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Publications of Diane M. Nelson    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds323610,
   Author = {D.M. Nelson},
   Title = {Who Counts? The Mathematics of Death and Life after
             Genocide},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2015},
   Key = {fds323610}
}

@book{fds290811,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Reckoning: The Ends of War in Guatemala},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {February},
   Abstract = {Following the 1996 treaty ending decades of civil war, how
             are Guatemalans reckoning with genocide and with the fact
             that almost everyone collaborated in some way with the
             violence? Meaning “to count, figure up” and “to settle
             rewards and punishments,” reckoning promises accounting
             and accountability. Yet Diane Nelson shows that the means by
             which the war was waged, especially its raced and gendered
             modes, unsettle the very premises of knowing and being.
             Symptomatic are the stories of duplicity and living with
             “two faces” pervasive in post-war Guatemala and applied
             to the left, Mayan people, and the state. Drawing on over
             twenty years of research in Guatemala, Nelson explores how
             postwar struggles to reckon traumatic experience illuminate
             the assumptions of identity more generally. Nelson lashes
             together stories of human rights activism, Mayan identity
             struggles, forced-voluntary participation in massacres, and
             popular enjoyments like traditional dances, horror films,
             and carnivals, with exhumations of mass graves, official
             apologies, and reparations. She discusses the stereotype of
             the Two-Faced Indian as colonial discourse revivified by
             anti-guerrilla counterinsurgency and by the claims of
             duplicity leveled against Nobel laureate Rigoberta Menchú,
             as well as functioning as a survival strategy for some.
             Nelson examines suspicions that state power is also
             two-faced, from the left’s fears of a clandestine
             para-state behind the democratic façade to the right’s
             conviction that NGOs threaten Guatemalan sovereignty.
             Comparing anti-malaria and anti-subversive campaigns
             suggests biopolitical ways the state is two-faced,
             simultaneously taking and giving life. Emphasizing that the
             ends of war are always sites of struggle, Nelson offers a
             ground-up take on political transition as Guatemalans find
             creative ways forward, turning ledger books, technoscience,
             and even gory popular culture into tools for making sense of
             violence, loss, and the future.},
   Key = {fds290811}
}

@book{fds323611,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Under the sign of the Virgen de Tránsito},
   Pages = {1-28},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {January},
   Abstract = {Following the 1996 treaty ending decades of civil war, how
             are Guatemalans reckoning with genocide, especially since
             almost everyone contributed in some way to the violence?
             Meaning "to count, figure up" and "to settle rewards and
             punishments," reckoning promises accounting and
             accountability. Yet as Diane M. Nelson shows, the means by
             which the war was waged, especially as they related to race
             and gender, unsettled the very premises of knowing and
             being. Symptomatic are the stories of duplicity pervasive in
             postwar Guatemala, as the left, the Mayan people, and the
             state were each said to have "two faces." Drawing on more
             than twenty years of research in Guatemala, Nelson explores
             how postwar struggles to reckon with traumatic experience
             illuminate the assumptions of identity more generally.
             Nelson brings together stories of human rights activism,
             Mayan identity struggles, coerced participation in
             massacres, and popular entertainment-including traditional
             dances, horror films, and carnivals-with analyses of
             mass-grave exhumations, official apologies, and reparations.
             She discusses the stereotype of the Two-Faced Indian as
             colonial discourse revivified by anti-guerrilla
             counterinsurgency and by the claims of duplicity leveled
             against the Nobel laureate Rigoberta Menchú, and she
             explores how duplicity may in turn function as a survival
             strategy for some. Nelson examines suspicions that state
             power is also two-faced, from the left's fears of a
             clandestine para-state behind the democratic façade, to the
             right's conviction that NGOs threaten Guatemalan
             sovereignty. Her comparison of antimalaria and
             antisubversive campaigns suggests biopolitical ways that the
             state is two-faced, simultaneously giving and taking life.
             Reckoning is a view from the ground up of how Guatemalans
             are finding creative ways forward, turning ledger books,
             technoscience, and even gory horror movies into tools for
             making sense of violence, loss, and the future.},
   Key = {fds323611}
}

