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Fuqua School of Business
Duke University

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Publications of Ashleigh S. Rosette    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Papers Published   
@article{fds363804,
   Author = {Petsko, CD and Rosette, AS},
   Title = {Are leaders still presumed white by default? Racial bias in
             leader categorization revisited.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Applied Psychology},
   Year = {2022},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/apl0001020},
   Abstract = {In the United States, leaders of the highest valued
             companies, best-ranked universities, and most-consumed media
             outlets are more likely to be White than what would be
             expected based on White people's representation in the U.S.
             population. One explanation for this racial gap is that U.S.
             respondents' prototype of a leader is White by default-which
             is, in turn, what causes White (vs. non-White) people to be
             promoted up the organizational ladder more quickly. Although
             this explanation has empirical support, its central premise
             was recently challenged by experimental evidence documenting
             that U.S. respondents no longer associate leaders, more than
             nonleaders, with being White. To reconcile these
             contradictory findings, we conducted three preregistered
             experiments (N = 1,316) on the topic of whether leaders,
             more than nonleaders, continue to be associated with
             Whiteness (i.e., being categorized as White or being
             represented with stereotypically White qualities). Results
             suggest that associations between leaders and Whiteness hold
             up to scrutiny, but that detecting them may depend on what
             methods researchers employ. In particular, when researchers
             use direct methods of detecting racial assumptions (e.g.,
             self-report measures), there appears to be no evidence of an
             association between leaders and Whiteness (Experiment 1).
             Yet, when researchers use more indirect methods of detecting
             racial assumptions (e.g., a Princeton trilogy task), an
             association between leaders and Whiteness readily emerges
             (Experiments 2 and 3). In short, although respondents
             refrain from freely expressing associations they may harbor
             between leaders and Whiteness, these associations do not
             appear to have dissipated with time. (PsycInfo Database
             Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).},
   Doi = {10.1037/apl0001020},
   Key = {fds363804}
}

@article{fds363675,
   Author = {Ma, A and Rosette, AS and Koval, CZ},
   Title = {Reconciling female agentic advantage and disadvantage with
             the CADDIS measure of agency.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Applied Psychology},
   Year = {2022},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/apl0000550},
   Abstract = {Contradictory findings about whether agentic women are
             penalized or rewarded persist in gender and leadership
             research. To account for these divergent effects, we
             distinguish between agentic traits that people believe
             female leaders ought to possess (i.e., agency prescriptions)
             and ought not possess (i.e., agency proscriptions). We draw
             on expectancy violation theory to suggest that an agentic
             advantage is elicited when women are perceived to violate
             agency prescriptions (e.g., competence), whereas an agentic
             disadvantage is elicited when they are perceived to violate
             agency proscriptions (e.g., dominance). We first developed
             and validated a new, six-factor measure of agency in Studies
             1 and 2, CADDIS (i.e., <i>C</i>ompetent agency, Ambitious
             agency, <i>D</i>ominant agency, <i>D</i>iligent agency,
             <i>I</i>ndependent agency, and Self-assured agency). We
             theorized that these agency factors represented distinct
             agency prescriptions and proscriptions for men and women. In
             Studies 3-5, we found that this six-factor conceptualization
             of agency not only reconciles existing tensions within the
             gender and leadership literature, but also leads to a
             different understanding of past conclusions-an agentic
             advantage occurs when women are perceived to possess
             competent agency, diligent agency, and independent agency,
             and an agentic disadvantage occurs when women are perceived
             to possess dominant agency. (PsycInfo Database Record (c)
             2022 APA, all rights reserved).},
   Doi = {10.1037/apl0000550},
   Key = {fds363675}
}

@article{fds362531,
   Author = {Petsko, CD and Rosette, AS and Bodenhausen, GV},
   Title = {Through the looking glass: A lens-based account of
             intersectional stereotyping.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Year = {2022},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pspi0000382},
   Abstract = {A growing body of scholarship documents the intersectional
             nature of social stereotyping, with stereotype content being
             shaped by a target person's multiple social identities.
             However, conflicting findings in this literature highlight
             the need for a broader theoretical integration. For example,
             although there are contexts in which perceivers stereotype
             gay Black men and heterosexual Black men in very different
             ways, so too are there contexts in which perceivers
             stereotype these men in very similar ways. We develop and
             test an explanation for contradictory findings of this sort.
             In particular, we argue that perceivers have a repertoire of
             lenses in their minds-identity-specific schemas for
             categorizing others-and that characteristics of the
             perceiver and the social context determine which one of
             these lenses will be used to organize social perception.
             Perceivers who are using the lens of race, for example, are
             expected to attend to targets' racial identities so strongly
             that they barely attend, in these moments, to targets' other
             identities (e.g., their sexual orientations). Across six
             experiments, we show (a) that perceivers tend to use just
             one lens at a time when thinking about others, (b) that the
             lenses perceivers use can be singular and simplistic (e.g.,
             the lens of gender by itself) or intersectional and complex
             (e.g., a race-by-gender lens, specifically), and (c) that
             different lenses can prescribe categorically distinct sets
             of stereotypes that perceivers use as frameworks for
             thinking about others. This lens-based account can resolve
             apparent contradictions in the literature on intersectional
             stereotyping, and it can likewise be used to generate novel
             hypotheses. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all
             rights reserved).},
   Doi = {10.1037/pspi0000382},
   Key = {fds362531}
}

