipline and externalizing over time. In Study 1, which
             followed a community sample of 562 boys and girls from age 6
             to 9, high levels of physical discipline in a given year
             predicted high levels of externalizing behavior in the next
             year, and externalizing behavior in a given year predicted
             high levels of physical discipline in the next year. In
             Study 2, which followed an independent sample of 290 lower
             income, higher risk boys from age 10 to 15, mother-reported
             physical discipline in a given year predicted child ratings
             of antisocial behavior in the next year, but child
             antisocial behavior in a given year did not predict parents'
             use of physical discipline in the next year. In neither
             sample was there evidence that associations between physical
             discipline and child externalizing changed as the child
             aged, and findings were not moderated by gender, race,
             socioeconomic status, or the severity of the physical
             discipline. Implications for the reciprocal nature of the
             socialization process and the risks associated with physical
             discipline are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579410000751},
   Key = {fds272031}
}

@article{fds272064,
   Author = {Berlin, LJ and Appleyard, K and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Intergenerational continuity in child maltreatment:
             mediating mechanisms and implications for
             prevention.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {162-176},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21291435},
   Abstract = {In the interest of improving child maltreatment prevention,
             this prospective, longitudinal, community-based study of 499
             mothers and their infants examined (a) direct associations
             between mothers' experiences of childhood maltreatment and
             their offspring's maltreatment, and (b) mothers' mental
             health problems, social isolation, and social information
             processing patterns (hostile attributions and aggressive
             response biases) as mediators of these associations.
             Mothers' childhood physical abuse--but not neglect--directly
             predicted offspring victimization. This association was
             mediated by mothers' social isolation and aggressive
             response biases. Findings are discussed in terms of specific
             implications for child maltreatment prevention.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01547.x},
   Key = {fds272064}
}

@article{fds191683,
   Author = {Berlin, L.J. and Appleyard, K. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Intergenerational continuity in child maltreatment:
             Mediating mechanisms and implications for
             prevention},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {162-176},
   Year = {2011},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01547.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01547.x},
   Key = {fds191683}
}

@article{fds272017,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Does physical abuse in early childhood predict substance use
             in adolescence and early adulthood?},
   Journal = {Child Maltreatment},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {190-194},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20019026},
   Abstract = {Prospective longitudinal data from 585 families were used to
             examine parents' reports of child physical abuse in the
             first 5 years of life as a predictor of substance use at
             ages 12, 16, and 24. Path analyses revealed that physical
             abuse in the first 5 years of life predicted subsequent
             substance use for females but not males. We found a direct
             effect of early physical abuse on girls'substance use at age
             12 and indirect effects on substance use at age 16 and age
             24 through substance use at age 12. For boys, age 12
             substance use predicted age 16 substance use, and age 16
             substance use predicted age 24 substance use, but physical
             abuse in the first 5 years of life was unrelated to
             subsequent substance use. These findings suggest that for
             females, a mechanism of influence of early physical abuse on
             substance use into early adulthood appears to be through
             precocious initiation of substance use in early
             adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1077559509352359},
   Key = {fds272017}
}

@article{fds272013,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Alampay, LP and Al-Hassan, S and Bacchini, D and Bombi,
             AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta,
             L and Dodge, KA and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Runyan, DK and Skinner,
             AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya, S and Tirado, LMU and Zelli,
             A},
   Title = {Corporal punishment of children in nine countries as a
             function of child gender and parent gender.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Pediatrics},
   Volume = {2010},
   Pages = {672780},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20976255},
   Abstract = {Background. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a
             global perspective on corporal punishment by examining
             differences between mothers' and fathers' use of corporal
             punishment with daughters and sons in nine countries.
             Methods. Interviews were conducted with 1398 mothers, 1146
             fathers, and 1417 children (age range = 7 to 10 years) in
             China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines,
             Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. Results. Across the
             entire sample, 54% of girls and 58% of boys had experienced
             mild corporal punishment, and 13% of girls and 14% of boys
             had experienced severe corporal punishment by their parents
             or someone in their household in the last month. Seventeen
             percent of parents believed that the use of corporal
             punishment was necessary to rear the target child. Overall,
             boys were more frequently punished corporally than were
             girls, and mothers used corporal punishment more frequently
             than did fathers. There were significant differences across
             countries, with reports of corporal punishment use lowest in
             Sweden and highest in Kenya. Conclusion. This work
             establishes that the use of corporal punishment is
             widespread, and efforts to prevent corporal punishment from
             escalating into physical abuse should be commensurately
             widespread.},
   Doi = {10.1155/2010/672780},
   Key = {fds272013}
}