@book{fds290810,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {A Finger in the Wound: Body Politics in Quincenntenial
             Guatemala},
   Publisher = {University of California Press},
   Year = {1999},
   Abstract = {http://www.ucpress.edu/books/pages/8109.html},
   Key = {fds290810}
}


%% Papers Published   
@article{fds303223,
   Author = {Nelson, D},
   Title = {"The Truth of Testimonial: The Controversy over I. Rigoberta
             Menchú},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds303223}
}

@article{fds305971,
   Author = {Nelson, DM and McAllister, C},
   Title = {War By Other Means Aftermath in Post-Genocide
             Guatemala},
   Publisher = {Duke UP},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds305971}
}

@article{fds290807,
   Author = {Nelson, D},
   Title = {"Los Maya-hackers"},
   Journal = {Proceedings From the First Maya Studies Conference},
   Publisher = {Guatemala City: Cholsamah Publishing},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds290807}
}

@article{fds290805,
   Author = {Nelson, D},
   Title = {Letter from the Field: From Inside the Guatemalan
             Coup},
   Journal = {Stanford Anthropology Newsletter},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {November},
   Key = {fds290805}
}

@article{fds290804,
   Author = {Nelson, D},
   Title = {"The Reconstruction of Mayan Identity"},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {fds290804}
}


%% Published Articles   
@article{fds341372,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Low intensities},
   Journal = {Current Anthropology},
   Volume = {60},
   Number = {S19},
   Pages = {S122-S133},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/701040},
   Abstract = {This essay opens with one of hundreds of massacres carried
             out in the early 1980s in Guatemala by agents of the
             military state. The killing was meant to depopulate the Rio
             Negro valley to make way for a hydroelectric dam. Like much
             of the violence of the 36-year conflict, it was low-tech and
             carried out by civil patrollers, which is perhaps why the
             Guatemalan civil war was considered a “low intensity
             conflict” by US Army definitions: “below conventional
             war … employing political, economic, informational, and
             military instruments.” I suggest that these instruments
             encompass what many anthropologists call culture. While
             beginning with a moment of spectacular violence, the essay
             then traces the mundane, everyday political and economic
             embeddings of militarism into Guatemalan social
             institutions, life, conditions of possibility, meaning
             systems, and abilities to affect and be affected. A history
             of the present, it traces the paramil-itarization of the
             army/government in the 1960s and 1970s via the development
             of death squads and other clandestine bodies and illicit
             networks that shape state functioning today. Yet it also
             explores the intensities of countercultures of militarism,
             the networks that have forced perpetrator accountability,
             reparations, and state recognition of Mayan peoples and
             their rights to defend their territories from accumulation
             by dispossession.},
   Doi = {10.1086/701040},
   Key = {fds341372}
}

@article{fds351477,
   Author = {Oglesby, E and Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Guatemala’s genocide trial and the nexus of racism and
             counterinsurgency},
   Journal = {Journal of Genocide Research},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {2-3},
   Pages = {133-142},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14623528.2016.1186436},
   Doi = {10.1080/14623528.2016.1186436},
   Key = {fds351477}
}

@article{fds351478,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Bonesetting: the algebra of genocide},
   Journal = {Journal of Genocide Research},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {2-3},
   Pages = {171-187},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14623528.2016.1186439},
   Abstract = {Genocide rulings should not care about numbers. Legally,
             proving the intent to destroy a people in whole or in part
             is what counts. Yet numbers are vital actants in the often
             decades-long lead-up to trials. Aggregate numbers give
             weight to the specificity of individual testimony,
             statistical estimates can transform missing people into
             cold, hard facts, and algorithms can reveal ‘excess
             death’, even when forensic anthropologists cannot find all
             the bones. And because of this power, numbers are highly
             contested in both truth commission findings and trials like
             that of Generals Ríos Montt and Rodríguez Sánchez. In
             this article I analyse the disentangling work of
             statisticians and anthropologists in exhuming and counting
             bodies, and how particular numbers (200,000; 1,771;
             ninety-three per cent) are made, then re-entangled in
             efforts to count. The modern ideal of a universal subject of
             rationality and abstraction that positions women and natives
             as those who cannot count contributed to their historic
             exclusion and dehumanization. Counting, as in adding things
             up, is part of the historic achievement of the trial to make
             Maya-Ixil women and men count, in the sense of to
             matter.},
   Doi = {10.1080/14623528.2016.1186439},
   Key = {fds351478}
}

