Kenneth A. Dodge

Publications of Kenneth A. Dodge    :recent first  alphabetical  by type  by tags listing:

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@article{fds272208,
   Author = {Steinberg, MD and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Attributional bias in aggressive adolescent boys and
             girls},
   Journal = {Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {1},
   Pages = {312-321},
   Year = {1983},
   Key = {fds272208}
}

@misc{fds39752,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Murphy, R.R.},
   Title = {The assessment of social competence in adolescence},
   Pages = {61-96},
   Booktitle = {Adolescent behavior disorders: Current perspectives.
             Advances in child behavioral analysis and therapy,
             4},
   Publisher = {Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath and Company},
   Editor = {P. Karoly and J.J. Steffen},
   Year = {1984},
   Key = {fds39752}
}

@article{fds272264,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Price, JM and Bachorowski, JA and Newman,
             JP},
   Title = {Hostile attributional biases in severely aggressive
             adolescents.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {99},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {385-392},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0021-843X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0021-843x.99.4.385},
   Abstract = {Adolescent boys (N = 128) from a maximum security prison for
             juvenile offenders were administered a task to assess
             hostile attributional biases. As hypothesized, these biases
             were positively correlated with undersocialized aggressive
             conduct disorder (as indicated by high scores on
             standardized scales and by psychiatric diagnoses), with
             reactive-aggressive behavior, and with the number of
             interpersonally violent crimes committed. Hostile
             attributional biases were found not to relate to nonviolent
             crimes or to socialized aggressive behavior disorder. These
             findings held even when race and estimates of intelligence
             and socioeconomic status were controlled. These findings
             suggest that within a population of juvenile offenders,
             attributional biases are implicated specifically in
             interpersonal reactive aggression that involves anger and
             not in socialized delinquency.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0021-843x.99.4.385},
   Key = {fds272264}
}

@article{fds272227,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Lochman, JE and Harnish, JD and Bates, JE and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Reactive and proactive aggression in school children and
             psychiatrically impaired chronically assaultive
             youth.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {106},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {37-51},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0021-843X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9103716},
   Abstract = {The authors proposed that reactively aggressive and
             proactively aggressive types of antisocial youth would
             differ in developmental histories, concurrent adjustment,
             and social information-processing patterns. In Study 1, 585
             boys and girls classified into groups called reactive
             aggressive, proactive aggressive, pervasively aggressive
             (combined type), and nonaggressive revealed distinct
             profiles. Only the reactive aggressive groups demonstrated
             histories of physical abuse and early onset of problems,
             adjustment problems in peer relations, and inadequate
             encoding and problem-solving processing patterns. Only the
             proactive aggressive groups demonstrated a processing
             pattern of anticipating positive outcomes for aggressing. In
             Study 2, 50 psychiatrically impaired chronically violent
             boys classified as reactively violent or proactively violent
             demonstrated differences in age of onset of problem
             behavior, adjustment problems, and processing
             problems.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0021-843x.106.1.37},
   Key = {fds272227}
}

@article{fds272218,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {The social ecology of school-age child care},
   Journal = {Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {329-348},
   Year = {1998},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2792761/},
   Abstract = {The goal of this longitudinal study was to examine
             variations in school-age child care arrangements across the
             elementary school years as a function of child, family, and
             contextual factors. Pre-kindergarten family background
             measures were collected through parent questionnaires and
             interviews. Follow-up interviews with 466 parents provided
             information on children's care experiences in grades 1
             through 5. Some care arrangements (e.g., self care) showed
             considerable continuity, whereas other arrangements (e.g.,
             school programs) changed substantially from year-to-year.
             Increases in use were found for self-care, sibling care,
             neighbor care, and activity-based care; use of day care
             decreased across years. Children living with working and/or
             single mothers spent more time in non-parent care, as did
             boys with behavior problems. Time spent in specific care
             arrangements varied as a function of child sex, behavioral
             adjustment, ethnicity, family socioeconomic status, mothers'
             employment, and parents' marital status. These findings
             underscore the importance of developmental and
             ecological-contextual factors in families' choices of care
             arrangements.},
   Key = {fds272218}
}

@article{fds272215,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and McFadyen-Ketchum, SA and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Peer group victimization as a predictor of children's
             behavior problems at home and in school.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {87-99},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   Abstract = {This study reports a short-term prospective investigation of
             the role of peer group victimization in the development of
             children's behavior problems, at home and in school.
             Sociometric interviews were utilized to assess aggression,
             victimization by peers, and peer rejection, for 330 children
             who were in either the third or fourth grade (approximate
             mean ages of 8-9 years old). Behavior problems were assessed
             using standardized behavior checklists completed by mothers
             and teachers. A follow-up assessment of behavior problems
             was completed 2 years later, when the children were in
             either the fifth or sixth grade (approximate mean ages of
             10-11 years old). Victimization was both concurrently and
             prospectively associated with externalizing, attention
             dysregulation, and immature/dependent behavior.
             Victimization also predicted increases in these difficulties
             over time, and incremented the prediction in later behavior
             problems associated with peer rejection and aggression. The
             results of this investigation demonstrate that victimization
             in the peer group is an important predictor of later
             behavioral maladjustment.},
   Key = {fds272215}
}

@article{fds272170,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Meece,
             DW},
   Title = {The impact of after-school peer contact on early adolescent
             externalizing problems is moderated by parental monitoring,
             perceived neighborhood safety, and prior
             adjustment.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {768-778},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00055},
   Abstract = {Unsupervised peer contact in the after-school hours was
             examined as a risk factor in the development of
             externalizing problems in a longitudinal sample of early
             adolescents. Parental monitoring, neighborhood safety, and
             adolescents' preexisting behavioral problems were considered
             as possible moderators of the risk relation. Interviews with
             mothers provided information on monitoring, neighborhood
             safety, and demographics. Early adolescent (ages 12-13
             years) after-school time use was assessed via a telephone
             interview in grade 6 (N = 438); amount of time spent with
             peers when no adult was present was tabulated. Teacher
             ratings of externalizing behavior problems were collected in
             grades 6 and 7. Unsupervised peer contact, lack of
             neighborhood safety, and low monitoring incrementally
             predicted grade 7 externalizing problems, after controlling
             for family background factors and grade 6 problems. The
             greatest risk was for those unsupervised adolescents living
             in low-monitoring homes and comparatively unsafe
             neighborhoods. The significant relation between unsupervised
             peer contact and problem behavior in grade 7 held only for
             those adolescents who already were high in problem behavior
             in grade 6. These findings point to the need to consider
             individual, family, and neighborhood factors in evaluating
             risks associated with young adolescents' after-school care
             experiences.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00055},
   Key = {fds272170}
}

@article{fds272173,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Best Friendships, Group Relationships, and Antisocial
             Behavior in Early Adolescence.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Early Adolescence},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {413-437},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0272-4316},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0272431699019004001},
   Abstract = {Correlations between adolescents' own antisocial behavior
             and adolescents' perceptions of the antisocial behavior of
             their best friends and friendship groups were examined in
             this study. The strength of those correlations was expected
             to vary as a function of the qualities of the dyadic
             friendships and group relationships. Perceptions of peers'
             antisocial behavior and dyadic friendship and group
             relationship qualities were collected through interviews
             with 431, 12- through 13-year-old adolescents. Measures of
             adolescents' concurrent and subsequent antisocial behaviors
             were obtained from the adolescents and their teachers.
             Adolescents who perceived their friends and groups as
             participating in antisocial behavior had higher
             self-reported and teacher-reported antisocial behavior
             ratings. Perceptions of best friend antisocial behavior were
             correlated more strongly with adolescents' own concurrent,
             but not subsequent, antisocial behavior when high levels of
             help, companionship, and security characterized dyadic
             friendships. The results are discussed in terms of peer
             influence and friendship selection processes.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0272431699019004001},
   Key = {fds272173}
}

@article{fds272116,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Jordan, KY and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Peer rejection in childhood, involvement with antisocial
             peers in early adolescence, and the development of
             externalizing behavior problems.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {337-354},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579401002085},
   Abstract = {A longitudinal, prospective design was used to examine the
             roles of peer rejection in middle childhood and antisocial
             peer involvement in early adolescence in the development of
             adolescent externalizing behavior problems. Both early
             starter and late starter pathways were considered. Classroom
             sociometric interviews from ages 6 through 9 years,
             adolescent reports of peers' behavior at age 13 years, and
             parent, teacher, and adolescent self-reports of
             externalizing behavior problems from age 5 through 14 years
             were available for 400 adolescents. Results indicate that
             experiencing peer rejection in elementary school and greater
             involvement with antisocial peers in early adolescence are
             correlated but that these peer relationship experiences may
             represent two different pathways to adolescent externalizing
             behavior problems. Peer rejection experiences, but not
             involvement with antisocial peers. predict later
             externalizing behavior problems when controlling for
             stability in externalizing behavior. Externalizing problems
             were most common when rejection was experienced repeatedly.
             Early externalizing problems did not appear to moderate the
             relation between peer rejection and later problem behavior.
             Discussion highlights multiple pathways connecting
             externalizing behavior problems from early childhood through
             adolescence with peer relationship experiences in middle
             childhood and early adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579401002085},
   Key = {fds272116}
}

@article{fds272154,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Laird, RD and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Criss,
             MM},
   Title = {Antecedents and behavior-problem outcomes of parental
             monitoring and psychological control in early
             adolescence.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {583-598},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2766099/},
   Abstract = {The early childhood antecedents and behavior-problem
             correlates of monitoring and psychological control were
             examined in this prospective, longitudinal, multi-informant
             study. Parenting data were collected during home visit
             interviews with 440 mothers and their 13-year-old children.
             Behavior problems (anxiety/depression and delinquent
             behavior) were assessed via mother, teacher, and/or
             adolescent reports at ages 8 through 10 years and again at
             ages 13 through 14. Home-interview data collected at age 5
             years were used to measure antecedent parenting
             (harsh/reactive, positive/proactive), family background
             (e.g., socioeconomic status), and mother-rated child
             behavior problems. Consistent with expectation, monitoring
             was anteceded by a proactive parenting style and by
             advantageous family-ecological characteristics, and
             psychological control was anteceded by harsh parenting and
             by mothers' earlier reports of child externalizing problems.
             Consistent with prior research, monitoring was associated
             with fewer delinquent behavior problems. Links between
             psychological control and adjustment were more complex: High
             levels of psychological control were associated with more
             delinquent problems for girls and for teens who were low in
             preadolescent delinquent problems, and with more
             anxiety/depression for girls and for teens who were high in
             preadolescent anxiety/depression.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00298},
   Key = {fds272154}
}