@article{fds272036,
   Author = {Rosanbalm, KD and Dodge, KA and Murphy, R and O'Donnell, K and Christopoulos, C and Gibbs, SW and Appleyard, K and Daro,
             D},
   Title = {Evaluation of a Collaborative Community-Based Child
             Maltreatment Prevention Initiative.},
   Journal = {Protecting Children},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {8-23},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/7999 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272036}
}

@article{fds272056,
   Author = {Coleman, D and Dodge, K and Campbell, S},
   Title = {Where and How to Draw the Line Between Reasonable Corporal
             Punishment and Abuse},
   Journal = {Law & Contemporary Problems},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {107-165},
   Year = {2010},
   ISSN = {0023-9186},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/3756 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272056}
}

@article{fds272066,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Dodge, KA and Shaw, DS and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Trajectories of physical discipline: early childhood
             antecedents and developmental outcomes.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {80},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1385-1402},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19765007},
   Abstract = {This study examined childhood antecedents and developmental
             outcomes associated with trajectories of mild and harsh
             parental physical discipline. Interview, questionnaire, and
             observational data were available from 499 children followed
             from ages 5 to 16 and from 258 children in an independent
             sample followed from ages 5 to 15. Analyses indicated
             distinct physical discipline trajectory groups that varied
             in frequency of physical discipline and rate of change. In
             both samples, family ecological disadvantage differentiated
             the trajectory groups; in the first sample, early child
             externalizing also differentiated the groups. Controlling
             for early childhood externalizing, the minimal/ceasing
             trajectory groups were associated with the lowest levels of
             subsequent adolescent antisocial behavior in both samples
             and with parent-adolescent positive relationship quality in
             the second sample.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01340.x},
   Key = {fds272066}
}

@article{fds272062,
   Author = {Daro, D and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Creating community responsibility for child protection:
             possibilities and challenges.},
   Journal = {The Future of Children},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {67-93},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1054-8289},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/foc.0.0030},
   Abstract = {Deborah Daro and Kenneth Dodge observe that efforts to
             prevent child abuse have historically focused on directly
             improving the skills of parents who are at risk for or
             engaged in maltreatment. But, as experts increasingly
             recognize that negative forces within a community can
             overwhelm even well-intentioned parents, attention is
             shifting toward creating environments that facilitate a
             parent's ability to do the right thing. The most
             sophisticated and widely used community prevention programs,
             say Daro and Dodge, emphasize the reciprocal interplay
             between individual-family behavior and broader neighborhood,
             community, and cultural contexts. The authors examine five
             different community prevention efforts, summarizing for each
             both the theory of change and the empirical evidence
             concerning its efficacy. Each program aims to enhance
             community capacity by expanding formal and informal
             resources and establishing a normative cultural context
             capable of fostering collective responsibility for positive
             child development. Over the past ten years, researchers have
             explored how neighborhoods influence child development and
             support parenting. Scholars are still searching for
             agreement on the most salient contextual factors and on how
             to manipulate these factors to increase the likelihood
             parents will seek out, find, and effectively use necessary
             and appropriate support. The current evidence base for
             community child abuse prevention, observe Daro and Dodge,
             offers both encouragement and reason for caution. Although
             theory and empirical research suggest that intervention at
             the neighborhood level is likely to prevent child
             maltreatment, designing and implementing a high-quality,
             multifaceted community prevention initiative is expensive.
             Policy makers must consider the trade-offs in investing in
             strategies to alter community context and those that expand
             services for known high-risk individuals. The authors
             conclude that if the concept of community prevention is to
             move beyond the isolated examples examined in their article,
             additional conceptual and empirical work is needed to garner
             support from public institutions, community-based
             stakeholders, and local residents.},
   Doi = {10.1353/foc.0.0030},
   Key = {fds272062}
}

