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Publications of Irene Silverblatt    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds150832,
   Author = {I. Silverblatt and Irene Silverblatt and Helene Silverblatt editors and introduction, translated by Jerry Glenn and Florian
             Birkmayer and Helene Silverblatt and Irene
             Silverblatt},
   Title = {Harvest of Blossoms: Poems from a Life Cut
             Short},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://news.duke.edu/2008/10/harvestofblossoms.html},
   Key = {fds150832}
}

@book{fds285511,
   Author = {Meerbaum-Eisinger, S},
   Title = {Harvest of Blossoms: Poems from a Life Cut Short (Collected
             Poems of Selma Meerbaum-Eisinger)},
   Publisher = {Northwestern University Press},
   Editor = {Silverblatt, I and Silverblatt, H},
   Year = {2008},
   Abstract = {Introduction by Irene Silverblatt and Helene
             Silverblatt},
   Key = {fds285511}
}

@book{fds285510,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Modern Inquisitions: Peru and the Colonial Origins of the
             Civilized World},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2004},
   Abstract = {Modern Inquisitions explores the cultural work of
             colonialism in the seventeenth century Peruvian Andes and
             attempts to address some of the complex, cultural practices
             that accompanied the institutionalization of state power in
             Europe and the colonial New World. A primary source of my
             investigation has been records from the Lima headquarters of
             the Spanish Inquisition. These documents show us the
             Inquisition’s modern side: it was Europe’s most advanced
             bureaucracy at the time and it helped instantiate the
             racialized categories of colonial rule that girded modern
             state-making.},
   Key = {fds285510}
}

@book{fds15833,
   Author = {I.M. Silverblatt},
   Title = {Moon, Sun, and Witches},
   Publisher = {Iwanami Shoten},
   Year = {2001},
   Key = {fds15833}
}

@book{fds285491,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Japanes translation of Moon, Sun, and Witches},
   Publisher = {Iwanami Shoten Publisher},
   Year = {2001},
   Key = {fds285491}
}

@book{fds285509,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Spanish translation of Moon, Sun, and Witches},
   Publisher = {Centro-Las Casas},
   Year = {1990},
   Key = {fds285509}
}

@book{fds285508,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Moon, Sun, and Witches: Gender Ideologies and Class in Inca
             and Colonial Peru},
   Publisher = {Princeton University Press},
   Year = {1987},
   Abstract = {http://pup.princeton.edu/titles/2624.html},
   Key = {fds285508}
}


%% Book Chapters   
@misc{fds303226,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Family Values in Seventeenth-Century Peru},
   Booktitle = {Envisioning Women in Latin America History},
   Editor = {Nava, C},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds303226}
}

@misc{fds303227,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Cristianos nuevos y miedos a proposito del Nuevo Mundo en el
             Peru del siglo xvii},
   Booktitle = {Auto de la Fe Celebrado en Lima a 23 Enero de 1639, al
             Tribunal del Santo Oficio de la Inquisicion by Fernando de
             Montesinos},
   Publisher = {Iberoamericana editorial Vervuert},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {September},
   Abstract = {Edición critica de Esperanza Lopez Parada y Maria
             Ortiz},
   Key = {fds303227}
}

@misc{fds285490,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Acllacuna},
   Booktitle = {Encyclopedia of the Incas},
   Publisher = {Rowan and Littlefield},
   Editor = {Urton, G and von Hagen, A},
   Year = {2015},
   Key = {fds285490}
}

@misc{fds285492,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Haunting the Modern Andean State: Colonial Legacies of Race
             and Civilization},
   Booktitle = {Off-Centered States: Political Formation and Deformation in
             the Andes},
   Publisher = {University of Pennsylvania Press},
   Editor = {Krupa, C and Nugent, D},
   Year = {2015},
   Abstract = {Contemporary Andean polities are haunted by colonial
             legacies. Looking at state-making from the off-centered
             view-point of emerging colonial institutions helps make
             sense of the trajectory of horrors and irrationalities –
             as well as idioms of political legitimacy and justice –
             that have profoundly marked modern Andean life. European
             state-making was chained to imperial endeavors and Spanish
             political ideologies, like those of Spain’s early modern
             competitors, reflect modernity’s beginnings in this
             dialectic of state-making and colonialism. My essay explores
             how colonial apparatuses of statecraft, washed in the
             dictates of imperial control, made race-thinking – and the
             imperatives of “civilization” – part of the body
             politic. And, while this essay can be suggestive at best, I
             hope it pushes us to ask why – and how – these
             beginnings have not been central to our perceptions of
             modern experience or modern states},
   Key = {fds285492}
}

