Kenneth A. Dodge

Publications of Kenneth A. Dodge    :chronological  alphabetical  combined  by tags listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds45886,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Dishion, T.J. and Lansford, J.E.},
   Title = {Deviant peer influences in programs for youth: Problems and
             solutions},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds45886}
}

@book{fds38867,
   Author = {Kupersmidt, J. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Children’s peer relations: From development to
             intervention to policy: A festschrift to honor John D.
             Coie},
   Publisher = {Washington, D.C.: American Psychological
             Association},
   Editor = {J. Kupersmidt and K.A. Dodge},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {fds38867}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds26381,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The Fast Track experiment: Translating the developmental
             model into a prevention design},
   Pages = {181-208},
   Booktitle = {Children's Peer Relations: From Development to
             Intervention},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association},
   Editor = {J.B. Kupersmidt and K.A. Dodge},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {fds26381}
}

@misc{fds13026,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {II Fast Track Project},
   Pages = {19-60},
   Booktitle = {Giovani a rischio: Interventi possibili in realta
             impossibili},
   Publisher = {Milan, Italy: FrancoAngeli},
   Year = {2001},
   Key = {fds13026}
}

@misc{fds13007,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Developmental Psychology},
   Pages = {1-17},
   Booktitle = {Current Diagnosis and Treatment in Psychiatry},
   Publisher = {East Norwalk, CT: Appleton & Lange},
   Editor = {M. H. Ebert and P.T. Loosen and B. Nurcombe},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds13007}
}

@misc{fds38857,
   Author = {Reiter-Lavery, B. and Rabiner, D. and Dodge,
             K.A.},
   Title = {The State of Durham’s Children 2000},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds38857}
}

@misc{fds38858,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Kupersmidt, J. and Fontaine,
             R.},
   Title = {The Willie M. Program},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds38858}
}

@misc{fds38905,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and McClaskey, C.L. and Feldman,
             E.},
   Title = {A situational approach to the assessment of social
             competence in children (Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {OVID Technologies: Health and Psychosocial Instruments
             Database},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds38905}
}

@misc{fds44856,
   Author = {Valente, E. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Evaluation of prevention programs for children},
   Pages = {183-218},
   Booktitle = {Healthy children 2010: Establishing preventive
             services},
   Publisher = {Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage},
   Editor = {R.P. Weissberg and T.P. Gulotta and R.L. Hampton and S.A.Ryan and G.R.
             Adams},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds44856}
}

@misc{fds39726,
   Author = {Consortium on the School-Based Promotion of Social
             Competence},
   Title = {Classroom curricula for drug abuse prevention},
   Pages = {129-148},
   Booktitle = {Communities that care: Action for drug abuse
             prevention},
   Publisher = {San Francisco: Jossey-Bass},
   Editor = {J. D. Hawkins and R. Catalano},
   Year = {1992},
   Key = {fds39726}
}

@misc{fds39746,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {A social information processing model of social competence
             in children},
   Pages = {77-125},
   Booktitle = {Minnesota symposium in child psychology},
   Publisher = {Hillsdale, N. J.: Lawrence Erlbaum},
   Editor = {M. Perlmutter},
   Year = {1986},
   Key = {fds39746}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds224096,
   Author = {Dymnicki, A.B. and the Multisite Violence Prevention
             Project},
   Title = {Moderating Effects of School Climate on Outcomes for the
             Multisite Violence Prevention Project Universal
             Program},
   Journal = {Journal of Research in Adolescence},
   Volume = {24},
   Pages = {383-398},
   Year = {2014},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jora.12073},
   Doi = {10.1111/jora.12073},
   Key = {fds224096}
}

@article{fds223306,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Goodman, W.B. and Murphy, R.A. and O’Donnell, K. and Sato, J. and Guptill, S.},
   Title = {Implementation and randomized controlled trial evaluation of
             universal postnatal nurse home visiting},
   Journal = {American Journal of Public Health},
   Volume = {104},
   Pages = {36-43},
   Year = {2014},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2013.301361},
   Doi = {10.2105/AJPH.2013.301361},
   Key = {fds223306}
}

@misc{fds219475,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Goodman, W.B. and Murphy, R.A. and O’Donnell, K. and Sato, J.},
   Title = {Randomized controlled trial evaluation of universal
             postnatal nurse home visiting: Impacts on child emergency
             medical care at age 12-months},
   Journal = {Pediatrics},
   Volume = {132},
   Pages = {S140-S146},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds219475}
}

@article{fds218551,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Assessing findings from the Fast Track Study},
   Journal = {. Journal of Experimental Criminology},
   Volume = {9},
   Pages = {119-126},
   Year = {2013},
   url = {http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11292-013-9173-4#page-1},
   Key = {fds218551}
}