@article{fds272158,
   Author = {Colwell, MJ and Pettit, GS and Meece, D and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Cumulative Risk and Continuity in Nonparental Care from
             Infancy to Early Adolescence.},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {207-234},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/mpq.2001.0009},
   Abstract = {Variations in amounts of nonparental care across infancy,
             preschool, early elementary school, and early adolescence
             were examined in a longitudinal sample (N = 438). Of
             interest was (a) continuity in use of the different
             arrangements, (b) whether the arrangements were additively
             and cumulatively associated with children's externalizing
             behavior problems, and (c) whether predictive relations were
             accounted for by social-ecological (socioeconomic status,
             mothers' employment status, marital status) and
             social-experiential (parenting quality, exposure to
             aggressive peers) factors. Correlations among overall
             amounts of care provided little evidence of cross-time
             continuity. Consistent with the cumulative risk perspective,
             Grade 1 self-care and Grade 6 unsupervised peer contact
             incrementally predicted Grade 6 externalizing problems. Most
             of the predictive associations were accounted for by family
             background and social relationship factors.},
   Doi = {10.1353/mpq.2001.0009},
   Key = {fds272158}
}

@misc{fds13039,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Investing in the Prevention of Youth Violence},
   Journal = {International Society for the Study of Behavioral
             Development Newsletter},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds13039}
}

@article{fds13046,
   Author = {Lansford, J.E. and Dodge, K.A. and Pettit, G.S. and Bates, J.E. and Crozier, J. and Kaplow, J.},
   Title = {A 12-Year Prospective Study of the Long-Term Effects of
             Early Child Physical Maltreatment and Psychological
             Behavioral, and Academic Problems in Adolescence},
   Journal = {Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine},
   Volume = {156},
   Pages = {824-830},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds13046}
}

@article{fds272146,
   Author = {Fontaine, RG and Burks, VS and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Response decision processes and externalizing behavior
             problems in adolescents.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {107-122},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11893088},
   Abstract = {Externalizing behavior problems of 124 adolescents were
             assessed across Grades 7-11. In Grade 9, participants were
             also assessed across social-cognitive domains after
             imagining themselves as the object of provocations portrayed
             in six videotaped vignettes. Participants responded to
             vignette-based questions representing multiple processes of
             the response decision step of social information processing.
             Phase 1 of our investigation supported a two-factor model of
             the response evaluation process of response decision
             (response valuation and outcome expectancy). Phase 2 showed
             significant relations between the set of these response
             decision processes, as well as response selection, measured
             in Grade 9 and (a) externalizing behavior in Grade 9 and (b)
             externalizing behavior in Grades 10-11, even after
             controlling externalizing behavior in Grades 7-8. These
             findings suggest that on-line behavioral judgments about
             aggression play a crucial role in the maintenance and growth
             of aggressive response tendencies in adolescence.},
   Key = {fds272146}
}

@article{fds272153,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Evaluation of the first 3 years of the Fast Track prevention
             trial with children at high risk for adolescent conduct
             problems.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {19-35},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1014274914287},
   Abstract = {Fast Track is a conduct-problem prevention trial that
             derives its intervention from longitudinal research on how
             serious and chronic adolescent problem behaviors develop.
             Over 9,000 kindergarten children at 4 sites in 3 cohorts
             were screened, and 891 were identified as high risk and then
             randomly assigned to intervention or control groups.
             Beginning in Grade 1, high-risk children and their parents
             were asked to participate in a combination of social skills
             and anger-control training, academic tutoring, parent
             training, and home visiting. A multiyear universal classroom
             program was delivered to the core schools attended by these
             high-risk children. By the end of third grade, 37% of the
             intervention group was determined to be free of serious
             conduct-problem dysfunction, in contrast with 27% of the
             control group. Teacher ratings of conduct problems and
             official records of use of special education resources gave
             modest effect-size evidence that the intervention was
             preventing conduct problem behavior at school. Parent
             ratings provided additional support for prevention of
             conduct problems at home. Parenting behavior and children's
             social cognitive skills that had previously emerged as
             proximal outcomes at the end of the 1st year of intervention
             continued to show positive effects of the intervention at
             the end of third grade.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1014274914287},
   Key = {fds272153}
}

@article{fds272144,
   Author = {Kaplow, JB and Curran, PJ and Dodge, KA and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Child, parent, and peer predictors of early-onset substance
             use: a multisite longitudinal study.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {199-216},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12041707},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this study was to identify kindergarten-age
             predictors of early-onset substance use from demographic,
             environmental, parenting, child psychological, behavioral,
             and social functioning domains. Data from a longitudinal
             study of 295 children were gathered using
             multiple-assessment methods and multiple informants in
             kindergarten and 1st grade. Annual assessments at ages 10,
             11, and 12 reflected that 21% of children reported having
             initiated substance use by age 12. Results from longitudinal
             logistic regression models indicated that risk factors at
             kindergarten include being male, having a parent who abused
             substances, lower levels of parental verbal reasoning,
             higher levels of overactivity, more thought problems, and
             more social problem solving skills deficits. Children with
             no risk factors had less than a 10% chance of initiating
             substance use by age 12, whereas children with 2 or more
             risk factors had greater than a 50% chance of initiating
             substance use. Implications for typology, etiology, and
             prevention are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1015183927979},
   Key = {fds272144}
}

@misc{fds13060,
   Author = {Bates, J.E. and Alexander, D. and Oberlander, S. and Dodge, K.A. and Petit, G.S.},
   Title = {Antecedents of Sexual Activity at Ages 16 and 17 in a
             Community Sample Followed from Age 5},
   Pages = {206-237},
   Booktitle = {Sexual Development},
   Publisher = {Bloomington: Indiana University Press},
   Editor = {J. Bancroft},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds13060}
}

@article{fds272138,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {A biopsychosocial model of the development of chronic
             conduct problems in adolescence.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {349-371},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12661890},
   Abstract = {A biopsychosocial model of the development of adolescent
             chronic conduct problems is presented and supported through
             a review of empirical findings. This model posits that
             biological dispositions and sociocultural contexts place
             certain children at risk in early life but that life
             experiences with parents, peers. and social institutions
             increment and mediate this risk. A transactional
             developmental model is best equipped to describe the
             emergence of chronic antisocial behavior across time.
             Reciprocal influences among dispositions, contexts, and life
             experiences lead to recursive iterations across time that
             exacerbate or diminish antisocial development. Cognitive and
             emotional processes within the child, including the
             acquisition of knowledge and social-information-processing
             patterns, mediate the relation between life experiences and
             conduct problem outcomes. Implications for prevention
             research and public policy are noted.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0012-1649.39.2.349},
   Key = {fds272138}
}

@article{fds272140,
   Author = {Broidy, LM and Nagin, DS and Tremblay, RE and Bates, JE and Brame, B and Dodge, KA and Fergusson, D and Horwood, JL and Loeber, R and Laird, R and Lynam, DR and Moffitt, TE and Pettit, GS and Vitaro,
             F},
   Title = {Developmental trajectories of childhood disruptive behaviors
             and adolescent delinquency: a six-site, cross-national
             study.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {222-245},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0012-1649.39.2.222},
   Abstract = {This study used data from 6 sites and 3 countries to examine
             the developmental course of physical aggression in childhood
             and to analyze its linkage to violent and nonviolent
             offending outcomes in adolescence. The results indicate that
             among boys there is continuity in problem behavior from
             childhood to adolescence and that such continuity is
             especially acute when early problem behavior takes the form
             of physical aggression. Chronic physical aggression during
             the elementary school years specifically increases the risk
             for continued physical violence as well as other nonviolent
             forms of delinquency during adolescence. However, this
             conclusion is reserved primarily for boys, because the
             results indicate no clear linkage between childhood physical
             aggression and adolescent offending among female samples
             despite notable similarities across male and female samples
             in the developmental course of physical aggression in
             childhood.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0012-1649.39.2.222},
   Key = {fds272140}
}

@article{fds272133,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Friendship Quality, Peer Group Affiliation, and Peer
             Antisocial Behavior as Moderators of the Link Between
             Negative Parenting and Adolescent Externalizing
             Behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Research on Adolescence},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {161-184},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1050-8392},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20209019},
   Abstract = {Quality of peer relationships and perceived peer antisocial
             behavior were examined as moderators of the link between
             negative parenting and externalizing behavior problems in
             school from middle childhood to early adolescence. Data on
             negative parenting (i.e., unilateral parental decision
             making, low supervision and awareness, and harsh discipline)
             were collected from 362 parents in the summer preceding the
             adolescents' entry into Grade 6. Adolescent reports of
             positive peer relationships and peer antisocial behavior
             were assessed in the winter of Grade 7. The outcome measure
             was teacher report of adolescent externalizing behavior in
             the spring of Grade 7, controlling for externalizing
             behavior in Grade 5. High levels of friendship quality and
             peer group affiliation attenuated the association between
             unilateral parental decision making and adolescent
             externalizing behavior in school; this was particularly true
             when adolescents associated with peers perceived to be low
             in antisocial behavior. In addition, having low-quality peer
             relationships and having peers perceived to be highly
             antisocial further amplified the association between
             unilateral parental decision making and adolescent
             externalizing behavior problems. Finally, high levels of
             friend and peer group antisocial behavior exacerbated the
             predictiveness of harsh discipline for adolescents'
             externalizing behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1532-7795.1302002},
   Key = {fds272133}
}

