Kenneth A. Dodge

Publications of Kenneth A. Dodge    :chronological  by type  by tags listing:

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@article{fds38906,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and McClaskey, C.L. and Feldman,
             E.},
   Title = {A situational approach to the assessment of social
             competence in children (Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {Psychology in Education Portfolio},
   Publisher = {Berkshire UK: NFRF/Nelson},
   Editor = {N. Frederickson and R.J. Cameron},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds38906}
}

@article{fds38894,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and McClaskey, C.L. and Feldman,
             E.},
   Title = {A situational approach to the assessment of social
             competence in children (Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {Clinical assessment of children's personality and
             behavior},
   Publisher = {Allyn and Bacon},
   Editor = {P.J. Frick and R.W. Kamphaus},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds38894}
}

@misc{fds39725,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {A social information processing model of social competence
             in children (Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {Child Development},
   Publisher = {New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston},
   Editor = {T.J. Berndt},
   Year = {1992},
   Key = {fds39725}
}

@article{fds272197,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Coie, JD and Brakke, NP},
   Title = {Behavior patterns of socially rejected and neglected
             preadolescents: the roles of social approach and
             aggression.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {389-409},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7175045},
   Abstract = {Sociometric nominations were used to select groups of
             popular, average, rejected, and neglected third- and
             fifth-grade children. In two studies, the peer interactive
             behaviors of these children were naturalistically observed
             in their classrooms and on the playground. In contrast to
             popular children, rejected children displayed fewer
             task-appropriate behaviors and more task-inappropriate and
             aggressive behaviors. Whereas rejected children prosocially
             approached peers as frequently as did popular children, peer
             responses to the approaches of rejected children were more
             likely to be negative. Neglected children, on the other
             hand, displayed relatively few task-inappropriate and
             aggressive behaviors, and socially approached peers
             infrequently. Their approaches also met with frequent rebuff
             by peers. The findings were discussed in terms of the
             behavioral bases of sociometric status. Suggestions were
             made for clinical researchers interested in behavioral
             change with rejected and neglected children.},
   Doi = {10.1007/bf00912329},
   Key = {fds272197}
}

@article{fds272205,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Behavioral antecedents of peer social status},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {54},
   Pages = {1386-1389},
   Year = {1983},
   Key = {fds272205}
}

@article{fds272173,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Best Friendships, Group Relationships, and Antisocial
             Behavior in Early Adolescence.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Early Adolescence},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {413-437},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0272-4316},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0272431699019004001},
   Abstract = {Correlations between adolescents' own antisocial behavior
             and adolescents' perceptions of the antisocial behavior of
             their best friends and friendship groups were examined in
             this study. The strength of those correlations was expected
             to vary as a function of the qualities of the dyadic
             friendships and group relationships. Perceptions of peers'
             antisocial behavior and dyadic friendship and group
             relationship qualities were collected through interviews
             with 431, 12- through 13-year-old adolescents. Measures of
             adolescents' concurrent and subsequent antisocial behaviors
             were obtained from the adolescents and their teachers.
             Adolescents who perceived their friends and groups as
             participating in antisocial behavior had higher
             self-reported and teacher-reported antisocial behavior
             ratings. Perceptions of best friend antisocial behavior were
             correlated more strongly with adolescents' own concurrent,
             but not subsequent, antisocial behavior when high levels of
             help, companionship, and security characterized dyadic
             friendships. The results are discussed in terms of peer
             influence and friendship selection processes.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0272431699019004001},
   Key = {fds272173}
}

@article{fds272144,
   Author = {Kaplow, JB and Curran, PJ and Dodge, KA and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Child, parent, and peer predictors of early-onset substance
             use: a multisite longitudinal study.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {199-216},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12041707},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this study was to identify kindergarten-age
             predictors of early-onset substance use from demographic,
             environmental, parenting, child psychological, behavioral,
             and social functioning domains. Data from a longitudinal
             study of 295 children were gathered using
             multiple-assessment methods and multiple informants in
             kindergarten and 1st grade. Annual assessments at ages 10,
             11, and 12 reflected that 21% of children reported having
             initiated substance use by age 12. Results from longitudinal
             logistic regression models indicated that risk factors at
             kindergarten include being male, having a parent who abused
             substances, lower levels of parental verbal reasoning,
             higher levels of overactivity, more thought problems, and
             more social problem solving skills deficits. Children with
             no risk factors had less than a 10% chance of initiating
             substance use by age 12, whereas children with 2 or more
             risk factors had greater than a 50% chance of initiating
             substance use. Implications for typology, etiology, and
             prevention are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1015183927979},
   Key = {fds272144}
}

@article{fds272223,
   Author = {Poulin, F and Cillessen, AHN and Hubbard, JA and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Schwartz, D},
   Title = {Children’s friends and behavioral similarity in two social
             contexts},
   Journal = {Social Development},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {225-237},
   Year = {1997},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9507.1997.tb00103.x},
   Abstract = {The general purpose of this study was to examine similarity
             between friends with respect to behavior. The specific goals
             were to consider; 1) different sources of evaluation (peer
             ratings and direct observations); 2) different social
             contexts (classroom and play group); and 3) different
             subtypes of aggressive behavior (proactive and reactive
             aggression). In the first phase of the study, sociometric
             assessments and peer evaluations of behavior were conducted
             in the school setting with third-grade boys and girls (n =
             268). In the second phase, a subsample of boys participated
             in a series of play group sessions (n = 66). Direct
             observations and peer ratings of children's behavior were
             conducted in those sessions. Results showed in both social
             contexts a tendency towards similarity among friends,
             especially with respect to aggressive behavior. Separate
             analyses for subtypes of aggressive behavior revealed that
             the similarity hypothesis applied for proactive aggression
             but not for reactive aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9507.1997.tb00103.x},
   Key = {fds272223}
}

@book{fds38867,
   Author = {Kupersmidt, J. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Children’s peer relations: From development to
             intervention to policy: A festschrift to honor John D.
             Coie},
   Publisher = {Washington, D.C.: American Psychological
             Association},
   Editor = {J. Kupersmidt and K.A. Dodge},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {fds38867}
}

@article{fds272212,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Continuity of children's social status: A five-year
             longitudinal study},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {261-282},
   Year = {1983},
   Key = {fds272212}
}

@article{fds272041,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Developmental cascades of peer rejection, social information
             processing biases, and aggression during middle
             childhood.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {593-602},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20576181},
   Abstract = {This study tested a developmental cascade model of peer
             rejection, social information processing (SIP), and
             aggression using data from 585 children assessed at 12 time
             points from kindergarten through Grade 3. Peer rejection had
             direct effects on subsequent SIP problems and aggression.
             SIP had direct effects on subsequent peer rejection and
             aggression. Aggression had direct effects on subsequent peer
             rejection. Each construct also had indirect effects on each
             of the other constructs. These findings advance the
             literature beyond a simple mediation approach by
             demonstrating how each construct effects changes in the
             others in a snowballing cycle over time. The progressions of
             SIP problems and aggression cascaded through lower liking,
             and both better SIP skills and lower aggression facilitated
             the progress of social preference. Findings are discussed in
             terms of the dynamic, developmental relations among social
             environments, cognitions, and behavioral
             adjustment.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579410000301},
   Key = {fds272041}
}

@article{fds167316,
   Author = {Lansford, J.E. and Dishion, T.J. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Deviant peer clustering and influence within public school
             settings: Inadvertent negative outcomes from traditional
             professional practices},
   Booktitle = {Interventions for achievement and behavior in a three-tier
             model including response to intervention},
   Publisher = {National Association for School Psychologists
             Press},
   Address = {Bethesda, MD},
   Editor = {Shinn, M.R. and Walker, H.M. and Stoner, G.},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds167316}
}

@misc{fds45887,
   Author = {Dishion, T.J. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Deviant peer contagion in interventions and programs: An
             ecological framework for understanding influence
             mechanisms},
   Pages = {14-43},
   Booktitle = {Deviant peer influences in programs for youth: Problems and
             solutions},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Editor = {K.A. Dodge and T.J. Dishion and J.E. Lansford},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds45887}
}

@misc{fds45890,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Sherrill, M.R.},
   Title = {Deviant peer group effects in youth mental health
             interventions},
   Pages = {97-121},
   Booktitle = {Deviant peer influences in programs for youth: Problems and
             solutions},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Editor = {K.A. Dodge and T.J. Dishion and J.E. Lansford},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds45890}
}

@book{fds45886,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Dishion, T.J. and Lansford, J.E.},
   Title = {Deviant peer influences in programs for youth: Problems and
             solutions},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds45886}
}

@article{fds272028,
   Author = {Latendresse, SJ and Bates, JE and Goodnight, JA and Lansford, JE and Budde, JP and Goate, A and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Dick,
             DM},
   Title = {Differential susceptibility to adolescent externalizing
             trajectories: examining the interplay between CHRM2 and peer
             group antisocial behavior.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1797-1814},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01640.x},
   Abstract = {The present study characterized prototypical patterns of
             development in self-reported externalizing behavior, between
             12 and 22 years of age, within a community sample of 452
             genotyped individuals. A Caucasian subset (n = 378) was then
             examined to determine whether their probabilities of
             displaying discrete trajectories were differentially
             associated with CHRM2, a gene implicated in self-regulatory
             processes across a range of externalizing behaviors, and if
             affiliating with antisocial peers moderated these
             associations. Findings indicate that relative to a normative
             "lower risk" externalizing trajectory, likelihood of
             membership in two "higher risk" trajectories increased with
             each additional copy of the minor allelic variant at CHRM2,
             and that this association was exacerbated among those
             exposed to higher levels of peer group antisocial
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01640.x},
   Key = {fds272028}
}