@article{fds271950,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, J and Dodge, K and Greenberg, M and Lochman, J and Mcmohan, R and Pinderhughes, E and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg,
             MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ},
   Title = {School Outcomes of Aggressive-Disruptive Children:
             Prediction From Kindergarten Risk Factors and Impact of the
             Fast Track Prevention Program},
   Journal = {Aggressive Behavior},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {114-130},
   Year = {2013},
   ISSN = {0096-140X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ab.21467},
   Abstract = {A multi-gate screening process identified 891 children with
             aggressive-disruptive behavior problems at school entry.
             Fast Track provided a multi-component preventive
             intervention in the context of a randomized-controlled
             design. In addition to psychosocial support and skill
             training for parents and children, the intervention included
             intensive reading tutoring in first grade, behavioral
             management consultation with teachers, and the provision of
             homework support (as needed) through tenth grade. This study
             examined the impact of the intervention, as well as the
             impact of the child's initial aggressive-disruptive
             behaviors and associated school readiness skills (cognitive
             ability, reading readiness, attention problems) on academic
             progress and educational placements during elementary school
             (Grades 1-4) and during the secondary school years (Grades
             7-10), as well as high school graduation. Child behavior
             problems and skills at school entry predicted school
             difficulties (low grades, grade retention, placement in a
             self-contained classroom, behavior disorder classification,
             and failure to graduate). Disappointingly, intervention did
             not significantly improve these long-term school outcomes.
             © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc..},
   Doi = {10.1002/ab.21467},
   Key = {fds271950}
}

@article{fds272011,
   Author = {Snyder, EH and Lawrence, CN and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {The impact of system of care support in adherence to
             wraparound principles in Child and Family Teams in child
             welfare in North Carolina},
   Journal = {Children and Youth Services Review},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {639-647},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {0190-7409},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2011.12.010},
   Abstract = {North Carolina is one of a growing number of states to
             implement family meeting models in child welfare as a way to
             engage families, while simultaneously addressing complex
             familial needs and child safety issues. However, much is
             still unknown regarding how family meetings actually operate
             in child welfare, underscoring a clear need for further
             evaluation of this process. Utilizing direct observational
             data of Child and Family Team (CFT) meetings, collected as
             part of two separate evaluations of the North Carolina
             Division of Social Service's Multiple Response System (MRS)
             and System of Care (SOC) initiatives, the purpose of the
             current study was to examine whether the support provided by
             SOC improved fidelity to the CFT model in child welfare. The
             observations were conducted using the Team Observation
             Measure consisting of 78 indicators that measure adherence
             to ten domains associated with high quality family team
             meetings (e.g., collaborative, individualized, natural
             supports, outcomes based, strengths-based). Findings
             indicate that receiving SOC support in child welfare leads
             to a more collaborative and individualized decision-making
             process with families. Meeting facilitators in SOC counties
             were better prepared for CFTs, and had greater ability to
             lead a more robust and creative brainstorming process to
             develop a family-driven case plan. The current study also
             provides a much needed description of the CFT meeting
             process within child welfare using a direct observational
             measure. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.childyouth.2011.12.010},
   Key = {fds272011}
}

@article{fds272033,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The effects of the fast track preventive intervention on the
             development of conduct disorder across childhood.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {331-345},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000286986600021&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The impact of the Fast Track intervention on externalizing
             disorders across childhood was examined. Eight
             hundred-ninety-one early-starting children (69% male; 51%
             African American) were randomly assigned by matched sets of
             schools to intervention or control conditions. The 10-year
             intervention addressed parent behavior-management, child
             social cognitive skills, reading, home visiting, mentoring,
             and classroom curricula. Outcomes included psychiatric
             diagnoses after grades 3, 6, 9, and 12 for conduct disorder,
             oppositional defiant disorder, attention deficit
             hyperactivity disorder, and any externalizing disorder.
             Significant interaction effects between intervention and
             initial risk level indicated that intervention prevented the
             lifetime prevalence of all diagnoses, but only among those
             at highest initial risk, suggesting that targeted
             intervention can prevent externalizing disorders to promote
             the raising of healthy children.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01558.x},
   Key = {fds272033}
}

@article{fds272035,
   Author = {Berlin, LJ and Dunning, RD and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Enhancing the Transition to Kindergarten: A Randomized Trial
             to Test the Efficacy of the "Stars" Summer Kindergarten
             Orientation Program.},
   Journal = {Early Childhood Research Quarterly},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {247-254},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0885-2006},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21969767},
   Abstract = {This randomized trial tested the efficacy of an intensive,
             four-week summer program designed to enhance low-income
             children's transition to kindergarten (n's = 60 program
             children, 40 controls). Administered in four public schools,
             the program focused on social competence, pre-literacy and
             pre-numeracy skills, school routines, and parental
             involvement. Hierarchical linear modeling indicated that the
             program significantly improved teachers' ratings of (a) the
             transition to the social aspect of kindergarten for girls
             (but not boys); and (b) the transition to kindergarten
             routines for the subgroup of children who had the same
             teacher for kindergarten as for the summer program. Findings
             are discussed in terms of practices and policies for
             supporting children's transition to school.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ecresq.2010.07.004},
   Key = {fds272035}
}

