Economics Faculty Database
Economics
Arts & Sciences
Duke University

 HOME > Arts & Sciences > Economics > Faculty    Search Help Login pdf version printable version 

Publications of Dan Ariely    :recent first  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Books   
@book{fds265909,
   Author = {Hughes, CE and Hughes, and Ariely, D and Eckerman,
             DA},
   Title = {The Joy of Experimental Psychology},
   Pages = {104 pages},
   Publisher = {Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {078725682X},
   Key = {fds265909}
}

@book{fds265910,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Predictably Irrational, Revised and Expanded Edition The
             Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions},
   Pages = {384 pages},
   Publisher = {Harper Collins},
   Year = {2008},
   ISBN = {0061353248},
   Abstract = {But are we? In this newly revised and expanded edition of
             the groundbreaking New York Times bestseller, Dan Ariely
             refutes the common assumption that we behave in
             fundamentally rational ways.},
   Key = {fds265910}
}

@book{fds265911,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {The Upside of Irrationality The Unexpected Benefits of
             Defying Logic},
   Pages = {368 pages},
   Publisher = {Harper Perennial},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {May},
   ISBN = {0061995045},
   Abstract = {The Upside of Irrationality will change the way we see
             ourselves at work and at home—and cast our irrational
             behaviors in a more nuanced light.},
   Key = {fds265911}
}

@book{fds265912,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {The (Honest) Truth about Dishonesty How We Lie to Everyone -
             Especially Ourselves},
   Pages = {314 pages},
   Publisher = {Harper Collins},
   Year = {2013},
   ISBN = {0007477333},
   Abstract = {If you've ever wondered how a whole company can turn a
             blind eye to evident misdemeanours within their ranks,
             whether people are born dishonest and whether you can really
             be successful by being totally, brutally honest, then Dan
             Ariely has ...},
   Key = {fds265912}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds265994,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Wallsten, TS},
   Title = {Seeking subjective dominance in multidimensional space: An
             explanation of the asymmetric dominance effect},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {223-232},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0749-5978},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1995RW12300001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {An important example of the influence of context on elicited
             values and choice is the effect of asymmetrically dominated
             alternatives, first studied by Huber, Payne, and Puto
             (1982). A theory of dynamic choice reconstruction is
             presented to account for this effect. The theory is based on
             ideas of dominance seeking, in which the decision maker
             actively looks for ways to simplify the task. Results of
             three experiments showed that the relationship of an
             irrelevant alternative to others in the choice set
             influences the weights of the different dimensions as well
             as the values of the different items. The results support
             the claim that values depend on local relationships in a way
             that is consistent with the theory. © 1995 Academic Press.
             All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1006/obhd.1995.1075},
   Key = {fds265994}
}

@article{fds266019,
   Author = {Dar, R and Ariely, D and Frenk, H},
   Title = {The effect of past-injury on pain threshold and
             tolerance.},
   Journal = {Pain},
   Volume = {60},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {189-193},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0304-3959},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7784104},
   Abstract = {Forty male veterans who had been injured during their
             military service in the Israeli Defense Forces were assessed
             for pain threshold and tolerance in a thermal pain
             procedure. Based on their medical records, subjects were
             classified by three independent judges as having been either
             severely or lightly injured. Veterans who had been severely
             injured had much higher threshold and tolerance for thermal
             pain as compared to lightly injured veterans. These results
             are interpreted as supporting adaptation-level theory, which
             implies that painful experiences can change the internal
             anchor points for the subjective evaluation of
             pain.},
   Doi = {10.1016/0304-3959(94)00108-q},
   Key = {fds266019}
}

@article{fds266018,
   Author = {Burbeck, CA and Pizer, SM and Morse, BS and Ariely, D and Zauberman, GS and Rolland, JP},
   Title = {Linking object boundaries at scale: a common mechanism for
             size and shape judgments.},
   Journal = {Vision Research},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {361-372},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0042-6989},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8746226},
   Abstract = {The area over which boundary information contributes to the
             determination of the center of an extended object was
             inferred from results of a bisection task. The object to be
             bisected was a rectangle with two long sinusoidally
             modulated sides, i.e. a wiggly rectangle. The spatial
             frequency and amplitude of the edge modulation were varied.
             Two object widths were tested. The modulation of the
             perceived center approximately equaled that of the edges at
             very low edge modulation frequencies and decreased in
             amplitude with increasing edge modulation frequency. The
             edge modulation had a greater modulating effect on the
             perceived center for the narrower object than for the wider
             object. This scaling with object width didn't follow perfect
             zoom invariance but was precisely matched by the scaling of
             the bisection threshold with width, strongly supporting the
             idea that the same mechanism determines both the location of
             the perceived center for these stimuli and its variance. We
             propose that this mechanism is the linking of object
             boundaries at a scale determined by the object
             width.},
   Doi = {10.1016/0042-6989(95)00106-9},
   Key = {fds266018}
}