@article{fds290802,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Vitamin},
   Journal = {Somatosphere: Science, Medicine and Anthropology},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://somatosphere.net/commonplaces},
   Key = {fds290802}
}

@article{fds290803,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {’Yes to Life = No to Mining:’ Counting as Biotechnology
             in Life(Ltd) Guatemala},
   Journal = {The Scholar and the Feminist Online},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://sfonline.barnard.edu/life-un-ltd-feminism-bioscience-race/yes-to-life-no-to-mining-counting-as-biotechnology-in-life-ltd-guatemala/},
   Key = {fds290803}
}

@article{fds290816,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Banal, Familiar and Enrapturing: Financial Enchantment after
             Guatemala’s Genocide},
   Journal = {Women’S Studies Quarterly},
   Volume = {40},
   Number = {3-4},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {fds290816}
}

@article{fds290801,
   Author = {Nelson, DM and Members of Occupy Chapel Hill},
   Title = {Her Earliest Leaf’s a Flower},
   Journal = {Cultural Anthropology Hotspots (On Line). Occupy,
             Anthropology, and the 2011 Global Uprisings.},
   Year = {2012},
   url = {http://www.culanth.org/?q=node/641},
   Key = {fds290801}
}

@article{fds290815,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Pirates, Robbers, and Mayan Shamans: The Terrible and Fine
             Allure of the Spirits of Capital},
   Journal = {Science Fiction Studies},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {118},
   Pages = {437-458},
   Publisher = {SF-TH, Inc.},
   Year = {2012},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5621/sciefictstud.39.3.0437},
   Abstract = {This essay examines China Miéville's The Scar (2004) and
             Nalo Hopkinson's Midnight Robber (2000) alongside Fredric
             Jameson's work on "the desire called Utopia and other
             science fictions," in order to read an anthropological
             "social science fiction" from the post-genocide Maya
             highlands of Guatemala, involving a scam that promised half
             a million quetzals (about $70,000) to people who were deemed
             worthy by the Ajau or Earthparent (and who had contributed a
             small fee). Only Maya could participate, and those who
             created the wealth would get a bit of it. I argue that this
             situation was a form of postcolonial or global science
             fiction: An emergent form embarking from the point of view
             of the enslaved, the indebted, all those who work for
             nothing-a.k.a. "free" labor. Exploring Miéville's pirates,
             Hopkinson's robber queen, and Mayan shamanic investors
             together offers ways to think about the spirits of capital
             and their intensely ambivalent allure on this crisis-ridden
             planet. © 2000-2013 ITHAKA.},
   Doi = {10.5621/sciefictstud.39.3.0437},
   Key = {fds290815}
}

@article{fds290817,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {“The Power of Sweetness” Commentary},
   Journal = {Current Anthropology},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {5},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   Key = {fds290817}
}

@article{fds290818,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Reckoning the after/math of war in Guatemala},
   Journal = {Anthropological Theory},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {87-95},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1463-4996},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000278481400008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Working from multiple meanings of reckoning (to count, to
             settle rewards or penalties, to pay a bill, to measure
             possibilities for the future), this essay explores the
             post-war in Guatemala and the work of, and struggles over,
             number in making different people and experiences count. The
             peace treaty signed in 1996 instituted a truth commission
             and efforts to bring justice to the victims. The
             commission's quantifications of 250,000 dead, 93 percent at
             the hands of the state, mix in complex ways with the
             qualitative judgment that those deaths constitute genocide,
             leading to further quandaries in quantifying forms of
             repair. The state has begun paying reparations to survivors,
             but is also compensating civilians who were drafted into
             para-militaries that carried out massacres. How these
             para-victimizers count in relation to the aggregate of
             victims is, in turn, hard to calculate, and I look at some
             ways Guatemalans are working to make it all add up.
             Copyright © 2010 SAGE Publications.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1463499610365374},
   Key = {fds290818}
}

