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Publications [#342352] of Kim Valenta

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Journal Articles

  1. Sarkar, D; Chapman, CA; Valenta, K; Angom, SC; Kagoro, W; Sengupta, R, A Tiered Analysis of Community Benefits and Conservation Engagement from the Makerere University Biological Field Station, Uganda, The Professional Geographer (January, 2019) [doi]
    (last updated on 2019/06/16)

    Abstract:
    © 2019, © 2019 by American Association of Geographers. Conservation plans have evolved beyond biodiversity protection to include the welfare of the communities surrounding protected areas. Local community engagement initiatives include development of ecotourism, revenue-sharing arrangements, and resource access agreements. Although research stations are common in African national parks, their contributions to biodiversity protection and community benefits have seldom featured in the literature. In this article, we consider whether community benefits accruing from field research stations are effective and indicate how they could promote community–park relationships. We employ a mixed methods approach to understand the impacts on the local community of a field station located in Kibale National Park, Uganda. We find that the presence of a research station in Kibale National Park provides long-term direct employment for fifty-two people and indirect, cascading benefits for up to 720 people several kilometers away. Additionally, other important community benefits, primarily health care and education, are associated with the research field station. Although benefits of the research station do not eliminate community–park conflict, the long-term presence of researchers and the gains to local people associated with them are underappreciated and important means to better integrate the goals of biodiversity protection and local community investment. Key Words: community perception, conservation evaluation, economic benefits, inclusive conservation plans, park–people interaction, research station, Uganda.


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