@article{fds272198,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Coppotelli, H},
   Title = {Dimensions and types of social status: A cross-age
             perspective},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {557-570},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.18.4.557},
   Abstract = {In Exp I, peer perceptual correlates of social preference
             (SP) and social impact (SI) were investigated with 311 3rd,
             5th, and 8th graders. SP was highly positively related to
             cooperativeness, supportiveness, and physical attractiveness
             and negatively related to disruptiveness and aggression. SI
             was related to active, salient behaviors of both positive
             and negative valence. Whereas the correlates were found to
             be similar at each grade level, greater proportions of the
             variance in these dimensions could be predicted at younger
             than older ages. In Exp II, these dimensions were used to
             assign 531 Ss to 5 sociometric status groups: popular,
             rejected, neglected, controversial, and average. Peer
             perceptions of the behavioral correlates of these groups
             were solicited and found to reveal distinct profiles. A
             previously unidentified group of controversial children was
             perceived as disruptive and aggressive (like the rejected
             group), but also as social leaders (like popular Ss). It is
             suggested that researchers consider controversial children
             as a distinct group in future behavioral and epidemiological
             studies. (32 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA,
             all rights reserved). © 1982 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.18.4.557},
   Key = {fds272198}
}

@article{fds272165,
   Author = {Bellanti, CJ and Bierman, KL},
   Title = {Disentangling the impact of low cognitive ability and
             inattention on social behavior and peer relationships.
             Conduct Problems Prevention Re search Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child Psychology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {66-75},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2767167/},
   Abstract = {Examined the shared and unique contributions of low
             cognitive ability and inattention to the development of
             social behavior problems and peer relationships of children
             at the time of school entry. Kindergarten and first-grade
             assessments of cognitive ability, inattention and prosocial
             and aggressive behavior were collected for a multisite,
             normative sample. Sociometric assessments of peer
             relationships were collected at the end of first grade.
             Cognitive ability and inattention both contributed to the
             prediction of social behavior and peer relationships. Low
             cognitive ability was particularly predictive of prosocial
             skill deficits, and social behavior mediated the relation
             between cognitive ability and social preference. Inattention
             predicted both prosocial skill deficits and elevated
             aggressive-disruptive behavior problems. Behavior problems
             partially mediated the relation between inattention and
             social preference. Identified subgroups of children with
             elevated levels of inattention or low cognitive ability
             showed different patterns of peer problems, with low
             acceptance characteristic of the low cognitive ability
             (only) group and high dislike ratings characteristic of the
             inattentive and inattentive/low-ability group. Implications
             are discussed for the design of early intervention and
             prevention programs.},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15374424jccp2901_7},
   Key = {fds272165}
}

@article{fds272217,
   Author = {Lochman, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Distorted perceptions in dyadic interactions of aggressive
             and nonaggressive boys: effects of prior expectations,
             context, and boys' age.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {495-512},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9741679},
   Abstract = {This study examined distorted self- and peer perceptions in
             aggressive and nonaggressive boys at preadolescent and early
             adolescent age levels. Subjects completed semantic
             differential ratings of themselves and of their peer
             partners following two brief dyadic discussion tasks with
             competitive inductions and a game-playing task with a
             cooperative induction. Subjects also rated their
             expectations for self- and peer behavior prior to the two
             competitive interaction tasks. Research assistants later
             rated videotapes of the interactions. Aggressive boys had
             more distorted perceptions of dyadic behavior as they
             overperceived aggression in their partners and
             underperceived their own aggressiveness. These distorted
             perceptions of aggression carried over for aggressive boys
             into the third interaction task with a cooperative
             induction, indicating these boys' difficulty in modulating
             these perceptions when the overt demand for conflict is no
             longer present in the situation. Results also indicated that
             aggressive boys' perceptions of their own behavior after the
             first interaction task is substantially affected by their
             prior expectations, in comparison to nonaggressive boys who
             rely more on their actual behavior to form their
             perceptions.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579498001710},
   Key = {fds272217}
}

@article{fds272169,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and McFadyen-Ketchum, S and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Early behavior problems as a predictor of later peer group
             victimization: moderators and mediators in the pathways of
             social risk.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {191-201},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1021948206165},
   Abstract = {This study is a prospective investigation of the predictive
             association between early behavior problems (internalizing,
             externalizing, hyperactivity-impulsiveness,
             immaturity-dependency) and later victimization in the peer
             group. Teacher ratings of the behavioral adjustment of 389
             kindergarten and 1st-grade children (approximate age range
             of 5 to 6 years-old) were obtained, using standardized
             behavior problem checklists. These ratings predicted peer
             nomination scores for victimization, obtained 3 years later,
             even after the prediction associated with concurrent
             behavior problems was statistically controlled. Further
             analyses suggested that the relation between early behavior
             problems and later victimization is mediated by peer
             rejection and moderated by children's dyadic friendships.
             Behavior problems appear to play an important role in
             determining victimization within the peer group, although
             the relevant pathways are complex and influenced by other
             aspects of children's social adjustment.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1021948206165},
   Key = {fds272169}
}

@article{fds272190,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Brown, MM},
   Title = {Early family experience, social problem solving patterns,
             and children's social competence},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {59},
   Pages = {107-120},
   Year = {1988},
   Key = {fds272190}
}

@article{fds39004,
   Author = {Brown, J. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Early peer relations and child psychiatry},
   Pages = {305-320},
   Booktitle = {The basic handbook of child and adolescent
             psychiatry},
   Publisher = {New York: John Wiley & Sons},
   Editor = {S.I. Greenspan and J. Osofsky and K. Pruett},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds39004}
}

@article{fds272079,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Effects of physical maltreatment on the development of peer
             relations},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {43-55},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579400005873},
   Abstract = {The effect of early physical maltreatment on the development
             of peer relationships was examined in a representative
             sample of 585 boys and girls. Subjects were assessed for
             physical maltreatment in the first 5 years of life and then
             followed for 5 consecutive years. The assessment was based
             on a clinical interview with parents. Twelve percent of the
             sample was identified as having experienced physical
             maltreatment. Peers, teachers, and mothers independently
             evaluated the maltreated group of children as being more
             disliked, less popular, and more socially withdrawn than the
             nonmaltreated group in every year of evaluation, with the
             magnitude of difference growing over time. These effects
             held even when family socioeconomic status was controlled.
             The findings were interpreted as being consistent with the
             hypothesis that early maltreatment disrupts attachment
             relationships with adult caregivers, and these disruptions
             then impair a child's ability to form effective peer
             relationships. © 1994, Cambridge University Press. All
             rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400005873},
   Key = {fds272079}
}

@misc{fds147814,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Pettit, G.S. and Bates, J.E.},
   Title = {Effects of physical maltreatment on the development of peer
             relations (Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Publisher = {Wadsworth Press},
   Address = {New York},
   Editor = {E. Mash and D. Wolfe},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds147814}
}

@article{fds38976,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Pettit, G.S. and Bates, J.E.},
   Title = {Effects of physical maltreatment on the development of peer
             relations(Reprint)},
   Booktitle = {Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Publisher = {Brooks/Cole},
   Editor = {E. Mash and D. Wolfe},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds38976}
}

@article{fds272245,
   Author = {Sinclair, JJ and Pettit, GS and Harrist, AW and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Encounters with Aggressive Peers in Early Childhood:
             Frequency, Age Differences, and Correlates of Risk for
             Behaviour Problems},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Development},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {675-696},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/016502549401700407},
   Abstract = {The primary goal of the present study was to describe the
             range, types, and quality (in terms of exposure to
             aggressive peers) of social activity settings in which young
             children typically have contact with peers. We also examined
             whether participation in these settings varied as a function
             of child sex and age, and family demographic
             characteristics. Subjects were 277 preschoolaged children.
             On the basis of detailed accounts of their mothers, activity
             setting measures were derived separately for ages 2-4 years
             (era 1) and ages 4-5 years (era 2). Each of seven activity
             settings (e.g. neighbourhood, day care, organised
             playgroups) was rated for frequency of participation and
             frequency of exposure to aggressive peers. Children had the
             greatest amount of peer contact and were exposed to
             aggressive peers most often in the neighbourhood setting. In
             contrast, children participated least frequently in
             structured playgroup settings, and these settings were least
             likely to contain aggressive peers. Children from lower SES
             and single-parent families were more likely to be involved
             in settings (especially neighbourhoods) containing
             aggressive peers. These findings suggest that one mechanism
             through which risk for behaviour problems among children in
             lower SES and single-parent families may operate is
             increased exposure to activity settings in which aggression
             occurs regularly. © 1994, Sage Publications. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/016502549401700407},
   Key = {fds272245}
}

@article{fds272149,
   Author = {Criss, MM and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Lapp,
             AL},
   Title = {Family adversity, positive peer relationships, and
             children's externalizing behavior: a longitudinal
             perspective on risk and resilience.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1220-1237},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00468},
   Abstract = {Peer acceptance and friendships were examined as moderators
             in the link between family adversity and child externalizing
             behavioral problems. Data on family adversity (i.e.,
             ecological disadvantage, violent marital conflict, and harsh
             discipline) and child temperament and social information
             processing were collected during home visits from 585
             families with 5-year-old children. Children's peer
             acceptance, friendship, and friends' aggressiveness were
             assessed with sociometric methods in kindergarten and grade
             1. Teachers provided ratings of children's externalizing
             behavior problems in grade 2. Peer acceptance served as a
             moderator for all three measures of family adversity, and
             friendship served as a moderator for harsh discipline.
             Examination of regression slopes indicated that family
             adversity was not significantly associated with child
             externalizing behavior at high levels of positive peer
             relationships. These moderating effects generally were not
             qualified by child gender, ethnicity, or friends'
             aggressiveness, nor were they accounted for by child
             temperament or social information-processing patterns. The
             need for process-oriented studies of risk and protective
             factors is stressed.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00468},
   Key = {fds272149}
}

