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Publications of Arnaud Maurel    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds342518,
   Author = {Ashworth, J and Hotz, VJ and Maurel, A and Ransom,
             T},
   Title = {Changes Across Cohorts in Wage Returns to Schooling and
             Early Work Experiences},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {fds342518}
}

@article{fds320604,
   Author = {D'Haultfœuille, X and Maurel, A and Zhang, Y},
   Title = {Extremal quantile regressions for selection models and the
             black–white wage gap},
   Journal = {Journal of Econometrics},
   Volume = {203},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {129-142},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jeconom.2017.11.004},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Elsevier B.V. We consider the estimation of a
             semiparametric sample selection model without instrument or
             large support regressor. Identification relies on the
             independence between the covariates and selection, for
             arbitrarily large values of the outcome. We propose a simple
             estimator based on extremal quantile regression and
             establish its asymptotic normality by extending previous
             results on extremal quantile regressions to allow for
             selection. Finally, we apply our method to estimate the
             black–white wage gap among males from the NLSY79 and
             NLSY97. We find that premarket factors such as AFQT and
             family background play a key role in explaining the
             black–white wage gap.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jeconom.2017.11.004},
   Key = {fds320604}
}

@article{fds320605,
   Author = {Clark, B and Joubert, C and Maurel, A},
   Title = {The career prospects of overeducated Americans},
   Journal = {Iza Journal of Labor Economics},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {48 pages},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40172-017-0053-4},
   Abstract = {© 2017, The Author(s). In this paper we analyze career
             dynamics for US workers who have more schooling than their
             peers in the same occupation. We use data from the NLSY79
             combined with the CPS to analyze transitions into and out of
             overeducated employment, together with the corresponding
             effects on wages. Overeducation is a fairly persistent
             phenomenon at the aggregate and individual levels, with 66%
             of workers remaining overeducated after 1 year.
             Overeducation is not just more common but also more
             persistent among blacks and low-AFQT individuals. Further,
             the hazard rate out of overeducation drops by about 60%
             during the first 5 years spent overeducated. However, the
             estimation of a mixed proportional hazard model suggests
             that this is attributable to selection on unobservables
             rather than true duration dependence. Lastly, overeducation
             is associated with lower current as well as future wages,
             consistent with scarring effects.},
   Doi = {10.1186/s40172-017-0053-4},
   Key = {fds320605}
}

@article{fds340633,
   Author = {Ashworth, J and Hotz, VJ and Maurel, A and Ransom,
             T},
   Title = {Changes Across Cohorts in Wage Returns to Schooling and
             Early Work Experiences},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   Key = {fds340633}
}

@article{fds323959,
   Author = {Belzil, C and Maurel, A and Sidibe, M},
   Title = {Estimating the Value of Higher Education Financial Aid:
             Evidence from a Field Experiment},
   Number = {235},
   Pages = {53 pages},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {June},
   Abstract = {Using data from a Canadian field experiment designed to
             elicit risk and time preferences and quantify financial
             barriers to higher education, we estimate the distribution
             of the value of financial aid for prospective students, and
             relate it to parental socio-economic background, individual
             skills, risk and time preferences. Our results point to
             credit constraints affecting a sizable share of prospective
             students. We find that most of the individuals are willing
             to pay a sizable interest premium above the prevailing
             market rate for the option to take-up a loan, with a median
             interest rate wedge equal to 6.6 percentage points for a
             $1,000 loan. The willingness-to-pay for financial aid is
             also highly heterogeneous across students, with preferences,
             in particular discount factors, playing a key role in
             accounting for this variation.},
   Key = {fds323959}
}

@article{fds320602,
   Author = {Arcidiacono, P and Aucejo, E and Maurel, AP and Ransom,
             T},
   Title = {College Attrition and the Dynamics of Information
             Revelation},
   Journal = {Economic Research Initiatives at Duke (Erid)},
   Number = {222},
   Pages = {69 pages},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {May},
   Abstract = {This paper investigates the role played by informational
             frictions in college and the workplace. We estimate a
             dynamic structural model of schooling and work decisions,
             where individuals have imperfect information about their
             schooling ability and labor market productivity. We take
             into account the heterogeneity in schooling investments by
             distinguishing between two- and four-year colleges, graduate
             school, as well as science and non-science majors for
             four-year colleges. Individuals may also choose whether to
             work full-time, part-time, or not at all. A key feature of
             our approach is to account for correlated learning through
             college grades and wages, whereby individuals may leave or
             re-enter college as a result of the arrival of new
             information on their ability and productivity. Our findings
             indicate that the elimination of informational frictions
             would increase the college graduation rate by 9 percentage
             points, and would increase the college wage premium by 32.7
             percentage points through increased sorting on
             ability.},
   Key = {fds320602}
}