@misc{fds285493,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Women},
   Booktitle = {Encyclopedia of the Incas},
   Publisher = {Rowman and Littlefield},
   Editor = {Urton, G and Hagen, AV},
   Year = {2015},
   Key = {fds285493}
}

@misc{fds219827,
   Author = {I.M. Silverblatt},
   Title = {Haunting the Modern Andean State: Colonial Legacies of Race
             and Civilization},
   Booktitle = {Off-Centered States: State Formation and Deformation in the
             Andes},
   Publisher = {University of Pennsylvania Press},
   Editor = {Christopher Krupa and David Nugent},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds219827}
}

@misc{fds285506,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Prologo},
   Booktitle = {No Se Puede Descolonizar Sin Despatriarcalizar: Teoria y
             Propuesta de la Despatriarcalizacion, by Maria
             Galindo},
   Publisher = {Mujeres Creando},
   Address = {La Paz, Bolivia},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds285506}
}

@misc{fds166461,
   Author = {I.M. Silverblatt},
   Title = {“Forward”, Imperial Subjects: Race and Identity in
             Colonial Latin America},
   Booktitle = {Imperial Subjects: Race and Identity in Colonial Latin
             America},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Editor = {M. O'Hara and A. Fisher},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds166461}
}

@misc{fds285505,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Forward},
   Booktitle = {Imperial Subjects: Race and Identity in Colonial Latin
             America},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Editor = {Hara, MO and Fisher, A},
   Year = {2009},
   Key = {fds285505}
}

@misc{fds285503,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {The Black Legend and Global Conspiracies: The Spanish
             Inquisition, Race-Thinking and the Emerging Modern
             World},
   Booktitle = {Rereading the Black Legend},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Editor = {Greer, M and Mignolo, W},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds285503}
}

@misc{fds285504,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Native Andeans Observe Spanish Colonials},
   Booktitle = {Europe Observed},
   Publisher = {Bucknell University Press},
   Editor = {Hawes, C and Chaterjee, K},
   Year = {2008},
   Key = {fds285504}
}

@misc{fds285502,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Modern Inquisitions},
   Pages = {295-331},
   Booktitle = {Empires: Thinking Colonial Studies Beyond
             Europe},
   Publisher = {School of American Research},
   Editor = {Stoler, A and McGranahan, C},
   Year = {2007},
   Key = {fds285502}
}

@misc{fds303228,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Religion and Race in the Emerging Modern World: Indians,
             Incas, and Conspiracy Stories in Colonial
             Peru},
   Booktitle = {Practicing Catholic: Ritual, Body, and Contestation in
             Catholic Faith},
   Publisher = {Palgrave Macmillan},
   Editor = {Morrill, B and Ziegler, J and Rodgers, S},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds303228}
}

@misc{fds285523,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Religion and Race in the Emerging Modern World: Indians,
             Incas, and Conspiracy Stories in Colonial
             Peru},
   Booktitle = {Practicing Catholic: Ritual, Body, and Contestation in
             Catholic Faith},
   Publisher = {Palgrave/MacMillian},
   Editor = {Morrill, BT and Ziegler, J and Rodgers, S},
   Year = {2006},
   ISBN = {9781349534197},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/9781403982964},
   Doi = {10.1057/9781403982964},
   Key = {fds285523}
}

@misc{fds285500,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Political Disenfranchisement},
   Booktitle = {Latin American Cultural Studies Reader},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Editor = {del Sarto, A and Rios, A and Trigo, A},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {fds285500}
}

@misc{fds285499,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {New World Christians and New World Fears in Colonial
             Peru},
   Booktitle = {From the Margins: Historical Anthropology and its
             Futures},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Editor = {Axel, BK},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds285499}
}

@misc{fds285497,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Definiciones de la Modernidad y Inquisiciones
             Modernas},
   Booktitle = {Reestructuracion de las Ciencias Sociales en los Paises
             Andinos},
   Publisher = {Instituto Pensar},
   Editor = {Gomez, S},
   Year = {2001},
   Abstract = {This essay explores the way in which “modernity” has
             been defined in the English speaking world and asks how that
             definition has excluded the participation of Spain and the
             Spanish colonies. I trace this process back to the 16th
             century and the propoganda wars (the Black Legend) of
             England against its principal rival, Spain. Currently, while
             academics in the Latin America trace the beginning of
             “modernity” to Spanish colonialism, counterparts in the
             United States and England have tended to look at the
             nineteenth century – when British colonialism achieved
             dominance.},
   Key = {fds285497}
}