@article{fds272266,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Harrist, AW and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Family interaction, social cognition, and children's
             subsequent relations},
   Journal = {Journal of Social and Personal Relationships},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {383-402},
   Year = {1991},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0265407591083005},
   Abstract = {This study examined relations among family interaction
             qualities and children's social cognitions and subsequent
             social competence with peers. Thirty five-year-old children
             (fifteen boys) and their families were observed in their
             homes and the children were administered a social cognitive
             assessment battery during the summer prior to the children's
             entry into kindergarten. Interactional episodes were coded
             in terms of the degree of observed parent-child
             responsiveness, coerciveness and intrusiveness. Social
             cognitive measures consisted of self-efficacy and outcome
             expectations regarding aggressive and competent responding
             to hypothetical conflicts. Children's subsequent relations
             with peers in kindergarten were evaluated on the basis of
             teacher ratings. Social competence with peers was predicted
             by responsive family interactions and lower self-efficacy
             scores for both aggressive and competent responding.
             Aggression with peers was predicted by coercive and
             intrusive family interactions and higher self-efficacy
             scores for aggressive responding. Regression analyses
             suggested that the social cognitive patterns mediated the
             relation between family interaction and children's social
             behavior. Implications of these findings are discussed with
             respect to the role of family interaction patterns in the
             social transmission of interpersonal style. © 1991, Sage
             Publications. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0265407591083005},
   Key = {fds272266}
}

@misc{fds45888,
   Author = {Dishion, T.J. and Dodge, K.A. and Lansford, J.E.},
   Title = {Findings and recommendations: A blueprint to minimize
             deviant peer influence in youth interventions and
             programs},
   Pages = {366-394},
   Booktitle = {Deviant peer influences in programs for youth: Problems and
             solutions},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Editor = {K.A. Dodge and T.J. Dishion and J.E. Lansford},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds45888}
}

@article{fds272160,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Friendship as a moderating factor in the pathway between
             early harsh home environment and later victimization in the
             peer group. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {646-662},
   Year = {2000},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000089047400010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Two prospective investigations of the moderating role of
             dyadic friendship in the developmental pathway to peer
             victimization are reported. In Study 1, the preschool home
             environments (i.e., harsh discipline, marital conflict,
             stress, abuse, and maternal hostility) of 389 children were
             assessed by trained interviewers. These children were then
             followed into the middle years of elementary school, with
             peer victimization, group social acceptance, and friendship
             assessed annually with a peer nomination inventory. In Study
             2, the home environments of 243 children were assessed in
             the summer before 1st grade, and victimization, group
             acceptance, and friendship were assessed annually over the
             next 3 years. In both studies, early harsh, punitive, and
             hostile family environments predicted later victimization by
             peers for children who had a low number of friendships.
             However, the predictive associations did not hold for
             children who had numerous friendships. These findings
             provide support for conceptualizations of friendship as a
             moderating factor in the pathways to peer group
             victimization.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.36.5.646},
   Key = {fds272160}
}

@article{fds272133,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Friendship Quality, Peer Group Affiliation, and Peer
             Antisocial Behavior as Moderators of the Link Between
             Negative Parenting and Adolescent Externalizing
             Behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Research on Adolescence},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {161-184},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1050-8392},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20209019},
   Abstract = {Quality of peer relationships and perceived peer antisocial
             behavior were examined as moderators of the link between
             negative parenting and externalizing behavior problems in
             school from middle childhood to early adolescence. Data on
             negative parenting (i.e., unilateral parental decision
             making, low supervision and awareness, and harsh discipline)
             were collected from 362 parents in the summer preceding the
             adolescents' entry into Grade 6. Adolescent reports of
             positive peer relationships and peer antisocial behavior
             were assessed in the winter of Grade 7. The outcome measure
             was teacher report of adolescent externalizing behavior in
             the spring of Grade 7, controlling for externalizing
             behavior in Grade 5. High levels of friendship quality and
             peer group affiliation attenuated the association between
             unilateral parental decision making and adolescent
             externalizing behavior in school; this was particularly true
             when adolescents associated with peers perceived to be low
             in antisocial behavior. In addition, having low-quality peer
             relationships and having peers perceived to be highly
             antisocial further amplified the association between
             unilateral parental decision making and adolescent
             externalizing behavior problems. Finally, high levels of
             friend and peer group antisocial behavior exacerbated the
             predictiveness of harsh discipline for adolescents'
             externalizing behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1532-7795.1302002},
   Key = {fds272133}
}

@article{fds272075,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Gorman, AH and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Friendships with peers who are low or high in aggression as
             moderators of the link between peer victimization and
             declines in academic functioning.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {719-730},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-007-9200-x},
   Abstract = {This paper reports two prospective investigations of the
             role of friendship in the relation between peer
             victimization and grade point averages (GPA). Study 1
             included 199 children (105 boys, 94 girls; mean age of 9.1
             years) and Study 2 included 310 children (151 boys, 159
             girls; mean age of 8.5 years). These children were followed
             for two school years. In both projects, we assessed
             aggression, victimization, and friendship with a peer
             nomination inventory, and we obtained children's GPAs from a
             review of school records. Peer victimization was associated
             with academic declines only when children had either a high
             number of friends who were above the classroom mean on
             aggression or a low number of friends who were below the
             classroom mean on aggression. These results highlight the
             importance of aggression levels among friends for the
             academic adjustment of victimized children.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-007-9200-x},
   Key = {fds272075}
}

@misc{fds39733,
   Author = {Coie, J.D. and Dodge, K.A. and Kupersmidt, J.},
   Title = {Group behavior and social status},
   Pages = {17-59},
   Booktitle = {Peer rejection in childhood: Origins, consequences, and
             intervention},
   Publisher = {New York: Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {S.R. Asher and J.D. Coie},
   Year = {1990},
   Key = {fds39733}
}

@article{fds272261,
   Author = {DeRosier, ME and Cillessen, AH and Coie, JD and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Group social context and children's aggressive
             behavior.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1068-1079},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7956465},
   Abstract = {Very little is known about the influence of the
             social-psychological context on children's aggressive
             behavior. The purpose of this research was to examine the
             interrelations of group contextual factors and the
             occurrence of aggressive behavior in 22 experimental play
             groups of 7- and 9-year-old African-American boys. Group
             context was examined before, during, and after an aggressive
             act as well as during nonaggressive periods. The results
             showed that there are dimensions of group context (i.e.,
             negative affect, high aversive behavior, high activity
             level, low group cohesion, competitiveness) that were
             related to the occurrence of aggressive behavior between 2
             children in the group. Group context influenced how children
             reacted to aggression between its members (e.g., siding with
             the victim), which in turn influenced the quality of the
             postaggression group atmosphere. This study suggests that
             individual-within-context information be incorporated into
             theories of aggression among children.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1994.tb00803.x},
   Key = {fds272261}
}

@article{fds272230,
   Author = {Bierman, KL},
   Title = {Implementing a comprehensive program for the prevention of
             conduct problems in rural communities: the Fast Track
             experience. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {493-514},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0091-0562},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1024659622528},
   Abstract = {Childhood conduct problems are predictive of a number of
             serious long-term difficulties (e.g., school failure,
             delinquent behavior, and mental health problems), making the
             design of effective prevention programs a priority. The Fast
             Track Program is a demonstration project currently underway
             in four demographically diverse areas of the United States,
             testing the feasibility and effectiveness of a
             comprehensive, multicomponent prevention program targeting
             children at risk for conduct disorders. This paper describes
             some lessons learned about the implementation of this
             program in a rural area. Although there are many areas of
             commonality in terms of program needs, program design, and
             implementation issues in rural and urban sites, rural areas
             differ from urban areas along the dimensions of geographical
             dispersion and regionalism, and community stability and
             insularity. Rural programs must cover a broad geographical
             area and must be sensitive to the multiple, small and
             regional communities that constitute their service area.
             Small schools, homogeneous populations, traditional values,
             limited recreational, educational and mental health
             services, and politically conservative climates are all more
             likely to emerge as characteristics of rural rather than
             urban sites (Sherman, 1992). These characteristics may both
             pose particular challenges to the implementation of
             prevention programs in rural areas, as well as offer
             particular benefits. Three aspects of program implementation
             are described in detail: (a) community entry and program
             initiation in rural areas, (b) the adaptation of program
             components and service delivery to meet the needs of rural
             families and schools, and (c) issues in administrative
             organization of a broadly dispersed tricounty rural
             prevention program.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1024659622528},
   Key = {fds272230}
}

@article{fds272243,
   Author = {Boivin, M and Dodge, KA and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Individual-group behavioral similarity and peer status in
             experimental play groups of boys: the social misfit
             revisited.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {69},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {269-279},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7643305},
   Abstract = {This study evaluated individual-group similarity and
             dissimilarity hypotheses generally stipulating that the
             behavioral correlates of status are moderated by the peer
             group context in which they are displayed. Thirty play
             groups of 5 or 6 unacquainted same-age boys participated in
             five 45-min sessions. Five behaviors described group and
             individual characteristics: reactive aggression, proactive
             aggression, solitary play, rough-and-tumble play, and
             positive interactive behavior. Individual social preference
             scores were computed following a variant of the J. D. Coie
             and K. A. Dodge (1983) procedure. The behavioral correlates
             of emerging peer status were examined as a function of the
             group's behavioral norms. Evidence of a dissimilarity effect
             was found for solitary play and reactive aggression whereas
             positive interactive behavior followed a rule of
             similarity.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.69.2.269},
   Key = {fds272243}
}

@article{fds272181,
   Author = {Burks, VS and Dodge, KA and Price, JM and Laird, RD},
   Title = {Internal representational models of peers: implications for
             the development of problematic behavior.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {802-810},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0012-1649.35.3.802},
   Abstract = {The authors investigated the relation between children's
             knowledge structures for peers and externalizing behavior
             problems. Initial levels of aggression were evaluated in 135
             boys and 124 girls (Grades 1-3; 40% African American, 60%
             Caucasian) in Year 1 and again in Years 6 and 9. In Year 6,
             3 aspects of their social knowledge structures were
             assessed: quality, density, and appropriateness. Results
             indicate that knowledge structures are related to children's
             concurrent levels of externalizing behaviors and that
             knowledge structures are related to children's concurrent
             levels of externalizing behaviors and predict externalizing
             behaviors 3 years later even after controlling for current
             levels of behavior. In addition, knowledge structures in
             Year 6 mediate the relation between aggression in Year 1 and
             externalizing behaviors in Year 9. The role of knowledge
             structures in the maintenance and growth of children's
             antisocial behavior is discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0012-1649.35.3.802},
   Key = {fds272181}
}