@article{fds272089,
   Author = {Kaplow, JB and Hall, E and Koenen, KC and Dodge, KA and Amaya-Jackson,
             L},
   Title = {Dissociation predicts later attention problems in sexually
             abused children.},
   Journal = {Child Abuse & Neglect},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {261-275},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0145-2134},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2007.07.005},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: The goals of this research are to develop and
             test a prospective model of attention problems in sexually
             abused children that includes fixed variables (e.g.,
             gender), trauma, and disclosure-related pathways. METHODS:
             At Time 1, fixed variables, trauma variables, and stress
             reactions upon disclosure were assessed in 156 children aged
             8-13 years. At the Time 2 follow-up (8-36 months following
             the initial interview), 56 of the children were assessed for
             attention problems. RESULTS: A path analysis involving a
             series of hierarchically nested, ordinary least squares
             multiple regression analyses indicated two direct paths to
             attention problems including the child's relationship to the
             perpetrator (beta=.23) and dissociation measured immediately
             after disclosure (beta=.53), while controlling for
             concurrent externalizing behavior (beta=.43). Post-traumatic
             stress symptoms were only indirectly associated with
             attention problems via dissociation. Taken together, these
             pathways accounted for approximately 52% of the variance in
             attention problems and provided an excellent fit to the
             data. CONCLUSIONS: Children who report dissociative symptoms
             upon disclosure of CSA and/or were sexually abused by
             someone within their family are at an increased risk of
             developing attention problems. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:
             Findings from this study indicate that children who
             experienced sexual abuse at an earlier age, by someone
             within their family, and/or report symptoms of dissociation
             during disclosure are especially likely to benefit from
             intervention. Effective interventions should involve (1)
             providing emotion regulation and coping skills; and (2)
             helping children to process traumatic aspects of the abuse
             to reduce the cyclic nature of traumatic reminders leading
             to unmanageable stress and dissociation.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.chiabu.2007.07.005},
   Key = {fds272089}
}

@article{fds272123,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Chang, L and Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Oburu, P and Palmérus, K and Bacchini, D and Pastorelli, C and Bombi, AS and Zelli,
             A and Tapanya, S and Chaudhary, N and Deater-Deckard, K and Manke, B and Quinn, N},
   Title = {Physical discipline and children's adjustment: cultural
             normativeness as a moderator.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {76},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1234-1246},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16274437},
   Abstract = {Interviews were conducted with 336 mother-child dyads
             (children's ages ranged from 6 to 17 years; mothers' ages
             ranged from 20 to 59 years) in China, India, Italy, Kenya,
             the Philippines, and Thailand to examine whether
             normativeness of physical discipline moderates the link
             between mothers' use of physical discipline and children's
             adjustment. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that
             physical discipline was less strongly associated with
             adverse child outcomes in conditions of greater perceived
             normativeness, but physical discipline was also associated
             with more adverse outcomes regardless of its perceived
             normativeness. Countries with the lowest use of physical
             discipline showed the strongest association between mothers'
             use and children's behavior problems, but in all countries
             higher use of physical discipline was associated with more
             aggression and anxiety.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2005.00847.x},
   Key = {fds272123}
}

@article{fds272287,
   Author = {Jaffee, SR and Caspi, A and Moffitt, TE and Dodge, KA and Rutter, M and Taylor, A and Tully, LA},
   Title = {Nature X nurture: genetic vulnerabilities interact with
             physical maltreatment to promote conduct
             problems.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {67-84},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15971760},
   Abstract = {Maltreatment places children at risk for psychiatric
             morbidity, especially conduct problems. However, not all
             maltreated children develop conduct problems. We tested
             whether the effect of physical maltreatment on risk for
             conduct problems was strongest among those who were at high
             genetic risk for these problems using data from the E-risk
             Study, a representative cohort of 1,116 5-year-old British
             twin pairs and their families. Children's conduct problems
             were ascertained via parent and teacher interviews. Physical
             maltreatment was ascertained via parent report. Children's
             genetic risk for conduct problems was estimated as a
             function of their co-twin's conduct disorder status and the
             pair's zygosity. The effect of maltreatment on risk for
             conduct problems was strongest among those at high genetic
             risk. The experience of maltreatment was associated with an
             increase of 2% in the probability of a conduct disorder
             diagnosis among children at low genetic risk for conduct
             disorder but an increase of 24% among children at high
             genetic risk. Prediction of behavioral pathology can attain
             greater accuracy if both pathogenic environments and genetic
             risk are ascertained. Certain genotypes may promote
             resistance to trauma. Physically maltreated children whose
             first-degree relatives engage in antisocial behavior warrant
             priority for therapeutic intervention.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579405050042},
   Key = {fds272287}
}