@article{fds351502,
   Author = {Koval, CZ and Rosette, AS},
   Title = {The Natural Hair Bias in Job Recruitment},
   Journal = {Social Psychological and Personality Science},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {741-750},
   Year = {2021},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1948550620937937},
   Abstract = {Across four studies, we demonstrate a bias against Black
             women with natural hairstyles in job recruitment. In Study
             1, participants evaluated profiles of Black and White female
             job applicants across a variety of hairstyles. We found that
             Black women with natural hairstyles were perceived to be
             less professional, less competent, and less likely to be
             recommended for a job interview than Black women with
             straightened hairstyles and White women with either curly or
             straight hairstyles. We replicated these findings in a
             controlled experiment in Study 2. In Study 3A and 3B, we
             found Black women with natural hairstyles received more
             negative evaluations when they applied for a job in an
             industry with strong dress norms. Taken together, this
             article advances the research on biases in the labor market
             in the age of social media use and highlights the importance
             of taking an intersectional approach when studying inequity
             in the workplace.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1948550620937937},
   Key = {fds351502}
}

@article{fds346909,
   Author = {Grimm, LJ and Redmond, RA and Campbell, JC and Rosette,
             AS},
   Title = {Gender and Racial Bias in Radiology Residency Letters of
             Recommendation.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American College of Radiology :
             Jacr},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1 Pt A},
   Pages = {64-71},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2019.08.008},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: Perceptions of agency and communality vary by
             race and gender, which may be contributing to the persistent
             gender and racial inequality in radiology. The objective of
             this study was to determine if there are differences in the
             use of agentic and communal language in letters of
             recommendation for radiology residency programs based on the
             demographics of the applicant and letter writer. METHODS: We
             retrospectively reviewed letters of recommendation for 736
             diagnostic radiology residency applicants to Duke University
             from the 2015 to 2016 interview season. We then used
             computerized text analysis software to calculate the
             frequency of agentic and communal terms and multilevel
             negative binominal regression to compare differences in
             count by applicant and letter writer demographics. RESULTS:
             We analyzed 2,624 letters of recommendation, comprising
             976,489 words. The majority of applicants were male (75%,
             549 of 736) and white or Asian (77%, 565 of 736). Letter
             writers, who were mostly male (75%, 1,979 of 2,624) and of
             senior rank (50%, 1,313 of 2,624), described female
             applicants as more agentic than men (incidence rate ratio
             [IRR] = 1.08, P < .05) and described blacks and Latinx
             applicants as less agentic than whites and Asians (IRR =
             0.932, P < .05). Secondary analysis showed that female
             letters writers described applicants as more agentic (IRR =
             1.09, P < .05) and more communal (IRR = 1.12, P < .01) than
             did male writers, and senior rank faculty used agentic
             (IRR = 0.95, P < .05) and communal (IRR = 0.88, P < .01)
             language less often than did junior faculty. CONCLUSION: The
             extent to which agentic and communal language is used in
             letters of recommendation for diagnostic radiology residency
             programs differs by applicant and letter writer
             demographics.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jacr.2019.08.008},
   Key = {fds346909}
}

@article{fds336111,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Zhou Koval and C},
   Title = {Framing advantageous inequity with a focus on others: A
             catalyst for equity restoration},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {76},
   Pages = {283-289},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2018.03.002},
   Abstract = {Prior research has found that framing inequity as an ingroup
             advantage, but not as an outgroup disadvantage, can lead the
             advantaged to be more supportive of redistributive policies
             towards disadvantaged groups. However, it is unclear whether
             these framing effects would occur in the same manner when
             inequity occurs between individuals. In two experiments, we
             test whether different inequity frames (self-focused vs.
             other-focused) can elicit different responses to
             advantageous inequity based on the level of inequity
             (individual-level vs. group-level) that is activated. In
             Study 1, we found that inequity frame and inequity level
             interactively predicted redistribution decisions, such that
             advantaged individuals engaged in more redistributive
             behaviors when the inequity was framed as another
             individual's disadvantage than when the inequity was framed
             as another group's disadvantage. These divergent effects
             occurred because individual-level inequity elicited less
             negative evaluation of others than group-level inequity in
             an other-focused frame (Study 2). These findings establish a
             boundary condition of previous research on inequity frame
             and highlight inequity level as an important moderator that
             affects advantaged individuals’ willingness to engage in
             restorative behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2018.03.002},
   Key = {fds336111}
}