@misc{fds39734,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Feldman, E.},
   Title = {Issues in social cognition and sociometric
             status},
   Pages = {119-155},
   Booktitle = {Peer rejection in childhood: Origins, consequences, and
             intervention},
   Publisher = {New York: Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {S.R. Asher and J.D. Coie},
   Year = {1990},
   Key = {fds39734}
}

@article{fds272148,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Laird, R and Lochman, JE and Zelli, A and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Multidimensional latent-construct analysis of children's
             social information processing patterns: correlations with
             aggressive behavior problems.},
   Journal = {Psychological Assessment},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {60-73},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1040-3590},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11911050},
   Abstract = {Social information processing (SIP) patterns were
             conceptualized in orthogonal domains of process and context
             and measured through responses to hypothetical vignettes in
             a stratified sample of 387 children (50% boys; 49% minority)
             from 4 geographical sites followed from kindergarten through
             3rd grade. Multidimensional, latent-construct, confirmatory
             factor analyses supported the within-construct internal
             consistency, cross-construct discrimination, and
             multidimensionality of SIP patterns. Contrasts among nested
             structural equation models indicated that SIP constructs
             significantly predicted children's aggressive behavior
             problems as measured by later teacher reports. The findings
             support the multidimensional construct validity of
             children's social cognitive patterns and the relevance of
             SIP patterns in children's aggressive behavior
             problems.},
   Doi = {10.1037//1040-3590.14.1.60},
   Key = {fds272148}
}

@article{fds272191,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Multiple sources of data on social behavior and social
             status in the school: a cross-age comparison.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {815-829},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3383681},
   Abstract = {Behavioral data relating to peer social status were
             collected from peers, teachers, and observers on both first-
             and third-grade boys (ages 6-7 and 8-9 years, respectively).
             Peer and teacher ratings had greater intermethod agreement
             than observer data, although all 3 sources provided evidence
             that rejected and controversial boys were more aggressive
             than other boys. However, relatively little aggression was
             observed among the older boys, indicating that peers and
             teachers may be better sources of information about
             aggression in this group. Observational data differentiated
             among status groups on measures of activity (on task vs.
             off-task, and prosocial play vs. solitary activity) for both
             age groups. Rejected boys displayed little prosocial
             behavior according to peers and teachers, but were not less
             often engaged in prosocial play, according to observers.
             Neglected boys were the most solitary group during play;
             however, teachers rated rejected boys as the most solitary,
             contrary to observations. Controversial boys were seen as
             highly aggressive by all sources but as highly prosocial
             only by peers and observers.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1988.tb03237.x},
   Key = {fds272191}
}

@article{fds272141,
   Author = {Beyers, JM and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Neighborhood structure, parenting processes, and the
             development of youths' externalizing behaviors: a multilevel
             analysis.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {35-53},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0091-0562},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1023018502759},
   Abstract = {Associations among neighborhood structure, parenting
             processes, and the development of externalizing behavior
             problems were investigated in a longitudinal sample of early
             adolescents (from age 11 to 13). Mothers' reports of
             parental monitoring (at age 11), mothers' and youths'
             reports of the amount of youths' unsupervised time (at age
             11), and youths' reports of positive parental involvement
             (at age 12) were used to predict initial levels (at age 11)
             and growth rates in youths' externalizing behavior as
             reported by teachers. Census-based measures of neighborhood
             structural disadvantage, residential instability, and
             concentrated affluence were expected to moderate the effects
             of parenting processes (e.g., parental monitoring) on
             externalizing behavior. Hierarchical linear modeling results
             revealed that less parental monitoring was associated with
             more externalizing behavior problems at age 11, and more
             unsupervised time spent out in the community (vs.
             unsupervised time in any context) and less positive parental
             involvement were associated with increases in externalizing
             behavior across time. Furthermore, the decrease in
             externalizing levels associated with more parental
             monitoring was significantly more pronounced when youths
             lived in neighborhoods with more residential
             instability.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1023018502759},
   Key = {fds272141}
}

@article{fds272279,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Price, JM and Coie, JD and Christopoulos,
             C},
   Title = {On the Development of Aggressive Dyadic Relationships in
             Boys’ Peer Groups},
   Journal = {Human Development},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {4-5},
   Pages = {260-270},
   Publisher = {S. Karger AG},
   Year = {1990},
   ISSN = {0018-716X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1990DQ90900005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1159/000276523},
   Key = {fds272279}
}

@article{fds272247,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Price, JM},
   Title = {On the relation between social information processing and
             socially competent behavior in early school-aged
             children.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1385-1397},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7982356},
   Abstract = {This article tested the hypotheses that (1) children's
             behavioral competence is a function of patterns of social
             information processing; (2) processing correlates of
             behavior occur at each of 5 steps of processing within each
             of 3 social situations; (3) measures at each step uniquely
             increment each other in predicting behavior; (4) the
             relation between processing and behavior is stronger within
             than across domains; and (5) processing patterns are more
             sophisticated among older than younger children and the
             processing-behavior relation is stronger among older than
             younger children. Videorecorded stimuli were used to assess
             processing patterns (encoding, interpretational errors and
             bias, response generation, response evaluation, and
             enactment skill) in 3 domains (peer group entry, response to
             provocation, and response to authority directive) in 259
             first-, second-, and third-grade boys and girls (ages 6-9
             years). Ratings of behavioral competence in each domain were
             made by peers and teachers. Findings generally supported
             hypotheses, with the magnitude of relations being
             modest.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1994.tb00823.x},
   Key = {fds272247}
}

@article{fds272049,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, and S, and Gorman-Smith, and D, and Sullivan, and T, and Orpinas, and P, and Dodge, TM-SVPPKA and member},
   Title = {Parent and peer predictors of physical dating violence
             perpetration in early adolescence: Tests of moderation and
             gender differences},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent
             Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {535-550},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374410902976270},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374410902976270},
   Key = {fds272049}
}

@article{fds272086,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Criss, MM and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Parents' monitoring knowledge attenuates the link between
             antisocial friends and adolescent delinquent
             behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {299-310},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-007-9178-4},
   Abstract = {Developmental trajectories of parents' knowledge of their
             adolescents' whereabouts and activities were tested as
             moderators of transactional associations between friends'
             antisociality and adolescent delinquent behavior. 504
             adolescents (50% female) provided annual reports (from ages
             12 to 16) of their parents' knowledge and (from ages 13 to
             16) their own delinquent behavior and their friends'
             antisociality. Parents also reported the adolescents'
             delinquent behavior. Growth mixture modeling was used to
             identify two sub-groups based on their monitoring knowledge
             growth trajectories. Adolescents in the sub-group
             characterized by decreasing levels of parents' knowledge
             reported more delinquent behavior and more friend
             antisociality in early adolescence, and reported greater
             increases in delinquent behavior and friend antisociality
             from early to middle adolescence compared to adolescents in
             the sub-group characterized by increasing levels of parents'
             knowledge. Transactional associations consistent with social
             influence and social selection processes also were
             suppressed in the increasing knowledge sub-group as compared
             to the decreasing knowledge sub-group.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-007-9178-4},
   Key = {fds272086}
}

@article{fds271931,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Yu, T and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Pathways of Peer Relationships from Childhood to Young
             Adulthood.},
   Journal = {Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {111-117},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0193-3973},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2013.12.002},
   Abstract = {This study examined trajectories of peer social preference
             during childhood and personality assessed in early
             adolescence in relation to trajectories of friendship
             quality during early adulthood. Participants (N = 585) were
             followed from age 5 to age 23. At ages 5 to 8, peers
             provided sociometric nominations; at age 12 participants
             reported their own personality characteristics; from age 19
             to 23 participants rated their friendship quality. Latent
             growth modeling revealed that trajectories characterized by
             high levels of childhood peer social preference were related
             to trajectories characterized by high levels of early
             adulthood friendship quality. Early adolescent personality
             characterized by extraversion and conscientiousness
             predicted higher friendship quality at age 19, and
             conscientiousness predicted change in friendship quality
             from age 19 to 23. This study demonstrates that peer
             relationships show continuity from childhood to early
             adulthood and that qualities of core personality are linked
             to the development of adult friendships.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.appdev.2013.12.002},
   Key = {fds271931}
}

@article{fds272188,
   Author = {Dishion, TJ and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Peer contagion in interventions for children and
             adolescents: moving towards an understanding of the ecology
             and dynamics of change.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {395-400},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-005-3579-z},
   Abstract = {The influence of deviant peers on youth behavior is of
             growing concern, both in naturally occurring peer
             interactions and in interventions that might inadvertently
             exacerbate deviant development. The focus of this special
             issue is on understanding the moderating and mediating
             variables that account for peer contagion effects in
             interventions for youth. This set of nine innovative papers
             moves the field forward on three fronts: (1) Broadening the
             empirical basis for understanding the conditions under which
             peer contagion is more or less likely (that is, moderators
             of effects); (2) Identifying mechanisms that might account
             for peer contagion effects (mediators); and (3) Forging the
             methodological rigor that is needed to study peer contagion
             effects within the context of intervention trials. We
             propose an ecological framework for disentangling the
             effects of individuals, group interactions, and program
             contexts in understanding peer contagion effects. Finally,
             we suggest methodological enhancements to study peer
             contagion in intervention trials.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-005-3579-z},
   Key = {fds272188}
}

@article{fds272071,
   Author = {Stearns, E and Dodge, KA and Nicholson, M},
   Title = {Peer Contextual Influences on the Growth of
             Authority-Acceptance Problems in Early Elementary
             School.},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {208-231},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0272-930X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/mpq.2008.0018},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the effects of the peer social
             context and child characteristics on the growth of
             authority-acceptance behavior problems across first, second,
             and third grades, using data from the normative sample of
             the Fast Track Project. Three hundred sixty-eight European
             American and African American boys and girls (51% male; 46%
             African American) and their classmates were assessed in each
             grade by teacher ratings on the Teacher Observation of Child
             Adaptation-Revised. Children's growth in
             authority-acceptance behavior problems across time was
             partially attributable to the level of disruptive behavior
             in the class-room peer context into which they were placed.
             Peer-context influence, however, were strongest among
             same-gender peers. Findings held for both boys and girls,
             both European Americans and African Americans, and
             nondeviant, marginally deviant, and highly deviant children.
             Findings suggest that children learn and follow behavioral
             norms from their same-gender peers within the
             classroom.},
   Doi = {10.1353/mpq.2008.0018},
   Key = {fds272071}
}