@article{fds266020,
   Author = {Marshall, JA and Burbeck, CA and Ariely, D and Rolland, JP and Martin,
             KE},
   Title = {Occlusion edge blur: a cue to relative visual
             depth.},
   Journal = {Journal of the Optical Society of America
             A},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {681-688},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {1084-7529},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8867752},
   Abstract = {We studied whether the blur/sharpness of an occlusion
             boundary between a sharply focused surface and a blurred
             surface is used as a relative depth cue. Observers judged
             relative depth in pairs of images that differed only in the
             blurriness of the common boundary between two adjoining
             texture regions, one blurred and one sharply focused. Two
             experiments were conducted; in both, observers consistently
             used the blur of the boundary as a cue to relative depth.
             However, the strength of the cue, relative to other cues,
             varied across observers. The occlusion edge blur cue can
             resolve the near/far ambiguity inherent in depth-from-focus
             computations.},
   Doi = {10.1364/josaa.13.000681},
   Key = {fds266020}
}

@article{fds265956,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Combining experiences over time: The effects of duration,
             intensity changes and on-line measurements on retrospective
             pain evaluations},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Decision Making},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {19-45},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0894-3257},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000072061100002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Two experiments were conducted to examine the effects of
             various factors on retrospective pain evaluation. The
             factors examined in Experiment 1 were the rate and pattern
             of change, the intensity (particularly the final intensity),
             and the duration of the painful experience. Experiment 2
             manipulated these factors and, in addition, examined the
             effect of continuous (on-line) ratings on the overall
             retrospective evaluation. The two experiments utilized
             different pain modalities, heat in the first and mechanical
             pressure in the second. In addition, all subjects in
             Experiment 1 experienced stimuli with the same physical
             magnitude, while in Experiment 2 stimuli were individually
             tailored to make them subjectively equivalent. In both
             experiments, subjects were presented with a series of
             painful stimuli and evaluated the intensity of each stimulus
             immediately upon its termination. The stimuli themselves
             were composed of multiple intensity levels that
             differentially changed over time (Intensity-Patterns).
             Subjects' on-line ratings in Experiment 2 closely mirrored
             the physical patterns of the intensities. The main
             conclusion from both experiments is that the retrospective
             evaluations of painful experiences are influenced primarily
             by a combination of the final pain intensity and the
             intensity trend during the latter half of the experience. In
             addition, results indicated that duration has little impact
             on retrospective evaluations for stimuli of relatively
             constant intensity. However, when the stimulus intensity
             changes over time, duration does play a role. Finally, the
             task of continuously reporting the stimulus intensity had a
             moderating impact on the retrospective evaluations. © 1998
             John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/(SICI)1099-0771(199803)11:1<19::AID-BDM277>3.0.CO;2-},
   Key = {fds265956}
}

@article{fds265951,
   Author = {West, PM and Ariely, D and Bellman, S and Bradlow, E and Huber, J and Johnson, E and Kahn, B and Little, J and Schkade,
             D},
   Title = {Agents to the Rescue?},
   Journal = {Marketing Letters},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {285-300},
   Year = {1999},
   ISSN = {0923-0645},
   Abstract = {The advent of electronic environments is bound to have
             profound effects on consumer decision making. While the
             exact nature of these influences is only partially known it
             is clear that consumers could benefit from properly designed
             electronic agents that know individual users' preferences
             and can act on their behalf. An examination of the various
             roles agents perform is presented as a framework for
             thinking about the design of electronic agents. In addition,
             a set of goals is established that include both
             outcome-based measures, such as improving decision quality,
             as well as process measures like increasing satisfaction and
             developing trust.},
   Key = {fds265951}
}

@article{fds265933,
   Author = {Hoeffler, S and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Constructing stable preferences: A look into dimensions of
             experience and their impact on preference
             stability},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {113-139},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1057-7408},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15327663jcp0802_01},
   Abstract = {There are 2 polar schools of thought regarding the existence
             of preferences. The economics tradition is based on the
             assumption of existing preferences. The emerging
             constructive processing approach assumes preferences are
             constructed based on the task and context factors present
             during choice or preference elicitation. Most researchers
             believe in a middle ground in which consumers construct
             their preferences when they are new to a category and
             eventually develop more stable preferences with experience
             in a domain. This research was designed to bridge the gap
             between these 2 schools of thought by understanding the
             process by which preferences are learned and developed over
             time. Specifically, we investigated the impact of several
             dimensions of experience (effort, choice, and experience) on
             preference stability. Results revealed that the type of
             experience and its corresponding effort had a large impact
             on the process of preference development. Study 1
             demonstrated that by exposing participants to the trade-offs
             in their environment, their preferences developed and
             stabilized most rapidly. In addition, the act of making a
             choice (Study 2) and repeated choices (Study 3) both led to
             increased preference stability as indicated by measures of
             objective and subjective preference stability. Copyright ©
             1999, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15327663jcp0802_01},
   Key = {fds265933}
}