@article{fds340794,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Ponce de Leon and R and Koval, CZ and Harrison,
             DA},
   Title = {Intersectionality: Connecting experiences of gender with
             race at work},
   Journal = {Research in Organizational Behavior},
   Volume = {38},
   Pages = {1-22},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.riob.2018.12.002},
   Abstract = {In recent years, research from various disciplines,
             including social psychology, sociology, economics, gender
             studies, and organizational behavior, has illuminated the
             importance of considering the various ways in which multiple
             social categories intersect to shape outcomes for women in
             the workplace. However, these findings are scattered across
             disciplines, making it difficult for organizational scholars
             to leverage this knowledge in the advancement of gender
             research. The purpose of this review is to assemble these
             findings to capture how gender and race, when considered in
             tandem, can generate new understandings about women of
             different racial groups and their experiences in the
             workplace. We first provide a review of both historic and
             contemporary interpretations of the intersectionality
             concept. Next, using an intersectional framework, we review
             key findings on the distinct stereotypes ascribed to Black,
             Asian, and White women, and compare and contrast the
             differential impact of these stereotypes on hiring and
             leadership for these subgroups of women. Building from these
             stereotypes, we further review research that explores the
             different job roles that Black, Asian, and White women
             occupy, specifically focusing on the impact of occupational
             segregation, organizational support, and the motherhood
             penalty. Finally, we examine how the frequency, emotional
             toll, and legal implications of sexual harassment can vary
             for women of differing races. Through this review, we bring
             attention to the pitfalls of studying women as a monolithic
             category and call for organizational scholars to consider
             the role of intersectionality in shaping workplace
             outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.riob.2018.12.002},
   Key = {fds340794}
}

@article{fds315142,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Koval, CZ and Ma, A and Livingston,
             R},
   Title = {Race matters for women leaders: Intersectional effects on
             agentic deficiencies and penalties},
   Journal = {The Leadership Quarterly},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {429-445},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1048-9843},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2016.01.008},
   Abstract = {A significant amount of the research on two types of biases
             against women leaders-agentic deficiency (perceptions that
             women have minimal leadership potential) and agentic penalty
             (backlash for counter-stereotypical behavior)-has generally
             presumed that the descriptive, prescriptive, and
             proscriptive stereotypes on which the biases are based are
             comparable for women across racial groups. We propose that
             the degree to which agentic deficiencies and penalties occur
             is contingent on the dimension of agency that is under
             consideration and its relation to the stereotypes associated
             with the target's gendered and racial group. The results of
             our literature review and analysis suggest that when
             considered in the context of gender and leadership research,
             at least two dimensions of agency, competence and dominance,
             closely align with perceptions of agentic deficiency and
             agentic penalty, respectively. Based on our analysis and the
             prevalent stereotypes of Black and Asian American women that
             are likely most relevant to the two types of biases against
             women leaders, we examined the interactive effects of racial
             stereotypes and the agentic biases. We suggest that when
             specific racial and gendered stereotypes are aligned with a
             specific dimension of agency, we can gain a more thorough
             understanding of how agentic biases may hinder women's
             progression to leadership positions.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.leaqua.2016.01.008},
   Key = {fds315142}
}

@article{fds277944,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Mueller, JS and Lebel, RD},
   Title = {Are male leaders penalized for seeking help? The influence
             of gender and asking behaviors on competence
             perceptions},
   Journal = {The Leadership Quarterly},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {749-762},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1048-9843},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2015.02.001},
   Abstract = {This study draws on research derived from role congruity
             theory (RCT) and the status incongruity hypothesis (SIH) to
             test the prediction that male leaders who seek help will be
             evaluated as less competent than male leaders who do not
             seek help. In a field setting, Study 1 showed that seeking
             help was negatively related to perceived competence for male
             (but not female) leaders. In an experimental setting, Study
             2 showed that this effect was not moderated by leadership
             style (Study 2a) or a gender-specific context (Study 2b).
             Study 2b further showed that the cognitive tenets of RCT
             rather than the motivational view espoused by the SIH
             explained our findings. Specifically, leader typicality
             (perceptions of help seeking as an atypical behavior for
             male leaders; the RCT view), and not leader weakness (a
             proscribed behavior for male leaders; the SIH view),
             mediated our predicted moderation.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.leaqua.2015.02.001},
   Key = {fds277944}
}