@article{fds39755,
   Author = {Schwartz, D. and McFadyen-Ketchum, S.A. and Dodge. K.A. and Pettit, G.S. and Bates, J.E.},
   Title = {Peer group victimization as a predictor of children's
             behavior problems at home and in school(Abstract)},
   Journal = {Clinician’s Research Digest: Briefings in Behavioral
             Science},
   Volume = {17},
   Year = {1999},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9524809},
   Key = {fds39755}
}

@article{fds272215,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and McFadyen-Ketchum, SA and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Peer group victimization as a predictor of children's
             behavior problems at home and in school.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {87-99},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   Abstract = {This study reports a short-term prospective investigation of
             the role of peer group victimization in the development of
             children's behavior problems, at home and in school.
             Sociometric interviews were utilized to assess aggression,
             victimization by peers, and peer rejection, for 330 children
             who were in either the third or fourth grade (approximate
             mean ages of 8-9 years old). Behavior problems were assessed
             using standardized behavior checklists completed by mothers
             and teachers. A follow-up assessment of behavior problems
             was completed 2 years later, when the children were in
             either the fifth or sixth grade (approximate mean ages of
             10-11 years old). Victimization was both concurrently and
             prospectively associated with externalizing, attention
             dysregulation, and immature/dependent behavior.
             Victimization also predicted increases in these difficulties
             over time, and incremented the prediction in later behavior
             problems associated with peer rejection and aggression. The
             results of this investigation demonstrate that victimization
             in the peer group is an important predictor of later
             behavioral maladjustment.},
   Key = {fds272215}
}

@article{fds272286,
   Author = {Gifford-Smith, M and Dodge, KA and Dishion, TJ and McCord,
             J},
   Title = {Peer influence in children and adolescents: crossing the
             bridge from developmental to intervention
             science.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {255-265},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15957555},
   Abstract = {Considerable evidence supports the hypothesis that peer
             relationships influence the growth of problem behavior in
             youth. Developmental research consistently documents the
             high levels of covariation between peer and youth deviance,
             even controlling for selection effects. Ironically, the most
             common public interventions for deviant youth involve
             segregation from mainstream peers and aggregation into
             settings with other deviant youth. Developmental research on
             peer influence suggests that desired positive effects of
             group interventions in education, mental health, juvenile
             justice, and community programming may be offset by deviant
             peer influences in these settings. Given the public health
             policy issues raised by these findings, there is a need to
             better understand the conditions under which these peer
             contagion effects are most pronounced with respect to
             intervention foci and context, the child's developmental
             level, and specific strategies for managing youth behavior
             in groups.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-005-3563-7},
   Key = {fds272286}
}

@misc{fds39751,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Richard, B.A},
   Title = {Peer perceptions, aggression, and the development of peer
             relations},
   Pages = {35-58},
   Booktitle = {The development of social cognition},
   Publisher = {New York: Springer-Verlag},
   Editor = {J. Pryor and J. Day},
   Year = {1985},
   Key = {fds39751}
}

@article{fds272142,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, S and Coie, JD and Maumary-Gremaud, A and Bierman, K and Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Peer rejection and aggression and early starter models of
             conduct disorder.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {217-230},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12041708},
   Abstract = {Peer rejection and aggression in the early school years were
             examined for their relevance to early starting conduct
             problems. The sample of 657 boys and girls from 4
             geographical locations was followed from 1st through 4th
             grades. Peer rejection in 1st grade added incrementally to
             the prediction of early starting conduct problems in 3rd and
             4th grades, over and above the effects of aggression. Peer
             rejection and aggression in 1st grade were also associated
             with the impulsive and emotionally reactive behaviors found
             in older samples. Being rejected by peers subsequent to 1st
             grade marginally added to the prediction of early starting
             conduct problems in 3rd and 4th grades, controlling for 1st
             grade ADHD symptoms and aggression. Furthermore, peer
             rejection partially mediated the predictive relation between
             early ADHD symptoms and subsequent conduct problems. These
             results support the hypothesis that the experience of peer
             rejection in the early school years adds to the risk for
             early starting conduct problems.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1015198612049},
   Key = {fds272142}
}

@article{fds272139,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Lansford, JE and Burks, VS and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Fontaine, R and Price, JM},
   Title = {Peer rejection and social information-processing factors in
             the development of aggressive behavior problems in
             children.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {374-393},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12705561},
   Abstract = {The relation between social rejection and growth in
             antisocial behavior was investigated. In Study 1,259 boys
             and girls (34% African American) were followed from Grades 1
             to 3 (ages 6-8 years) to Grades 5 to 7 (ages 10-12 years).
             Early peer rejection predicted growth in aggression. In
             Study 2,585 boys and girls (16% African American) were
             followed from kindergarten to Grade 3 (ages 5-8 years), and
             findings were replicated. Furthermore, early aggression
             moderated the effect of rejection, such that rejection
             exacerbated antisocial development only among children
             initially disposed toward aggression. In Study 3, social
             information-processing patterns measured in Study 1 were
             found to mediate partially the effect of early rejection on
             later aggression. In Study 4, processing patterns measured
             in Study 2 replicated the mediation effect. Findings are
             integrated into a recursive model of antisocial
             development.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.7402004},
   Key = {fds272139}
}

@article{fds272116,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Jordan, KY and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Peer rejection in childhood, involvement with antisocial
             peers in early adolescence, and the development of
             externalizing behavior problems.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {337-354},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579401002085},
   Abstract = {A longitudinal, prospective design was used to examine the
             roles of peer rejection in middle childhood and antisocial
             peer involvement in early adolescence in the development of
             adolescent externalizing behavior problems. Both early
             starter and late starter pathways were considered. Classroom
             sociometric interviews from ages 6 through 9 years,
             adolescent reports of peers' behavior at age 13 years, and
             parent, teacher, and adolescent self-reports of
             externalizing behavior problems from age 5 through 14 years
             were available for 400 adolescents. Results indicate that
             experiencing peer rejection in elementary school and greater
             involvement with antisocial peers in early adolescence are
             correlated but that these peer relationship experiences may
             represent two different pathways to adolescent externalizing
             behavior problems. Peer rejection experiences, but not
             involvement with antisocial peers. predict later
             externalizing behavior problems when controlling for
             stability in externalizing behavior. Externalizing problems
             were most common when rejection was experienced repeatedly.
             Early externalizing problems did not appear to moderate the
             relation between peer rejection and later problem behavior.
             Discussion highlights multiple pathways connecting
             externalizing behavior problems from early childhood through
             adolescence with peer relationship experiences in middle
             childhood and early adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579401002085},
   Key = {fds272116}
}

@article{fds271913,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Fontaine, RG and Bates, JE and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Peer rejection, affiliation with deviant peers, delinquency,
             and risky sexual behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1742-1751},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0047-2891},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-014-0175-y},
   Abstract = {Risky sexual behavior poses significant health risks by
             increasing sexually transmitted infections and unintended
             pregnancies. Previous research has documented many factors
             related to risky sexual behavior. This study adds to the
             literature by proposing a prospective, developmental model
             of peer factors related to risky sexual behavior.
             Developmental pathways to risky sexual behavior were
             examined in a sample of 517 individuals (51% female; 82%
             European American, 16% African American, 2% other) followed
             from age 5-27. Structural equation models examined direct
             and indirect effects of peer rejection (assessed via peer
             nominations at ages 5, 6, 7, and 8), affiliation with
             deviant peers (assessed via self-report at ages 11 and 12),
             and delinquency (assessed via maternal report at ages 10 and
             16) on risky sexual behavior (assessed via self-report at
             age 27). More peer rejection during childhood, affiliation
             with deviant peers during pre- adolescence, and delinquency
             in childhood and adolescence predicted more risky sexual
             behavior through age 27, although delinquency at age 16 was
             the only risk factor that had a significant direct effect on
             risky sexual behavior through age 27 above and beyond the
             other risk factors. Peer rejection was related to subsequent
             risk factors for girls but not boys. Peer risk factors as
             early as age 5 shape developmental pathways through
             childhood and adolescence and have implications for risky
             sexual behavior into adulthood.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10964-014-0175-y},
   Key = {fds271913}
}

@article{fds272288,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Peer relationship antecedents of delinquent behavior in late
             adolescence: Is there evidence of demographic group
             differences in developmental processes?},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-18},
   Year = {2005},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579405050078},
   Abstract = {A longitudinal prospective design was used to test the
             generalizability of low levels of social preference and high
             levels of antisocial peer involvement as risk factors for
             delinquent behavior problems to African American (AA) and
             European American (EA) boys and girls (N = 384). Social
             preference scores were computed from peer reports in middle
             childhood (ages 6-9). Parents and adolescents reported
             antisocial peer involvement in early adolescence (ages
             13-16) and adolescents reported on their own delinquent
             behavior in late adolescence (ages 17 and 18). Analyses
             tested for differences across four groups (AA boys, EA boys,
             AA girls, EA girls) in construct measurement, mean levels,
             and associations among variables. Few measurement
             differences were found. Mean-level differences were found
             for social preference and delinquent behavior. AA boys were
             least accepted by peers and reported the highest level of
             delinquent behavior. EA girls were most accepted by peers
             and reported the lowest level of delinquent behavior.
             Associations among peer experiences and delinquent behavior
             were equivalent across groups, with lower levels of social
             preference and higher levels of antisocial peer involvement
             associated with more delinquent behavior. Person-centered
             analyses showed the risk associated with low social
             preference and high antisocial peer involvement to be
             similar across groups, providing further evidence of the
             generalizability of the peer relationship experiences as
             risk factors for subsequent delinquent behavior problems.
             Copyright © 2005 Cambridge University Press.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579405050078},
   Key = {fds272288}
}

