Kenneth A. Dodge

Publications of Kenneth A. Dodge    :chronological  alphabetical  combined  by tags listing:

%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds200022,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Processes in the prevention of crime and
             delinquency},
   Booktitle = {Controlling crime: Strategies and tradeoffs
             (pp.407-418)},
   Publisher = {Chicago: University of Chicago Press},
   Editor = {P. J. Cook and J. Ludwig and J. McCrary},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds200022}
}

@misc{fds186603,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The Fast Track Project: The prevention of severe conduct
             problems in school-age youth},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of clinical assessment and treatment of conduct
             problems in youth},
   Publisher = {Springer},
   Address = {New York},
   Editor = {R.C. Murrihy and A.D. Kidman and T.H. Ollendick},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds186603}
}

@misc{fds152593,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Social information processing models of aggressive
             behavior},
   Booktitle = {Understanding and reducing aggression, violence, and their
             consequences},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association},
   Address = {Washington, DC},
   Editor = {M. Mikulincer and P.R. Shaver},
   Key = {fds152593}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds271931,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Yu, T and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Pathways of Peer Relationships from Childhood to Young
             Adulthood.},
   Journal = {Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {111-117},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0193-3973},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2013.12.002},
   Abstract = {This study examined trajectories of peer social preference
             during childhood and personality assessed in early
             adolescence in relation to trajectories of friendship
             quality during early adulthood. Participants (N = 585) were
             followed from age 5 to age 23. At ages 5 to 8, peers
             provided sociometric nominations; at age 12 participants
             reported their own personality characteristics; from age 19
             to 23 participants rated their friendship quality. Latent
             growth modeling revealed that trajectories characterized by
             high levels of childhood peer social preference were related
             to trajectories characterized by high levels of early
             adulthood friendship quality. Early adolescent personality
             characterized by extraversion and conscientiousness
             predicted higher friendship quality at age 19, and
             conscientiousness predicted change in friendship quality
             from age 19 to 23. This study demonstrates that peer
             relationships show continuity from childhood to early
             adulthood and that qualities of core personality are linked
             to the development of adult friendships.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.appdev.2013.12.002},
   Key = {fds271931}
}

@article{fds271922,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Sharma, C and Malone, PS and Woodlief, D and Dodge, KA and Oburu, P and Pastorelli, C and Skinner, AT and Sorbring, E and Tapanya,
             S and Tirado, LMU and Zelli, A and Al-Hassan, SM and Alampay, LP and Bacchini, D and Bombi, AS and Bornstein, MH and Chang, L and Deater-Deckard, K and Di Giunta and L},
   Title = {Corporal Punishment, Maternal Warmth, and Child Adjustment:
             A Longitudinal Study in Eight Countries},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the
             Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and
             Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association,
             Division 53},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {670-685},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1537-4416},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2014.893518},
   Abstract = {Two key tasks facing parents across cultures are managing
             children's behaviors (and misbehaviors) and conveying love
             and affection. Previous research has found that corporal
             punishment generally is related to worse child adjustment,
             whereas parental warmth is related to better child
             adjustment. This study examined whether the association
             between corporal punishment and child adjustment problems
             (anxiety and aggression) is moderated by maternal warmth in
             a diverse set of countries that vary in a number of
             sociodemographic and psychological ways. Interviews were
             conducted with 7- to 10-year-old children (N = 1,196; 51%
             girls) and their mothers in 8 countries: China, Colombia,
             Italy, Jordan, Kenya, the Philippines, Thailand, and the
             United States. Follow-up interviews were conducted 1 and 2
             years later. Corporal punishment was related to increases,
             and maternal warmth was related to decreases, in children's
             anxiety and aggression over time; however, these
             associations varied somewhat across groups. Maternal warmth
             moderated the effect of corporal punishment in some
             countries, with increases in anxiety over time for children
             whose mothers were high in both warmth and corporal
             punishment. The findings illustrate the overall association
             between corporal punishment and child anxiety and aggression
             as well as patterns specific to particular countries.
             Results suggest that clinicians across countries should
             advise parents against using corporal punishment, even in
             the context of parent-child relationships that are otherwise
             warm, and should assist parents in finding other ways to
             manage children's behaviors. © 2014 Copyright Taylor &
             Francis Group, LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374416.2014.893518},
   Key = {fds271922}
}

@article{fds224096,
   Author = {Dymnicki, A.B. and the Multisite Violence Prevention
             Project},
   Title = {Moderating Effects of School Climate on Outcomes for the
             Multisite Violence Prevention Project Universal
             Program},
   Journal = {Journal of Research in Adolescence},
   Volume = {24},
   Pages = {383-398},
   Year = {2014},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jora.12073},
   Doi = {10.1111/jora.12073},
   Key = {fds224096}
}

@article{fds224095,
   Author = {Racz, S.J. and King, K.M. and Wu, J. and Witkiewitz, K. and McMahon, R.J. and Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {The predictive utility of a brief kindergarten screening
             measure of child behavior problems},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {81},
   Pages = {588-599},
   Year = {2013},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0032366},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0032366},
   Key = {fds224095}
}