@article{fds272025,
   Author = {Lawrence, CN and Rosanbalm, KD and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Multiple response system: Evaluation of policy change in
             North Carolina's child welfare system},
   Journal = {Children and Youth Services Review},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {2355-2365},
   Year = {2011},
   ISSN = {0190-7409},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/7996 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {Systemic challenges within child welfare have prompted many
             states to explore new strategies aimed at protecting
             children while meeting the needs of families, but doing so
             within the confines of shrinking budgets. Differential
             Response has emerged as a promising practice for low or
             moderate risk cases of child maltreatment. This mixed
             methods evaluation explored various aspects of North
             Carolina's differential response system, known as the
             Multiple Response System (MRS), including: child safety,
             timeliness of response and case decision, frontloading of
             services, case distribution, implementation of Child and
             Family Teams, collaboration with community-based service
             providers and Shared Parenting. Utilizing Child Protective
             Services (CPS) administrative data, researchers found that
             compared to matched control counties, MRS: had a positive
             impact on child safety evidenced by a decline in the rates
             of substantiations and re-assessments; temporarily disrupted
             timeliness of response in pilot counties but had no effect
             on time to case decision; and increased the number of
             upfront services provided to families during assessment.
             Qualitative data collected through focus groups with
             providers and phone interviews with families provided
             important information on key MRS strategies, highlighting
             aspects that families and social workers like as well as
             identifying areas for improvement. This information is
             useful for continuous quality improvement efforts,
             particularly related to the development of training and
             technical assistance programs at the state and local level.
             © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.childyouth.2011.08.007},
   Key = {fds272025}
}

@article{fds272036,
   Author = {Rosanbalm, KD and Dodge, KA and Murphy, R and O'Donnell, K and Christopoulos, C and Gibbs, SW and Appleyard, K and Daro,
             D},
   Title = {Evaluation of a Collaborative Community-Based Child
             Maltreatment Prevention Initiative.},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {8-23},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/7999 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272036}
}

@article{fds272037,
   Author = {McGowan, and H, and Nix, and L, R and Murphy, and A, S and Bierman, and L,
             K and Group, TCPPR},
   Title = {Investigating the impact of selection bias in dose-response
             analyses of preventive interventions},
   Journal = {Prevention Science},
   Volume = {11},
   Pages = {239-251},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-010-0169-2},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-010-0169-2},
   Key = {fds272037}
}

@article{fds272057,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Yu, T and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE},
   Title = {A Developmental Process Analysis of Cross-Generational
             Continuity in Educational Attainment.},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {250-284},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0272-930X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000266748400004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {In this prospective longitudinal study (N = 585) we examined
             intergenerational links in level of educational attainment.
             Of particular interest was whether family background
             characteristics, parenting in early childhood and early
             adolescence, and school adjustment and performance in middle
             childhood accounted for (i.e., mediated) continuity and
             amplified or attenuated (i.e., moderated) continuity. Family
             background data, including mother education level, were
             collected when the children were age 5 years; parenting was
             assessed at ages 5 and 12; and school adjustment data
             (behavior problems, peer acceptance, academic performance)
             were collected in the first four years of elementary school.
             Cross-generational continuity in educational attainment was
             moderate (r = .38) and largely indirect via children's
             academic performance in elementary school and mothers'
             academic involvement in early adolescence. Moderator
             analyses indicated greater cross-generational continuity in
             single-parent families; in families low in proactive
             teaching, monitoring, and academic involvement; and in
             families with lower-IQ children who performed poorly in
             school and were disliked by peers, These findings suggest
             that distal and proximal family and child characteristics
             may serve as crucial processes in the intergenerational
             transmission of low educational attainment.},
   Doi = {10.1353/mpq.0.0022},
   Key = {fds272057}
}

@article{fds272088,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {On the meaning of meaning when being mean: commentary on
             Berkowitz's "on the consideration of automatic as well as
             controlled psychological processes in aggression".},
   Journal = {Aggressive Behavior},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {133-135},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18203196},
   Abstract = {Berkowitz (this issue) makes a cogent case for his cognitive
             neo-associationist (CNA) model that some aggressive
             behaviors occur automatically, emotionally, and through
             conditioned association with other stimuli. He also proposes
             that they can occur without "processing," that is, without
             meaning. He contrasts his position with that of social
             information processing (SIP) models, which he casts as
             positing only controlled processing mechanisms for
             aggressive behavior. However, both CNA and SIP models posit
             automatic as well as controlled processes in aggressive
             behavior. Most aggressive behaviors occur through automatic
             processes, which are nonetheless rule governed. SIP models
             differ from the CNA model in asserting the essential role of
             meaning (often through nonconscious, automatic, and
             emotional processes) in mediating the link between a
             stimulus and an angry aggressive behavioral
             response.},
   Doi = {10.1002/ab.20242},
   Key = {fds272088}
}