@article{fds272099,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Capanna, C and Dodge, KA and Caprara, GV and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Pastorelli, C},
   Title = {Peer social preference and depressive symptoms of children
             in Italy and the United States.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Development},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {274-283},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0165-0254},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19777082},
   Abstract = {This study examined the role of low social preference in
             relation to subsequent depressive symptoms, with particular
             attention to prior depressive symptoms, prior and concurrent
             aggression, mutual friendships, and peer victimization.
             Italian children (N = 288) were followed from grade 6
             through grade 8, and American children (N = 585) were
             followed from kindergarten through grade 12. Analyses
             demonstrate that low social preference contributes to later
             depressive symptoms. The effects are not accounted for by
             depressive symptoms or aggression experienced prior to low
             social preference but are mostly accounted for by the
             co-occurrence of depressive symptoms with concurrent
             aggressive behavior; gender, mutual friendships, and peer
             victimization generally did not moderate these associations.
             We conclude that peer relationship problems do predict later
             depressive symptoms, and a possible mechanism through which
             this effect occurs is through the effect of poor peer
             relationships on increasing aggressive behavior, which is
             associated with depressive symptoms.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0165025407076440},
   Key = {fds272099}
}

@article{fds272271,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Coie, JD and Pettit, GS and Price, JM},
   Title = {Peer status and aggression in boys' groups: developmental
             and contextual analyses.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1289-1309},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2245725},
   Abstract = {The social transactions of popular, rejected, neglected, and
             average first- and third-grade boys were examined during
             their initial encounters with peers. 23 groups of 5 or 6
             boys each were observed for 45-min free-play sessions
             conducted on 5 consecutive days, with sociometric interviews
             following each session. Social preference in the play groups
             correlated significantly with classroom social preference
             after the third and subsequent play sessions for the third
             graders, and after the fourth and subsequent sessions for
             the first graders. The observational coding system
             distinguished 4 types of aggressive behavior that were
             hypothesized to relate to peer status in different ways. The
             first, rough play, was not related to peer status. However,
             rejected boys at both ages displayed significantly higher
             rates of angry reactive aggression and instrumental
             aggression than average boys. The relation between bullying
             and peer status varied with the age of the child. Popular
             first graders engaged in more bullying than average first
             graders, but popular third graders did not differ from
             average in bullying. Other questions concerned the temporal
             relation between play group behaviors and social preference
             scores within the group. Socially interactive behaviors
             anteceded high preference by peers, and low preference in
             turn led to social isolation in subsequent
             sessions.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1990.tb02862.x},
   Key = {fds272271}
}

@misc{fds39737,
   Author = {Price, J.M. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Peers' contribution to children's social maladjustment:
             Description and intervention},
   Pages = {341-370},
   Booktitle = {Contributions of peer relationships to children's
             development},
   Publisher = {New York: Wiley},
   Editor = {T. J. Berndt and G.W. Ladd},
   Year = {1989},
   Key = {fds39737}
}

@misc{fds39735,
   Author = {Kupersmidt, J. and Coie, J.D. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Predicting disorder from peer social problems},
   Pages = {274-338},
   Booktitle = {Peer rejection in childhood: Origins, consequences, and
             intervention},
   Publisher = {New York: Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {S.R. Asher and J.D. Coie},
   Year = {1990},
   Key = {fds39735}
}

@article{fds39023,
   Author = {McFadyen-Ketchum, S.A. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Problems in social relationships},
   Series = {2nd edition},
   Pages = {338-365},
   Booktitle = {Treatment of childhood disorders},
   Publisher = {New York: Guilford},
   Editor = {E.J. Mash and R.A. Barkley},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds39023}
}

@misc{fds39738,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Problems in social relationships},
   Pages = {222-244},
   Booktitle = {Behavioral treatment of childhood disorders},
   Publisher = {New York: Guilford Press},
   Editor = {E.J. Mash and R.A. Barkley},
   Year = {1989},
   Key = {fds39738}
}

@article{fds272210,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Promoting social competence in children},
   Journal = {Schools and Teaching},
   Volume = {1},
   Year = {1983},
   Key = {fds272210}
}

@article{fds272252,
   Author = {Price, JM and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Reactive and proactive aggression in childhood: relations to
             peer status and social context dimensions.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {455-471},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00915038},
   Abstract = {Although there has been an accumulation of evidence to
             suggest a link between peer-directed aggression and social
             rejection, little attention has been given to the relations
             between specific subtypes of aggressive behavior and social
             rejection. The purpose of this investigation was to examine
             the relations between two subtypes of aggressive behavior
             (reactive and proactive aggression) and children's classroom
             peer status. The reciprocity of each of these subtypes of
             aggressive behavior and the social contexts in which these
             behaviors occur were also examined. Assessments of each of
             these forms of aggression among 70 boys (ages 5 and 6) were
             conducted using direct observations and teacher ratings. In
             general, directing reactive aggressive behavior toward peers
             was associated with social rejection, while utilization of
             instrumental aggression was positively related to peer
             status. The findings also indicated that directing proactive
             forms of aggression toward peers was related to being the
             target of proactive aggression. Finally, among older boys,
             both subtypes of aggression were more likely to occur during
             rough play than during any other type of play
             activity.},
   Doi = {10.1007/bf00915038},
   Key = {fds272252}
}

@article{fds272204,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and McClaskey, CL and Feldman, E},
   Title = {Situational approach to the assessment of social competence
             in children.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {344-353},
   Year = {1985},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-006x.53.3.344},
   Abstract = {The present study attempted to generate and evaluate a
             taxonomy of the situations and tasks most likely to lead
             deviant children to experience social difficulties. In Study
             1, elementary school teachers and clinicians were asked to
             notice such situations as they occurred. The outcome was a
             44-item Taxonomy of Problematic Social Situations for
             Children. This survey was administered to teachers of 45
             socially rejected children and 39 adaptive children. The
             survey was found to have high internal consistency and high
             test-retest reliability. Six situation types emerged as
             factors in analyses: Peer Group Entry; Response to Peer
             Provocations; Response to Failure; Response to Success;
             Social Expectations; and Teacher Expectations. Teachers
             rated the rejected group as having more problems than the
             adaptive group in each situation, but particularly in
             Response to Peer Provocations and Teacher Expectations. In
             Study 2, 15 items within the six factors were presented in
             hypothetical format to 39 clinic-referred rejected
             aggressive children and 34 adaptive children, who were asked
             to role-play their responses. The items, in particular the
             provocation items, again differentiated the two groups. Sex
             and age differences were also found. The usefulness of this
             taxonomy in a three-step model of clinical assessment is
             proposed. © 1985 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-006x.53.3.344},
   Key = {fds272204}
}

@article{fds272207,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Schlundt, DG and Schocken, I and Delugach,
             JD},
   Title = {Social competence and children's sociometric status: The
             role of peer group entry strategies},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {29},
   Pages = {309-336},
   Year = {1983},
   Key = {fds272207}
}

@article{fds272216,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and Coie, JD and Hubbard, JA and Cillessen,
             AH and Lemerise, EA and Bateman, H},
   Title = {Social-cognitive and behavioral correlates of aggression and
             victimization in boys' play groups.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {431-440},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9915650},
   Abstract = {A contrived play group procedure was utilized to examine the
             behavioral and social-cognitive correlates of reactive
             aggression, proactive aggression, and victimization via
             peers. Eleven play groups, each of which consisted of six
             familiar African-American 8-year-old boys, met for 45-min
             sessions on five consecutive days. Social-cognitive
             interviews were conducted following the second and fourth
             sessions. Play group interactions were videotaped and
             examined by trained observers. High rates of proactive
             aggression were associated with positive outcome
             expectancies for aggression/assertion, frequent displays of
             assertive social behavior, and low rates of submissive
             behavior. Reactive aggression was associated with hostile
             attributional tendencies and frequent victimization by
             peers. Victimization was associated with submissive
             behavior, hostile attributional bias, reactive aggression,
             and negative outcome expectations for aggression/assertion.
             These results demonstrate that there is a theoretically
             coherent and empirically distinct set of correlates
             associated with each of the examined aggression subtypes,
             and with victimization by peers.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1022695601088},
   Key = {fds272216}
}

@article{fds272246,
   Author = {Lochman, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Social-cognitive processes of severely violent, moderately
             aggressive, and nonaggressive boys.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {366-374},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8201075},
   Abstract = {This study examined social-cognitive processes of aggressive
             and nonaggressive boys at preadolescent and early adolescent
             age levels. The social-cognitive variables included
             processing of cues, attributions, social problem solving,
             affect labeling, outcome expectations, and perceived
             competence and self-worth. Results indicated that a wide
             range of social-cognitive processes is distorted and
             deficient for violent and moderately aggressive children,
             and that different types of social cognition contribute
             unique variance in discriminating among groups. Severely
             violent boys at both age levels had difficulties with cue
             recall, attributions, social problem solving, general
             self-worth, and a pattern of endorsing unusually positive
             affects that they may experience in different settings.
             Moderately aggressive boys shared some of the
             social-cognitive difficulties demonstrated by severely
             violent boys, but they also displayed indications that their
             aggression may be more planfully aimed to achieve expected
             outcomes. When the moderately aggressive and the violent
             boys differed from the nonaggressive boys on attributional
             biases and low perceived self-worth, a continuum existed
             with violent boys displaying more extreme social-cognitive
             dysfunctions than the moderately aggressive boys. These
             findings carry implications for cognitive-behavioral
             intervention with severely violent and moderately aggressive
             youths.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-006x.62.2.366},
   Key = {fds272246}
}