@article{fds272024,
   Author = {Kupersmidt, JB and Stelter, R and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Development and validation of the social information
             processing application: a Web-based measure of social
             information processing patterns in elementary school-age
             boys.},
   Journal = {Psychological Assessment},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {834-847},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21534693},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric
             properties of an audio computer-assisted self-interviewing
             Web-based software application called the Social Information
             Processing Application (SIP-AP) that was designed to assess
             social information processing skills in boys in 3rd through
             5th grades. This study included a racially and ethnically
             diverse sample of 244 boys ages 8 through 12 (M = 9.4) from
             public elementary schools in 3 states. The SIP-AP includes 8
             videotaped vignettes, filmed from the first-person
             perspective, that depict common misunderstandings among
             boys. Each vignette shows a negative outcome for the victim
             and ambiguous intent on the part of the perpetrator. Boys
             responded to 16 Web-based questions representing the 5
             social information processing mechanisms, after viewing each
             vignette. Parents and teachers completed measures assessing
             boys' antisocial behavior. Confirmatory factor analyses
             revealed that a model positing the original 5 cognitive
             mechanisms fit the data well when the items representing
             prosocial cognitions were included on their own factor,
             creating a 6th factor. The internal consistencies for each
             of the 16 individual cognitions as well as for the 6
             cognitive mechanism scales were excellent. Boys with
             elevated scores on 5 of the 6 cognitive mechanisms exhibited
             more antisocial behavior than boys whose scores were not
             elevated. These findings highlight the need for further
             research on the measurement of prosocial cognitions or
             cognitive strengths in boys in addition to assessing
             cognitive deficits. Findings suggest that the SIP-AP is a
             reliable and valid tool for use in future research of social
             information processing skills in boys.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0023621},
   Key = {fds272024}
}

@article{fds272030,
   Author = {Appleyard, K and Berlin, LJ and Rosanbalm, KD and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Preventing early child maltreatment: implications from a
             longitudinal study of maternal abuse history, substance use
             problems, and offspring victimization.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science : the Official Journal of the Society for
             Prevention Research},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {139-149},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21240556},
   Abstract = {In the interest of improving child maltreatment prevention
             science, this longitudinal, community based study of 499
             mothers and their infants tested the hypothesis that
             mothers' childhood history of maltreatment would predict
             maternal substance use problems, which in turn would predict
             offspring victimization. Mothers (35% White/non-Latina, 34%
             Black/non-Latina, 23% Latina, 7% other) were recruited and
             interviewed during pregnancy, and child protective services
             records were reviewed for the presence of the participants'
             target infants between birth and age 26 months. Mediating
             pathways were examined through structural equation modeling
             and tested using the products of the coefficients approach.
             The mediated pathway from maternal history of sexual abuse
             to substance use problems to offspring victimization was
             significant (standardized mediated path [ab] = .07, 95%
             CI [.02, .14]; effect size = .26), as was the mediated
             pathway from maternal history of physical abuse to substance
             use problems to offspring victimization (standardized
             mediated path [ab] = .05, 95% CI [.01, .11]; effect
             size = .19). There was no significant mediated pathway
             from maternal history of neglect. Findings are discussed in
             terms of specific implications for child maltreatment
             prevention, including the importance of assessment and early
             intervention for maternal history of maltreatment and
             substance use problems, targeting women with maltreatment
             histories for substance use services, and integrating child
             welfare and parenting programs with substance use
             treatment.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-010-0193-2},
   Key = {fds272030}
}

@article{fds272029,
   Author = {Kam, C-M and Greenberg, MT and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Foster, ME and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Maternal depressive symptoms and child social preference
             during the early school years: mediation by maternal warmth
             and child emotion regulation.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {365-377},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21080053},
   Abstract = {This longitudinal study examined processes that mediate the
             association between maternal depressive symptoms and peer
             social preference during the early school years. Three
             hundred and fifty six kindergarten children (182 boys) and
             their mothers participated in the study. During
             kindergarten, mothers reported their level of depressive
             symptomatology. In first grade, teachers rated children's
             emotion regulation at school and observers rated the
             affective quality of mother-child interactions. During
             second grade, children's social preference was assessed by
             peer nomination. Results indicated that mothers' level of
             depressive symptomatology negatively predicted their child's
             social preference 2 years later, controlling for the family
             SES and teacher-rated social preference during kindergarten.
             Among European American families, the association between
             maternal depressive symptoms and social preference was
             partially mediated by maternal warmth and the child's
             emotion regulation. Although the relation between maternal
             depressive symptoms and children peer preference was
             stronger among African American families than Europrean
             American families, its mediation by the maternal warmth and
             child's emotion regulation was not found in African American
             families.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-010-9468-0},
   Key = {fds272029}
}