@misc{fds285498,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Power and Memory in Latin America: The Uses of the
             Pre-Columbian Past},
   Pages = {21-32},
   Booktitle = {Archaeology and Society in the 21st Century: The Dead Sea
             Scrolls and Other Case Studies},
   Publisher = {The Dorot Foundation},
   Editor = {Silberman, NA and Frerichs, ES},
   Year = {2001},
   Abstract = {This essay, published in the proceedings of an international
             conference on archaeology and memory in light of the
             publication of the Dead Sea Scrolls, explores how
             conceptions of the pre-Columbian past have been used to
             support political agendas. It includes a critique of von
             Daniken’s theory of the extraterrestrial origins of pre-
             Columbian sites, Mexican revolutionary ideology, and
             Indianist movements in Peru.},
   Key = {fds285498}
}

@misc{fds285496,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {The Inca’s Witches: Gender and the Cultural Work of
             Colonization in Seventeenth Century Peru},
   Pages = {109-130},
   Booktitle = {Possible Pasts: Becoming Colonial in Early
             America},
   Publisher = {Cornell University Press},
   Editor = {St. George and R},
   Year = {2000},
   Abstract = {Inquisitors considered "witches" to be a colonial plague.
             This essay explores the history of the charges made agsinst
             these women and, in the process, uncovers patterns linking
             discourses of gender and race to political ideologies.
             Accused witches, nearly always women, came from all of the
             colony’s racial clases except "indio". Some were Spanish,
             others mestizos, mulattas, and blacks. Nevertheless, bu the
             early seventeenth century they were condemed for sorcery
             that depended on Ineian prayers, herbs, language and sacred
             ohjects. By the middle of the seventeenth century,
             non-Indian witches were charged with practicing an
             Inca-centered form of sorcery. The essay argues that this
             presumed, unholy alliance was also a political charge,
             steeped in discourses not usually used in the West – a
             nascent, gendered expression of creole belief.},
   Key = {fds285496}
}

@misc{fds37092,
   Author = {I.M. Silverblatt},
   Title = {"Family Values in Seventeenth Century Peru"},
   Pages = {63-89},
   Booktitle = {Native Traditions in the Postconquest World},
   Publisher = {Washington, D.C.: Dumberton Oaks Research Library and
             Collection},
   Editor = {Elizabeth Boone and Tom Cummins},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds37092}
}

@misc{fds285495,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Becoming Indian in the Central Andes of Seventeenth Century
             Peru},
   Pages = {279-298},
   Booktitle = {Imperial Aftermaths and Postcolonial Displacements},
   Publisher = {Princeton: Princeton University Press},
   Editor = {Prakash, G},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds285495}
}

@misc{fds285494,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Andean Witches and Virgins: Seventeenth Century Nativism and
             Subversive Gender Ideologies},
   Pages = {259-271},
   Booktitle = {Women, Race and Writing in the Early Modern
             Period},
   Publisher = {London: Routledge},
   Editor = {Hendricks, M and Parker, P},
   Year = {1994},
   Key = {fds285494}
}


%% Papers Published   
@article{fds327583,
   Author = {Glauz-Todrank, AE and Boyarin, J and Silverblatt, I and Geller, J and Gross, A and Imhoff, S and Sippy, S},
   Title = {Jewish identification and critical theory: The political
             significance of conceptual categories},
   Journal = {Critical Research on Religion},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {165-194},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050303214535009},
   Abstract = {This symposium examines how various discursive frameworks
             inform Jewish and non-Jewish interpretations of Jewishness.
             Although the specific characteristics of these frameworks
             are context-dependent, the underlying themes remain the
             same: Jewish identification entails identifying
             “difference,” and this process of drawing distinctions
             between Jews and non-Jews gets developed in discursive
             frameworks of temporality, “race thinking,” nationalism,
             and genetics, among others. In the broader contexts within
             which Jewish identification is formulated, these frameworks
             serve to: (i) delineate categories of people on the basis of
             socially salient qualities associated with human and other
             bodies; (ii) evaluate these categorical “types” in
             regard to their determined “desirable” and
             “undesirable” qualities; (iii) implement institutionally
             sanctioned measures that facilitate the privileging of the
             people who apparently embody desired qualities; and (iv)
             enforce structural constraints within which people may
             choose to contest, re-inscribe, re-appropriate, and/or
             attempt to transform components of the other three networks
             mentioned above. It also emphasizes the significance of who
             mobilizes these discourses, with what objectives in mind,
             and how both factors instantiate discursive and discursively
             informed concretized outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1177/2050303214535009},
   Key = {fds327583}
}