@article{fds272098,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Social-information-processing factors in reactive and
             proactive aggression in children's peer groups.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1146-1158},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3694454},
   Abstract = {We examined social-information-processing mechanisms (e.g.,
             hostile attributional biases and intention-cue detection
             deficits) in chronic reactive and proactive aggressive
             behavior in children's peer groups. In Study 1, a
             teacher-rating instrument was developed to assess these
             behaviors in elementary school children (N = 259). Reactive
             and proactive scales were found to be internally consistent,
             and factor analyses partially supported convergent and
             discriminant validities. In Study 2, behavioral correlates
             of these forms of aggression were examined through
             assessments by peers (N = 339). Both types of aggression
             related to social rejection, but only proactively aggressive
             boys were also viewed as leaders and as having a sense of
             humor. In Study 3, we hypothesized that reactive aggression
             (but not proactive aggression) would occur as a function of
             hostile attributional biases and intention-cue detection
             deficits. Four groups of socially rejected boys (reactive
             aggressive, proactive aggressive, reactive-proactive
             aggressive, and nonaggressive) and a group of average boys
             were presented with a series of hypothetical videorecorded
             vignettes depicting provocations by peers and were asked to
             interpret the intentions of the provocateur (N = 117). Only
             the two reactive-aggressive groups displayed biases and
             deficits in interpretations. In Study 4, attributional
             biases and deficits were found to be positively correlated
             with the rate of reactive aggression (but not proactive
             aggression) displayed in free play with peers (N = 127).
             These studies supported the hypothesis that attributional
             biases and deficits are related to reactive aggression but
             not to proactive aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.53.6.1146},
   Key = {fds272098}
}

@article{fds271956,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Godwin, J and Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {Social-information-processing patterns mediate the impact of
             preventive intervention on adolescent antisocial
             behavior.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {456-465},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23406610},
   Abstract = {In the study reported here, we tested the hypothesis that
             the Fast Track preventive intervention's positive impact on
             antisocial behavior in adolescence is mediated by its impact
             on social-cognitive processes during elementary school. Fast
             Track is the largest and longest federally funded preventive
             intervention trial for children showing aggressive behavior
             at an early age. Participants were 891 high-risk
             kindergarten children (69% male, 31% female; 49% ethnic
             minority, 51% ethnic majority) who were randomly assigned to
             an intervention or a control group by school cluster.
             Multiyear intervention addressed social-cognitive processes
             through social-skill training groups, parent groups,
             classroom curricula, peer coaching, and tutoring. Assigning
             children to the intervention decreased their mean
             antisocial-behavior score after Grade 9 by 0.16 standardized
             units (p < .01). Structural equation models indicated that
             27% of the intervention's impact on antisocial behavior was
             mediated by its impact on three social-cognitive processes:
             reducing hostile-attribution biases, increasing competent
             response generation to social problems, and devaluing
             aggression. These findings support a model of antisocial
             behavioral development mediated by social-cognitive
             processes, and they guide prevention planners to focus on
             these processes.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0956797612457394},
   Key = {fds271956}
}

@article{fds272249,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Socialization mediators of the relation between
             socioeconomic status and child conduct problems},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {2 Spec No},
   Pages = {1385-1398},
   Year = {1994},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8013245},
   Abstract = {The goal was to examine processes in socialization that
             might account for an observed relation between early
             socioeconomic status and later child behavior problems. A
             representative sample of 585 children (n = 51 from the
             lowest socioeconomic class) was followed from preschool to
             grade 3. Socioeconomic status assessed in preschool
             significantly predicted teacher-rated externalizing problems
             and peer-rated aggressive behavior in kindergarten and
             grades 1, 2, and 3. Socioeconomic status was significantly
             negatively correlated with 8 factors in the child's
             socialization and social context, including harsh
             discipline, lack of maternal warmth, exposure to aggressive
             adult models, maternal aggressive values, family life
             stressors, mother's lack of social support, peer group
             instability, and lack of cognitive stimulation. These
             factors, in turn, significantly predicted teacher-rated
             externalizing problems and peer-nominated aggression and
             accounted for over half of the total effect of socioeconomic
             status on these outcomes. These findings suggest that part
             of the effect of socioeconomic status on children's
             aggressive development may be mediated by status-related
             socializing experiences.},
   Doi = {10.2307/1131407},
   Key = {fds272249}
}

@article{fds272244,
   Author = {Strassberg, Z and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Spanking in the home and children's subsequent aggression
             toward kindergarten peers},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {445-461},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579400006040},
   Abstract = {Although spanking of children is almost universal in U.S.
             society, its effects are not well understood. We examined
             the longitudinal relation between parental spanking and
             other physical punishment of preschool children and
             children's aggressive behavior toward peers later in
             kindergarten. A total of 273 boys and girls from diverse
             backgrounds served as subjects. The findings were consistent
             with a socialization model in which higher levels of
             severity in parental punishment practices are associated
             with higher levels of children's subsequent aggression
             toward peers. Findings indicated that children who had been
             spanked evidenced levels of aggression that were higher than
             those who had not been spanked, and children who had been
             the objects of violent discipline became the most aggressive
             of all groups. Patterns were qualified by the sexes of the
             parent and child and subtypes of child aggression (reactive,
             bullying, and instrumental). The findings suggest that in
             spite of parents' goals, spanking fails to promote prosocial
             development and, instead, is associated with higher rates of
             aggression toward peers. © 1994, Cambridge University
             Press. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400006040},
   Key = {fds272244}
}

@article{fds272232,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Clawson, MA and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Stability and change in peer-rejected status: The role of
             child behavior, parenting, and family ecology},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {267-294},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://www.jstor.org/stable/23087880},
   Abstract = {Antecedents and correlates of peer rejection in kindergarten
             and first grade were examined. Interviews with 585 mothers
             provided data on parenting and family ecology. Child
             behavior was indexed by peer and teacher ratings. Children
             were classified as sociometrically accepted in both grades,
             rejected in only one grade, or rejected in both grades.
             Compared to accepted children, rejected children were more
             likely to come from lower SES families in which restrictive
             discipline occurred at a high rate, and were more aggressive
             and less socially and academically skilled. Children
             rejected in both grades were more aggressive than children
             rejected in one grade. Decreases in aggression and increases
             in academic performance were shown by children whose status
             improved across grades, with the opposite pattern shown by
             children whose status worsened. Findings are discussed in
             terms of the etiology and maintenance of peer rejection in
             the early school years.},
   Key = {fds272232}
}

@article{fds272222,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {The early socialization of aggressive victims of
             bullying.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {68},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {665-675},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9306645},
   Abstract = {This study reports the first prospective investigation of
             the early family experiences of boys who later emerged as
             both aggressive and bullied (i.e., aggressive victims)
             during their middle childhood years. It was hypothesized
             that a history of violent victimization by adults leads to
             emotion dysregulation that results in a dual pattern of
             aggressive behavior and victimization by peers. Interviews
             with mothers of 198 5-year-old boys assessed preschool home
             environments. Four to 5 years later, aggressive behavior and
             peer victimization were assessed in the school classroom.
             The early experiences of 16 aggressive victims were
             contrasted with those of 21 passive (nonaggressive) victims,
             33 nonvictimized aggressors, and 128 normative boys.
             Analyses indicated that the aggressive victim group had
             experienced more punitive, hostile, and abusive family
             treatment than the other groups. In contrast, the
             nonvictimized aggressive group had a history of greater
             exposure to adult aggression and conflict, but not
             victimization by adults, than did the normative group,
             whereas the passive victim group did not differ from the
             normative group on any home environment variable.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1997.tb04228.x},
   Key = {fds272222}
}

@article{fds272278,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and Coie, JD},
   Title = {The emergence of chronic peer victimization in boys' play
             groups.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1755-1772},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8112117},
   Abstract = {This investigation utilized a contrived play group procedure
             to examine the behavioral patterns leading to chronic
             victimization by peers in middle childhood. 30 play groups,
             each of which consisted of 6 unacquainted African-American
             6-year-old or 8-year-old boys, met for 45-min sessions on 5
             consecutive days. Play group interactions were videotaped
             and then examined. 13 boys who came to be chronically
             victimized by their play group peers were identified, along
             with matched nonvictim contrasts. Victims demonstrated lower
             rates of assertive behaviors, such as persuasion attempts
             and social conversation initiatives, and higher rates of
             nonassertive behaviors, such as submissions to peers' social
             initiatives, than contrasts. This nonassertive behavior
             pattern appears to have preceded the development of chronic
             victimization. Children who eventually emerged as victims
             were pervasively submissive, beginning in the initial 2
             sessions. However, marked individual differences in
             victimization by peers did not become apparent until the
             final 3 sessions. These data provide evidence of strong
             linkages between submissive social behavior and the
             emergence of chronic victimization by peers.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1993.tb04211.x},
   Key = {fds272278}
}

@article{fds272267,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Bakshi, A and Dodge, KA and Coie, JD},
   Title = {The Emergence of Social Dominance in Young Boys' Play
             Groups: Developmental Differences and Behavioral
             Correlates},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1017-1025},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.26.6.1017},
   Abstract = {This study examined relations among dominance, sociometric
             preference, and social behavior in groups of 1st- and
             3rd-grade boys. Twenty groups of 6 unacquainted boys met for
             five 45-min semistructured play sessions on consecutive
             days. Sociometric interviews yielded daily social preference
             scores. Boys' social behaviors were coded from video records
             into discrete categories. Dominance hierarchies were formed
             on the basis of asymmetry (receiving vs. initiating) of
             peer-directed aggression or persuasion attempts. Group-level
             results indicated that the least coherently organized groups
             were those containing younger boys and those in which
             aggression occurred at a high rate. Individual-level results
             indicated that dominance was associated with social
             preference to a greater degree among younger than older
             boys. Dominance was more highly related to leadership in
             older than younger boys. Implications of these findings are
             discussed with respect to the role of aggression in the
             social organization of boys' peer groups.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.26.6.1017},
   Key = {fds272267}
}