@article{fds320867,
   Author = {Guyer, JI and Khan, N and Obarrio, J and Bledsoe, C and Chu, J and Bachir
             Diagne, S and Hart, K and Kockelman, P and Lave, J and McLoughlin, C and Maurer, B and Neiburg, F and Nelson, D and Stafford, C and Verran,
             H},
   Title = {Anthropological Theory: Introduction},
   Journal = {Anthropological Theory},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {36-61},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1463499610365388},
   Doi = {10.1177/1463499610365388},
   Key = {fds320867}
}

@article{fds290796,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Horologists Unite! Take Back the Night (of the Soul)
             Review},
   Journal = {Science Fiction Studies},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds290796}
}

@article{fds290821,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {“Mayan Ponzi: A Contagion of Hope, a Made-off With Your
             Money,”},
   Journal = {E Misférica, on Line Journal of Nyu Hemispheric
             Institute},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://hemisphericinstitute.org/hemi/en/e-misferica-61/nelson},
   Key = {fds290821}
}

@article{fds290788,
   Author = {Nelson, D},
   Title = {"Tengo dos caras:" El estado, duplicidad y las
             trans/acciones de la identificaión" ["I have Two Faces:"
             The State, Duplicity, and the Trans/Actions of
             Identification]},
   Journal = {Proceedings From the Biannual Maya Studies
             Conference},
   Publisher = {Guatemala City: Universidad Rafaél Landivar
             PRess},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds290788}
}

@article{fds290789,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {"I Want...to Look Like You: Mestizaje and Raciology in the
             Global Exchange of Glances"},
   Journal = {Key Issues in Latin American Anthropology: Social Movements,
             Mestizaje, Globalisation, and the Politics of
             Ethnography},
   Editor = {Diaz-Barriga, M},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds290789}
}

@article{fds320868,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {A social science fiction of fevers, delirium and discovery:
             The Calcutta Chromosome, the colonial laboratory, and the
             postcolonial new human},
   Journal = {Science Fiction Studies},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {246-266},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {December},
   Abstract = {Using critical studes of technology, medicine, and empire to
             analyze Europe's colonies as laboratories of modernity where
             both work (labor) and slippage (labi) occur, this essay
             explores the phenomenon of social science fiction by
             examining the novel The Calcutta Chromosome, written by
             social scientist Amitav Ghosh. The Calcutta Chromosome is a
             mystery thriller in the guise of sf and alternative history
             that explores a range of human/technology interfaces, from
             railroads, computers, and bureaucracies to genetic
             engineering and the mysterious workings of the malaria
             plasmodium. The eponymous chromosome is a form of
             transmission that shapes the human through books, whispered
             secrets, and email messages as surely as through genetic
             transfers, disease vectors, and medical contagion. The essay
             follows Ghosh in linking malaria (which is less a disease
             than a classic network of actants) with colonial tropes
             (ways of knowing) and troops (the militarized aspects of
             science) in order to imagine a new human entity arising from
             the "counterscience" devised in such laboratories.},
   Key = {fds320868}
}

@article{fds290799,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {’Relating to Terror: Gender, Anthropology, Law and Some
             September Elevenths"},
   Journal = {Gender, Law, and Public Policy. Special Issue},
   Pages = {24-24},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds290799}
}

@article{fds290822,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Phantom Limbs and Invisible Hands: Bodies, Prosthetics, and
             Late Capitalist Identities},
   Journal = {Cultural Anthropology},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {August},
   Key = {fds290822}
}