@article{fds272031,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Laird, RD and Shaw, DS and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Reciprocal relations between parents' physical discipline
             and children's externalizing behavior during middle
             childhood and adolescence.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {225-238},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21262050},
   Abstract = {Using data from two long-term longitudinal projects, we
             investigated reciprocal relations between maternal reports
             of physical discipline and teacher and self-ratings of child
             externalizing behavior, accounting for continuity in both
             discipline and externalizing over time. In Study 1, which
             followed a community sample of 562 boys and girls from age 6
             to 9, high levels of physical discipline in a given year
             predicted high levels of externalizing behavior in the next
             year, and externalizing behavior in a given year predicted
             high levels of physical discipline in the next year. In
             Study 2, which followed an independent sample of 290 lower
             income, higher risk boys from age 10 to 15, mother-reported
             physical discipline in a given year predicted child ratings
             of antisocial behavior in the next year, but child
             antisocial behavior in a given year did not predict parents'
             use of physical discipline in the next year. In neither
             sample was there evidence that associations between physical
             discipline and child externalizing changed as the child
             aged, and findings were not moderated by gender, race,
             socioeconomic status, or the severity of the physical
             discipline. Implications for the reciprocal nature of the
             socialization process and the risks associated with physical
             discipline are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579410000751},
   Key = {fds272031}
}

@article{fds272033,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The effects of the fast track preventive intervention on the
             development of conduct disorder across childhood.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {331-345},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000286986600021&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The impact of the Fast Track intervention on externalizing
             disorders across childhood was examined. Eight
             hundred-ninety-one early-starting children (69% male; 51%
             African American) were randomly assigned by matched sets of
             schools to intervention or control conditions. The 10-year
             intervention addressed parent behavior-management, child
             social cognitive skills, reading, home visiting, mentoring,
             and classroom curricula. Outcomes included psychiatric
             diagnoses after grades 3, 6, 9, and 12 for conduct disorder,
             oppositional defiant disorder, attention deficit
             hyperactivity disorder, and any externalizing disorder.
             Significant interaction effects between intervention and
             initial risk level indicated that intervention prevented the
             lifetime prevalence of all diagnoses, but only among those
             at highest initial risk, suggesting that targeted
             intervention can prevent externalizing disorders to promote
             the raising of healthy children.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01558.x},
   Key = {fds272033}
}

@article{fds272035,
   Author = {Berlin, LJ and Dunning, RD and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Enhancing the Transition to Kindergarten: A Randomized Trial
             to Test the Efficacy of the "Stars" Summer Kindergarten
             Orientation Program.},
   Journal = {Early Childhood Research Quarterly},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {247-254},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0885-2006},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21969767},
   Abstract = {This randomized trial tested the efficacy of an intensive,
             four-week summer program designed to enhance low-income
             children's transition to kindergarten (n's = 60 program
             children, 40 controls). Administered in four public schools,
             the program focused on social competence, pre-literacy and
             pre-numeracy skills, school routines, and parental
             involvement. Hierarchical linear modeling indicated that the
             program significantly improved teachers' ratings of (a) the
             transition to the social aspect of kindergarten for girls
             (but not boys); and (b) the transition to kindergarten
             routines for the subgroup of children who had the same
             teacher for kindergarten as for the summer program. Findings
             are discussed in terms of practices and policies for
             supporting children's transition to school.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ecresq.2010.07.004},
   Key = {fds272035}
}

@article{fds272064,
   Author = {Berlin, LJ and Appleyard, K and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Intergenerational continuity in child maltreatment:
             mediating mechanisms and implications for
             prevention.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {162-176},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21291435},
   Abstract = {In the interest of improving child maltreatment prevention,
             this prospective, longitudinal, community-based study of 499
             mothers and their infants examined (a) direct associations
             between mothers' experiences of childhood maltreatment and
             their offspring's maltreatment, and (b) mothers' mental
             health problems, social isolation, and social information
             processing patterns (hostile attributions and aggressive
             response biases) as mediators of these associations.
             Mothers' childhood physical abuse--but not neglect--directly
             predicted offspring victimization. This association was
             mediated by mothers' social isolation and aggressive
             response biases. Findings are discussed in terms of specific
             implications for child maltreatment prevention.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01547.x},
   Key = {fds272064}
}

@article{fds272034,
   Author = {Thomas, DE and Bierman, KL and Powers, CJ and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ},
   Title = {The influence of classroom aggression and classroom climate
             on the early development of aggressive-disruptive behavior
             problems in school},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {751-757},
   Year = {2011},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/7997 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272034}
}

@article{fds272042,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Resear,
             CPP},
   Title = {Fast Track intervention effects on youth arrests and
             delinquency},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Criminology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {131-157},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1573-3750},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000295470600002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11292-010-9091-7},
   Key = {fds272042}
}

@article{fds272052,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and McCourt, SN},
   Title = {Translating models of antisocial behavioral development into
             efficacious intervention policy to prevent adolescent
             violence.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychobiology},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {277-285},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20175096},
   Abstract = {Adolescent chronic antisocial behavior is costly but
             concentrated in a relatively small number of individuals.
             The search for effective preventive interventions draws from
             empirical findings of three kinds of gene-by-environment
             interactions: (1) parenting behaviors mute the impact of
             genes; (2) genes alter the impact of traumatic environmental
             experiences such as physical abuse and peer social
             rejection; and (3) individuals and environments influence
             each other in a dynamic developmental cascade. Thus,
             environmental interventions that focus on high-risk youth
             may prove effective. The Fast Track intervention and
             randomized controlled trial are described. The intervention
             is a 10-year series of efforts to produce proximal change in
             parenting, peer relations, social cognition, and academic
             performance in order to lead to distal prevention of
             adolescent conduct disorder. Findings indicate that conduct
             disorder cases can be prevented, but only in the highest
             risk group of children. Implications for policy are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1002/dev.20440},
   Key = {fds272052}
}

