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Curriculum Vitae

Harold Layton

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Box 90320, Durham, NC 27708-0320 (919) 660-2809 (office)
(email)
Education

Ph.D.Duke University1986
M.S.University of Kentucky at Lexington1980
B.A.Asbury College1979
Areas of Research

Mathematical Physiology

Areas of Interest

Mathematical models of renal hemodynamics
Mathematical models of the urine concentrating mechanism
Numerical methods for models of renal systems
Countercurrent systems in animals

Areas of Experience

Modeling countercurrent systems
Renal modeling
Numerical methods for renal models
Computational biofluiddynamics

Professional Experience / Employment History

Duke University
Professor, Department of Mathematics, July 01, 2001 - present
Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics, July 01, 1995 - June 30, 2001
Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics, September 01, 1988 - June 30, 1995
Visiting Positions
Visiting Member: Courant Institute of the Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 1986 - 1988
Major Grant Support

National Science Foundation: Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 1986-1988, ``Mathematical Models of Kidney Function''
National Institutes of Health: First Independent Research Support and Transition Award, 1990-1994, ``Mathematical Models of Renal Dynamics''
National Institutes of Health: Regular Research (R01) Grant, 1995-2000, ``Mathematical Models of Renal Dynamics''
National Science Foundation: Group Infrastructure Grant, 1997-2000, ``Applications of Mathematics to Physiology'' (Michael C. Reed, principal investigator; H. E. Layton and J. JosephBlum, co-principal investigators)
National Institutes of Health: Regular Research (R01) Grant, 2000-2005, ``Mathematical Models of Renal Dynamics''
National Institutes of Health: Regular Research (R01) Grant, 2006-2010, ``Mathematical Models of Renal Dynamics''

Recent Grant Support

  • EMSW21-RTG:, National Science Foundation, DMS-0943760, 2010/09-2017/08.      
  • Modeling Solute Transport and Urine Concentrating Mechanism in the Rat Kidney, National Institutes of Health, 2010/08-2016/07.      
Professional Service

Chair
Chair, Department of Mathematics, Duke University, July 1, 2010 - present  
DGS
Director of Graduate Studies in Mathematics, Duke University, July 1, 2008 - June 30, 2009  
DUS
Director of Undergraduate Studies in Mathematics, Duke Unviersity, July 01, 1996 - June 30, 1999  
Dept Officer
Department Chair, 2009 - 2015  
Chair, Department of Mathematics, 1 July 2009--??, January 2010  
Selected Recent Invited Talks

Harmonics and Heterodyning in Renal Hemodynamics, Medical College of Wisconsin, April 18, 2012  
Dynamics of Tubuloglomerular Feedback, Vanderbilt University, Nashville Tennessee, May 20, 2009  
The urine concentrating mechanism: insights from mathematical modeling, San Diego, CA, April 07, 2008  
The Urine concentrating mechanism of the inner medulla: functional significance of reconstructions based on new immunohistochemical data, San Diego, 15 December 2005  
The Urine Concentrating Mechanism of the Rat Kidney Inner Medulla, Emory University School of Medicine, Renal Division, May 18, 2004  
Irregular Oscillations in Nephron Flow Mediated by Tubuloglomerular Feedback, AMS Southeastern Sectional Meeting, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 2003/10/24  
Spectral Complexity in TGF Limit-cycle Oscillations, Nephrons and Numbers: The Past and Furture of Renal Systems Physiology (a symposium in honor of Donald Marsh), San Deigo, California, 11 April 2003  
Formation of Concentrated Urine by Birds and Mammals, Seminar, Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada, 24 May 2002  
Oscillations in Nephron Flow Mediated by Tubuloglomerular Feedback, Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics, McGill University, Montreal, Canada, 23 May 2002  
Oscillations Mediated by Tubuloglomerular Feedback: Physiological Role and Pathophysiology, Special Session on Applications of Mathematics to Human Physiology and Medicine, at the 2001 National Meeting of the American Mathematical Society, New Orleans, LA, 12 January 2001  
Irregular Oscillations in Kidney Nephron Flow May Be Mediated by Tubuloglomerular Feedback (TGF), Minisymposium ``Mathematical Models for Physiology'' at the 2000 SIAM Annual Meeting, Rio Grande, Peurto Rico, 11 July 2000  
The Dynamic Kidney, Joint Seminar in Mathematics and Physiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 25 February 1999  
Oscillations in the Tubuloglomerular Feedback System, Minisymposium ``Time Delays in Physiological and Neural System'' at the combined annual meetings of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics and the Society for Mathematical Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 15 July 1998  
Doctoral Theses Directed

Kevin Jay Kesseler, Analysis of Feedback-Mediated Dynamics in Two Coupled Nephrons, (2001 - May 09, 2004)  
Darren Randall Oldson, Flow Perturbations in a Mathematical Model of the Tubuloglomerular Feedback System, (2003)  
Kayne Marie Arthurs, Flow Regulation in the Afferent Arteriole: An Application of the Immersed Boundary Method, (1996)  
Professional Affiliations

American Physiological Society
American Society of Nephrology
Society for Mathematical Biology

Publications (listed separately)

Last modified: 2017/12/17

 

dept@math.duke.edu
ph: 919.660.2800
fax: 919.660.2821

Mathematics Department
Duke University, Box 90320
Durham, NC 27708-0320