@article{fds318181,
   Author = {Maurel, AP and Altonji, J and Arcidiacono, P},
   Title = {The Analysis of Field Choice in College and Graduate School:
             Determinants and Wage Effects},
   Journal = {In Handbook of the Economics of Education},
   Volume = {5},
   Pages = {305-396},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of the Economics of Education},
   Editor = {Hanushek, E and Machin, S and Woessmann, L},
   Year = {2016},
   ISBN = {9780444634597},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63459-7.00007-5},
   Abstract = {As the workforce has become more educated, educational
             decisions are about what type of education to pursue as well
             as how much to pursue. In college, individuals somewhat
             specialize through their choice of college major. Further
             specialization occurs in graduate school. This chapter
             investigates how majors and graduate school affect labor
             market outcomes, as well as how individuals make these
             potentially important decisions. To do so, we develop a
             dynamic model of educational decision-making. In light of
             the model, we examine the estimation issues associated with
             obtaining causal effects of educational choices on earnings.
             We then examine ways that authors have overcome the
             selection problem, as well as the approaches authors have
             taken to estimate the process by which these educational
             decisions are made. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.},
   Doi = {10.1016/B978-0-444-63459-7.00007-5},
   Key = {fds318181}
}

@article{fds333801,
   Author = {Arcidiacono, P and Hotz, VJ and Maurel, A and Romano,
             T},
   Title = {Recovering Ex Ante Returns and Preferences for Occupations
             Using Subjective Expectations Data},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {October},
   Key = {fds333801}
}

@article{fds320603,
   Author = {Arcidiacono, P and Hotz, V and Maurel, A and Romano,
             T},
   Title = {Recovering Ex Ante Returns and Preferences for Occupations
             Using Subjective Expectations Data},
   Journal = {Economic Research Initiatives at Duke (Erid) Working
             Paper},
   Number = {178},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {October},
   Abstract = {We show that data on subjective expectations, especially on
             outcomes from counterfactual choices and choice
             probabilities, are a powerful tool in recovering ex ante
             treatment effects as well as preferences for different
             treatments. In this paper we focus on the choice of
             occupation, and use elicited beliefs from a sample of male
             undergraduates at Duke University. By asking individuals
             about potential earnings associated with counterfactual
             choices of college majors and occupations, we can recover
             the distribution of the ex ante monetary returns to
             particular occupations, and how these returns vary across
             majors. We then propose a model of occupational choice which
             allows us to link subjective data on earnings and choice
             probabilities with the non-pecuniary preferences for each
             occupation. We find large differences in expected earnings
             across occupations, and substantial heterogeneity across
             individuals in the corresponding ex ante returns. However,
             while sorting across occupations is partly driven by the ex
             ante monetary returns, non-monetary factors play a key role
             in this decision. Finally, our results point to the
             existence of sizable complementarities between college major
             and occupations, both in terms of earnings and non-monetary
             benefits.},
   Key = {fds320603}
}

@article{fds294361,
   Author = {D'Haultfœuille, X and Maurel, A},
   Title = {Inference on an extended Roy model, with an application to
             schooling decisions in France},
   Journal = {Journal of Econometrics},
   Volume = {174},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {95-106},
   Year = {2013},
   ISSN = {0304-4076},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jeconom.2013.01.005},
   Abstract = {This paper considers the identification and estimation of an
             extension of Roy's model (1951) of sectoral choice, which
             includes a non-pecuniary component in the selection equation
             and allows for uncertainty on potential earnings. We focus
             on the identification of the non-pecuniary component, which
             is key to disentangling the relative importance of monetary
             incentives versus preferences in the context of sorting
             across sectors. By making the most of the structure of the
             selection equation, we show that this component is point
             identified from the knowledge of the covariate effects on
             earnings, as soon as one covariate is continuous. Notably,
             and in contrast to most results on the identification of Roy
             models, this implies that identification can be achieved
             without any exclusion restriction nor large support
             condition on the covariates. As a by-product, bounds are
             obtained on the distribution of the ex ante monetary
             returns. We propose a three-stage semiparametric estimation
             procedure for this model, which yields root-n consistent and
             asymptotically normal estimators. Finally, we apply our
             results to the educational context, by providing new
             evidence from French data that non-pecuniary factors are a
             key determinant of higher education attendance decisions. ©
             2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jeconom.2013.01.005},
   Key = {fds294361}
}