@article{fds277948,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Kopelman, S and Abbott, JAL},
   Title = {Good Grief! Anxiety Sours the Economic Benefits of First
             Offers},
   Journal = {Group Decision and Negotiation},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {629-647},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0926-2644},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10726-013-9348-4},
   Abstract = {Two studies tested whether making first offers influences
             negotiators' feelings of anxiety and their sense of
             satisfaction. The results of Study 1 show that the strategy
             of making the first offer led to decreased levels of
             satisfaction with the negotiation process and outcomes. This
             effect was mediated by perceived feelings of anxiety. Study
             2 discerned that anxiety about making the first offer
             derived from self-perception concerns, represented as
             anxiety about being taken advantage of by the opposing
             party. In both studies, anxiety led negotiators who made the
             first offer to be relatively less satisfied with the
             negotiation, than negotiators who did not make the first
             offer, despite the increased economic gains associated with
             making the first offer. © 2013 Springer Science+Business
             Media Dordrecht.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10726-013-9348-4},
   Key = {fds277948}
}

@article{fds277946,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Carton, AM and Bowes-Sperry, L and Hewlin,
             PF},
   Title = {Why do racial slurs remain prevalent in the workplace?
             Integrating theory on intergroup behavior},
   Journal = {Organization Science},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1402-1421},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/orsc.1120.0809},
   Abstract = {Racial slurs are prevalent in organizations; however, the
             social context in which racial slurs are exchanged remains
             poorly understood. To address this limitation, we integrate
             three intergroup theories (social dominance, gendered
             prejudice, and social identity) and complement the
             traditional emphasis on aggressors and targets with an
             emphasis on observers. In three studies, we test two primary
             expectations: (1) when racial slurs are exchanged, whites
             will act in a manner more consistent with social dominance
             than blacks; and (2) this difference will be greater for
             white and black men than for white and black women. In a
             survey (n = 471), we show that whites are less likely to be
             targets of racial slurs and are more likely to target blacks
             than blacks are to target them. We also show that the
             difference between white and black men is greater than the
             difference between white and black women. In an archival
             study that spans five years (n = 2,480), we found that white
             men are more likely to observe racial slurs than are black
             men, and that the difference between white and black men is
             greater than the difference between white and black women.
             In a behavioral study (n = 133), analyses showed that whites
             who observe racial slurs are more likely to remain silent
             than blacks who observe slurs. We also find that social
             dominance orientation (SDO) predicts observer silence and
             that racial identification enhances the effect of race on
             SDO for men, but not for women. Further, mediated moderation
             analyses show that SDO mediates the effect of the
             interaction between race, gender, and racial identification
             on observer silence. © 2013 INFORMS.},
   Doi = {10.1287/orsc.1120.0809},
   Key = {fds277946}
}

@article{fds277947,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Tost, LP},
   Title = {Perceiving social inequity: when subordinate-group
             positioning on one dimension of social hierarchy enhances
             privilege recognition on another.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1420-1427},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797612473608},
   Abstract = {Researchers have suggested that viewing social inequity as
             dominant-group privilege (rather than subordinate-group
             disadvantage) enhances dominant-group members' support for
             social policies aimed at lessening such inequity. However,
             because viewing inequity as dominant-group privilege can be
             damaging to dominant-group members' self-images, this
             perspective is frequently resisted. In the research reported
             here, we explored the circumstances that enhance the
             likelihood of dominant-group members' viewing inequity as
             privilege. Because social hierarchies have multiple vertical
             dimensions, individuals may have high status on one
             dimension but low status on another. We predicted that
             occupying a subordinate position on one dimension of social
             hierarchy could enhance perceptions of one's own privilege
             on a different dimension of hierarchy, but that this
             tendency would be diminished among individuals who felt they
             had achieved a particularly high level of success. Results
             from three studies that considered gender-based and
             race-based hierarchies in organizational settings supported
             our hypothesis.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0956797612473608},
   Key = {fds277947}
}