@article{fds272134,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Parents' monitoring-relevant knowledge and adolescents'
             delinquent behavior: evidence of correlated developmental
             changes and reciprocal influences.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {752-768},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00566},
   Abstract = {Links between parental knowledge and adolescent delinquent
             behavior were tested for correlated rates of developmental
             change and reciprocal associations. For 4 years beginning at
             age 14, adolescents (N = 396) reported on their delinquent
             behavior and on their parents' knowledge of their
             whereabouts and activities. Parents completed measures of
             their adolescents' delinquent behavior. Knowledge was
             negatively correlated with delinquent behaviors at baseline,
             and increases over time in knowledge were negatively
             correlated with increases in parent-reported delinquent
             behavior. Reciprocal associations indicate that low levels
             of parental knowledge predict increases in delinquent
             behavior and that high levels of delinquent behavior predict
             decreases in knowledge. Discussion considers both
             youth-driven and parent-driven processes that may account
             for the correlated developmental changes and reciprocal
             associations.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00566},
   Key = {fds272134}
}

@article{fds272135,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Change in parents' monitoring knowledge: Links with
             parenting, relationship quality, adolescent beliefs, and
             antisocial behavior},
   Journal = {Social Development (Oxford, England)},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {401-419},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9507.00240},
   Abstract = {A longitudinal prospective design was used to examine
             antisocial behavior, two aspects of the parent-child
             relationship, inept parenting, and adolescents 'beliefs in
             the appropriateness of monitoring as predictors of parents'
             monitoring and change in monitoring during the high school
             years. A total of 426 adolescents provided reports of their
             parents 'monitoring knowledge during four yearly assessments
             beginning the summer before entering grade 9. Greater
             concurrent levels of monitoring knowledge were associated
             with less antisocial behavior, more parent-reported
             relationship enjoy-ment, adolescents and parents spending
             more time together, and adolescents reporting stronger
             beliefs in the appropriateness of parental monitoring.
             Weaker knowledge beliefs predicted increases in monitoring
             knowledge over time. More antisocial behavior problems were
             linked to lower levels of knowledge through less enjoyable
             parent-adolescent relationships, parents and adolescents
             spending less time together, and adolescents reporting
             weaker monitoring beliefs. Discussion focuses on processes
             linking antisocial behavior problems with low levels of
             monitoring knowledge.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-9507.00240},
   Key = {fds272135}
}

@article{fds272185,
   Author = {Hill, NE and Lansford, J and Castellino, DR and Nowlin, P and Dodge, KA and Bates, J and Petit, G},
   Title = {Parent-academic involvement as related to school behavior,
             achievement and aspirations: Demographic variations across
             adolescence},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {75},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1491-1509},
   Year = {2004},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15369527},
   Abstract = {A longitudinal model of parent academic involvement,
             behavioral problems, achievement, and aspirations was
             examined for 463 adolescents, followed from 7th
             (approximately 12 years old) through 11th (approximately 16
             years old) grades. Parent academic involvement in 7th grade
             was negatively related to 8th-grade behavioral problems and
             positively related to 11th-grade aspirations. There were
             variations across parental education levels and ethnicity:
             Among the higher parental education group, parent academic
             involvement was related to fewer behavioral problems, which
             were related to achievement and then aspirations. For the
             lower parental education group, parent academic involvement
             was related to aspirations but not to behavior or
             achievement. Parent academic involvement was positively
             related to achievement for African Americans but not for
             European Americans. Parent academic involvement may be
             interpreted differently and serve different purposes across
             sociodemographic backgrounds.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2004.00753.x},
   Key = {fds272185}
}

@article{fds272299,
   Author = {Meyer, and L, A and Allison, and W, K and Reese, and E, L and Gay, and N, F and Dodge, TMVPPKA and member},
   Title = {Choosing to be violence free in middle school: The student
             component of the GREAT Schools and Families Universal
             Program.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {26},
   Pages = {20-28},
   Year = {2004},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2791963/},
   Key = {fds272299}
}

@article{fds272114,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Deater-Deckard, K and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Ethnic differences in the link between physical discipline
             and later adolescent externalizing behaviors.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {801-812},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0021-9630},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15056311},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND:Parents' use of physical discipline has generated
             controversy related to concerns that its use is associated
             with adjustment problems such as aggression and delinquency
             in children. However, recent evidence suggests that there
             are ethnic differences in associations between physical
             discipline and children's adjustment. This study examined
             race as a moderator of the link between physical discipline
             and adolescent externalizing behavior problems, extending
             previous research beyond childhood into adolescence and
             considering physical discipline at multiple points in time.
             METHODS:A representative community sample of 585 children
             was followed from pre-kindergarten (age 5) through grade 11
             (age 16). Mothers reported on their use of physical
             discipline in the child's first five years of life and again
             during grades 6 (age 11) and 8 (age 13). Mothers and
             adolescents reported on a variety of externalizing behaviors
             in grade 11 including aggression, violence, and trouble at
             school and with the police. RESULTS:A series of hierarchical
             linear regressions controlling for parents' marital status,
             socioeconomic status, and child temperament revealed
             significant interactions between physical discipline during
             the child's first five years of life and race in the
             prediction of 3 of the 7 adolescent externalizing outcomes
             assessed and significant interactions between physical
             discipline during grades 6 and 8 and race in the prediction
             of all 7 adolescent externalizing outcomes. Regression
             slopes showed that the experience of physical discipline at
             each time point was related to higher levels of subsequent
             externalizing behaviors for European American adolescents
             but lower levels of externalizing behaviors for African
             American adolescents. CONCLUSIONS:There are race differences
             in long-term effects of physical discipline on externalizing
             behaviors problems. Different ecological niches may affect
             the manner in which parents use physical discipline, the
             meaning that children attach to the experience of physical
             discipline, and its effects on the adjustment of children
             and adolescents.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1469-7610.2004.00273.x},
   Key = {fds272114}
}

@article{fds272288,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Peer relationship antecedents of delinquent behavior in late
             adolescence: Is there evidence of demographic group
             differences in developmental processes?},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-18},
   Year = {2005},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579405050078},
   Abstract = {A longitudinal prospective design was used to test the
             generalizability of low levels of social preference and high
             levels of antisocial peer involvement as risk factors for
             delinquent behavior problems to African American (AA) and
             European American (EA) boys and girls (N = 384). Social
             preference scores were computed from peer reports in middle
             childhood (ages 6-9). Parents and adolescents reported
             antisocial peer involvement in early adolescence (ages
             13-16) and adolescents reported on their own delinquent
             behavior in late adolescence (ages 17 and 18). Analyses
             tested for differences across four groups (AA boys, EA boys,
             AA girls, EA girls) in construct measurement, mean levels,
             and associations among variables. Few measurement
             differences were found. Mean-level differences were found
             for social preference and delinquent behavior. AA boys were
             least accepted by peers and reported the highest level of
             delinquent behavior. EA girls were most accepted by peers
             and reported the lowest level of delinquent behavior.
             Associations among peer experiences and delinquent behavior
             were equivalent across groups, with lower levels of social
             preference and higher levels of antisocial peer involvement
             associated with more delinquent behavior. Person-centered
             analyses showed the risk associated with low social
             preference and high antisocial peer involvement to be
             similar across groups, providing further evidence of the
             generalizability of the peer relationship experiences as
             risk factors for subsequent delinquent behavior problems.
             Copyright © 2005 Cambridge University Press.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579405050078},
   Key = {fds272288}
}

@article{fds272188,
   Author = {Dishion, TJ and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Peer contagion in interventions for children and
             adolescents: moving towards an understanding of the ecology
             and dynamics of change.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {395-400},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-005-3579-z},
   Abstract = {The influence of deviant peers on youth behavior is of
             growing concern, both in naturally occurring peer
             interactions and in interventions that might inadvertently
             exacerbate deviant development. The focus of this special
             issue is on understanding the moderating and mediating
             variables that account for peer contagion effects in
             interventions for youth. This set of nine innovative papers
             moves the field forward on three fronts: (1) Broadening the
             empirical basis for understanding the conditions under which
             peer contagion is more or less likely (that is, moderators
             of effects); (2) Identifying mechanisms that might account
             for peer contagion effects (mediators); and (3) Forging the
             methodological rigor that is needed to study peer contagion
             effects within the context of intervention trials. We
             propose an ecological framework for disentangling the
             effects of individuals, group interactions, and program
             contexts in understanding peer contagion effects. Finally,
             we suggest methodological enhancements to study peer
             contagion in intervention trials.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-005-3579-z},
   Key = {fds272188}
}

@article{fds272286,
   Author = {Gifford-Smith, M and Dodge, KA and Dishion, TJ and McCord,
             J},
   Title = {Peer influence in children and adolescents: crossing the
             bridge from developmental to intervention
             science.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {255-265},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15957555},
   Abstract = {Considerable evidence supports the hypothesis that peer
             relationships influence the growth of problem behavior in
             youth. Developmental research consistently documents the
             high levels of covariation between peer and youth deviance,
             even controlling for selection effects. Ironically, the most
             common public interventions for deviant youth involve
             segregation from mainstream peers and aggregation into
             settings with other deviant youth. Developmental research on
             peer influence suggests that desired positive effects of
             group interventions in education, mental health, juvenile
             justice, and community programming may be offset by deviant
             peer influences in these settings. Given the public health
             policy issues raised by these findings, there is a need to
             better understand the conditions under which these peer
             contagion effects are most pronounced with respect to
             intervention foci and context, the child's developmental
             level, and specific strategies for managing youth behavior
             in groups.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-005-3563-7},
   Key = {fds272286}
}