@article{fds272114,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Deater-Deckard, K and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Ethnic differences in the link between physical discipline
             and later adolescent externalizing behaviors.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {801-812},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0021-9630},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15056311},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Parents' use of physical discipline has generated
             controversy related to concerns that its use is associated
             with adjustment problems such as aggression and delinquency
             in children. However, recent evidence suggests that there
             are ethnic differences in associations between physical
             discipline and children's adjustment. This study examined
             race as a moderator of the link between physical discipline
             and adolescent externalizing behavior problems, extending
             previous research beyond childhood into adolescence and
             considering physical discipline at multiple points in time.
             METHODS:A representative community sample of 585 children
             was followed from pre-kindergarten (age 5) through grade 11
             (age 16). Mothers reported on their use of physical
             discipline in the child's first five years of life and again
             during grades 6 (age 11) and 8 (age 13). Mothers and
             adolescents reported on a variety of externalizing behaviors
             in grade 11 including aggression, violence, and trouble at
             school and with the police. RESULTS:A series of hierarchical
             linear regressions controlling for parents' marital status,
             socioeconomic status, and child temperament revealed
             significant interactions between physical discipline during
             the child's first five years of life and race in the
             prediction of 3 of the 7 adolescent externalizing outcomes
             assessed and significant interactions between physical
             discipline during grades 6 and 8 and race in the prediction
             of all 7 adolescent externalizing outcomes. Regression
             slopes showed that the experience of physical discipline at
             each time point was related to higher levels of subsequent
             externalizing behaviors for European American adolescents
             but lower levels of externalizing behaviors for African
             American adolescents. CONCLUSIONS:There are race differences
             in long-term effects of physical discipline on externalizing
             behaviors problems. Different ecological niches may affect
             the manner in which parents use physical discipline, the
             meaning that children attach to the experience of physical
             discipline, and its effects on the adjustment of children
             and adolescents.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1469-7610.2004.00273.x},
   Key = {fds272114}
}

@article{fds13046,
   Author = {Lansford, J.E. and Dodge, K.A. and Pettit, G.S. and Bates, J.E. and Crozier, J. and Kaplow, J.},
   Title = {A 12-Year Prospective Study of the Long-Term Effects of
             Early Child Physical Maltreatment and Psychological
             Behavioral, and Academic Problems in Adolescence},
   Journal = {Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine},
   Volume = {156},
   Pages = {824-830},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds13046}
}

@article{fds272158,
   Author = {Colwell, MJ and Pettit, GS and Meece, D and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Cumulative Risk and Continuity in Nonparental Care from
             Infancy to Early Adolescence.},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {207-234},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/mpq.2001.0009},
   Abstract = {Variations in amounts of nonparental care across infancy,
             preschool, early elementary school, and early adolescence
             were examined in a longitudinal sample (N = 438). Of
             interest was (a) continuity in use of the different
             arrangements, (b) whether the arrangements were additively
             and cumulatively associated with children's externalizing
             behavior problems, and (c) whether predictive relations were
             accounted for by social-ecological (socioeconomic status,
             mothers' employment status, marital status) and
             social-experiential (parenting quality, exposure to
             aggressive peers) factors. Correlations among overall
             amounts of care provided little evidence of cross-time
             continuity. Consistent with the cumulative risk perspective,
             Grade 1 self-care and Grade 6 unsupervised peer contact
             incrementally predicted Grade 6 externalizing problems. Most
             of the predictive associations were accounted for by family
             background and social relationship factors.},
   Doi = {10.1353/mpq.2001.0009},
   Key = {fds272158}
}