@article{fds272054,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Domain specificity in relationship history,
             social-information processing, and violent behavior in early
             adulthood.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {98},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {190-200},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0017991},
   Abstract = {Using prospective longitudinal data, we tested 5 hypotheses:
             (a) that the relation between earlier developmental
             experiences (peer social rejection and victimization in a
             romantic relationship) and adult violent behavior toward
             peers and romantic partners is specific to relationship
             domain; (b) that the relation between social-information
             processing (SIP) biases and subsequent violence is also
             specific to relational domain (romantic partner vs. peer);
             (c) that the relation between developmental experiences and
             SIP biases is domain specific; (d) that domain-specific SIP
             mediates the impact of earlier developmental experiences on
             later violent behavior; and (e) that harsh parenting early
             in life is a domain-general predictor of SIP and later
             violent behavior. Harsh parenting was assessed through
             interviews with parents when their children were age 5
             years. Classroom sociometric assessments indexing peer
             rejection were completed in elementary school, and
             self-report of victimization by romantic partners was
             provided at age 18 years. SIP was assessed via interview at
             age 22 years, and violent behavior was measured via self-
             and partner report at ages 23 years and 24 years. Structural
             equation analyses revealed specificity in the relation
             between developmental experiences and violence and in the
             prediction to and from SIP in the peer domain, but not in
             the romantic-relationship domain. The impact of early harsh
             treatment on violence toward peers was mediated by SIP
             biases in the peer domain. These findings provide support
             for domain specificity in the peer domain but for
             cross-domain generality in the romantic relationship domain
             in the development of violent behavior in early
             adulthood.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0017991},
   Key = {fds272054}
}

@article{fds272036,
   Author = {Rosanbalm, KD and Dodge, KA and Murphy, R and O'Donnell, K and Christopoulos, C and Gibbs, SW and Appleyard, K and Daro,
             D},
   Title = {Evaluation of a Collaborative Community-Based Child
             Maltreatment Prevention Initiative.},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {8-23},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/7999 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272036}
}

@article{fds272040,
   Author = {Thomas, DE and Bierman, KL and Thompson, C and Powers, CJ and Coie,
             JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon,
             RJ},
   Title = {Double jeopardy: Child and school characteristics that
             undermine school readiness and predict disruptive behavior
             at school entry},
   Journal = {School Psychology Review},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/7998 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272040}
}

@article{fds272067,
   Author = {Multisite Violence Prevention Project},
   Title = {The ecological effects of universal and selective violence
             prevention programs for middle school students: a randomized
             trial.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {77},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {526-542},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0014395},
   Abstract = {This study reports the findings of a multisite randomized
             trial evaluating the separate and combined effects of 2
             school-based approaches to reduce violence among early
             adolescents. A total of 37 schools at 4 sites were
             randomized to 4 conditions: (1) a universal intervention
             that involved implementing a student curriculum and teacher
             training with 6th-grade students and teachers, (2) a
             selective intervention in which a family intervention was
             implemented with a subset of 6th-grade students exhibiting
             high levels of aggression and social influence, (3) a
             combined intervention condition, and (4) a no-intervention
             control condition. Analyses of multiple waves of data from 2
             cohorts of students at each school (N = 5,581) within the
             grade targeted by the interventions revealed a complex
             pattern. There was some evidence to suggest that the
             universal intervention was associated with increases in
             aggression and reductions in victimization; however, these
             effects were moderated by preintervention risk. In contrast,
             the selective intervention was associated with decreases in
             aggression but no changes in victimization. These findings
             have important implications for efforts to develop effective
             violence prevention programs.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0014395},
   Key = {fds272067}
}

@article{fds272049,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, and S, and Gorman-Smith, and D, and Sullivan, and T, and Orpinas, and P, and Dodge, TM-SVPPKA and member},
   Title = {Parent and peer predictors of physical dating violence
             perpetration in early adolescence: Tests of moderation and
             gender differences},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent
             Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {535-550},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374410902976270},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374410902976270},
   Key = {fds272049}
}

@article{fds272072,
   Author = {Multisite Violence Prevention Project},
   Title = {The multisite violence prevention project: impact of a
             universal school-based violence prevention program on
             social-cognitive outcomes.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science : the Official Journal of the Society for
             Prevention Research},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {231-244},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1389-4986},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-008-0101-1},
   Abstract = {This study evaluated the impact of a universal school-based
             violence prevention program on social-cognitive factors
             associated with aggression and nonviolent behavior in early
             adolescence. The effects of the universal intervention were
             evaluated within the context of a design in which two
             cohorts of students at 37 schools from four sites (N =
             5,581) were randomized to four conditions: (a) a universal
             intervention that involved implementing a student curriculum
             and teacher training with sixth grade students and teachers;
             (b) a selective intervention in which a family intervention
             was implemented with a subset of sixth grade students
             exhibiting high levels of aggression and social influence;
             (c) a combined intervention condition; and (d) a
             no-intervention control condition. Short-term and long-term
             (i.e., 2-year post-intervention) universal intervention
             effects on social-cognitive factors targeted by the
             intervention varied as a function of students'
             pre-intervention level of risk. High-risk students benefited
             from the intervention in terms of decreases in beliefs and
             attitudes supporting aggression, and increases in
             self-efficacy, beliefs and attitudes supporting nonviolent
             behavior. Effects on low-risk students were in the opposite
             direction. The differential pattern of intervention effects
             for low- and high-risk students may account for the absence
             of main effects in many previous evaluations of universal
             interventions for middle school youth. These findings have
             important research and policy implications for efforts to
             develop effective violence prevention programs.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-008-0101-1},
   Key = {fds272072}
}