@article{fds290820,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Stumped identities: Body image, bodies politic, and the
             Mujer Maya as prosthetic},
   Journal = {Cultural Anthropology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {314-353},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/6933 Duke open
             access},
   Doi = {10.1525/can.2001.16.3.314},
   Key = {fds290820}
}

@article{fds290825,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Indian giver or Nobel savage: Duping, assumptions of
             identity, and other double entendres in Rigoberta Menchú
             Tum's Stoll/en past},
   Journal = {American Ethnologist},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {303-331},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/ae.2001.28.2.303},
   Abstract = {I address the emotional debate over David Stoll's claims
             that parts of Nobel Laureate Rigoberta Menchú Tum's
             testimonial are untrue. Rather than arguing for or against
             either "side," I negotiate the double entendre of "Indian
             giver" and the assumptions that structure the arguments that
             make up the debate. I track how such assumptions of identity
             involve a detour through gendered, ethnic, and transnational
             difference. Transactions such as gifting, joking, and
             stereotyping are ecstatic and pleasurable, and vacillate
             with threatening to suggest that the vacillation itself, the
             exchange, is essential to identification and that the
             empiricist promise of being "nonduped" is an
             error.},
   Doi = {10.1525/ae.2001.28.2.303},
   Key = {fds290825}
}

@article{fds290795,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Review of Love in a Time of Hate: Liberation Psychology in
             Latin America by Nancy Hollander},
   Journal = {American Ethnologist},
   Pages = {179-181},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds290795}
}

@article{fds290794,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Review of Violent Memories: Mayan War Widows in Guatemala,
             by Judith Zur and Fear as a Way of Life, by Linda
             Green},
   Journal = {Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {757-758},
   Publisher = {Great Britain},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds290794}
}

@article{fds290808,
   Author = {Nelson, D},
   Title = {"Rigoberta Menchú: Is Truth Stranger than
             Testimonial?"},
   Journal = {Guatemala Scholars Network News},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds290808}
}

@article{fds290823,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Perpetual Creation and Decomposition: Bodies, Gender, and
             Desire in the Assumption/s of a Guatemalan Discourse of
             Mestizaje},
   Journal = {Journal of Latin American Anthropology},
   Pages = {74-111},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds290823}
}

@article{fds290793,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {"Leftovers," review of Food of the Gods: Eating and the
             Eaten in Fantasy and Science Fiction},
   Journal = {Science Fiction Studies},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {Fall},
   Key = {fds290793}
}

@article{fds290792,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {The Horror:’ The Subject of Desire in Post-Colonial
             Theory.” Review of Imperial Leather by Anne McClintock,
             Colonial Desire by Robert Young, and Race and the Education
             of Desire by Ann Stoler},
   Journal = {American Anthropologist},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {June},
   Key = {fds290792}
}

@article{fds290824,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Crucifixion stories, the 1869 Caste War of Chiapas, and
             negative consciousness: A disruptive subaltern
             study},
   Journal = {American Ethnologist},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {331-354},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1525/ae.1997.24.2.331},
   Abstract = {In this article I apply the methodology of the Subaltern
             Studies group, especially Ranajit Guha's theory of negative
             consciousness, to an instance of indigenous insurgency in
             Mesoamerica. During the Caste War of Chiapas, 1867-69, the
             Maya apparently crucified a boy and, emboldened by this
             "Indian Christ," they swept out of the hills killing
             non-Indians indiscriminately. I argue not only that Guha's
             "elementary aspects of peasant insurgency" (1983) aid in
             understanding the ferocious mimesis of the Mayan
             crucifixion, but also that the Caste War has a disruptive
             history that challenges theories of resistance as well as
             the relation of the historian and the ethnographer to the
             subaltern and to the "colonizer" subject.},
   Doi = {10.1525/ae.1997.24.2.331},
   Key = {fds290824}
}

@article{fds290791,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Volatile Bodies: Toward a Corporeal Feminism by Elizabeth
             Grosz},
   Journal = {American Anthropologist},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {fds290791}
}