@article{fds272093,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Fast track randomized controlled trial to prevent
             externalizing psychiatric disorders: findings from grades 3
             to 9.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1250-1262},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0890-8567},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/chi.0b013e31813e5d39},
   Abstract = {This study tests the efficacy of the Fast Track Program in
             preventing antisocial behavior and psychiatric disorders
             among groups varying in initial risk.Schools within four
             sites (Durham, NC; Nashville, TN; Seattle, WA; and rural
             central Pennsylvania) were selected as high-risk
             institutions based on neighborhood crime and poverty levels.
             After screening 9,594 kindergarteners in these schools, 891
             highest risk and moderate-risk children (69% male and 51%
             African American) were randomly assigned by matched sets of
             schools to intervention or control conditions. The 10-year
             intervention (begun in 1991 with three yearly cohorts)
             included parent behavior-management training, child
             social-cognitive skills training, reading tutoring, home
             visiting, mentoring, and a universal classroom curriculum.
             Outcomes included criterion counts and psychiatric diagnoses
             after grades 3, 6, and 9 for conduct disorder, oppositional
             defiant disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder,
             any externalizing disorder, and self-reported antisocial
             behavior. Grade 9 outcomes were assessed between 2000 and
             2003, depending upon cohort.Significant interaction effects
             between intervention and initial risk level were found at
             each age but most strongly after grade 9. Assignment to
             intervention had a significant positive effect in lowering
             criterion count scores and diagnoses for conduct disorder,
             attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and any
             externalizing disorder, and lowering antisocial behavior
             scores, but only among those at highest risk
             initially.Prevention of serious antisocial behavior can be
             efficacious across sex, ethnicity, and urban/rural
             residence, but screening is essential.},
   Doi = {10.1097/chi.0b013e31813e5d39},
   Key = {fds272093}
}

@article{fds272091,
   Author = {Winn, DM and Newall, E and Coie, JD and Bierman, K and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ},
   Title = {Fast Track morphs into OnTrack: The dissemination of a
             conduct prevention program in Manchester,
             England},
   Journal = {Child and Family Policy Review},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {7-10},
   Year = {2007},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/8001 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272091}
}

@article{fds272103,
   Author = {Yechiam, E and Goodnight, J and Bates, JE and Busemeyer, JR and Dodge,
             KA and Pettit, GS and Newman, JP},
   Title = {A formal cognitive model of the go/no-go discrimination
             task: evaluation and implications.},
   Journal = {Psychological Assessment},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {239-249},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {1040-3590},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/1040-3590.18.3.239},
   Abstract = {This article proposes and tests a formal cognitive model for
             the go/no-go discrimination task. In this task, the
             performer chooses whether to respond to stimuli and receives
             rewards for responding to certain stimuli and punishments
             for responding to others. Three cognitive models were
             evaluated on the basis of data from a longitudinal study
             involving 400 adolescents. The results show that a
             cue-dependent model presupposing that participants can
             differentiate between cues was the most accurate and
             parsimonious. This model has 3 parameters denoting the
             relative impact of rewards and punishments on evaluations,
             the rate that contingent payoffs are learned, and the
             consistency between learning and responding. Commission
             errors were associated with increased attention to rewards;
             omission errors were associated with increased attention to
             punishments. Both error types were associated with low
             choice consistency. The parameters were also shown to have
             external validity: Attention to rewards was associated with
             externalizing behavior problems on the Achenbach scale, and
             choice consistency was associated with low Welsh anxiety.
             The present model can thus potentially improve the
             sensitivity of the task to differences between clinical
             populations.},
   Doi = {10.1037/1040-3590.18.3.239},
   Key = {fds272103}
}

@article{fds272108,
   Author = {Bierman, and L, K and Nix, and L, R and Maples, and J, J and Murphy, and A,
             S and Dodge, TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {Examining the use of clinical judgment in the context of an
             adaptive intervention design: The Fast Track prevention
             program},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {468-481},
   Year = {2006},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.74.3.468},
   Abstract = {Although clinical judgment is often used in assessment and
             treatment planning, rarely has research examined its
             reliability, validity, or impact in practice settings. This
             study tailored the frequency of home visits in a prevention
             program for aggressive- disruptive children (n = 410; 56%
             minority) on the basis of 2 kinds of clinical judgment:
             ratings of parental functioning using a standardized
             multi-item scale and global assessments of family need for
             services. Stronger reliability and better concurrent and
             predictive validity emerged for the 1st kind of clinical
             judgment than for the 2nd. Exploratory analyses suggested
             that using ratings of parental functioning to tailor
             treatment recommendations improved the impact of the
             intervention by the end of 3rd grade but using more global
             assessments of family need did not. Copyright 2006 by the
             American Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-006X.74.3.468},
   Key = {fds272108}
}

@article{fds272127,
   Author = {Foster, and M, E and Fang, and Y, G and Group, TCPPR},
   Title = {Estimated Intervention Impact and Alternative Methods for
             Handling Attrition},
   Journal = {Evaluation Review},
   Volume = {28},
   Pages = {434-464},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {fds272127}
}

@article{fds272136,
   Author = {Foster, EM and Dodge, KA and Jones, D},
   Title = {Issues in the Economic Evaluation of Prevention
             Programs},
   Journal = {Applied Developmental Science},
   Volume = {7},
   Pages = {76-86},
   Year = {2003},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S1532480XADS0702_4},
   Doi = {10.1207/S1532480XADS0702_4},
   Key = {fds272136}
}