@article{fds272104,
   Author = {Foster, EM and Jones, D and Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {Can a costly intervention be cost-effective?: An analysis of
             violence prevention.},
   Journal = {Archives of General Psychiatry},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1284-1291},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0003-990X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archpsyc.63.11.1284},
   Abstract = {To examine the cost-effectiveness of the Fast Track
             intervention, a multi-year, multi-component intervention
             designed to reduce violence among at-risk children. A
             previous report documented the favorable effect of
             intervention on the highest-risk group of ninth-graders
             diagnosed with conduct disorder, as well as self-reported
             delinquency. The current report addressed the
             cost-effectiveness of the intervention for these measures of
             program impact.Costs of the intervention were estimated
             using program budgets. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios
             were computed to determine the cost per unit of improvement
             in the 3 outcomes measured in the 10th year of the
             study.Examination of the total sample showed that the
             intervention was not cost-effective at likely levels of
             policymakers' willingness to pay for the key outcomes.
             Subsequent analysis of those most at risk, however, showed
             that the intervention likely was cost-effective given
             specified willingness-to-pay criteria.Results indicate that
             the intervention is cost-effective for the children at
             highest risk. From a policy standpoint, this finding is
             encouraging because such children are likely to generate
             higher costs for society over their lifetimes. However,
             substantial barriers to cost-effectiveness remain, such as
             the ability to effectively identify and recruit such
             higher-risk children in future implementations.},
   Doi = {10.1001/archpsyc.63.11.1284},
   Key = {fds272104}
}

@article{fds272101,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Professionalizing the practice of public policy in the
             prevention of violence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {475-479},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16823635},
   Abstract = {The State of the Science Conference Statement on "Preventing
             Violence and Related Health-Risking Social Behaviors in
             Adolescents" accurately summarizes the state of knowledge
             regarding risk factors for violence and intervention
             efficacy. The Statement missed an opportunity, however, to
             move the field of prevention practice and policy forward by
             advocating for more systematic, central review of preventive
             interventions through a new federal regulatory body, such as
             an "FDA for Preventive Interventions." This body would
             provide review of evidence-based programs and aid
             decision-making in funding. As a complement to this body,
             decision-makers also need guidelines in evidence-based
             practice in ambiguous circumstances, which characterize much
             of the reality of public policy. Therefore, this new
             regulatory body should be accompanied by guidelines for
             evidence-based practice in intervention and policy. Finally,
             in order to move forward both of these concepts, a National
             Academy of Sciences Panel should convene to deliberate how
             these concepts can be implemented.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-006-9040-0},
   Key = {fds272101}
}

@article{fds272082,
   Author = {Henry, and B, D and Miller-Johnson, and S, and Simon, and R, T and Schoeny, and E, M and Dodge, TM-SVPPKA and member},
   Title = {Validity of teacher ratings in selecting influential
             aggressive adolescents for a targeted preventive
             intervention},
   Journal = {Prevention Science},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {31-41},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds272082}
}

@article{fds272296,
   Author = {Ikeda, RM and Simon, TR and Smith, EP and Reese, LRE and Rabiner, DL and Miller-Johnson, S and Winn, DM and Asher, SR and Dodge, KA and Horne,
             AM and Orpinas, P and Quinn, WH and Huberty, CJ and Tolan, PH and Gorman-Smith, D and Henry, DB and Gay, FN and Farrell, AD and Meyer, AL and Sullivan, TN and Allison, KW and Proj, MVP},
   Title = {Lessons learned in the Multisite Violence Prevention Project
             Collaboration - Big questions require large
             efforts},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {62-71},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0749-3797},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000187880000008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.amepre.2003.09.025},
   Key = {fds272296}
}

@article{fds272297,
   Author = {Ikeda, RM and Simon, TR and Smith, EP and Reese, LRE and Rabiner, DL and Miller-Johnson, S and Winn, DM and Asher, SR and Dodge, KA and Horne,
             AM and Orpinas, P and Quinn, WH and Huberty, CJ and Tolan, PH and Gorman-Smith, D and Henry, DB and Gay, FN and Farrell, AD and Meyer, AL and Sullivan, TN and Allison, KW},
   Title = {The multisite violence prevention project - Background and
             overview},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3-11},
   Publisher = {ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0749-3797},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000187880000002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.amepre.2003.09.017},
   Key = {fds272297}
}