@article{fds277960,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Livingston, RW},
   Title = {Failure is not an option for Black women: Effects of
             organizational performance on leaders with single versus
             dual-subordinate identities},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1162-1167},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0022-1031},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2012.05.002},
   Abstract = {We contribute to a current debate that focuses on whether
             individuals with more than one subordinate identity (i.e.,
             Black women) experience more negative leader perceptions
             than do leaders with single-subordinate identities (i.e.,
             Black men and White women). Results confirmed that Black
             women leaders suffered . double jeopardy, and were evaluated
             more negatively than Black men and White women, but only
             under conditions of organizational failure. Under conditions
             of organizational success, the three groups were evaluated
             comparably to each other, but each group was evaluated less
             favorably than White men. Further, leader typicality, the
             extent to which individuals possess characteristics usually
             associated with a leader role, mediated the indirect effect
             of leader race, leader gender, and organizational
             performance on leader effectiveness. Taken together, these
             results suggest that Black women leaders may carry a burden
             of being disproportionately sanctioned for making mistakes
             on the job. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2012.05.002},
   Key = {fds277960}
}

@article{fds277959,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Brett, JM and Barsness, Z and Lytle,
             AL},
   Title = {When Cultures Clash Electronically: The Impact of Email and
             Social Norms on Negotiation Behavior and
             Outcomes},
   Journal = {Journal of Cross Cultural Psychology},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {628-643},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0022-0221},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022022111407190},
   Abstract = {This research examines the extent to which the email medium
             exacerbates the aggressiveness of opening offers made by
             negotiators from two distinct cultures. Hypotheses derived
             from negotiation, communication, and culture research
             predict that Hong Kong Chinese negotiators using email would
             exhibit a reactance effect and consequently engage in more
             aggressive opening offers and claim higher distributive
             outcomes than similar negotiators in the United States.
             Study 1 examines intercultural email negotiations and
             results indicate that Hong Kong Chinese negotiators made
             more aggressive opening offers and attained higher
             distributive outcomes than their U.S. counterparts. Study 2
             results replicate Study 1 findings in an intracultural
             negotiation setting and also show favorable outcomes for
             Hong Kong email negotiators when compared to both Hong Kong
             and U.S. face-to-face negotiators. Overall, the findings
             suggest that Hong Kong Chinese and U.S. negotiators vary
             substantially in how they negotiate via email and face to
             face, which results in differences in distributive outcomes.
             © The Author(s) 2012.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0022022111407190},
   Key = {fds277959}
}

@article{fds277958,
   Author = {Livingston, RW and Rosette, AS and Washington,
             EF},
   Title = {Can an agentic Black woman get ahead? The impact of race and
             interpersonal dominance on perceptions of female
             leaders.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {354-358},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22421203},
   Abstract = {Prior research has demonstrated that the display of agentic
             behaviors, such as dominance, can produce backlash against
             female leaders because of the incongruence between these
             behaviors and prescribed gender roles. The current study was
             designed to fill a gap in existing research by investigating
             whether these well-established findings are moderated by
             race. Results revealed that dominant Black female leaders
             did not create the same backlash that dominant White female
             leaders did. Experimental evidence confirmed that White
             female (and Black male) leaders were conferred lower status
             when they expressed dominance rather than communality,
             whereas Black female (and White male) leaders were not.
             These findings highlight the importance, and complexity, of
             considering the intersection of gender and race when
             examining penalties for and proscriptions against dominant
             behavior of female leaders.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0956797611428079},
   Key = {fds277958}
}

@article{fds277957,
   Author = {Carton, AM and Rosette, AS},
   Title = {Explaining bias against black leaders: Integrating theory on
             information processing and goal-based stereotyping},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Journal},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1141-1158},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0001-4273},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/amj.2009.0745},
   Abstract = {Approaches related to inference-based processing (e.g.,
             romance-of-leadership theory) would suggest that black
             leaders are evaluated positively after success. In contrast,
             approaches related to recognition-based processing (e.g.,
             leader categorization theory) would suggest that, because of
             stereotyping, black leaders are evaluated negatively
             regardless of their performance. To reconcile this
             discrepancy, we predicted that evaluators would engage in
             goal-based stereotyping by perceiving that black leaders -
             and not white leaders - fail because of negative
             leader-based attributes and succeed because of positive
             nonleader attributes (i.e., compensatory stereotypes).
             Multilevel analyses of archival data in the context of
             college football in the United States supported our
             predictions. © 2011 Academy of Management
             Journal.},
   Doi = {10.5465/amj.2009.0745},
   Key = {fds277957}
}

