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Math @ Duke





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Thomas P. Witelski, Professor of Mathematics and Pratt School of Engineering

Thomas P. Witelski

My primary area of expertise is the solution of nonlinear ordinary and partial differential equations for models of physical systems. Using asymptotics along with a mixture of other applied mathematical techniques in analysis and scientific computing I study a broad range of applications in engineering and applied science. Focuses of my work include problems in viscous fluid flow, dynamical systems, and industrial applications. Approaches for mathematical modelling to formulate reduced systems of mathematical equations corresponding to the physical problems is another significant component of my work.

Contact Info:
Office Location:  295 Physics Bldg, Box 90320, Durham, NC 27708-0320
Office Phone:  (919) 660-2841
Email Address: send me a message
Web Pages:  http://fds.duke.edu/db/aas/math/faculty/witelski
https://services.math.duke.edu/~witelski/book_errata.html

Teaching (Fall 2020):  (typical courses)

  • MATH 551.01, APP PART DIFF EQU & COMPX VAR Synopsis
    French Sci 2231, MWF 01:45 PM-02:35 PM
  • MATH 551.02, APP PART DIFF EQU & COMPX VAR Synopsis
    Online ON, MWF 01:45 PM-02:35 PM
  • MATH 553.01, ASYMP/PERTURBATION METHODS Synopsis
    Physics 119, WF 03:30 PM-04:45 PM
  • MATH 553.02, ASYMP/PERTURBATION METHODS Synopsis
    Online ON, WF 03:30 PM-04:45 PM
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Teaching (Spring 2021):

  • MATH 577.01, MATHEMATICAL MODELING Synopsis
    Online ON, TuTh 10:15 AM-11:30 AM
Office Hours:

By request
Education:

Ph.D.California Institute of Technology1995
B.S.E.The Cooper Union1991
Specialties:

Applied Math
Research Interests: Fluid Dynamics, Perturbation Methods, Asymptotic Analysis, Nonlinear Ordinary and Partial differential equations

My primary area of expertise is the solution of nonlinear ordinary and partial differential equations via perturbation methods. Using asymptotics along with a mixture of other applied mathematical techniques in analysis and scientific computing I study a broad range of applications in physical systems. Focuses of my work include problems in viscous fluid flow, dynamical systems, and industrial applications. Through my research I am working to extend the understanding of nonlinear diffusion processes in physical systems. Studying problems in a range of different fields has given me a unique opportunity to interact with a diverse set of collaborators and to transfer analytic techniques across the traditional boundaries that separate fields.

Areas of Interest:

Fluid dynamics
Partial differential equations
Asymptotics/Perturbation methods
Industrial and Applied mathematics

Keywords:

Differential equations, Nonlinear • Differential equations, Parabolic • Fluid dynamics • Perturbations, asymptotics • Surface Tension

Current Ph.D. Students   (Former Students)

    Postdocs Mentored

    Undergraduate Research Supervised

    • Veronica Ciocanel (May, 2010 - May, 2012)
      Honorable mention for 2012 Faculty Scholar,
      Thesis: Modeling and numerical simulation of the nonlinear dynamics of the forced planar string pendulum 
    • Jeremy Semko (May, 2009 - May, 2010)
      Thesis: Statistical Analysis of Simulations of Coarsening Droplets Coating a Hydrophobic Surface 
    • Lingren Zhang (July, 2006 - September, 2006)
      Thesis: The Motion of Sets of Vortices
      Undergraduate summer research 
    • Qinzheng Tian (July, 2005 - September, 2005)
      Thesis: Simulation of Newtonian fluid fluid between rotating cylinders
      Undergraduate summer research 
    Recent Publications   (More Publications)   (search)

    1. Aguareles, M; Chapman, SJ; Witelski, T, Dynamics of spiral waves in the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation in bounded domains, Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena, vol. 414 (December, 2020) [doi]  [abs]
    2. Dijksman, JA; Mukhopadhyay, S; Gaebler, C; Witelski, TP; Behringer, RP, Erratum: Obtaining self-similar scalings in focusing flows [Phys. Rev. E 92, 043016 (2015)]., Physical Review. E, vol. 101 no. 5-2 (May, 2020), pp. 059902 [doi]  [abs]
    3. Witelski, TP, Nonlinear dynamics of dewetting thin films, Aims Mathematics, vol. 5 no. 5 (January, 2020), pp. 4229-4259 [doi]  [abs]
    4. Dijksman, JA; Mukhopadhyay, S; Behringer, RP; Witelski, TP, Thermal Marangoni-driven dynamics of spinning liquid films, Physical Review Fluids, vol. 4 no. 8 (August, 2019) [doi]  [abs]
    5. Bowen, M; Witelski, TP, Pressure-dipole solutions of the thin-film equation, European Journal of Applied Mathematics, vol. 30 no. 2 (April, 2019), pp. 358-399 [doi]  [abs]
    Recent Grant Support

    • CAREER Award, NSF, 2003/09.      
    Conferences Organized

    Journal editorial boards Other Activities

     

    dept@math.duke.edu
    ph: 919.660.2800
    fax: 919.660.2821

    Mathematics Department
    Duke University, Box 90320
    Durham, NC 27708-0320