@article{fds272298,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, S and Sullivan, TN and Simon, TR and Multisite
             Violence Prevention Project},
   Title = {Evaluating the impact of interventions in the Multisite
             Violence Prevention Study: samples, procedures, and
             measures.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {1 Suppl},
   Pages = {48-61},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2755208/},
   Abstract = {This paper discusses the procedures and measures that were
             developed and utilized to evaluate the impact of the GREAT
             (Guiding Responsibility and Expectations in Adolescents
             Today and Tomorrow) programs in the Multisite Violence
             Prevention Project (MVPP). First, we describe the three
             different samples used to examine the impact of the
             programs, and the different sources of data used to assess
             these samples. Next, we outline procedures used to collect
             and manage the data. In the last section, we summarize the
             final set of measures selected for use in this study.
             Throughout the paper, we highlight ways in which the
             participating institutions collaborated to develop
             consistent procedures for use across the four sites.
             Overall, the paper provides important information related to
             the evaluation of violence prevention efforts, particularly
             for working effectively in multisite collaborative
             studies.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.amepre.2003.09.015},
   Key = {fds272298}
}

@article{fds272293,
   Author = {Henry, and B, D and Farrell, and D, A and Dodge, TMVPPKA and member},
   Title = {The study designed by a committee: Design of the Multisite
             Violence Prevention Project},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {26},
   Pages = {12-19},
   Year = {2004},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2758641/},
   Key = {fds272293}
}

@article{fds272294,
   Author = {Smith, EP and Gorman-Smith, D and Quinn, WH and Rabiner, DL and Tolan,
             PH and Winn, D-M},
   Title = {Community-based multiple family groups to prevent and reduce
             violent and aggressive behavior: The GREAT Families
             Program},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {1 SUPPL.},
   Pages = {39-47},
   Year = {2004},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2003.09.018},
   Abstract = {This paper describes the targeted intervention component of
             GREAT Schools and Families. The intervention - GREAT
             Families - is composed of 15 weekly multiple family group
             meetings (e.g., 4-6 families per group) and addresses
             parenting practices (discipline, monitoring), family
             relationship characteristics (communication, support,
             cohesion), parental involvement and investment in their
             child's schooling, parent and school relationship building,
             and planning for the future. High-risk youth and their
             families - students identified by teachers as aggressive and
             socially influential among their peers - were targeted for
             inclusion in the intervention. The paper describes the
             theoretical model and development of the intervention.
             Approaches to recruitment, engagement, staff training, and
             sociocultural sensitivity in work with families in
             predominantly poor and challenging settings are described.
             The data being collected throughout the program will aid in
             examining the theoretical and program processes that can
             potentially mediate and moderate effects on families. This
             work can inform us about necessary approaches and procedures
             to engage and support families in efforts to reduce
             individual and school grade-level violence and
             aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.amepre.2003.09.018},
   Key = {fds272294}
}

@article{fds272295,
   Author = {Orpinas, and P, and Horne, and M, A and Dodge, TMVPPKA and member},
   Title = {A teacher-focused approach to prevent and reduce students'
             aggressive behavior: The GREAT Teacher Program},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {26},
   Pages = {29-38},
   Year = {2004},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2753434/},
   Key = {fds272295}
}

@article{fds272299,
   Author = {Meyer, and L, A and Allison, and W, K and Reese, and E, L and Gay, and N, F and Dodge, TMVPPKA and member},
   Title = {Choosing to be violence free in middle school: The student
             component of the GREAT Schools and Families Universal
             Program.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {26},
   Pages = {20-28},
   Year = {2004},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2791963/},
   Key = {fds272299}
}

@article{fds272132,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Violent Children: Bridging Development, Intervention, and
             Public Policy},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {187-188},
   Year = {2003},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0012-1649.39.2.187},
   Abstract = {Childhood violence is a major public health and social
             policy concern in the United States. Scientists and
             policymakers alike have increasingly turned their attention
             to the causes of childhood violence and the extent to which
             its course can be modified through well-planned preventive
             interventions. However, it is not apparent that policymakers
             draw upon basic research findings in formulating their
             priorities and policies, nor is it apparent that
             developmental scientists incorporate policy considerations
             and prevention findings into their research frameworks and
             designs. The goal of this special issue on violent children
             is to begin to bridge the gaps among basic developmental
             science, prevention science, and public policy.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0012-1649.39.2.187},
   Key = {fds272132}
}

@article{fds272157,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {The science of youth violence prevention. Progressing from
             developmental epidemiology to efficacy to effectiveness to
             public policy.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {1 Suppl},
   Pages = {63-70},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0749-3797},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11146262},
   Abstract = {Public policy in the United States has historically
             considered youth violence as a moral problem to be punished
             after the fact, but growing scientific evidence supports a
             public health perspective on violent behavior as an
             interaction between cultural forces and failures in
             development. Prevention science has provided a bridge
             between an understanding of how chronic violence develops
             and how prevention programs can interrupt that development.
             Articles in this journal supplement provide yet another
             bridge between efficacious university-based programs and
             effective community-based programs. It is suggested that yet
             one more bridge will need to be constructed in future
             research between community-based programs that are known to
             be effective and community-wide implementation of prevention
             efforts at full scale. This last bridge integrates the
             science of children's development, the science of
             prevention, and the science of public policy.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0749-3797(00)00275-0},
   Key = {fds272157}
}