@article{fds272153,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Evaluation of the first 3 years of the Fast Track prevention
             trial with children at high risk for adolescent conduct
             problems.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {19-35},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1014274914287},
   Abstract = {Fast Track is a conduct-problem prevention trial that
             derives its intervention from longitudinal research on how
             serious and chronic adolescent problem behaviors develop.
             Over 9,000 kindergarten children at 4 sites in 3 cohorts
             were screened, and 891 were identified as high risk and then
             randomly assigned to intervention or control groups.
             Beginning in Grade 1, high-risk children and their parents
             were asked to participate in a combination of social skills
             and anger-control training, academic tutoring, parent
             training, and home visiting. A multiyear universal classroom
             program was delivered to the core schools attended by these
             high-risk children. By the end of third grade, 37% of the
             intervention group was determined to be free of serious
             conduct-problem dysfunction, in contrast with 27% of the
             control group. Teacher ratings of conduct problems and
             official records of use of special education resources gave
             modest effect-size evidence that the intervention was
             preventing conduct problem behavior at school. Parent
             ratings provided additional support for prevention of
             conduct problems at home. Parenting behavior and children's
             social cognitive skills that had previously emerged as
             proximal outcomes at the end of the 1st year of intervention
             continued to show positive effects of the intervention at
             the end of third grade.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1014274914287},
   Key = {fds272153}
}

@article{fds13041,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Putallaz, M. and Malone, D.},
   Title = {Coming of Age: The Department of Education},
   Journal = {Phi Delta Kappan},
   Volume = {83},
   Pages = {674-676},
   Year = {2002},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/8002},
   Key = {fds13041}
}

@article{fds272150,
   Author = {Group, CPPR},
   Title = {Using the Fast Track Randomiized Prevention Trial to Test
             the Early-Starter Model of the Development of Serious
             Conduct Problems},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {927-945},
   Year = {2002},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12549710},
   Abstract = {The Fast Track prevention trial was used to test hypotheses
             from the Early-Starter Model of the development of chronic
             conduct problems. We randomly assigned 891 high-risk
             first-grade boys and girls (51% African American) to receive
             the long-term Fast Track prevention or not. After 4 years,
             outcomes were assessed through teacher ratings, parent
             ratings, peer nominations, and child self-report. Positive
             effects of assignment to intervention were evident in
             teacher and parent ratings of conduct problems, peer social
             preference scores, and association with deviant peers.
             Assessments of proximal goals of intervention (e.g., hostile
             attributional bias, problem-solving skill, harsh parental
             discipline, aggressive and prosocial behavior at home and
             school) collected after grade 3 were found to partially
             mediate these effects. The findings are interpreted as
             consistent with developmental theory.},
   Key = {fds272150}
}

@article{fds272151,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, E},
   Title = {The implementation of the Fast Track program: An example of
             a large-scale prevention science efficacy
             trial},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-17},
   Year = {2002},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2756657/},
   Abstract = {In 1990, the Fast Track Project was initiated to evaluate
             the feasibility and effectiveness of a comprehensive,
             multicomponent prevention program targeting children at risk
             for conduct disorders in four demographically diverse
             American communities (Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group [CPPRG], 1992). Representing a prevention science
             approach toward community-based preventive intervention, the
             Fast Track intervention design was based upon the available
             data base elucidating the epidemiology of risk for conduct
             disorder and suggesting key causal developmental influences
             (R. P. Weissberg & M. T. Greenberg, 1998). Critical
             questions about this approach to prevention center around
             the extent to which such a science-based program can be
             effective at (1) engaging community members and
             stakeholders, (2) maintaining intervention fidelity while
             responding appropriately to the local norms and needs of
             communities that vary widely in their demographic and
             cultural/ethnic composition, and (3) maintaining community
             engagement in the long-term to support effective and
             sustainable intervention dissemination. This paper discusses
             these issues, providing examples from the Fast Track project
             to illustrate the process of program implementation and the
             evidence available regarding the success of this
             science-based program at engaging communities in sustainable
             and effective ways as partners in prevention
             programming.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1014292830216},
   Key = {fds272151}
}

@article{fds272152,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Predictor variables associated with positive Fast Track
             outcomes at the end of third grade},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {37-52},
   Year = {2002},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1014227031125},
   Abstract = {Progress has been made in understanding the outcome effects
             of preventive interventions and treatments designed to
             reduce children's conduct problems. However, limited
             research has explored the factors that may affect the degree
             to which an intervention is likely to benefit particular
             individuals. This study examines selected child, family, and
             community baseline characteristics that may predict proximal
             outcomes from the Fast Track intervention. The primary goal
             of this study was to examine predictors of outcomes after 3
             years of intervention participation, at the end of 3rd
             grade. Three types of proximal outcomes were examined:
             parent-rated aggression, teacher-rated oppositional-aggressive
             behavior, and special education involvement. The relation
             between 11 risk factors and these 3 outcomes was examined,
             with separate regression analyses for the intervention and
             control groups. Moderate evidence of prediction of outcome
             effects was found, although none of the baseline variables
             were found to predict all 3 outcomes, and different patterns
             of prediction emerged for home versus school
             outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1014227031125},
   Key = {fds272152}
}