@article{fds272213,
   Author = {Keiley, MK and Howe, TR and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Petti,
             GS},
   Title = {The timing of child physical maltreatment: a cross-domain
             growth analysis of impact on adolescent externalizing and
             internalizing problems.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {891-912},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1005122814723},
   Abstract = {In a sample of 578 children assessed in kindergarten through
             the eighth grade, we used growth modeling to determine the
             basic developmental trajectories of mother-reported and
             teacher-reported externalizing and internalizing behaviors
             for three physical maltreatment groups of
             children-early-harmed (prior to age 5 years), later-harmed
             (age 5 years and over), and nonharmed--controlling for SES
             and gender. Results demonstrated that the earlier children
             experienced harsh physical treatment by significant adults,
             the more likely they were to experience adjustment problems
             in early adolescence. Over multiple domains, early physical
             maltreatment was related to more negative sequelae than the
             same type of maltreatment occurring at later periods. In
             addition, the fitted growth models revealed that the
             early-harmed group exhibited someswhat higher initial levels
             of teacher-reported externalizing problems in kindergarten
             and significantly different rates of change in these problem
             behaviors than other children, as reported by mothers over
             the 9 years of this study. The early-harmed children were
             also seen by teachers, in kindergarten, as exhibiting higher
             levels of internalizing behaviors. The later-harmed children
             were seen by their teachers as increasing their
             externalizing problem behaviors more rapidly over the 9
             years than did the early- or nonharmed children. These
             findings indicate that the timing of maltreatment is a
             salient factor in examining the developmental effects of
             physical harm.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1005122814723},
   Key = {fds272213}
}

@article{fds272160,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Friendship as a moderating factor in the pathway between
             early harsh home environment and later victimization in the
             peer group. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {646-662},
   Year = {2000},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000089047400010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Two prospective investigations of the moderating role of
             dyadic friendship in the developmental pathway to peer
             victimization are reported. In Study 1, the preschool home
             environments (i.e., harsh discipline, marital conflict,
             stress, abuse, and maternal hostility) of 389 children were
             assessed by trained interviewers. These children were then
             followed into the middle years of elementary school, with
             peer victimization, group social acceptance, and friendship
             assessed annually with a peer nomination inventory. In Study
             2, the home environments of 243 children were assessed in
             the summer before 1st grade, and victimization, group
             acceptance, and friendship were assessed annually over the
             next 3 years. In both studies, early harsh, punitive, and
             hostile family environments predicted later victimization by
             peers for children who had a low number of friendships.
             However, the predictive associations did not hold for
             children who had numerous friendships. These findings
             provide support for conceptualizations of friendship as a
             moderating factor in the pathways to peer group
             victimization.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.36.5.646},
   Key = {fds272160}
}

@article{fds272172,
   Author = {Nix, RL and Pinderhughes, EE and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and McFadyen-Ketchum, SA},
   Title = {The relation between mothers' hostile attribution tendencies
             and children's externalizing behavior problems: the
             mediating role of mothers' harsh discipline
             practices.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {896-909},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00065},
   Abstract = {This study examined relations among mothers' hostile
             attribution tendencies regarding their children's ambiguous
             problem behaviors, mothers' harsh discipline practices, and
             children's externalizing behavior problems. A community
             sample of 277 families (19% minority representation) living
             in three geographic regions of the United States was
             followed for over 4 years. Mothers' hostile attribution
             tendencies were assessed during the summer prior to
             children's entry into kindergarten through their responses
             to written vignettes. Mothers' harsh discipline practices
             were assessed concurrently through ratings by interviewers
             and reports by spouses. Children's externalizing behavior
             problems were assessed concurrently through written
             questionnaires by mothers and fathers and in the spring of
             kindergarten and first, second, and third grades through
             reports by teachers and peer sociometric nominations.
             Results of structural equations models demonstrated that
             mothers' hostile attribution tendencies predicted children's
             future externalizing behavior problems at school and that a
             large proportion of this relation was mediated by mothers'
             harsh discipline practices. These results remained virtually
             unchanged when controlling for initial levels of children's
             prekindergarten externalizing behavior problems at
             home.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00065},
   Key = {fds272172}
}