@article{fds272111,
   Author = {Vitale, JE and Newman, JP and Bates, JE and Goodnight, J and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Deficient behavioral inhibition and anomalous selective
             attention in a community sample of adolescents with
             psychopathic traits and low-anxiety traits.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {461-470},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-005-5727-x},
   Abstract = {Socialization is the important process by which individuals
             learn and then effectively apply the rules of appropriate
             societal behavior. Response modulation is a psychobiological
             process theorized to aid in socialization by allowing
             individuals to utilize contextual information to modify
             ongoing behavior appropriately. Using Hare's (1991)
             Psychopathy Checklist and the Welsh (1956) anxiety scale,
             researchers have identified a relatively specific form of a
             response modulation deficit in low-anxious, Caucasian
             psychopaths. Preliminary evidence suggests that the
             Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; Frick & Hare,
             2001) may be used to identify children with a similar
             vulnerability. Using a representative community sample of
             308 16-year-olds from the Child Development Project (Dodge,
             Bates, & Pettit, 1990), we tested and corroborated the
             hypotheses that participants with relatively low anxiety and
             high APSD scores would display poorer passive avoidance
             learning and less interference on a spatially separated,
             picture-word Stroop task than controls. Consistent with
             hypotheses, the expected group differences in picture-word
             Stroop interference were found with male and female
             participants, whereas predicted differences in passive
             avoidance were specific to male participants. To the extent
             that response modulation deficits contributing to poor
             socialization among psychopathic adult offenders also
             characterize a subgroup of adolescents with mild conduct
             problems, clarification of the developmental processes that
             moderate the expression of this vulnerability could inform
             early interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-005-5727-x},
   Key = {fds272111}
}

@misc{fds45887,
   Author = {Dishion, T.J. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Deviant peer contagion in interventions and programs: An
             ecological framework for understanding influence
             mechanisms},
   Pages = {14-43},
   Booktitle = {Deviant peer influences in programs for youth: Problems and
             solutions},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Editor = {K.A. Dodge and T.J. Dishion and J.E. Lansford},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds45887}
}

@misc{fds45888,
   Author = {Dishion, T.J. and Dodge, K.A. and Lansford, J.E.},
   Title = {Findings and recommendations: A blueprint to minimize
             deviant peer influence in youth interventions and
             programs},
   Pages = {366-394},
   Booktitle = {Deviant peer influences in programs for youth: Problems and
             solutions},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Editor = {K.A. Dodge and T.J. Dishion and J.E. Lansford},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds45888}
}

@misc{fds45890,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Sherrill, M.R.},
   Title = {Deviant peer group effects in youth mental health
             interventions},
   Pages = {97-121},
   Booktitle = {Deviant peer influences in programs for youth: Problems and
             solutions},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Editor = {K.A. Dodge and T.J. Dishion and J.E. Lansford},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds45890}
}

@misc{fds43115,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Coie, J.D. and Lynam, D.},
   Title = {Aggression and antisocial behavior in youth},
   Series = {6th edition},
   Pages = {719-788},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of Child Psychology, Vol. 3: Social, Emotional, and
             Personality Development},
   Publisher = {Wiley},
   Editor = {W. Damon (Series Ed.), and N. Eisenberg (Vol.
             Ed.)},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds43115}
}

@misc{fds44278,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group (K.A. Dodge,
             member)},
   Title = {The Fast Track Project: Toward the prevention of severe
             conduct problems in school-aged youth.},
   Pages = {439-477},
   Booktitle = {Strengthening families: different evidence-based approaches
             to support child mental health.},
   Publisher = {Psychotherapie Verlag},
   Editor = {N. Heinrichs and K. Hahlweg and M. Dopfner},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds44278}
}

@misc{fds271898,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Holtzworth-Munroe, A and Marshall, AD and Harach, LD and Cleary, DJ and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Aggression and insecurity in late adolescent romantic
             relationships: Antecedents and developmental
             pathways},
   Volume = {9780521845571},
   Pages = {41-61},
   Booktitle = {Developmental Contexts in Middle Childhood: Bridges to
             Adolescence and Adulthood},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {A.C. Huston and M.N. Ripke},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {0521845572},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511499760.004},
   Abstract = {© Cambridge University Press 2006 and Cambridge University
             Press 2009. Experiences in the family and peer group play
             important roles in the development of interpersonal
             competencies across the childhood and adolescent years.
             Toward the end of adolescence, stable and supportive
             romantic relationships increasingly serve adaptive functions
             in promoting individual well-being and in fostering a sense
             of connection and security to others (Collins, Hennighausen,
             Schmit, & Sroufe, 1997; Conger, Cui, Bryant, & Elder, 2000;
             Furman, 1999). Romantic relationships marked by conflict and
             violence pose risks for current and longer-term adjustment
             and can compromise the health and well-being of the partner
             to whom the violence is directed (Capaldi & Owen, 2001).
             Romantic relationships in which one or both partners are
             wary, jealous, and insecure can stifle growth and fuel
             disagreements and disharmony (Holtzworth-Munroe, Meehan,
             Herron, Rehman, & Stuart, 2000). Relationship insecurity and
             relationship violence covary to some degree
             (Holtzworth-Munroe & Stewart, 1994), suggesting that they
             may be linked in the development of romantic relationship
             dysfunction. Within the marital violence literature,
             insecurity has been proposed as a key pathway through which
             relationship violence develops. Consistent with this
             perspective, Holtzworth-Munroe et al. (2000), in their
             examination of types of male batterers, found that one type
             of batterer could be characterized by insecurity and a
             tendency to confine violence to an intimate relationship.
             Holtzworth-Munroe et al. (2000) speculate that insecurity
             plays an etiological role in the development of partner
             violence. If this were the case, then insecurity might serve
             as a mediating link between social experience (e.g., of
             rejection and intimidation) and subsequent
             violence.},
   Doi = {10.1017/CBO9780511499760.004},
   Key = {fds271898}
}

@misc{fds271964,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Malone, PS and Lansford, JE and Miller-Johnson, S and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Toward a dynamic developmental model of the role of parents
             and peers in early onset substance use},
   Pages = {104-132},
   Booktitle = {Families count: Effects on child and adolescent
             development},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {A. Clarke-Stewart and J. Dunn},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {0521612292},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000299343800006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {© Cambridge University Press 2006 and 2010. Although most
             theories of deviant behavioral development explicitly
             acknowledge the roles of both parenting and peer relations,
             few theories, and even fewer empirical analyses, have
             articulated the manner in which these factors relate to each
             other and operate dynamically across childhood. The chapter
             by Collins and Roisman (Chapter 4 in this book) provides an
             excellent general overview of how these factors operate in
             adolescence. This chapter identifies aspects of parenting
             and peer relations across the life span that may play a role
             in the onset of illicit drug use in adolescence and the
             manner in which these factors may influence each other and
             operate in concert across development. The enormous social,
             psychological, and economic costs of substance use among
             adolescents in the United States over the past four decades
             (Kendall & Kessler, 2002; Kessler et al., 2001) have led to
             unprecedented attempts at interdiction, prosecution, and
             treatment, mostly without much success. Epidemiologic
             studies have directed attention toward prevention. This
             research has taken largely a risk-factor approach following
             from the methods of Rutter (Rutter & Garmezy, 1983), in
             which individual-difference variables in childhood are
             statistically linked to later substance use. Empirical
             research has identified several dozen factors in childhood
             that enhance risk for substance use during adolescence
             (reviewed by Hawkins, Catalano, & Miller, 1992; Weinberg,
             Rahdert, Colliver, & Glantz, 1998), but a laundry list of
             risk factors has not yet led to efficacious prevention
             programs.},
   Doi = {10.1017/CBO9780511616259.006},
   Key = {fds271964}
}

@article{fds272082,
   Author = {Henry, DB and Miller-Johnson, S and Simon, TR and Schoeny, ME and Multi-site Violence Prevention Project},
   Title = {Validity of teacher ratings in selecting influential
             aggressive adolescents for a targeted preventive
             intervention.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science : the Official Journal of the Society for
             Prevention Research},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {31-41},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-005-0004-3},
   Abstract = {This study describes a method for using teacher nominations
             and ratings to identify socially influential, aggressive
             middle school students for participation in a targeted
             violence prevention intervention. The teacher nomination
             method is compared with peer nominations of aggression and
             influence to obtain validity evidence. Participants were
             urban, predominantly African American and Latino sixth-grade
             students who were involved in a pilot study for a large
             multi-site violence prevention project. Convergent validity
             was suggested by the high correlation of teacher ratings of
             peer influence and peer nominations of social influence. The
             teacher ratings of influence demonstrated acceptable
             sensitivity and specificity when predicting peer nominations
             of influence among the most aggressive children. Results are
             discussed in terms of the application of teacher nominations
             and ratings in large trials and full implementation of
             targeted prevention programs.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-005-0004-3},
   Key = {fds272082}
}

@article{fds272126,
   Author = {Raine, A and Dodge, K and Loeber, R and Gatzke-Kopp, L and Lynam, D and Reynolds, C and Stouthamer-Loeber, M and Liu, J},
   Title = {The reactive-proactive aggression questionnaire:
             Differential correlates of reactive and proactive aggression
             in adolescent boys},
   Journal = {Aggressive Behavior},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {159-171},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0096-140X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ab.20115},
   Abstract = {This study reports the development of the Reactive-Proactive
             Aggression Questionnaire (RPQ), and the differential
             correlates of these two forms of aggression. Antisocial,
             psychosocial and personality measures were obtained at ages
             7 and 16 years in schoolboys, while the RPQ was administered
             to 334 of the boys at age 16 years. Confirmatory factor
             analysis indicated a significant fit for a two-factor
             proactive-reactive model that replicated from one
             independent subsample to another. Proactive aggression was
             uniquely characterized at age 7 by initiation of fights,
             strong-arm tactics, delinquency, poor school motivation,
             poor peer relationships, single-parent status, psychosocial
             adversity, substance-abusing parents, and hyperactivity, and
             at age 16 by a psychopathic personality, blunted affect,
             delinquency, and serious violent offending. Reactive
             aggression was uniquely characterized at age 16 by
             impulsivity, hostility, social anxiety, lack of close
             friends, unusual perceptual experiences, and ideas of
             reference. Findings confirm and extend the differential
             correlates of proactive-reactive aggression, and demonstrate
             that this brief but reliable and valid self-report
             instrument can be used to assess proactive and reactive
             aggression in child and adolescent samples. © 2006
             Wiley-Liss, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/ab.20115},
   Key = {fds272126}
}