@article{fds47957,
   Author = {Ikeda, R. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {The early prevention of violence in children},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds47957}
}

@article{fds272172,
   Author = {Nix, RL and Pinderhughes, EE and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and McFadyen-Ketchum, SA},
   Title = {The relation between mothers' hostile attribution tendencies
             and children's externalizing behavior problems: The
             mediating role of mothers' harsh discipline
             practices},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {896-909},
   Year = {1999},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00065},
   Abstract = {This study examined relations among mothers' hostile
             attribution tendencies regarding their children's ambiguous
             problem behaviors, mothers' harsh discipline practices, and
             children's externalizing behavior problems. A community
             sample of 277 families (19% minority representation) living
             in three geographic regions of the United States was
             followed for over 4 years. Mothers' hostile attribution
             tendencies were assessed during the summer prior to
             children's entry into kindergarten through their responses
             to written vignettes. Mothers' harsh discipline practices
             were assessed concurrently through ratings by interviewers
             and reports by spouses. Children's externalizing behavior
             problems were assessed concurrently through written
             questionnaires by mothers and fathers and in the spring of
             kindergarten and first, second, and third grades through
             reports by teachers and peer sociometric nominations.
             Results of structural equations models demonstrated that
             mothers' hostile attribution tendencies predicted children's
             future externalizing behavior problems at school and that a
             large proportion of this relation was mediated by mothers'
             harsh discipline practices. These results remained virtually
             unchanged when controlling for initial levels of children's
             prekindergarten externalizing behavior problems at
             home.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00065},
   Key = {fds272172}
}

@article{fds272216,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and Coie, JD and Hubbard, JA and Cillessen,
             AH and Lemerise, EA and Bateman, H},
   Title = {Social-cognitive and behavioral correlates of aggression and
             victimization in boys' play groups.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {431-440},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9915650},
   Abstract = {A contrived play group procedure was utilized to examine the
             behavioral and social-cognitive correlates of reactive
             aggression, proactive aggression, and victimization via
             peers. Eleven play groups, each of which consisted of six
             familiar African-American 8-year-old boys, met for 45-min
             sessions on five consecutive days. Social-cognitive
             interviews were conducted following the second and fourth
             sessions. Play group interactions were videotaped and
             examined by trained observers. High rates of proactive
             aggression were associated with positive outcome
             expectancies for aggression/assertion, frequent displays of
             assertive social behavior, and low rates of submissive
             behavior. Reactive aggression was associated with hostile
             attributional tendencies and frequent victimization by
             peers. Victimization was associated with submissive
             behavior, hostile attributional bias, reactive aggression,
             and negative outcome expectations for aggression/assertion.
             These results demonstrate that there is a theoretically
             coherent and empirically distinct set of correlates
             associated with each of the examined aggression subtypes,
             and with victimization by peers.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1022695601088},
   Key = {fds272216}
}

@article{fds272217,
   Author = {Lochman, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Distorted perceptions in dyadic interactions of aggressive
             and nonaggressive boys: effects of prior expectations,
             context, and boys' age.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {495-512},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9741679},
   Abstract = {This study examined distorted self- and peer perceptions in
             aggressive and nonaggressive boys at preadolescent and early
             adolescent age levels. Subjects completed semantic
             differential ratings of themselves and of their peer
             partners following two brief dyadic discussion tasks with
             competitive inductions and a game-playing task with a
             cooperative induction. Subjects also rated their
             expectations for self- and peer behavior prior to the two
             competitive interaction tasks. Research assistants later
             rated videotapes of the interactions. Aggressive boys had
             more distorted perceptions of dyadic behavior as they
             overperceived aggression in their partners and
             underperceived their own aggressiveness. These distorted
             perceptions of aggression carried over for aggressive boys
             into the third interaction task with a cooperative
             induction, indicating these boys' difficulty in modulating
             these perceptions when the overt demand for conflict is no
             longer present in the situation. Results also indicated that
             aggressive boys' perceptions of their own behavior after the
             first interaction task is substantially affected by their
             prior expectations, in comparison to nonaggressive boys who
             rely more on their actual behavior to form their
             perceptions.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579498001710},
   Key = {fds272217}
}

@article{fds272230,
   Author = {Bierman, KL},
   Title = {Implementing a comprehensive program for the prevention of
             conduct problems in rural communities: the Fast Track
             experience. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {493-514},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0091-0562},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1024659622528},
   Abstract = {Childhood conduct problems are predictive of a number of
             serious long-term difficulties (e.g., school failure,
             delinquent behavior, and mental health problems), making the
             design of effective prevention programs a priority. The Fast
             Track Program is a demonstration project currently underway
             in four demographically diverse areas of the United States,
             testing the feasibility and effectiveness of a
             comprehensive, multicomponent prevention program targeting
             children at risk for conduct disorders. This paper describes
             some lessons learned about the implementation of this
             program in a rural area. Although there are many areas of
             commonality in terms of program needs, program design, and
             implementation issues in rural and urban sites, rural areas
             differ from urban areas along the dimensions of geographical
             dispersion and regionalism, and community stability and
             insularity. Rural programs must cover a broad geographical
             area and must be sensitive to the multiple, small and
             regional communities that constitute their service area.
             Small schools, homogeneous populations, traditional values,
             limited recreational, educational and mental health
             services, and politically conservative climates are all more
             likely to emerge as characteristics of rural rather than
             urban sites (Sherman, 1992). These characteristics may both
             pose particular challenges to the implementation of
             prevention programs in rural areas, as well as offer
             particular benefits. Three aspects of program implementation
             are described in detail: (a) community entry and program
             initiation in rural areas, (b) the adaptation of program
             components and service delivery to meet the needs of rural
             families and schools, and (c) issues in administrative
             organization of a broadly dispersed tricounty rural
             prevention program.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1024659622528},
   Key = {fds272230}
}