@article{fds272196,
   Author = {Asher, SR and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {The identification of socially rejected children},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {444-449},
   Year = {1986},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.22.4.444},
   Abstract = {Recent research indicates the importance of distinguishing
             between sociometrically neglected children and
             sociometrically rejected children. Overall, rejected
             children exhibit more serious adjustment problems in
             childhood and in later life. However, making the distinction
             between neglected status and rejected status traditionally
             has required administering a negative-nomination sociometric
             measure, a measure viewed by some researchers and school
             personnel as having potentially harmful effects. In this
             article, we propose and evaluate an alternative method of
             identifying rejected children, which involves the joint use
             of positive-nomination and rating-scale measures. The
             results indicate that the alternative method accurately
             identifies a high percentage of rejected children (91.2%)
             and that the stability of rejected status, identified using
             the new method, is similar to that obtained in previous
             research. The method proposed here should make it possible
             to identify rejected children when circumstances do not
             allow for the administration of a negative-nomination
             measure. © 1986 American Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.22.4.444},
   Key = {fds272196}
}

@article{fds272170,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Meece,
             DW},
   Title = {The impact of after-school peer contact on early adolescent
             externalizing problems is moderated by parental monitoring,
             perceived neighborhood safety, and prior
             adjustment.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {768-778},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00055},
   Abstract = {Unsupervised peer contact in the after-school hours was
             examined as a risk factor in the development of
             externalizing problems in a longitudinal sample of early
             adolescents. Parental monitoring, neighborhood safety, and
             adolescents' preexisting behavioral problems were considered
             as possible moderators of the risk relation. Interviews with
             mothers provided information on monitoring, neighborhood
             safety, and demographics. Early adolescent (ages 12-13
             years) after-school time use was assessed via a telephone
             interview in grade 6 (N = 438); amount of time spent with
             peers when no adult was present was tabulated. Teacher
             ratings of externalizing behavior problems were collected in
             grades 6 and 7. Unsupervised peer contact, lack of
             neighborhood safety, and low monitoring incrementally
             predicted grade 7 externalizing problems, after controlling
             for family background factors and grade 6 problems. The
             greatest risk was for those unsupervised adolescents living
             in low-monitoring homes and comparatively unsafe
             neighborhoods. The significant relation between unsupervised
             peer contact and problem behavior in grade 7 held only for
             those adolescents who already were high in problem behavior
             in grade 6. These findings point to the need to consider
             individual, family, and neighborhood factors in evaluating
             risks associated with young adolescents' after-school care
             experiences.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00055},
   Key = {fds272170}
}

@article{fds272034,
   Author = {Thomas, DE and Bierman, KL and Powers, CJ and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ},
   Title = {The influence of classroom aggression and classroom climate
             on the early development of aggressive-disruptive behavior
             problems in school},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {751-757},
   Year = {2011},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/7997 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds272034}
}

@article{fds272106,
   Author = {Goodnight, JA and Bates, JE and Newman, JP and Dodge, KA and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {The interactive influences of friend deviance and reward
             dominance on the development of externalizing behavior
             during middle adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {573-583},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-006-9036-9},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the interactive effects of friend
             deviance and reward dominance on the development of
             externalizing behavior of adolescents in the Child
             Development Project. Reward dominance was assessed at age 16
             by performance on a computer-presented card-playing game in
             which participants had the choice of either continuing or
             discontinuing the game as the likelihood of reward decreased
             and the likelihood of punishment increased. At ages 14 and
             16, friend deviance and externalizing behavior were assessed
             through self-report. As expected, based on motivational
             balance and response modulation theories, path analysis
             revealed that age 14 friend deviance predicted age 16
             externalizing behavior controlling for age 14 externalizing
             behavior. Reward dominance was a significant moderator of
             the relationship between friend deviance and externalizing
             behavior. The contributions of deviant friends to the
             development of externalizing behavior were enhanced by
             adolescents' reward dominance.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-006-9036-9},
   Key = {fds272106}
}

@article{fds271951,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {The link between harsh home environments and negative
             academic trajectories is exacerbated by victimization in the
             elementary school peer group.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {305-316},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000314193900010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {This article presents a prospective investigation focusing
             on the moderating role of peer victimization on associations
             between harsh home environments in the preschool years and
             academic trajectories during elementary school. The
             participants were 388 children (198 boys, 190 girls) who we
             recruited as part of an ongoing multisite longitudinal
             investigation. Preschool home environment was assessed with
             structured interviews and questionnaires completed by
             parents. Peer victimization was assessed with a peer
             nomination inventory that was administered when the average
             age of the participants was approximately 8.5 years. Grade
             point averages (GPAs) were obtained from reviews of school
             records, conducted for 7 consecutive years. Indicators of
             restrictive punitive discipline and exposure to violence
             were associated with within-subject declines in academic
             functioning over 7 years. However, these effects were
             exacerbated for those children who had also experienced
             victimization in the peer group during the intervening
             years.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0028249},
   Key = {fds271951}
}

@article{fds328783,
   Author = {Powers, CJ and Bierman, KL and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {The multifaceted impact of peer relations on
             aggressive-disruptive behavior in early elementary
             school.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1174-1186},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0028400},
   Abstract = {Following a large, diverse sample of 4,096 children in 27
             schools, this study evaluated the impact of 3 aspects of
             peer relations, measured concurrently, on subsequent child
             aggressive-disruptive behavior during early elementary
             school: peer dislike, reciprocated friends' aggressiveness,
             and classroom levels of aggressive-disruptive behavior.
             Teachers rated child aggressive-disruptive behavior in 1st
             and 3rd grades, and peer relations were assessed during 2nd
             grade. Results indicated that heightened classroom
             aggressive-disruptive behavior levels were related to
             proximal peer relations, including an increased likelihood
             of having aggressive friends and lower levels of peer
             dislike of aggressive-disruptive children. Controlling for
             1st grade aggressive-disruptive behavior, the three 2nd
             grade peer experiences each made unique contributions to 3rd
             grade child aggressive-disruptive behavior. These findings
             replicate and extend a growing body of research documenting
             the multifaceted nature of peer influence on
             aggressive-disruptive behavior in early elementary school.
             They highlight the importance of the classroom ecology and
             proximal peer relations in the socialization of
             aggressive-disruptive behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0028400},
   Key = {fds328783}
}

@misc{fds45889,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Lansford, J.E. and Dishion, T.J.},
   Title = {The problem of deviant peer influences in intervention
             programs},
   Pages = {3-13},
   Booktitle = {Deviant peer influences in programs for youth: Problems and
             solutions},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Editor = {K.A. Dodge and T.J. Dishion and J.E. Lansford},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds45889}
}

@article{fds272168,
   Author = {Stormshak, EA and Bierman, KL and Bruschi, C and Dodge, KA and Coie,
             JD},
   Title = {The relation between behavior problems and peer preference
             in different classroom contexts. Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {169-182},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00013},
   Abstract = {This study tested two alternative hypotheses regarding the
             relations between child behavior and peer preference. The
             first hypothesis is generated from the person-group
             similarity model, which predicts that the acceptability of
             social behaviors will vary as a function of peer group
             norms. The second hypothesis is generated by the social
             skill model, which predicts that behavioral skill
             deficiencies reduce and behavioral competencies enhance peer
             preference. A total of 2895 children in 134 regular
             first-grade classrooms participated in the study.
             Hierarchical linear modeling was used to compare four
             different behaviors as predictors of peer preference in the
             context of classrooms with varying levels of these behavior
             problems. The results of the study supported both predictive
             models, with the acceptability of aggression and withdrawal
             varying across classrooms (following a person-group
             similarity model) and the effects of inattentive/hyperactive
             behavior (in a negative direction) and prosocial behavior
             (in a positive direction) following a social skill model and
             remaining constant in their associations with peer
             preference across classrooms. Gender differences also
             emerged, with aggression following the person-group
             similarity model for boys more strongly than for girls. The
             effects of both child behaviors and the peer group context
             on peer preference and on the trajectory of social
             development are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00013},
   Key = {fds272168}
}

@article{fds272270,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Terry, R and Wright, V},
   Title = {The role of aggression in peer relations: an analysis of
             aggression episodes in boys' play groups.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {812-826},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1935345},
   Abstract = {Although aggression is frequently cited as a major cause of
             peer social rejection, no more than half of all aggressive
             children are rejected. Aggressive episode data from
             experimental play groups of 7- and 9-year-old black males
             were coded to examine whether qualitative aspects of
             aggressive behavior, as well as frequency of aggression,
             determine the relation between aggressiveness and peer
             rejection. Reactive aggression and bullying were related to
             peer status among 9-year-olds, but not 7-year-olds, whereas
             instrumental aggression was characteristic of highly
             aggressive, rejected boys at both ages. Qualitative features
             of aggressive interaction suggested a greater level of
             hostility toward peers and a tendency to violate norms for
             aggressive exchange among rejected, aggressive boys at both
             ages in contrast to other groups of boys. The descriptive
             data provide a distinctive picture of reactive,
             instrumental, and bullying aggression as well as differing
             social norms for target and aggressor behavior in each of
             these 3 types of aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1991.tb01571.x},
   Key = {fds272270}
}

@article{fds38971,
   Author = {Consortium on the School-Based Promotion of Social
             Competence},
   Title = {The school-based promotion of social competence: Theory,
             research, practice, and policy},
   Pages = {268-389},
   Booktitle = {Stress, risk and resilience in children and
             adolescents},
   Publisher = {New York: Cambridge},
   Editor = {R.J. Haggarty and N. Garmezy and M. Rutter and L.
             Sherrod},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds38971}
}

@misc{fds323951,
   Author = {COIE, JD and CHRISTOPOULOS, C and TERRY, R and DODGE, KA and LOCHMAN,
             JE},
   Title = {TYPES OF AGGRESSIVE RELATIONSHIPS, PEER REJECTION, AND
             DEVELOPMENTAL CONSEQUENCES},
   Journal = {Social Competence in Developmental Perspective},
   Volume = {51},
   Pages = {223-237},
   Booktitle = {Social competence in development perspective},
   Publisher = {KLUWER ACADEMIC PUBL},
   Editor = {SCHNEIDER, BH and ATTILI, G and NADEL, J and WEISSBERG,
             RP},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {0-7923-0400-4},
   Key = {fds323951}
}

@book{fds167326,
   Author = {Prinstein, M.J. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Understanding Peer Influence in Children and
             Adolescents},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Address = {New York},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds167326}
}