@article{fds294362,
   Author = {D'Haultfoeuille, X and Maurel, A},
   Title = {Another look at the identification at infinity of sample
             selection models},
   Journal = {Econometric Theory},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {213-224},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2013},
   ISSN = {0266-4666},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S026646661200028X},
   Abstract = {It is often believed that without instruments, endogenous
             sample selection models are identified only if a covariate
             with a large support is available (see, e.g., Chamberlain,
             1986, Journal of Econometrics 32, 189-218; Lewbel, 2007,
             Journal of Econometrics141, 777-806). We propose a new
             identification strategy mainly based on the condition that
             the selection variable becomes independent of the covariates
             for large values of the outcome. No large support on the
             covariates is required. Moreover, we prove that this
             condition is testable. We finally show that our strategy can
             be applied to the identification of generalized Roy models.
             © 2012 Cambridge University Press.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S026646661200028X},
   Key = {fds294362}
}

@article{fds294365,
   Author = {Buscha, F and Maurel, A and Page, L and Speckesser,
             S},
   Title = {The Effect of Employment while in High School on Educational
             Attainment: A Conditional Difference-in-Differences
             Approach},
   Journal = {Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {380-396},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0305-9049},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0084.2011.00650.x},
   Abstract = {Using American panel data from the National Education
             Longitudinal Study of 1988, this article investigates the
             effect of working during grade 12 on attainment. We employ,
             for the first time in the related literature, a
             semiparametric propensity score matching approach combined
             with difference-in-differences. We address selection on both
             observables and unobservables associated with part-time work
             decisions, without the need for instrumental variable. Once
             such factors are controlled for, little to no effects on
             reading and math scores are found. Overall, our results
             therefore suggest a negligible academic cost from part-time
             working by the end of high school. © 2011 Blackwell
             Publishing Ltd and the Department of Economics, University
             of Oxford.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1468-0084.2011.00650.x},
   Key = {fds294365}
}

@article{fds294363,
   Author = {Beffy, M and Fougère, D and Maurel, A},
   Title = {Choosing the field of study in postsecondary education: Do
             expected earnings matter?},
   Journal = {The Review of Economics and Statistics},
   Volume = {94},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {334-347},
   Publisher = {MIT Press - Journals},
   Year = {2012},
   ISSN = {0034-6535},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/REST_a_00212},
   Abstract = {This paper examines the determinants of the choice of the
             college major when the length of studies and future earnings
             are uncertain. We estimate a three-stage schooling decision
             model, focusing on the effect of expected earnings on major
             choice. We control for dynamic selection through the use of
             mixture distributions. Exploiting variations across the
             French business cycle in the relative returns to the majors,
             our results yield a very low, though significant, elasticity
             of major choice to expected earnings. This suggests that at
             least for the French university context, nonpecuniary
             factors are a key determinant of schooling choices. © 2011
             by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the
             Massachusetts Institute of Technology.},
   Doi = {10.1162/REST_a_00212},
   Key = {fds294363}
}

@article{fds294364,
   Author = {Beffy, M and Fougère, D and Maurel, A},
   Title = {L'impact du travail salarié des étudiants sur la réussite
             et la poursuite des études universitaires},
   Journal = {Economie Et Statistique},
   Volume = {422},
   Number = {422},
   Pages = {31-50},
   Publisher = {PERSEE Program},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0336-1454},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3406/estat.2009.8017},
   Doi = {10.3406/estat.2009.8017},
   Key = {fds294364}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds340431,
   Author = {Altonji, JG and Arcidiacono, P and Maurel, A},
   Title = {The Analysis of Field Choice in College and Graduate School.
             Determinants and Wage Effects},
   Volume = {5},
   Pages = {305-396},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of the Economics of Education},
   Publisher = {Elsevier},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780444634597},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63459-7.00007-5},
   Abstract = {As the workforce has become more educated, educational
             decisions are about what type of education to pursue as well
             as how much to pursue. In college, individuals somewhat
             specialize through their choice of college major. Further
             specialization occurs in graduate school. This chapter
             investigates how majors and graduate school affect labor
             market outcomes, as well as how individuals make these
             potentially important decisions. To do so, we develop a
             dynamic model of educational decision-making. In light of
             the model, we examine the estimation issues associated with
             obtaining causal effects of educational choices on earnings.
             We then examine ways that authors have overcome the
             selection problem, as well as the approaches authors have
             taken to estimate the process by which these educational
             decisions are made. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.},
   Doi = {10.1016/B978-0-444-63459-7.00007-5},
   Key = {fds340431}
}


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