@article{fds272164,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Merging universal and indicated prevention programs: the
             Fast Track model. Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {Addictive Behaviors},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {913-927},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0306-4603(00)00120-9},
   Abstract = {Fast Track is a multisite, multicomponent preventive
             intervention for young children at high risk for long-term
             antisocial behavior. Based on a comprehensive developmental
             model, this intervention includes a universal-level
             classroom program plus social-skill training, academic
             tutoring, parent training, and home visiting to improve
             competencies and reduce problems in a high-risk group of
             children selected in kindergarten. The theoretical
             principles and clinical strategies utilized in the Fast
             Track Project are described to illustrate the interplay
             between basic developmental research, the understanding of
             risk and protective factors, and a research-based model of
             preventive intervention that integrates universal and
             indicated models of prevention.},
   Doi = {10.1016/s0306-4603(00)00120-9},
   Key = {fds272164}
}

@article{fds272178,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Grp, CPPR},
   Title = {Initial impact of the Fast Track prevention trial for
             conduct problems: II. Classroom effects. Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {648-657},
   Publisher = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000083117200003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {This study examined the effectiveness of the universal
             component of the Fast Track prevention model: the PATHS
             (Promoting Alternative THinking Strategies) curriculum and
             teacher consultation. This randomized clinical trial
             involved 198 intervention and 180 comparison classrooms from
             neighborhoods with greater than average crime in 4 U.S.
             locations. In the intervention schools, Grade 1 teachers
             delivered a 57-lesson social competence intervention focused
             on self-control, emotional awareness, peer relations, and
             problem solving. Findings indicated significant effects on
             peer ratings of aggression and hyperactive-disruptive
             behavior and observer ratings of classroom atmosphere.
             Quality of implementation predicted variation in assessments
             of classroom functioning. The results are discussed in terms
             of both the efficacy of universal, school-based prevention
             models and the need to examine comprehensive, multiyear
             programs.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-006X.67.5.648},
   Key = {fds272178}
}

@article{fds272179,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Grp, CPPR},
   Title = {Initial impact of the Fast Track prevention trial for
             conduct problems: I. The high-risk sample. Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {631-647},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000083117200002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Fast Track is a multisite, multicomponent preventive
             intervention for young children at high risk for long-term
             antisocial behavior. Based on a comprehensive developmental
             model, intervention included a universal-level classroom
             program plus social skills training, academic tutoring,
             parent training, and home visiting to improve competencies
             and reduce problems in a high-risk group of children
             selected in kindergarten. At the end of Grade 1, there were
             moderate positive effects on children's social, emotional,
             and academic skills; peer interactions and social status;
             and conduct problems and special-education use. Parents
             reported less physical discipline and greater parenting
             satisfaction/ease of parenting and engaged in more
             appropriate/consistent discipline, warmth/positive
             involvement, and involvement with the school. Evidence of
             differential intervention effects across child gender, race,
             site, and cohort was minimal.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-006X.67.5.631},
   Key = {fds272179}
}

@article{fds272175,
   Author = {Ellis, BJ and McFadyen-Ketchum, S and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Quality of early family relationships and individual
             differences in the timing of pubertal maturation in girls: a
             longitudinal test of an evolutionary model.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {77},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {387-401},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-3514.77.2.387},
   Abstract = {In an 8-year prospective study of 173 girls and their
             families, the authors tested predictions from J. Belsky, L.
             Steinberg, and P. Draper's (1991) evolutionary model of
             individual differences in pubertal timing. This model
             suggests that more negative-coercive (or less
             positive-harmonious) family relationships in early childhood
             provoke earlier reproductive development in adolescence.
             Consistent with the model, fathers' presence in the home,
             more time spent by fathers in child care, greater
             supportiveness in the parental dyad, more father-daughter
             affection, and more mother-daughter affection, as assessed
             prior to kindergarten, each predicted later pubertal timing
             by daughters in 7th grade. The positive dimension of family
             relationships, rather than the negative dimension, accounted
             for these relations. In total, the quality of fathers'
             investment in the family emerged as the most important
             feature of the proximal family environment relative to
             daughters' pubertal timing.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.77.2.387},
   Key = {fds272175}
}

@article{fds272166,
   Author = {Zelli, A and Dodge, KA and Lochman, JE and Laird,
             RD},
   Title = {The distinction between beliefs legitimizing aggression and
             deviant processing of social cues: testing measurement
             validity and the hypothesis that biased processing mediates
             the effects of beliefs on aggression. Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {77},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {150-166},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10434411},
   Abstract = {In 2 studies the authors examined knowledge and social
             information-processing mechanisms as 2 distinct sources of
             influence on child aggression. Data were collected from 387
             boys and girls of diverse ethnicity in 3 successive years.
             In Study 1, confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated the
             discriminant validity of the knowledge construct of
             aggression beliefs and the processing constructs of hostile
             intent attributions, accessing of aggressive responses, and
             positive evaluation of aggressive outcomes. In Study 2,
             structural equation modeling analyses were used to test the
             mediation hypothesis that aggression beliefs would influence
             child aggression through the effects of deviant processing.
             A stronger belief that aggressive retaliation is acceptable
             predicted more deviant processing 1 year later and more
             aggression 2 years later. However, this latter effect was
             substantially accounted for by the intervening effects of
             deviant processing on aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.77.1.150},
   Key = {fds272166}
}