@article{fds272222,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {The Early Socialization of Aggressive Victims of
             Bullying},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {68},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {665-675},
   Year = {1997},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9306645},
   Abstract = {This study reports the first prospective investigation of
             the early family experiences of boys who later emerged as
             both aggressive and bullied (i.e., aggressive victims)
             during their middle childhood years. It was hypothesized
             that a history of violent victimization by adults leads to
             emotion dysregulation that results in a dual pattern of
             aggressive behavior and victimization by peers. Interviews
             with mothers of 198 5-year-old boys assessed preschool home
             environments. Four to 5 years later, aggressive behavior and
             peer victimization were assessed in the school classroom.
             The early experiences of 16 aggressive victims were
             contrasted with those of 21 passive (nonaggressive) victims,
             33 nonvictimized aggressors, and 128 normative boys.
             Analyses indicated that the aggressive victim group had
             experienced more punitive, hostile, and abusive family
             treatment than the other groups. In contrast, the
             nonvictimized aggressive group had a history of greater
             exposure to adult aggression and conflict, but not
             victimization by adults, than did the normative group,
             whereas the passive victim group did not differ from the
             normative group on any home environment variable.},
   Key = {fds272222}
}

@article{fds272237,
   Author = {Crick, NR and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Social information-processing mechanisms in reactive and
             proactive aggression.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {993-1002},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8706540},
   Abstract = {Theories of aggressive behavior and ethological observations
             in animals and children suggest the existence of distinct
             forms of reactive (hostile) and proactive (instrumental)
             aggression. Toward the validation of this distinction,
             groups of reactive aggressive, proactive aggressive, and
             nonaggressive children were identified (n = 624
             9-12-year-olds). Social information-processing patterns were
             assessed in these groups by presenting hypothetical
             vignettes to subjects. 3 hypotheses were tested: (1) only
             the reactive-aggressive children would demonstrate hostile
             biases in their attributions of peers' intentions in
             provocation situations (because such biases are known to
             lead to reactive anger); (2) only proactive-aggressive
             children would evaluate aggression and its consequences in
             relatively positive ways (because proactive aggression is
             motivated by its expected external outcomes); and (3)
             proactive-aggressive children would select instrumental
             social goals rather than relational goals more often than
             nonaggressive children. All 3 hypotheses were at least
             partially supported.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1996.tb01778.x},
   Key = {fds272237}
}

@article{fds272239,
   Author = {Lochman, JE},
   Title = {Screening of child behavior problems for prevention programs
             at school entry. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {549-559},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-006x.63.4.549},
   Abstract = {Targeted programs designed to prevent conduct problems in
             childhood and adolescence rely on screening systems to
             identify high-risk individuals. This study examines the
             proximal usefulness of a multiple-gating approach to
             screening, using teacher and parent ratings in a 2-step
             procedure with a sample of 382 kindergarten children. The
             study explored differences in the accuracy of the 2 steps of
             screening information and whether parents' reports of
             parenting practices augments the prediction of negative
             outcomes. The 2-step screening system was found to
             effectively predict negative behavior outcomes over 1 year
             later, although some false-positive and false-negative
             predictions were evident. The Parenting Practices Screen did
             not substantially add to prediction accuracy. The discussion
             emphasizes the potential contributions and problems of using
             screening measures.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-006x.63.4.549},
   Key = {fds272239}
}

@article{fds272276,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Mechanisms in the cycle of violence},
   Journal = {Science (New York, N.Y.)},
   Volume = {250},
   Number = {4988},
   Pages = {1678-1683},
   Year = {1990},
   ISSN = {0036-8075},
   Abstract = {Two questions concerning the effect of physical abuse in
             early childhood on the child's development of aggressive
             behavior are the focus of this article. The first is whether
             abuse per se has deleterious effects. In earlier studies, in
             which samples were nonrepresentative and family ecological
             factors (such as poverty, marital violence, and family
             instability) and child biological variables (such as early
             health problems and temperament) were ignored, findings have
             been ambiguous. Results from a prospective study of a
             representative sample of 309 children indicated that
             physical abuse is indeed a risk factor for later aggressive
             behavior even when the other ecological and biological
             factors are known. The second question concerns the
             processes by which antisocial development occurs in abused
             children. Abused children tended to acquire deviant patterns
             of processing social information, and these may mediate the
             development of aggressive behavior.},
   Key = {fds272276}
}


%% Other   
@misc{fds13039,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Investing in the Prevention of Youth Violence},
   Journal = {International Society for the Study of Behavioral
             Development Newsletter},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds13039}
}