@article{fds277954,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Tost, LP},
   Title = {Agentic women and communal leadership: how role
             prescriptions confer advantage to top women
             leaders.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Applied Psychology},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {221-235},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20230065},
   Abstract = {The authors contribute to the ongoing debate about the
             existence of a female leadership advantage by specifying
             contextual factors that moderate the likelihood of the
             emergence of such an advantage. The investigation considered
             whether the perceived role incongruence between the female
             gender role and the leader role led to a female leader
             disadvantage (as predicted by role congruity theory) or
             whether instead a female leader advantage would emerge (as
             predicted by double standards and stereotype content
             research). In Study 1, it was only when success was
             internally attributed that women top leaders were evaluated
             as more agentic and more communal than men top leaders.
             Study 2 showed that the favorable ratings were unique to
             top-level positions and further showed that the effect on
             agentic traits was mediated by perceptions of double
             standards, while the effect on communal traits was mediated
             by expectations of feminized management skills. Finally,
             Study 2 showed that top women leaders were evaluated most
             favorably on overall leader effectiveness, and this effect
             was mediated by both mediators. Our results support the
             existence of a qualified female leadership
             advantage.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0018204},
   Key = {fds277954}
}

@article{fds277955,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Leonardelli, GJ and Phillips, KW},
   Title = {The White standard: racial bias in leader
             categorization.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Applied Psychology},
   Volume = {93},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {758-777},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0021-9010},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18642982},
   Abstract = {In 4 experiments, the authors investigated whether race is
             perceived to be part of the business leader prototype and,
             if so, whether it could explain differences in evaluations
             of White and non-White leaders. The first 2 studies revealed
             that "being White" is perceived to be an attribute of the
             business leader prototype, where participants assumed that
             business leaders more than nonleaders were White, and this
             inference occurred regardless of base rates about the
             organization's racial composition (Study 1), the racial
             composition of organizational roles, the business industry,
             and the types of racial minority groups in the organization
             (Study 2). The final 2 studies revealed that a leader
             categorization explanation could best account for
             differences in White and non-White leader evaluations, where
             White targets were evaluated as more effective leaders
             (Study 3) and as having more leadership potential (Study 4),
             but only when the leader had recently been given credit for
             organizational success, consistent with the prediction that
             leader prototypes are more likely to be used when they
             confirm and reinforce individualized information about a
             leader's performance. The results demonstrate a connection
             between leader race and leadership categorization.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0021-9010.93.4.758},
   Key = {fds277955}
}

@article{fds277956,
   Author = {Kopelman, S and Rosette, AS},
   Title = {Cultural variation in response to strategic emotions in
             negotiations},
   Journal = {Group Decision and Negotiation},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {65-77},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0926-2644},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10726-007-9087-5},
   Abstract = {This research examined how culture influences the
             effectiveness of the strategic displays of emotions in
             negotiations. We predicted that in cross-cultural
             negotiation settings, East Asian negotiators who highly
             regarded cultural values that are consistent with
             communicating respect as humility and deference would be
             more likely to accept an offer from an opposing party who
             displayed positive as opposed to negative emotion. With a
             sample of East Asian MBA students, the results of Study 1
             confirmed this prediction. Study 2 results replicated this
             finding with a sample of Hong Kong executive managers and
             also found they were less likely to accept an offer from a
             negotiator displaying negative emotion than Israeli
             executive managers who did not hold humility and deference
             in such high regard. Implications for strategic display of
             emotions in cross-cultural settings are discussed. © 2007
             Springer Science + Business Media B.V.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10726-007-9087-5},
   Key = {fds277956}
}

@article{fds277945,
   Author = {Thompson, L and Rosette, AS},
   Title = {Leading by Analogy},
   Pages = {73-90},
   Publisher = {JOHN WILEY & SONS INC},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9780470172223.ch5},
   Doi = {10.1002/9780470172223.ch5},
   Key = {fds277945}
}

@article{fds277952,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Tost, LP},
   Title = {Denying white privilege in organizations: The perception of
             race-based advantges as socially normative},
   Journal = {Academy of Management 2007 Annual Meeting: Doing Well by
             Doing Good, Aom 2007},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {December},
   Abstract = {Two studies investigated the predictions that privileged
             group members tend to perceive their unearned advantages as
             normative for organization members in their workplace
             (Hypothesis 1) and that this perception limits their ability
             to perceive the ways in which their unearned advantages
             accrue to endow their group with privileged status. The
             concept of White privilege in organizational settings was
             used for Study 1 which included both Black and White
             employees who worked in a single organization and in Study 2
             which included White, Black, Hispanic, and Asian respondents
             who worked across an array of industries. In Study 1, survey
             data was used to demonstrate that Whites experienced more
             unearned (race-based) advantages in the workplace than did
             Blacks. However, Whites were less likely to report an
             awareness of White privilege than were Blacks. Furthermore,
             qualitative data analysis provided convincing support that
             White employees perceived that their race-based advantages
             were normative and available to most organizational members;
             whereas Blacks did not share these perceptions. In Study 2,
             survey data replicated Study 1 findings and demonstrated
             that while minority status in an identity domain other than
             race increased the likelihood that individuals of a minority
             race would perceive White privilege, minority status in
             another identity domain did not affect the likelihood that
             White individuals would recognize White privilege.
             Implications for perspective-taking and intersectionality of
             social identities are discussed.},
   Key = {fds277952}
}