@article{fds272176,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Cost-Effectiveness of Psychotherapy for Child Agression:
             First is There Effectiveness?},
   Journal = {Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice},
   Volume = {3},
   Pages = {1-4},
   Year = {1999},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/1089-2699.3.4.275},
   Doi = {10.1037/1089-2699.3.4.275},
   Key = {fds272176}
}

@article{fds272177,
   Author = {Crick, NR and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {'Superiority' is in the eye of the beholder: A comment on
             Sutton, Smith, and Swettenham},
   Journal = {Social Development},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {128-131},
   Year = {1999},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9507.00084},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-9507.00084},
   Key = {fds272177}
}

@article{fds38895,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and McClaskey, C.L. and Feldman,
             E.},
   Title = {A situational approach to the assessment of social
             competence in children (Reprint)},
   Series = {Child Psychology Portfolio, I. Sclare (Series
             Ed.)},
   Booktitle = {Children's social relationships},
   Publisher = {London: NFRE-Nelson},
   Editor = {K. Sylva},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds38895}
}

@article{fds38990,
   Author = {Bierman, K. and the Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group (K.A. Dodge and member)},
   Title = {Social skills training in the FAST Track
             Program},
   Pages = {65-89},
   Booktitle = {Preventing childhood disorders, substance use, and
             delinquency},
   Publisher = {Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage},
   Editor = {R. Dev. Peters and R.J. McMahon},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds38990}
}

@article{fds38992,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {An initial evaluation of the FAST Track Program},
   Pages = {54-56},
   Booktitle = {Proceedings of the Fifth National Prevention Research
             Conference},
   Publisher = {Washington, DC: National Institute of Mental
             Health},
   Editor = {J.A. Linney},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds38992}
}

@article{fds39000,
   Author = {McMahon, R.J. and Slough, N. and the Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group (K.A. Dodge and member)},
   Title = {Family-based intervention in the FAST Track
             Program},
   Pages = {90-110},
   Booktitle = {Preventing childhood disorders, substance use, and
             delinquency},
   Publisher = {Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage},
   Editor = {R. Dev. Peters and R.J. McMahon},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds39000}
}

@article{fds272238,
   Author = {McMahon, and J, R and Greenberg, and T, M and Dodge, TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {The FAST Track Program: A developmentally focused
             intervention for children with conduct problems},
   Journal = {Clinician's Research Digest},
   Volume = {13},
   Pages = {1-2},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds272238}
}

@article{fds38971,
   Author = {Consortium on the School-Based Promotion of Social
             Competence},
   Title = {The school-based promotion of social competence: Theory,
             research, practice, and policy},
   Pages = {268-389},
   Booktitle = {Stress, risk and resilience in children and
             adolescents},
   Publisher = {New York: Cambridge},
   Editor = {R.J. Haggarty and N. Garmezy and M. Rutter and L.
             Sherrod},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds38971}
}

@article{fds272268,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {The future of research on the treatment of conduct
             disorder},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {5},
   Pages = {309-317},
   Year = {1993},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579400004405},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400004405},
   Key = {fds272268}
}

@article{fds272258,
   Author = {BIERMAN, KL and COIE, JD and DODGE, KA and GREENBERG, MT and LOCHMAN,
             JE and MCMAHON, RJ},
   Title = {A developmental and clinical model for the prevention of
             conduct disorder: The FAST Track Program},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {04},
   Pages = {509-509},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1992KG60800003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400004855},
   Key = {fds272258}
}

@article{fds272272,
   Author = {Dodge, CFTS-BPOSCK and member},
   Title = {Preparing students for the Twenty-First Century:
             Contributions of the Prevention and Social Competence
             Promotion Fields},
   Journal = {Teachers College Record},
   Volume = {93},
   Pages = {297-305},
   Year = {1991},
   Key = {fds272272}
}

@article{fds272250,
   Author = {Dodge, CFTS-BPOSCK and member},
   Title = {Support for school-based social competence
             promotion},
   Journal = {American Psychologist},
   Volume = {45},
   Pages = {986-988},
   Year = {1990},
   Key = {fds272250}
}