@article{fds272106,
   Author = {Goodnight, JA and Bates, JE and Newman, JP and Dodge, KA and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {The interactive influences of friend deviance and reward
             dominance on the development of externalizing behavior
             during middle adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {573-583},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-006-9036-9},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the interactive effects of friend
             deviance and reward dominance on the development of
             externalizing behavior of adolescents in the Child
             Development Project. Reward dominance was assessed at age 16
             by performance on a computer-presented card-playing game in
             which participants had the choice of either continuing or
             discontinuing the game as the likelihood of reward decreased
             and the likelihood of punishment increased. At ages 14 and
             16, friend deviance and externalizing behavior were assessed
             through self-report. As expected, based on motivational
             balance and response modulation theories, path analysis
             revealed that age 14 friend deviance predicted age 16
             externalizing behavior controlling for age 14 externalizing
             behavior. Reward dominance was a significant moderator of
             the relationship between friend deviance and externalizing
             behavior. The contributions of deviant friends to the
             development of externalizing behavior were enhanced by
             adolescents' reward dominance.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-006-9036-9},
   Key = {fds272106}
}

@article{fds272090,
   Author = {Hillemeier, and M, and Foster, and M, E and Heinrichs, and B, and Heier, and Dodge, TCPPRGKA and member},
   Title = {Racial differences in the measurement of
             attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
             behaviors},
   Journal = {Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics},
   Volume = {28},
   Pages = {353-361},
   Year = {2007},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DBP.0b013e31811ff8b8},
   Doi = {10.1097/DBP.0b013e31811ff8b8},
   Key = {fds272090}
}

@article{fds53592,
   Author = {K.A. Dodge},
   Title = {Review of book: Dynamic assessment in practice: Clinical and
             educational applications},
   Journal = {Journal of Cognitive Education and Psychology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {313-315},
   Year = {2007},
   Key = {fds53592}
}

@misc{fds50943,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A. and Sherrill, M.R.},
   Title = {The interaction of nature and nurture in antisocial
             behavior},
   Pages = {215-242},
   Booktitle = {The Cambridge Handbook of Violent Behavior},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Address = {New York},
   Editor = {D. Flannery and A. Vazonsyi and I. Waldman},
   Year = {2007},
   Key = {fds50943}
}

@article{fds272095,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Keiley, MK and Laird, RD and Bates, JE and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Predicting the developmental course of mother-reported
             monitoring across childhood and adolescence from early
             proactive parenting, child temperament, and parents'
             worries.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {206-217},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0893-3200},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.21.2.206},
   Abstract = {Change in mothers' reported monitoring and awareness of
             their children's activities and companions across Grades 5,
             6, 8, and 11 were examined with the use of latent factor
             growth modeling. Proactive parenting and
             resistant-to-control (RTC) child temperament assessed prior
             to kindergarten, as well as parents' worries about their
             children's behavior in Grades 5 and 8, were tested as
             factors associated with change in monitoring over time.
             Higher proactive parenting, lower RTC temperament, and the
             mounting of a successful campaign to change their children's
             behavior were associated with higher monitoring scores
             overall. Monitoring levels decreased across time, but the
             rate of decline was steeper among mothers with high RTC
             children and slower among mothers who mounted a campaign and
             judged it to be effective. These findings shed light on
             factors contributing to continuity and change across
             development in a key domain of parenting.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.21.2.206},
   Key = {fds272095}
}

@article{fds272084,
   Author = {Slough, NM and McMahon, RJ and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Foster, EM and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and Pinderhughes,
             EE},
   Title = {Preventing Serious Conduct Problems in School-Age Youths:
             The Fast Track Program.},
   Journal = {Cognitive and Behavioral Practice},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3-17},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1077-7229},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19890487},
   Abstract = {Children with early-starting conduct Problems have a very
             poor prognosis and exact a high cost to society. The Fast
             Track project is a multisite, collaborative research project
             investigating the efficacy of a comprehensive, long-term,
             multicomponent intervention designed to prevent the
             development of serious conduct problems in high-risk
             children. In this article, we (a) provide an overview of the
             development model that serves as the conceptual foundation
             for the Fast Track intervention and describe its integration
             into the intervention model; (b) outline the research design
             and intervention model, with an emphasis on the elementary
             school phase of the intervention; and (c) summarize findings
             to dale concerning intervention outcomes. We then provide a
             case illustration, and conclude with a discussion of
             guidelines for practitioners who work with children with
             conduct problems.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cbpra.2007.04.002},
   Key = {fds272084}
}

@article{fds272087,
   Author = {Fontaine, RG and Yang, C and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Testing an individual systems model of response evaluation
             and decision (RED) and antisocial behavior across
             adolescence.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {462-475},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18366434},
   Abstract = {This study examined the bidirectional development of
             aggressive response evaluation and decision (RED) and
             antisocial behavior across five time points in adolescence.
             Participants (n = 522) were asked to imagine themselves
             behaving aggressively while viewing videotaped ambiguous
             provocations and answered a set of RED questions following
             each aggressive retaliation (administered at Grades 8 and 11
             [13 and 16 years, respectively]). Self- and mother reports
             of antisocial behavior were collected at Grades 7, 9/10, and
             12 (12, 14/15, and 17 years, respectively). Using structural
             equation modeling, the study found a partial mediating
             effect at each hypothesized mediational path despite high
             stability of antisocial behavior across adolescence.
             Findings are consistent with an individual systems
             perspective by which adolescents' antisocial conduct
             influences how they evaluate aggressive interpersonal
             behaviors, which affects their future antisocial
             conduct.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2007.01136.x},
   Key = {fds272087}
}

@article{fds272086,
   Author = {Laird, RD and Criss, MM and Pettit, GS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Parents' monitoring knowledge attenuates the link between
             antisocial friends and adolescent delinquent
             behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {299-310},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-007-9178-4},
   Abstract = {Developmental trajectories of parents' knowledge of their
             adolescents' whereabouts and activities were tested as
             moderators of transactional associations between friends'
             antisociality and adolescent delinquent behavior. 504
             adolescents (50% female) provided annual reports (from ages
             12 to 16) of their parents' knowledge and (from ages 13 to
             16) their own delinquent behavior and their friends'
             antisociality. Parents also reported the adolescents'
             delinquent behavior. Growth mixture modeling was used to
             identify two sub-groups based on their monitoring knowledge
             growth trajectories. Adolescents in the sub-group
             characterized by decreasing levels of parents' knowledge
             reported more delinquent behavior and more friend
             antisociality in early adolescence, and reported greater
             increases in delinquent behavior and friend antisociality
             from early to middle adolescence compared to adolescents in
             the sub-group characterized by increasing levels of parents'
             knowledge. Transactional associations consistent with social
             influence and social selection processes also were
             suppressed in the increasing knowledge sub-group as compared
             to the decreasing knowledge sub-group.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-007-9178-4},
   Key = {fds272086}
}

@article{fds272085,
   Author = {Crozier, JC and Dodge, KA and Fontaine, RG and Lansford, JE and Bates,
             JE and Pettit, GS and Levenson, RW},
   Title = {Social information processing and cardiac predictors of
             adolescent antisocial behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {117},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {253-267},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0021-843X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18489202},
   Abstract = {The relations among social information processing (SIP),
             cardiac activity, and antisocial behavior were investigated
             in adolescents over a 3-year period (from ages 16 to 18) in
             a community sample of 585 (48% female, 17% African American)
             participants. Antisocial behavior was assessed in all 3
             years. Cardiac and SIP measures were collected between the
             first and second behavioral assessments. Cardiac measures
             assessed resting heart rate (RHR) and heart rate reactivity
             (HRR) as participants imagined themselves being victimized
             in hypothetical provocation situations portrayed via video
             vignettes. The findings were moderated by gender and
             supported a multiprocess model in which antisocial behavior
             is a function of trait-like low RHR (for male individuals
             only) and deviant SIP. In addition, deviant SIP mediated the
             effects of elevated HRR reactivity and elevated RHR on
             antisocial behavior (for male and female
             participants).},
   Doi = {10.1037/0021-843X.117.2.253},
   Key = {fds272085}
}

@article{fds272077,
   Author = {Fite, JE and Goodnight, JA and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit,
             GS},
   Title = {Adolescent aggression and social cognition in the context of
             personality: impulsivity as a moderator of predictions from
             social information processing.},
   Journal = {Aggressive Behavior},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {511-520},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0096-140X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ab.20263},
   Abstract = {This study asked how individual differences in social
             cognition and personality interact in predicting later
             aggressive behavior. It was hypothesized that the
             relationship between immediate response evaluations in
             social information processing (SIP) and later aggressive
             behavior would be moderated by impulsivity. In particular,
             the immediate positive evaluations of aggressive responses
             would be more strongly related to later aggressive behavior
             for high-impulsive than for low-impulsive individuals,
             because high-impulsive children would be less likely to
             integrate peripheral information and consider long-term
             future consequences of their actions. Participants were 585
             adolescents (52% male) and their mothers and teachers from
             the longitudinal Child Development Project. Structural
             equation modeling indicated that teacher-reported
             impulsivity at ages 11-13 moderated the association between
             adolescents' endorsement of aggressive responses in
             hypothetical, ambiguous situations and subsequent
             mother-reported aggressive behavior. Specifically, positive
             endorsement of aggressive responses at age 13 was
             significantly related to later aggressive behavior (age
             14-17) for participants with high and medium levels of
             impulsivity, but this association was not significant for
             participants with low levels of impulsivity. This study
             provides evidence of personality variables as potential
             moderators of the link between SIP and behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1002/ab.20263},
   Key = {fds272077}
}

@article{fds272074,
   Author = {Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Framing public policy and prevention of chronic violence in
             American youths.},
   Journal = {American Psychologist},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {573-590},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0003-066X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18855489},
   Keywords = {aggressive behavior • frame analysis • prevention
             • public policy},
   Abstract = {Metaphors can both inspire and mislead the public. Current
             metaphors for youth violence are inconsistent with
             scientific evidence about how chronic violence develops and
             evoke inaccurate or harmful reactions. Popular, problematic
             metaphors include superpredator, quarantining the
             contagious, corrective surgery, man as computer, vaccine,
             and chronic disease. Four new metaphors that more accurately
             reflect the science of child development are proposed to
             shape the field. Preventive dentistry offers a lifelong
             system of universal, selected, and indicated intervention
             policies. Cardiovascular disease offers concepts of distal
             risk factors, proximal processes, equifinality and
             multifinality, and long-term prevention. The Centers for
             Disease Control and Prevention's public health model focuses
             on injury and the victim to elicit popular support. Public
             education for illiteracy offers concepts of long-term
             universal education coupled with specialized help for
             high-risk youths and goes beyond metaphor to represent a
             truly applicable framework. Research is proposed to test the
             scientific merit for and public receptivity to these
             metaphors.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0003-066X.63.7.573},
   Key = {fds272074}
}