@article{fds315141,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Dumas, T},
   Title = {The Hair Dilemma: Conform to Mainstream Expectations or
             Emphasize Racial Identity},
   Journal = {Duke Journal of Gender Law and Policy},
   Volume = {14},
   Pages = {407-421},
   Publisher = {Duke University School of Law},
   Year = {2007},
   ISSN = {1090-1043},
   Key = {fds315141}
}

@article{fds277951,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Phillips, KW and Leonardelli, GJ},
   Title = {The white standard in leadership evaluations: Attributional
             benefits of a white corporate leader},
   Journal = {Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action
             and the Public Concern, Aom 2006},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {December},
   Abstract = {Relative to White corporate leaders, African-Americans have
             typically been under-represented in upperlevel management
             and this study investigated whether psychological biases
             contribute to this under representation. In all, 479
             participants from different racial backgrounds
             (African-American, White, Asian, and Hispanic) evaluated a
             White or African-American CEO's leadership effectiveness
             after finding that the CEO's company had a recent record of
             financial success or failure, and that the company's
             performance was attributable to the CEO's leadership or to
             environmental conditions. Results showed that White CEOs
             were considered much more effective than African-American
             CEOs when a company's success was attributed to the CEO's
             leadership, but that White CEOs were considered less
             responsible than African-American CEOs when an
             organization's failure was attributed to the CEO's
             leadership. Participants' race did not moderate these
             effects. Evidence from this study and a supplementary pilot
             test support the idea that White leaders are evaluated more
             favorably because they are considered more prototypical
             leaders.},
   Key = {fds277951}
}

@article{fds277953,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Leonardelli, GJ and Tost, LP and Phillips,
             KW},
   Title = {Leadership subtype activation: Favorable evaluations of
             women leaders in chief positions},
   Journal = {Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action
             and the Public Concern, Aom 2006},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {December},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this study was to compare evaluations of
             female leaders to male leaders in chief leadership positions
             to ascertain if women leaders are evaluated favorably to men
             and to assess if women leaders benefit from a gendered
             stereotype that differs from women in lower and middle
             management positions. Results of a two (CEO gender: male,
             female) by two (attribution: internal, external) by two
             (performance: successful, unsuccessful) experimental design
             showed that when organizational success was attributed to
             internal attributions female CEOs were evaluated more
             favorably than male CEOs on both agentic and communal
             abilities. These findings suggest that women in chief
             leadership positions activate a subtype that distinguishes
             highly successful women from the stereotype of women in
             general (i.e., low agentic characteristics, high communal
             characteristics) and the counterstereotype for women
             managers that sometimes elicits the backlash effect (i.e.,
             high agentic characteristics, low communal
             characteristics).},
   Key = {fds277953}
}

@article{fds277950,
   Author = {Kopelman, S and Rosette, AS and Thompson, L},
   Title = {The three faces of Eve: Strategic displays of positive,
             negative, and neutral emotions in negotiations},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {99},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {81-101},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2005.08.003},
   Abstract = {In a series of laboratory experiments, we tested the
             influence of strategically displaying positive, negative,
             and neutral emotions on negotiation outcomes. In Experiment
             1, a face-to-face dispute simulation, negotiators who
             displayed positive emotion, in contrast to negative or
             neutral emotions, were more likely to incorporate a future
             business relationship in the negotiated contract. In
             Experiment 2, an ultimatum setting, managers strategically
             displaying positive emotion were more likely to close a
             deal. This effect was mediated by negotiators' willingness
             to pay more to a negotiator strategically displaying
             positive versus negative emotions. In Experiment 3, display
             of positive emotion was a more effective strategy for
             gaining concessions from the other party in a distributive
             setting. Negotiators made more extreme demands when facing a
             negotiator strategically displaying negative, rather than
             positive or neutral, emotions. Implications for strategic
             display of emotion in negotiations are discussed. © 2005
             Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.obhdp.2005.08.003},
   Key = {fds277950}
}

@article{fds277949,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Thompson, L},
   Title = {The Camouflage Effect: Separating Achieved Status and
             Unearned Privilege in Organizations},
   Journal = {Research on Managing Groups and Teams},
   Volume = {7},
   Pages = {259-281},
   Publisher = {Emerald (MCB UP )},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1534-0856},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1534-0856(05)07011-8},
   Abstract = {In many organizational settings, status hierarchies result
             in the conferral of privileges that are based on
             achievement. However, in the same settings, status may
             result in the bestowal of privileges that are unearned. We
             argue that these unearned privileges are often awarded based
             on ascribed characteristics, but are perceived to be
             achieved. We further argue that these misattributions occur
             because acknowledging that one has benefited from unearned
             advantages that are awarded in a meritocracy can be
             threatening to a person's self-identity. We propose that by
             studying unearned privileges in organizational settings, a
             more accurate assessment of status hierarchies may result.
             © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S1534-0856(05)07011-8},
   Key = {fds277949}
}