@article{fds285489,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Stained Blood in the Old World and the New: New Christians
             and the Racial Categories of the Colonial-Modern
             World},
   Journal = {Critical Research on Religion},
   Volume = {2},
   Editor = {Glauz-Todrank, AE},
   Year = {2014},
   Abstract = {Symposium, “Jewish Identification and Critical Theory: The
             Political Significance of Conceptual Categories"},
   Key = {fds285489}
}

@article{fds285513,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Heresies and colonial geopolitics},
   Journal = {Romanic Review},
   Volume = {103},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {65-80},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0035-8118},
   Key = {fds285513}
}

@article{fds285526,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Confronting Nationalisms, Cosmopolitan Visions, and the
             Politics of Memory: Aesthetics of Reconciliation and Selma
             Meerbaum-Eisinger in Western Ukraine},
   Journal = {Dissidences},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {8},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {Winter},
   Abstract = {Selma Meerbaum-Eisinger, an eighteen year old,
             German-speaking poet, died in an SS labor camp in 1942. She
             left behind a hand-written album of 57 poems that
             miraculously survived the War. Selma was from Czernowitz (at
             the time, Cernauti, Romania and today Chernivtsi, Ukraine),
             a city famous for its poets, like cousin Paul Celan, as well
             as for its “multicultural” ethos. Although Selma’s
             poetry had its first commercial publication in Hamburg
             thirty years ago, over the last seven years her poems have
             captured the imaginations of German and Austrian
             playwrights, professors, students, and musicians; now
             Ukrainian teachers, students, artists and city officials are
             discovering her poetry as well. This paper explores the
             resurging interest in Selma Meerbaum’s life and poetry as
             part of a project of potential reconciliation with the past
             -- and for the future. It focuses on memory-work, the social
             practices and social relations that make the past into a
             vital part of the present. It connects broad debates over
             how to – or whether to –publicly represent, atone for,
             or bury one of the modern world’s most horrifying episodes
             with current frictions over nationhood, moral obligations,
             and political vision. The goal is to explore how Chernvitsi
             residents, living in a city marked by communities with
             shared and diverse histories -- and diverse histories of
             facing the past – are creating milieus of meaning, and
             potential meanings, for Selma’s life and art. Selma
             presentations and performances are part of an aesthetic
             negotiation of public memory and embody the discord of
             unresolved pasts and an unsettled present.},
   Key = {fds285526}
}

@article{fds285512,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Chasteté et pureté des liens sociaux dans le Pérou du
             XVIIe siècle},
   Journal = {Cahiers Du Genre},
   Volume = {50},
   Series = {Genre, modernite et colonialite du pouvoir},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {17-40},
   Publisher = {CAIRN},
   Editor = {Maria Eleonora Sanna and Eleni Varikas},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1298-6046},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3917/cdge.050.0017},
   Doi = {10.3917/cdge.050.0017},
   Key = {fds285512}
}

@article{fds285525,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Colonial Peru and the Inquisition: Race-Thinking, Torture,
             and the Making of the Modern World},
   Journal = {Transforming Anthropology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {132-138},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1051-0559},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1548-7466.2011.01127.x},
   Abstract = {The Spanish Inquisition in colonial Peru: Bureaucracy,
             Race-Thinking, and the Making of the Modern World Trying to
             understand how “civilized” people could embrace fascism,
             Hannah Arendt searched for a precedent in Western history.
             She found it in 19th century colonialism, with its mix of
             bureaucratic rule, “race-thinking,” and appeals to
             violent, “civilized” rationality. This article takes
             Arendt's insights about the barbaric underside of Western
             society and moves them back to the 17th century, when
             Spanish colonialism dominated the globe. From the 16th
             century through the mid-17th century, Spain was in the
             vanguard of Europe, putting in place cutting-edge
             bureaucracies, like the Inquisition, to administer and
             control colonial populations. The Inquisition was the
             premier bureaucracy to evaluate and install race-thinking
             designs and ideologies of “civilizing” that camouflaged
             the horrors of modern experience—including the use of
             torture.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1548-7466.2011.01127.x},
   Key = {fds285525}
}