@article{fds272070,
   Author = {Schofield, H-LT and Bierman, KL and Heinrichs, B and Nix, RL and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Predicting early sexual activity with behavior problems
             exhibited at school entry and in early adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1175-1188},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-008-9252-6},
   Abstract = {Youth who initiate sexual intercourse in early adolescence
             (age 11-14) experience multiple risks, including concurrent
             adjustment problems and unsafe sexual practices. The current
             study tested two models describing the links between
             childhood precursors, early adolescent risk factors, and
             adolescent sexual activity: a cumulative model and a
             meditational model. A longitudinal sample of 694 boys and
             girls from four geographical locations was utilized, with
             data collected from kindergarten through high school.
             Structural equation models revealed that, irrespective of
             gender or race, high rates of aggressive disruptive
             behaviors and attention problems at school entry increased
             risk for a constellation of problem behaviors in middle
             school (school maladjustment, antisocial activity, and
             substance use) which, in turn, promoted the early initiation
             of sexual activity. Implications are discussed for
             developmental models of early sexual activity and for
             prevention programming.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-008-9252-6},
   Key = {fds272070}
}

@article{fds272073,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Malone, PS and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Testing an idealized dynamic cascade model of the
             development of serious violence in adolescence.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1907-1927},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19037957},
   Abstract = {A dynamic cascade model of development of serious adolescent
             violence was proposed and tested through prospective inquiry
             with 754 children (50% male; 43% African American) from 27
             schools at 4 geographic sites followed annually from
             kindergarten through Grade 11 (ages 5-18). Self, parent,
             teacher, peer, observer, and administrative reports provided
             data. Partial least squares analyses revealed a cascade of
             prediction and mediation: An early social context of
             disadvantage predicts harsh-inconsistent parenting, which
             predicts social and cognitive deficits, which predicts
             conduct problem behavior, which predicts elementary school
             social and academic failure, which predicts parental
             withdrawal from supervision and monitoring, which predicts
             deviant peer associations, which ultimately predicts
             adolescent violence. Findings suggest targets for in-depth
             inquiry and preventive intervention.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2008.01233.x},
   Key = {fds272073}
}

@article{fds272049,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, and S, and Gorman-Smith, and D, and Sullivan, and T, and Orpinas, and P, and Dodge, TM-SVPPKA and member},
   Title = {Parent and peer predictors of physical dating violence
             perpetration in early adolescence: Tests of moderation and
             gender differences},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent
             Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {535-550},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374410902976270},
   Doi = {10.1080/15374410902976270},
   Key = {fds272049}
}

@article{fds272067,
   Author = {Dodge, TMVPPKA and member},
   Title = {The ecological effects of universal and selective violence
             prevention programs for middle school students: A randomized
             trial},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {77},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {526.-542.},
   Year = {2009},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0014395},
   Abstract = {This study reports the findings of a multisite randomized
             trial evaluating the separate and combined effects of 2
             school-based approaches to reduce violence among early
             adolescents. A total of 37 schools at 4 sites were
             randomized to 4 conditions: (1) a universal intervention
             that involved implementing a student curriculum and teacher
             training with 6th-grade students and teachers, (2) a
             selective intervention in which a family intervention was
             implemented with a subset of 6th-grade students exhibiting
             high levels of aggression and social influence, (3) a
             combined intervention condition, and (4) a no-intervention
             control condition. Analyses of multiple waves of data from 2
             cohorts of students at each school (N = 5,581) within the
             grade targeted by the interventions revealed a complex
             pattern. There was some evidence to suggest that the
             universal intervention was associated with increases in
             aggression and reductions in victimization; however, these
             effects were moderated by preintervention risk. In contrast,
             the selective intervention was associated with decreases in
             aggression but no changes in victimization. These findings
             have important implications for efforts to develop effective
             violence prevention programs.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0014395},
   Key = {fds272067}
}

@article{fds167314,
   Author = {Jones, D. and Foster, E.M. and the Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Service use patterns for adolescents with ADHD and comorbid
             conduct disorder},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Health Service and
             Research},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {436-449},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11414-008-9133-3},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11414-008-9133-3},
   Key = {fds167314}
}

@article{fds167316,
   Author = {Lansford, J.E. and Dishion, T.J. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Deviant peer clustering and influence within public school
             settings: Inadvertent negative outcomes from traditional
             professional practices},
   Booktitle = {Interventions for achievement and behavior in a three-tier
             model including response to intervention},
   Publisher = {National Association for School Psychologists
             Press},
   Address = {Bethesda, MD},
   Editor = {Shinn, M.R. and Walker, H.M. and Stoner, G.},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds167316}
}

@book{fds167326,
   Author = {Prinstein, M.J. and Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Understanding Peer Influence in Children and
             Adolescents},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Address = {New York},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds167326}
}

@article{fds272068,
   Author = {Fontaine, RG and Yang, C and Burks, VS and Dodge, KA and Price, JM and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Loneliness as a partial mediator of the relation between low
             social preference in childhood and anxious/depressed
             symptoms in adolescence.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {479-491},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0954-5794},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579409000261},
   Abstract = {This study examined the mediating role of loneliness
             (assessed by self-report at Time 2; Grade 6) in the relation
             between early social preference (assessed by peer report at
             Time 1; kindergarten through Grade 3) and adolescent
             anxious/depressed symptoms (assessed by mother, teacher, and
             self-reports at Time 3; Grades 7-9). Five hundred
             eighty-five boys and girls (48% female; 16% African
             American) from three geographic sites of the Child
             Development Project were followed from kindergarten through
             Grade 9. Loneliness partially mediated and uniquely
             incremented the significant effect of low social preference
             in childhood on anxious/depressed symptoms in adolescence,
             controlling for early anxious/depressed symptoms at Time 1.
             Findings are critical to understanding the psychological
             functioning through which early social experiences affect
             youths' maladjusted development. Directions for basic and
             intervention research are discussed, and implications for
             treatment are addressed.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579409000261},
   Key = {fds272068}
}

@article{fds272058,
   Author = {Fontaine, RG and Yang, C and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Development of Response Evaluation and Decision (RED) and
             antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {447-459},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0014142},
   Abstract = {Using longitudinal data on 585 youths (48% female; 17%
             African American, 2% other ethnic minority), the authors
             examined the development of social response evaluation and
             decision (RED) across childhood (Study 1; kindergarten
             through Grade 3) and adolescence (Study 2; Grades 8 and 11).
             Participants completed hypothetical-vignette-based RED
             assessments, and their antisocial behaviors were measured by
             multiple raters. Structural equation modeling and linear
             growth analyses indicated that children differentiate
             alternative responses by Grade 3, but these RED responses
             were not consistently related to antisocial behavior.
             Adolescent analyses provided support for a model of multiple
             evaluative domains of RED and showed strong relations
             between aggressive response evaluations, nonaggressive
             response evaluations, and antisocial behavior. Findings
             indicate that RED becomes more differential (or specific to
             response style) and is increasingly related to youths'
             antisocial conduct across development.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0014142},
   Key = {fds272058}
}

@article{fds272078,
   Author = {Jones, DE and Foster, EM and Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {Service use patterns for adolescents with ADHD and comorbid
             conduct disorder.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Behavioral Health Services &
             Research},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {436-449},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11414-008-9133-3},
   Abstract = {Service use patterns and costs of youth diagnosed with
             attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid
             conduct disorder (CD) were assessed across adolescence (ages
             12 through 17). Featured service sectors include mental
             health, school services, and the juvenile justice system.
             Data are provided by three cohorts from the Fast Track
             evaluation and are based on parent report. Diagnostic groups
             are identified through a structured assessment. Results show
             that public costs for youth with ADHD exceed $40,000 per
             child on average over a 6-year period, more than doubling
             service expenditures for a non-ADHD group. Public costs for
             children with comorbid ADHD and CD double the costs of those
             with ADHD alone. Varying patterns by service sector,
             diagnosis, and across time indicate different needs for
             youth with different conditions and at different ages and
             can provide important information for prevention and
             treatment researchers.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11414-008-9133-3},
   Key = {fds272078}
}

@article{fds272060,
   Author = {Erath, SA and Keiley, MK and Pettit, GS and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Bates, JE},
   Title = {Behavioral predictors of mental health service utilization
             in childhood through adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics :
             Jdbp},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {481-488},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0196-206X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DBP.0b013e3181c35938},
   Abstract = {This study investigated predictors of mental health service
             utilization from age 5 through age 16.Data were collected on
             a community sample of 399 children, including 338 European
             Americans and 61 African Americans. Internalizing and
             externalizing behaviors were assessed by maternal and
             teacher reports in kindergarten. History of mental health
             service utilization was assessed by maternal reports when
             participants were 16 years old.On average, the probability
             of first-time mental health service utilization increased in
             early to middle childhood, stabilized, and then increased in
             early adolescence. Mother reports of internalizing behaviors
             (independent of teacher reports of externalizing behaviors)
             predicted an increased likelihood of service use among
             European American children but a decreased likelihood of
             service use among African American children. Externalizing
             behaviors (independent of internalizing behaviors) predicted
             a higher likelihood of first-time service use in middle
             childhood. The combination of elevated internalizing and
             externalizing behaviors predicted a higher likelihood of
             first-time service use in adolescence, mainly among European
             American children.This study provides evidence that elevated
             mother-reported internalizing behaviors are less likely to
             forecast mental health service utilization among African
             American children compared with European American children.
             To meet the mental health service needs of all children, it
             is critical to further examine reasons for service
             utilization and underutilization among children with
             internalizing problems.},
   Doi = {10.1097/DBP.0b013e3181c35938},
   Key = {fds272060}
}