@article{fds290819,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Maya hackers and the cyberspatialized nation-state:
             Modernity, ethnostalgia, and a lizard queen in
             Guatemala},
   Journal = {Cultural Anthropology},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {287-308},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/6970 Duke open
             access},
   Doi = {10.1525/can.1996.11.3.02a00010},
   Key = {fds290819}
}

@article{fds290806,
   Author = {Nelson, D},
   Title = {"Gringas, Baby Snatching, and "Partial" Anthropology in
             Guatemala"},
   Journal = {Anthropology Newsletter: Recent Developments},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {5},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {fds290806}
}

@article{fds290790,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Skin of the Soul: Women Writing Horror by Lisa
             Tuttle},
   Journal = {Science Fiction and Fantasy Book Review Annual
             L99l.},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds290790}
}


%% Articles & Book Chapters   
@article{fds174057,
   Author = {D.M. Nelson},
   Title = {“Life During Wartime: Guatemala, Vitality, Conspiracy,
             Milieu,”},
   Booktitle = {The Anthropologies of Modernity: Foucault, Governmentality,
             and Life Politics},
   Publisher = {Blackwell Press},
   Editor = {Jonathan Xavier Inda},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds174057}
}


%% Book Chapters   
@misc{fds290785,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {100% OMNILIFE: Health, Economy, and the End/s of
             War},
   Booktitle = {War By Other Means Aftermath in Post-Genocide
             Guatemala},
   Publisher = {Duke UP},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds290785}
}

@misc{fds290786,
   Author = {Nelson, DM and McAllister, C},
   Title = {Aftermath: Harvests of Violence and Histories of the
             Future},
   Booktitle = {War By Other Means Aftermath in Post-Genocide
             Guatemala},
   Publisher = {Duke UP},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds290786}
}

@misc{fds290787,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Mayan Pyramids},
   Booktitle = {The Guatemala Reader},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Editor = {Grandin, L and Oglesby},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds290787}
}

@misc{fds290784,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Los efectos especiales del horror},
   Booktitle = {Re-pensando la violencia},
   Publisher = {University of Cordoba, Spain},
   Editor = {García, JL and Bastos, S},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds290784}
}

@misc{fds290813,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Los Efectos Especialdes de los "Mecanismos del
             Horror"},
   Pages = {153-183},
   Booktitle = {Guatemala, Violencias Desbordadas},
   Publisher = {Universidad de Cordoba},
   Editor = {Garcia, Julian Lopez and Bastos, Santiago and Camus,
             Manuela},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/7428 Duke open
             access},
   Key = {fds290813}
}

@misc{fds290782,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {The Cultural Agency of Wounded Bodies Politic: Ethnicity and
             Gender as Prosthetic Support in Post-War
             Guatemala},
   Pages = {28-28},
   Booktitle = {Cultural Agency in the Americas},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Editor = {Sommer, D},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds290782}
}

@misc{fds290783,
   Author = {Nelson, DM},
   Title = {Life During Wartime: Guatemala, Vitality, Conspiracy,
             Milieu},
   Pages = {34 pages},
   Booktitle = {The Anthropologies of Modernity: Foucault, Governmentality,
             and Life Politics},
   Publisher = {Blackwell Press},
   Editor = {Inda, JX},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds290783}
}


%% Book Reviews   
@article{fds13641,
   Author = {Nancy Hollander},
   Title = {Love in a Time of Hate: Liberation Psychology in Latin
             America},
   Journal = {American Ethnologist},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds13641}
}

@article{fds13639,
   Author = {Judith Zur},
   Title = {Violent Memories: Mayan War Widows in Guatemala},
   Journal = {Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute},
   Publisher = {Great Britain},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds13639}
}

@article{fds13640,
   Author = {Linda Green},
   Title = {Fear as a Way of Life},
   Journal = {Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute},
   Publisher = {Great Britain},
   Year = {2000},
   Key = {fds13640}
}


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