@article{fds285521,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Colonial conspiracies},
   Journal = {Ethnohistory},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {259-280},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0014-1801},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000236844300001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Using records from the Lima office of the Spanish
             Inquisition, this article explores the cultural politics of
             Spanish colonialism in the Andes. Spain's imperial
             enterprise was rooted in the construction of new social
             beings at the core of modernity: (1) the racialized triad -
             Indian, Spaniard, and black; and (2) bureaucratized beings
             created in tandem with institutions of state. Conspiracies
             and confusions were the result as inquisitors, officers in
             the most modern bureaucracy of the time, intertwined
             stereotypes of Jews, Indians, African slaves, and women as
             part of an etiology of blame. Seventeenth-century Peru
             provides a glaring example of how fears could coalesce,
             develop, and ultimately balloon into absurd conspiracy
             theories, made all the more dangerous by an ideology of
             reason and the support of an institution of state. Copyright
             © 2006 by the American Society for Ethnohistory.},
   Doi = {10.1215/00141801-53-2-259},
   Key = {fds285521}
}

@article{fds285529,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {New Christians and new world fears in seventeenth-century
             Peru},
   Journal = {Comparative Studies in Society and History},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {524-546},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0010-4175},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000089243900003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Spanish colonialism brought the Inquisition to the
             Viceroyalty of Peru in 1569, and from the end of the
             sixteenth century until Peru declared independence from
             Spain in 1820, Spanish Inquisitors prosecuted men and women
             for clandestinely practicing Jewish rites. In this paper,
             however, I will not talk about 'Jews' as such, nor try to
             discern who among Peru's New Christians bore 'Jewish'
             identities or followed Jewish practices and beliefs. Rather,
             using Inquisition records from the first half of the
             seventeenth century, and drawing heavily on the lengthy
             trial brought against Manuel Bautista Perez, I want to
             investigate some of the ways in which the 'Jew' grabbed
             colonial imaginations. I will be looking at accusations
             levied against 'New Christians, ' the conspiracies they
             supposedly engaged in, the terrors they provoked, the
             societal dangers they embodied.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0010417500002929},
   Key = {fds285529}
}

@article{fds285519,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {The secret history of gender: Women, men, and power in late
             Colonial Mexico.},
   Journal = {Comparative Studies in Society and History},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {406-406},
   Publisher = {CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0010-4175},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000083178000007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds285519}
}

@article{fds285528,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Honor, Sex, and Civilizing in the Making of Seventeenth
             Century Peru},
   Journal = {Journal of the Steward Anthropological Society},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {1&2},
   Pages = {181-198},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds285528}
}

@article{fds285527,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Lessons of Gender and Ethnohistory in Mesoamerica},
   Journal = {Ethnohistory},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {639-639},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1995},
   ISSN = {0014-1801},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1995TG78700008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/483149},
   Key = {fds285527}
}

@article{fds285522,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Women in States},
   Journal = {Annual Review of Anthropology},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {427-460},
   Publisher = {ANNUAL REVIEWS},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0084-6570},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1988Q535100018&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1146/annurev.an.17.100188.002235},
   Key = {fds285522}
}

@article{fds285518,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Imperial Dilemmas, the Politics of Kinship, and Inca
             Reconstructions of History},
   Journal = {Comparative Studies in Society and History},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {83-102},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0010-4175},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1988M267200004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1017/S001041750001505X},
   Key = {fds285518}
}

@article{fds285524,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {The evolution of witchcraft and the meaning of healing in
             colonial Andean society.},
   Journal = {Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {413-427},
   Year = {1983},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0165-005X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6362989},
   Abstract = {This paper explores the ways in which traditional beliefs of
             Andean peoples regarding health and sickness were
             transformed by the process of Spanish colonization. It also
             examines how the colonial context devolved new meanings and
             powers on native curers. The analysis of these
             transformations in Andean systems of meanings and role
             structures relating to healing depends on an examination of
             the European witchcraze of the 16th-17th centuries. The
             Spanish conquest of the Inca empire in the mid-1500's
             coincided with the European witch hunts; it is argued that
             the latter formed the cultural lens through which the
             Spanish evaluated native religion--the matrix through which
             Andean concepts of disease and health were expressed--as
             well as native curers. Andean religion was condemned as
             heresy and curers were condemned as witches. Traditional
             Andean cosmology was antithetical to 16th century European
             beliefs in the struggle between god and the devil, between
             loyal Christians and the Satan's followers. Consequently,
             European concepts of disease and health based on the power
             of witches, Satan's adherents, to cause harm and cure were
             alien to pre-Columbian Andean thought. Ironically European
             concepts of Satan and the supposed powers of witches began
             to graft themselves onto the world view of Andean peoples.
             The ensuing dialectic of ideas as well as the creation of
             new healers/witches forged during the imposition of colonial
             rule form the crux of this analysis.},
   Doi = {10.1007/bf00052240},
   Key = {fds285524}
}