@article{fds272043,
   Author = {Lanza, and T, S and Rhoades, and L, B and Nix, and L, R and Greenberg, and T,
             M and Group, TCPPR},
   Title = {Modeling the interplay of multilevel risk factors for future
             academic and behavior problems: A person-centered
             approach},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {22},
   Pages = {313-335},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579410000088},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579410000088},
   Key = {fds272043}
}

@article{fds272047,
   Author = {Fontaine, RG and Yang, C and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Development of response evaluation and decision (RED) and
             antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Pages = {615-626},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0014142},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0014142},
   Key = {fds272047}
}

@article{fds272054,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Domain specificity in relationship history,
             social-information processing, and violent behavior in early
             adulthood.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {98},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {190-200},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0017991},
   Abstract = {Using prospective longitudinal data, we tested 5 hypotheses:
             (a) that the relation between earlier developmental
             experiences (peer social rejection and victimization in a
             romantic relationship) and adult violent behavior toward
             peers and romantic partners is specific to relationship
             domain; (b) that the relation between social-information
             processing (SIP) biases and subsequent violence is also
             specific to relational domain (romantic partner vs. peer);
             (c) that the relation between developmental experiences and
             SIP biases is domain specific; (d) that domain-specific SIP
             mediates the impact of earlier developmental experiences on
             later violent behavior; and (e) that harsh parenting early
             in life is a domain-general predictor of SIP and later
             violent behavior. Harsh parenting was assessed through
             interviews with parents when their children were age 5
             years. Classroom sociometric assessments indexing peer
             rejection were completed in elementary school, and
             self-report of victimization by romantic partners was
             provided at age 18 years. SIP was assessed via interview at
             age 22 years, and violent behavior was measured via self-
             and partner report at ages 23 years and 24 years. Structural
             equation analyses revealed specificity in the relation
             between developmental experiences and violence and in the
             prediction to and from SIP in the peer domain, but not in
             the romantic-relationship domain. The impact of early harsh
             treatment on violence toward peers was mediated by SIP
             biases in the peer domain. These findings provide support
             for domain specificity in the peer domain but for
             cross-domain generality in the romantic relationship domain
             in the development of violent behavior in early
             adulthood.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0017991},
   Key = {fds272054}
}

@article{fds272052,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and McCourt, SN},
   Title = {Translating models of antisocial behavioral development into
             efficacious intervention policy to prevent adolescent
             violence.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychobiology},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {277-285},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20175096},
   Abstract = {Adolescent chronic antisocial behavior is costly but
             concentrated in a relatively small number of individuals.
             The search for effective preventive interventions draws from
             empirical findings of three kinds of gene-by-environment
             interactions: (1) parenting behaviors mute the impact of
             genes; (2) genes alter the impact of traumatic environmental
             experiences such as physical abuse and peer social
             rejection; and (3) individuals and environments influence
             each other in a dynamic developmental cascade. Thus,
             environmental interventions that focus on high-risk youth
             may prove effective. The Fast Track intervention and
             randomized controlled trial are described. The intervention
             is a 10-year series of efforts to produce proximal change in
             parenting, peer relations, social cognition, and academic
             performance in order to lead to distal prevention of
             adolescent conduct disorder. Findings indicate that conduct
             disorder cases can be prevented, but only in the highest
             risk group of children. Implications for policy are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1002/dev.20440},
   Key = {fds272052}
}

@article{fds272017,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Does physical abuse in early childhood predict substance use
             in adolescence and early adulthood?},
   Journal = {Child Maltreatment},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {190-194},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20019026},
   Abstract = {Prospective longitudinal data from 585 families were used to
             examine parents' reports of child physical abuse in the
             first 5 years of life as a predictor of substance use at
             ages 12, 16, and 24. Path analyses revealed that physical
             abuse in the first 5 years of life predicted subsequent
             substance use for females but not males. We found a direct
             effect of early physical abuse on girls'substance use at age
             12 and indirect effects on substance use at age 16 and age
             24 through substance use at age 12. For boys, age 12
             substance use predicted age 16 substance use, and age 16
             substance use predicted age 24 substance use, but physical
             abuse in the first 5 years of life was unrelated to
             subsequent substance use. These findings suggest that for
             females, a mechanism of influence of early physical abuse on
             substance use into early adulthood appears to be through
             precocious initiation of substance use in early
             adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1077559509352359},
   Key = {fds272017}
}

@article{fds272042,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Fast Track intervention effects on youth arrests and
             delinquency.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Criminology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {131-157},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1573-3750},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000295470600002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {This paper examines the effects of the Fast Track preventive
             intervention on youth arrests and self-reported delinquent
             behavior through age 19. High-risk youth randomly assigned
             to receive a long-term, comprehensive preventive
             intervention from 1st grade through 10th grade at four sites
             were compared to high-risk control youth. Findings indicated
             that random assignment to Fast Track reduced court-recorded
             juvenile arrest activity based on a severity weighted sum of
             juvenile arrests. Supplementary analyses revealed an
             intervention effect on the reduction in the number of
             court-recorded moderate-severity juvenile arrests, relative
             to control children. In addition, among youth with higher
             initial behavioral risk, the intervention reduced the number
             of high-severity adult arrests relative to the control
             youth. Survival analyses examining the onset of arrests and
             delinquent behavior revealed a similar pattern of findings.
             Intervention decreased the probability of any juvenile
             arrest among intervention youth not previously arrested. In
             addition, intervention decreased the probability of a
             self-reported high-severity offense among youth with no
             previous self-reported high-severity offense. Intervention
             effects were also evident on the onset of high-severity
             court-recorded adult arrests among participants, but these
             effects varied by site. The current findings suggest that
             comprehensive preventive intervention can prevent juvenile
             arrest rates, although the presence and nature of
             intervention effects differs by outcome.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11292-010-9091-7},
   Key = {fds272042}
}

@article{fds272045,
   Author = {Edwards, AC and Dodge, KA and Latendresse, SJ and Lansford, JE and Bates, JE and Pettit, GS and Budde, JP and Goate, AM and Dick,
             DM},
   Title = {MAOA-uVNTR and early physical discipline interact to
             influence delinquent behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied
             Disciplines},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {679-687},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0021-9630},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=000272027300049&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the
             monoamine oxidizing gene monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) has been
             associated with behavioral sensitivity to adverse
             environmental conditions in multiple studies (e.g., Caspi et
             al. 2002; Kim-Cohen et al., 2006). The present study
             investigates the effects of genotype and early physical
             discipline on externalizing behavior. We expand on the
             current literature in our assessment of externalizing,
             incorporating information across multiple reporters and over
             a broad developmental time period, and in our understanding
             of environmental risk.This study uses data from the Child
             Development Project, an ongoing longitudinal study following
             a community sample of children beginning at age 5. Physical
             discipline before age 6 was quantified using a subset of
             questions from the Conflict Tactics Scale (Straus, 1979).
             Externalizing behavior was assessed in the male,
             European-American sub-sample (N = 250) by parent, teacher,
             and self-report using Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist,
             Teacher Report Form, and Youth Self-Report (Achenbach,
             1991), at 17 time points from ages 6 to 22. Regression
             analyses tested the influence of genotype, physical
             discipline, and their interaction on externalizing behavior,
             and its subscales, delinquency and aggression.We found a
             significant interaction effect between genotype and physical
             discipline on levels of delinquent behavior. Similar trends
             were observed for aggression and overall externalizing
             behavior, although these did not reach statistical
             significance. Main effects of physical discipline held for
             all outcome variables, and no main effects held for
             genotype.The adverse consequences of physical discipline on
             forms of externalizing behavior are exacerbated by an
             underlying biological risk conferred by MAOA
             genotype.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1469-7610.2009.02196.x},
   Key = {fds272045}
}

@article{fds272041,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Malone, PS and Dodge, KA and Pettit, GS and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Developmental cascades of peer rejection, social information
             processing biases, and aggression during middle
             childhood.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {593-602},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20576181},
   Abstract = {This study tested a developmental cascade model of peer
             rejection, social information processing (SIP), and
             aggression using data from 585 children assessed at 12 time
             points from kindergarten through Grade 3. Peer rejection had
             direct effects on subsequent SIP problems and aggression.
             SIP had direct effects on subsequent peer rejection and
             aggression. Aggression had direct effects on subsequent peer
             rejection. Each construct also had indirect effects on each
             of the other constructs. These findings advance the
             literature beyond a simple mediation approach by
             demonstrating how each construct effects changes in the
             others in a snowballing cycle over time. The progressions of
             SIP problems and aggression cascaded through lower liking,
             and both better SIP skills and lower aggression facilitated
             the progress of social preference. Findings are discussed in
             terms of the dynamic, developmental relations among social
             environments, cognitions, and behavioral
             adjustment.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579410000301},
   Key = {fds272041}
}

@article{fds272014,
   Author = {Miller, S and Malone, PS and Dodge, KA and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Developmental trajectories of boys' and girls' delinquency:
             sex differences and links to later adolescent
             outcomes.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {1021-1032},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0091-0627},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-010-9430-1},
   Abstract = {This study examined gender differences in trajectories of
             delinquent behaviors over a 6-year period in adolescence and
             differential outcomes of these diverse developmental
             pathways. Participants were 754 children who were part of a
             longitudinal study of the development of early starting
             conduct problems. Four trajectory patterns were identified
             across grades 7-12: increasing, desisting, chronic, and
             nonproblem groups. Although the proportion of boys and girls
             varied across the pathways, both genders were represented on
             these trajectories. Boys were more represented on the
             chronic and desisting trajectories; girls were more
             represented in the nonproblem group. However, the proportion
             of boys and girls was similar in the increasing trajectory.
             Trajectory membership significantly predicted age 19
             outcomes for partner violence, risky sexual behavior and
             depression, and the risk conferred on these negative
             adjustment outcomes did not vary by gender. The overall
             pattern was characterized by poor outcomes at age 19 for
             youth in both the chronic and the increasing trajectories.
             The major conclusion is that, other than base rate
             differences, developmental patterns and outcomes for girls
             mimic those previously found for boys.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-010-9430-1},
   Key = {fds272014}
}