@article{fds272255,
   Author = {Barefoot, JC and Dodge, KA and Peterson, BL and Dahlstrom, WG and Williams, RB},
   Title = {The Cook-Medley hostility scale: item content and ability to
             predict survival.},
   Journal = {Psychosomatic Medicine},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {46-57},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0033-3174},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2928460},
   Abstract = {Previous studies have identified the MMPI-based Cook and
             Medley hostility scale (Ho) as a predictor of health
             outcomes. To achieve a better understanding of the construct
             measured by this scale, Ho items were classified on an a
             priori basis. Six subsets were identified: Cynicism, Hostile
             Attributions, Hostile Affect, Aggressive Responding, Social
             Avoidance, and Other. Study 1 examined the correlations of
             these subsets with scales of the NEO Personality Inventory
             in two samples of undergraduates. Good convergent and
             discriminant validity were demonstrated, but there was some
             evidence that items in the Social Avoidance and Other
             categories reflect constructs other than hostility. Study 2
             examined the ability of the Ho scale and the item subsets to
             predict the 1985 survival of 118 lawyers who had completed
             the MMPI in 1956 and 1957. As in previous studies, those
             with high scores had poorer survival (chi 2 = 6.37, p =
             0.012). Unlike previous studies, the relation between Ho
             scores and survival was linear. Cynicism, Hostile Affect,
             and Aggressive Responding subsets were related to survival,
             whereas the other subsets were not. The sum of the three
             predictive subsets, with a chi 2 of 9.45 (p = 0.002), was a
             better predictor than the full Ho scale, suggesting that it
             may be possible to refine the scale and achieve an even more
             effective measure of those aspects of hostility that are
             deleterious to health.},
   Doi = {10.1097/00006842-198901000-00005},
   Key = {fds272255}
}

@article{fds272192,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and McClaskey, CL and Brown, MM and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {The generalizability of laboratory assessments of children's
             socially competent behavior in specific situations},
   Journal = {Behavioral Assessment},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {81-96},
   Year = {1987},
   Key = {fds272192}
}

@article{fds272002,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Murphy, RR and Buchsbaum, K},
   Title = {The assessment of intention-cue detection skills in
             children: implications for developmental
             psychopathology.},
   Journal = {Child development},
   Volume = {55},
   Series = {Special issue on developmental psychopathology},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {163-173},
   Year = {1984},
   Abstract = {A reliable measure of children's skills in discriminating
             intention cues in others was developed for this
             investigation in order to test the hypothesis that
             intention-cue detection skill is related to social
             competence in children. Videotapes were prepared in which
             one child provoked another child. The intention of the first
             child varied across videotapes. The subject's task was to
             discriminate among types of intentions. Care was taken to
             ensure that scores on this measure were not confounded by a
             child's verbal capacity or general discrimination skill.
             This instrument was administered to 176 children in
             kindergarten, second grade, and fourth grade, who were
             identified by sociometric measures as having a peer status
             as popular, average, socially rejected, or socially
             neglected. Scores on this measure were found to increase as
             a function of increasing age, and normal children (popular
             and average) were found to score more highly than deviant
             children (neglected and rejected). The errors by deviant
             children tended to consist of erroneous labels of prosocial
             intentions as hostile. Also, children's statements about
             their probable behavioral responses to provocations by peers
             were found to vary as a function of subjects' perceptions of
             the intention of the peer causing the provocation, not as a
             function of the actual intention portrayed by the peer.
             Sociometric status differences in these responses were also
             found. These findings were consistent with a hypothesis of a
             developmental lag among socially deviant children in the
             acquisition of intention-cue detection skills.},
   Key = {fds272002}
}

@article{fds272210,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Promoting social competence in children},
   Journal = {Schools and Teaching},
   Volume = {1},
   Year = {1983},
   Key = {fds272210}
}

@article{fds272211,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Must we dilute child psychology?},
   Journal = {Contemporary Psychology},
   Volume = {28},
   Pages = {513-515},
   Year = {1983},
   Key = {fds272211}
}

@article{fds272197,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Coie, JD and Brakke, NP},
   Title = {Behavior patterns of socially rejected and neglected
             preadolescents: the roles of social approach and
             aggression.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {389-409},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7175045},
   Abstract = {Sociometric nominations were used to select groups of
             popular, average, rejected, and neglected third- and
             fifth-grade children. In two studies, the peer interactive
             behaviors of these children were naturalistically observed
             in their classrooms and on the playground. In contrast to
             popular children, rejected children displayed fewer
             task-appropriate behaviors and more task-inappropriate and
             aggressive behaviors. Whereas rejected children prosocially
             approached peers as frequently as did popular children, peer
             responses to the approaches of rejected children were more
             likely to be negative. Neglected children, on the other
             hand, displayed relatively few task-inappropriate and
             aggressive behaviors, and socially approached peers
             infrequently. Their approaches also met with frequent rebuff
             by peers. The findings were discussed in terms of the
             behavioral bases of sociometric status. Suggestions were
             made for clinical researchers interested in behavioral
             change with rejected and neglected children.},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF00912329},
   Key = {fds272197}
}


%% Book Reviews   
@article{fds53592,
   Author = {K.A. Dodge},
   Title = {Review of book: Dynamic assessment in practice: Clinical and
             educational applications},
   Journal = {Journal of Cognitive Education and Psychology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {313-315},
   Year = {2007},
   Key = {fds53592}
}

@article{fds38886,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Review of social cognition and social development (E.T.
             Higgins, D.N. Ruble, & W.W. Hartup (Eds.)},
   Journal = {Child Development Abstracts and Bibliography},
   Year = {1984},
   Key = {fds38886}
}


%% Other   
@misc{fds45529,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Kupersmidt, J. and Fontaine,
             R.},
   Title = {The Willie M. Program},
   Journal = {Report to the State of North Carolina Department of Mental
             Health Administration},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds45529}
}