%% Book Chapters   
@misc{fds359851,
   Author = {Livingston, RW and Rosette, AS},
   Title = {Stigmatization, subordination, or marginalization? The
             complexity of social disadvantage across gender and
             race},
   Pages = {39-59},
   Booktitle = {Inclusive Leadership: Transforming Diverse Lives,
             Workplaces, and Societies},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780429831393},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780429449673-3},
   Abstract = {The central assumption of this chapter is that a focus on
             the comparative degree of hardship among socially
             disadvantaged groups does little to advance our
             understanding of the persistence of disadvantage in general,
             or the ways in which organizations can create greater
             inclusion toward a variety of socially disadvantaged groups.
             A more productive approach to understanding inclusive
             leadership involves a nuanced investigation of the
             distinctions that exist among socially disadvantaged groups
             (e.g., White women, Black men, Black women), in addition to
             considering the mechanisms that regulate the dynamics
             between the dominant group (i.e., White men) and the various
             socially disadvantaged groups that must interact with it to
             access power and leadership.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780429449673-3},
   Key = {fds359851}
}

@misc{fds329394,
   Author = {Khattab, J and Rosette, AS},
   Title = {Workplace barriers faced by women leaders in emerging
             markets},
   Pages = {164-193},
   Booktitle = {Women Leadership in Emerging Markets: Featuring 46 Women
             Leaders},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   ISBN = {9781138188952},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315641959},
   Doi = {10.4324/9781315641959},
   Key = {fds329394}
}

@misc{fds340489,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Akinola, M and Ma, A},
   Title = {Subtle discrimination in the workplace: Individual- level
             factors and processes},
   Pages = {7-24},
   Booktitle = {The Oxford Handbook of Workplace Discrimination},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {February},
   ISBN = {9780199363643},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199363643.013.2},
   Abstract = {Despite the laws that protect employee rights,
             discrimination still persists in the workplace. This chapter
             examines individual- level factors that may influence subtle
             discrimination in the workplace. More specifically, it
             examines how social categories tend to perpetuate the use of
             stereotypes and reviews contemporary theories of subtle
             prejudice and discrimination. In addition, the chapter
             divides discrimination in the workplace along two
             dimensions, gateways and pathways, and examines the extent
             to which stereotypes, prejudice, and social categorization
             processes influence subtle discrimination at these critical
             junctures in an individual's career. Finally, it considers
             the extent to which individual differences may influence a
             person's propensity toward prejudice and
             discrimination.},
   Doi = {10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199363643.013.2},
   Key = {fds340489}
}

@misc{fds315140,
   Author = {Rosette, AS},
   Title = {Unearned Privilege: Race, Gender, and Social Inequality in
             U.S. Organizations},
   Pages = {253-268},
   Booktitle = {Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in the Workplace Issues and
             Challenges for Today's Organizations},
   Publisher = {Praeger Publishers},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {0275988023},
   Key = {fds315140}
}

@misc{fds350881,
   Author = {Rosette, AS and Phillips, KW and Leonardelli, GJ},
   Title = {The white standard in leadership evaluations: Attributional
             benefits of a white corporate leader},
   Journal = {Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action
             and the Public Concern, Aom 2006},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/ambpp.2006.22898280},
   Abstract = {Relative to White corporate leaders, African-Americans have
             typically been under-represented in upperlevel management
             and this study investigated whether psychological biases
             contribute to this under representation. In all, 479
             participants from different racial backgrounds
             (African-American, White, Asian, and Hispanic) evaluated a
             White or African-American CEO's leadership effectiveness
             after finding that the CEO's company had a recent record of
             financial success or failure, and that the company's
             performance was attributable to the CEO's leadership or to
             environmental conditions. Results showed that White CEOs
             were considered much more effective than African-American
             CEOs when a company's success was attributed to the CEO's
             leadership, but that White CEOs were considered less
             responsible than African-American CEOs when an
             organization's failure was attributed to the CEO's
             leadership. Participants' race did not moderate these
             effects. Evidence from this study and a supplementary pilot
             test support the idea that White leaders are evaluated more
             favorably because they are considered more prototypical
             leaders.},
   Doi = {10.5465/ambpp.2006.22898280},
   Key = {fds350881}
}


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