%% Papers Accepted   
@article{fds198776,
   Author = {I.M. Silverblatt},
   Title = {Women, Religion, and the Incas},
   Journal = {Annual of the Science of Religion (Peru)},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds198776}
}


%% Papers Submitted   
@article{fds219828,
   Author = {I.M. Silverblatt},
   Title = {"Inca Women"},
   Booktitle = {Encyclopedia of the Incas},
   Publisher = {Altamira Press},
   Editor = {Gary Urton and Adriana von Hagen},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds219828}
}

@article{fds219829,
   Author = {I.M. Silverblatt},
   Title = {Aclla},
   Booktitle = {Encyclopedia of the Incas},
   Publisher = {Altamira Press},
   Editor = {Gary Urton and Adriana von Hagen},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds219829}
}

@article{fds183489,
   Author = {I.M. Silverblatt},
   Title = {"Haunting the Modern Andean State: Colonial Legacies of Race
             and Civilization”},
   Booktitle = {Estados Decentrados: Formacion y deformacion politica en los
             andes},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {September},
   Abstract = {Contemporary Andean polities are haunted by colonial
             legacies. Looking at state-making from the off-centered
             view-point of emerging colonial institutions helps make
             sense of the trajectory of horrors and irrationalities –
             as well as idioms of political legitimacy and justice –
             that have profoundly marked modern Andean life. European
             state-making was chained to imperial endeavors and Spanish
             political ideologies, like those of Spain’s early modern
             competitors, reflect modernity’s beginnings in this
             dialectic of state-making and colonialism. My essay explores
             how colonial apparatuses of statecraft, washed in the
             dictates of imperial control, made race-thinking – and the
             imperatives of “civilization” -- part of the body
             politic. And, while this essay can be suggestive at best, I
             hope it pushes us to ask why -- and how -- these beginnings
             have not been central to our perceptions of modern
             experience or modern states},
   Key = {fds183489}
}


%% Book Reviews   
@article{fds285514,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Into the Archive: Writing and Power in Colonial Peru. By
             Kathryn Burns (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010. xv
             plus 247 pp.)},
   Journal = {Journal of Social History},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {596-598},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-4529},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000311902500026&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1093/jsh/shs049},
   Key = {fds285514}
}

@article{fds211263,
   Author = {I.M. Silverblatt},
   Title = {Into the Archive: Writing and Power in Colonial Peru, by
             Kathryn Burns},
   Journal = {Journal of Social History},
   Year = {2012},
   Key = {fds211263}
}

@article{fds285516,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I and Sanchez, A and MacCormack, S},
   Title = {Amancebados, hechiceros, y rebeldes. Chancay, siglo
             XVII.},
   Journal = {The Hispanic American Historical Review},
   Volume = {73},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {157-157},
   Publisher = {JSTOR},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0018-2168},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1993KR10500033&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2517659},
   Key = {fds285516}
}

@article{fds285517,
   Author = {SILVERBLATT, I},
   Title = {Anthropological History of Andean Polities. JOHN V. MURRA,
             NATHAN WACHTEL, and JACQUES REVEL, eds},
   Journal = {American Ethnologist},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {400-401},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0094-0496},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1989CT41200031&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1525/ae.1989.16.2.02a00280},
   Key = {fds285517}
}

@article{fds285520,
   Author = {SILVERBLATT, I},
   Title = {Native lords of Quito in the age of the incas: The political
             economy of north Andean chiefdoms. FRANK
             SALOMON},
   Journal = {American Ethnologist},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {585-586},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0094-0496},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1988P926700028&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1525/ae.1988.15.3.02a00260},
   Key = {fds285520}
}


%% Other   
@misc{fds285507,
   Author = {Silverblatt, I},
   Title = {Threads Speak},
   Journal = {Eccentric Archive},
   Year = {2012},
   Abstract = {Exhibition in “Unauthorized”, Inter Arts Center, Malmö
             (Sweden); and “Reflecting Fashion”, Museum of Modern
             Art, Vienna.},
   Key = {fds285507}
}


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