@article{fds38995,
   Author = {Deater-Deckard, K. and Dodge, K.A. and Bates, J.E. and Pettit,
             G.S.},
   Title = {Physical discipline among African-American and
             European-American mothers: Links to children's externalizing
             behaviors(Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {E.L.I.T.E. Library: Extended Library Individualized to
             Education},
   Publisher = {Guilford, CT: Dushkin Publishing},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds38995}
}

@article{fds272079,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Effects of physical maltreatment on the development of peer
             relations},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {43-55},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579400005873},
   Abstract = {The effect of early physical maltreatment on the development
             of peer relationships was examined in a representative
             sample of 585 boys and girls. Subjects were assessed for
             physical maltreatment in the first 5 years of life and then
             followed for 5 consecutive years. The assessment was based
             on a clinical interview with parents. Twelve percent of the
             sample was identified as having experienced physical
             maltreatment. Peers, teachers, and mothers independently
             evaluated the maltreated group of children as being more
             disliked, less popular, and more socially withdrawn than the
             nonmaltreated group in every year of evaluation, with the
             magnitude of difference growing over time. These effects
             held even when family socioeconomic status was controlled.
             The findings were interpreted as being consistent with the
             hypothesis that early maltreatment disrupts attachment
             relationships with adult caregivers, and these disruptions
             then impair a child's ability to form effective peer
             relationships. © 1994, Cambridge University Press. All
             rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400005873},
   Key = {fds272079}
}

@article{fds272244,
   Author = {Strassberg, Z and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Spanking in the home and children's subsequent aggression
             toward kindergarten peers},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {445-461},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579400006040},
   Abstract = {Although spanking of children is almost universal in U.S.
             society, its effects are not well understood. We examined
             the longitudinal relation between parental spanking and
             other physical punishment of preschool children and
             children's aggressive behavior toward peers later in
             kindergarten. A total of 273 boys and girls from diverse
             backgrounds served as subjects. The findings were consistent
             with a socialization model in which higher levels of
             severity in parental punishment practices are associated
             with higher levels of children's subsequent aggression
             toward peers. Findings indicated that children who had been
             spanked evidenced levels of aggression that were higher than
             those who had not been spanked, and children who had been
             the objects of violent discipline became the most aggressive
             of all groups. Patterns were qualified by the sexes of the
             parent and child and subtypes of child aggression (reactive,
             bullying, and instrumental). The findings suggest that in
             spite of parents' goals, spanking fails to promote prosocial
             development and, instead, is associated with higher rates of
             aggression toward peers. © 1994, Cambridge University
             Press. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400006040},
   Key = {fds272244}
}

@article{fds38976,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Pettit, G.S. and Bates, J.E.},
   Title = {Effects of physical maltreatment on the development of peer
             relations(Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Publisher = {Brooks/Cole},
   Editor = {E. Mash and D. Wolfe},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds38976}
}

@article{fds272256,
   Author = {Weiss, B and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Some consequences of early harsh discipline: child
             aggression and a maladaptive social information processing
             style.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1321-1335},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1446555},
   Abstract = {Although a number of studies have reported a relation
             between abusive parental behavior and later aggressive
             behavior in the victim, many of these investigations have
             had methodological limitations that make precise
             interpretation of their results problematic. In the present
             study, we attempted to determine whether harsh parental
             discipline occurring early in life was associated with later
             aggression and internalizing behavior in children, using a
             prospective design with randomly selected samples to avoid
             some of these methodological difficulties. Structural
             equation modeling indicated a consistent relation between
             harsh discipline and aggression in 2 separate cohorts of
             children. This relation did not appear to be due to possible
             confounding factors such as child temperament, SES, and
             marital violence, although there was some indication in our
             data that the latter variables were related to child
             aggression. In addition, our analyses suggested that the
             effect of harsh discipline on child aggression may be
             mediated at least in part by maladaptive social information
             processing patterns that develop in response to the harsh
             discipline.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1992.tb01697.x},
   Key = {fds272256}
}