@article{fds272039,
   Author = {Wu, J and Witkiewitz, K and McMahon, RJ and Dodge, KA and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {A parallel process growth mixture model of conduct problems
             and substance use with risky sexual behavior.},
   Journal = {Drug and Alcohol Dependence},
   Volume = {111},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {207-214},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0376-8716},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.04.013},
   Abstract = {Conduct problems, substance use, and risky sexual behavior
             have been shown to coexist among adolescents, which may lead
             to significant health problems. The current study was
             designed to examine relations among these problem behaviors
             in a community sample of children at high risk for conduct
             disorder. A latent growth model of childhood conduct
             problems showed a decreasing trend from grades K to 5.
             During adolescence, four concurrent conduct problem and
             substance use trajectory classes were identified (high
             conduct problems and high substance use, increasing conduct
             problems and increasing substance use, minimal conduct
             problems and increasing substance use, and minimal conduct
             problems and minimal substance use) using a parallel process
             growth mixture model. Across all substances (tobacco, binge
             drinking, and marijuana use), higher levels of childhood
             conduct problems during kindergarten predicted a greater
             probability of classification into more problematic
             adolescent trajectory classes relative to less problematic
             classes. For tobacco and binge drinking models, increases in
             childhood conduct problems over time also predicted a
             greater probability of classification into more problematic
             classes. For all models, individuals classified into more
             problematic classes showed higher proportions of early
             sexual intercourse, infrequent condom use, receiving money
             for sexual services, and ever contracting an STD.
             Specifically, tobacco use and binge drinking during early
             adolescence predicted higher levels of sexual risk taking
             into late adolescence. Results highlight the importance of
             studying the conjoint relations among conduct problems,
             substance use, and risky sexual behavior in a unified
             model.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.04.013},
   Key = {fds272039}
}

@article{fds272038,
   Author = {McMahon, RJ and Witkiewitz, K and Kotler, JS and Bierman, KL and Coie,
             JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Predictive validity of callous-unemotional traits measured
             in early adolescence with respect to multiple antisocial
             outcomes},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {119},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {752-763},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0020796},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the predictive validity of youth
             callous-unemotional (CU) traits, as measured in early
             adolescence (Grade 7) by the Antisocial Process Screening
             Device (APSD; Frick & Hare, 2001), in a longitudinal sample
             (N = 754). Antisocial outcomes, assessed in adolescence and
             early adulthood, included self-reported general delinquency
             from 7th grade through 2 years post-high school,
             self-reported serious crimes through 2 years post-high
             school, juvenile and adult arrest records through 1 year
             post-high school, and antisocial personality disorder
             symptoms and diagnosis at 2 years post-high school. CU
             traits measured in 7th grade were highly predictive of 5 of
             the 6 antisocial outcomes-general delinquency, juvenile and
             adult arrests, and early adult antisocial personality
             disorder criterion count and diagnosis-over and above prior
             and concurrent conduct problem behavior (i.e., criterion
             counts of oppositional defiant disorder and conduct
             disorder) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
             (criterion count). Incorporating a CU traits specifier for
             those with a diagnosis of conduct disorder improved the
             positive prediction of antisocial outcomes, with a very low
             false-positive rate. There was minimal evidence of
             moderation by sex, race, or urban/rural status. Urban/rural
             status moderated one finding, with being from an urban area
             associated with stronger relations between CU traits and
             adult arrests. Findings clearly support the inclusion of CU
             traits as a specifier for the diagnosis of conduct disorder,
             at least with respect to predictive validity. © 2010
             American Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0020796},
   Key = {fds272038}
}

@article{fds272015,
   Author = {Donahue, KL and D'Onofrio, BM and Bates, JE and Lansford, JE and Dodge,
             KA and Pettit, GS},
   Title = {Early exposure to parents' relationship instability:
             implications for sexual behavior and depression in
             adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Adolescent Health},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {547-554},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1054-139X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.04.004},
   Abstract = {Examine the effects of the timing of parents' relationship
             instability on adolescent sexual and mental health.We
             assessed whether the timing of parents' relationship
             instability predicted adolescents' history of sexual
             partnerships (SP) and major depressive episodes.
             Multivariate logistic regression analyses controlled for
             potential mediators related to parenting and the family,
             including parent knowledge of activities, parent-child
             relationship quality, number of parents' post-separation
             relationship transitions, and number of available
             caregivers. Participants were assessed annually from age 5
             through young adulthood as part of a multisite community
             sample (N = 585).Participants who experienced parents'
             relationship instability before age 5 were more likely to
             report SP at age 16 (odds ratio [OR](adj) = 1.58) or an
             episode of major depression during adolescence (OR(adj) =
             2.61). Greater parent knowledge at age 12 decreased the odds
             of SP at age 16, but none of the hypothesized parenting and
             family variables statistically mediated the association
             between early instability and SP or major depressive
             episode.These results suggest that experiencing parents'
             relationship instability in early childhood is associated
             with sexual behavior and major depression in adolescence,
             but these associations are not explained by the parenting
             and family variables included in our analyses. Limitations
             of the current study and implications for future research
             are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.04.004},
   Key = {fds272015}
}

@misc{fds200022,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Processes in the prevention of crime and
             delinquency},
   Booktitle = {Controlling crime: Strategies and tradeoffs
             (pp.407-418)},
   Publisher = {Chicago: University of Chicago Press},
   Editor = {P. J. Cook and J. Ludwig and J. McCrary},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds200022}
}

@misc{fds200033,
   Author = {Dodge, K.A.},
   Title = {Social information processing models of aggressive
             behavior},
   Booktitle = {Understanding and reducing aggression, violence, and their
             consequences (pp. 165-186)},
   Publisher = {Washington, DC: American Psychological Association},
   Editor = {M. Mikulncer and P.R. Shaver},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds200033}
}

@article{fds272031,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Criss, MM and Laird, RD and Shaw, DS and Pettit, GS and Bates, JE and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Reciprocal relations between parents' physical discipline
             and children's externalizing behavior during middle
             childhood and adolescence.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {225-238},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21262050},
   Abstract = {Using data from two long-term longitudinal projects, we
             investigated reciprocal relations between maternal reports
             of physical discipline and teacher and self-ratings of child
             externalizing behavior, accounting for continuity in both
             discipline and externalizing over time. In Study 1, which
             followed a community sample of 562 boys and girls from age 6
             to 9, high levels of physical discipline in a given year
             predicted high levels of externalizing behavior in the next
             year, and externalizing behavior in a given year predicted
             high levels of physical discipline in the next year. In
             Study 2, which followed an independent sample of 290 lower
             income, higher risk boys from age 10 to 15, mother-reported
             physical discipline in a given year predicted child ratings
             of antisocial behavior in the next year, but child
             antisocial behavior in a given year did not predict parents'
             use of physical discipline in the next year. In neither
             sample was there evidence that associations between physical
             discipline and child externalizing changed as the child
             aged, and findings were not moderated by gender, race,
             socioeconomic status, or the severity of the physical
             discipline. Implications for the reciprocal nature of the
             socialization process and the risks associated with physical
             discipline are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579410000751},
   Key = {fds272031}
}

@article{fds272027,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Erath, SA and Lansford, JE and Dodge, KA and Bates,
             JE},
   Title = {Dimensions of social capital and life adjustment in the
             transition to early adulthood.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Development},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {482-489},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0165-0254},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165025411422995},
   Abstract = {The predictive relations between social capital depth
             (high-quality relationships across contexts) and breadth
             (friendship network extensivity) and early-adult, life
             adjustment outcomes were examined using data from a
             prospective longitudinal study. Interviews at age 22 yielded
             (a) psychometrically sound indexes of relationship quality
             with parents, peers, and romantic partners that served as
             indicators of a latent construct of social capital depth,
             and (b) a measure of number of close friends. In follow-up
             interviews at age 24, participants reported on their
             behavioral adjustment, educational attainment, and arrests
             and illicit substance use. Early-adolescent assessments of
             behavioral adjustment and academic performance served as
             controls; data on what were construed as interpersonal
             assets (teacher-rated social skills) and opportunities
             (family income) were also collected at this time. Results
             showed that depth was associated with overall better
             young-adult adjustment, net of prior adjustment, and assets
             and opportunities. Breadth was only modestly associated with
             later outcomes, and when its overlap with depth was taken
             into account, breadth predicted higher levels of subsequent
             externalizing problems. These findings are consistent with
             the notion that social capital is multidimensional and that
             elements of it confer distinct benefits during an important
             life transition.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0165025411422995},
   Key = {fds272027}
}

@article{fds328784,
   Author = {Makin-Byrd, K and Bierman, KL and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Individual and family predictors of the perpetration of
             dating violence and victimization in late
             adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {536-550},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-012-9810-7},
   Abstract = {Teen dating violence is a crime of national concern with
             approximately one-fourth of adolescents reporting
             victimization of physical, psychological, or sexual dating
             violence each year. The present study examined how
             aggressive family dynamics in both childhood and early
             adolescence predicted the perpetration of dating violence
             and victimization in late adolescence. Children (n = 401, 43
             % female) were followed from kindergarten entry to the age
             of 18 years. Early adolescent aggressive-oppositional
             problems at home and aggressive-oppositional problems at
             school each made unique predictions to the emergence of
             dating violence in late adolescence. The results suggest
             that aggressive family dynamics during childhood and early
             adolescence influence the development of dating violence
             primarily by fostering a child's oppositional-aggressive
             responding style initially in the home, which is then
             generalized to other contexts. Although this study is
             limited by weaknesses detailed in the discussion, the
             contribution of longitudinal evidence including parent,
             teacher, and adolescent reports from both boys and girls, a
             dual-emphasis on the prediction of perpetration and
             victimization, as well as an analysis of both relations
             between variables and person-oriented group comparisons
             combine to make a unique contribution to the growing
             literature on adolescent partner violence.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10964-012-9810-7},
   Key = {fds328784}
}