@article{fds265997,
   Author = {Fischer, GW and Carmon, Z and Ariely, D and Zauberman,
             G},
   Title = {Goal-based construction of preferences: task goals and the
             prominence effect},
   Journal = {Management Science},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1057-1075},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.45.8.1057},
   Abstract = {Preferences inferred from choice are more likely to favor
             the alternative that is superior with respect to the
             prominent (most important or salient) attribute than are
             preferences inferred from matching (direct tradeoff)
             judgments. This prominence effect violates standard models
             of rational choice and complicates the task of measuring
             preferences. In this article, we propose a new task-goal
             hypothesis regarding the prominence effect: The prominent
             attribute receives more weight in tasks whose goal is to
             differentiate among options than in tasks whose goal is to
             equate options. We use this hypothesis to generalize the
             prominence effect beyond choice and matching to several
             additional tasks, including the choice-based matching and
             difference comparison methods that are widely employed in
             decision analysis. The results of three studies provide
             strong support for the task-goal account of the prominence
             effect and cast doubt on competing explanations. We discuss
             the implications of these findings for descriptive decision
             theory and for preference measurement in decision analysis,
             public policy, and marketing.},
   Doi = {10.1287/mnsc.45.8.1057},
   Key = {fds265997}
}

@article{fds265964,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Carmon, Z},
   Title = {Gestalt characteristics of experiences: The defining
             features of summarized events},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Decision Making},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {191-201},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0894-3257},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000086598100005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {In this paper we take stock of recent research on how people
             summarize and evaluate extended experiences. Summary
             assessments do not simply integrate all the components of
             the evaluated events, but tend to focus on only a few
             features (gestalt characteristics). Examples of these
             defining features include the rate at which the transient
             state components of the experience become more or less
             pleasant over its duration, and the intensity of the state
             at key instances, in particular the most intense (peak) and
             the final (end) moments. It is not yet sufficiently clear
             which specific gestalt characteristics dominate summary
             assessments of experiences, nor how this differs across
             types of experiences or measurement approaches. To address
             some of these issues, we describe new research in this area,
             discuss potential methodological difficulties, and suggest
             directions for future research. Copyright © 2000 John Wiley
             & Sons, Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/(SICI)1099-0771(200004/06)13:2<191::AID-BDM330>3.0.C},
   Key = {fds265964}
}

@article{fds265969,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Zauberman, G},
   Title = {On the making of an experience: The effects of breaking and
             combining experiences on their overall evaluation},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Decision Making},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {219-232},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0894-3257},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000086598100007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {How do people create overall evaluations for experiences
             that change in intensity over time? What 'rules' do they use
             for combining such different intensities into single overall
             evaluations? And what factors influence these integration
             rules? This paper starts by examining the relationship
             between the patterns of experiences over time and their
             overall evaluations. Within this framework, we propose and
             test the idea that the rules for combining such experiences
             depend on whether the experiences are perceived to be
             composed of single or multiple parts (i.e. continuous or
             discrete). In two experiments we demonstrate that an
             experience's level of cohesiveness moderates the
             relationship between its pattern and overall evaluation. The
             results show that breaking up experiences substantially
             reduces the impact of patterns on overall evaluations. In
             addition, we demonstrate that continuously measuring
             momentary intensities produces a similar effect on this
             relationship, causing us to speculate that providing
             continuous intensity responses causes subjects to
             self-segment the experience. Copyright © 2000 John Wiley &
             Sons, Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/(SICI)1099-0771(200004/06)13:2<219::AID-BDM331>3.0.C},
   Key = {fds265969}
}

@article{fds266002,
   Author = {Carmon, Z and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Focusing on the forgone: How value can appear so different
             to buyers and sellers},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Research},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {360-370},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0093-5301},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000165697600006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {We propose that buying-and selling-price estimates reflect a
             focus on what the consumer forgoes in the potential exchange
             and that this notion offers insight into the well-known
             difference between those two types of value assessment.
             Buyers and sellers differ not simply in their valuation of
             the same item but also in how they assess the value. Buyers
             tend to focus on their sentiment toward what they forgo
             (typically, the expenditure), and buying prices are thus
             heavily influenced by variables such as salient reference
             prices. By the same token, sellers tend to focus on their
             sentiment toward surrendering the item, and selling prices
             are hence more heavily influenced by variables such as
             benefits of possessing the item. Four studies examining
             buying-and selling-price estimates of tickets for National
             Collegiate Athletic Association basketball games offer
             consistent support for these ideas. The studies show that
             naturally occurring differences among respondents in
             attitudes relating to the tickets that sellers forgo (e.g.,
             significance of the game) corresponded more closely to
             variation in selling prices than in buying prices.
             Conversely, measures relating to the expenditure (e.g.,
             respondents' concern with money) corresponded more closely
             to buying prices than to selling prices. Using controlled
             manipulations we then showed that changes in aspects
             relating to the game (e.g., expected climate in the stadium)
             affected selling prices more than buying prices, but changes
             relating to the expenditure (e.g., list price of the ticket)
             influenced buying prices more than selling prices. We also
             showed that drawing attention to the benefits of possessing
             a ticket before asking for the price estimates influenced
             buying prices more than selling prices, supporting our claim
             that otherwise these benefits are naturally more salient to
             sellers than buyers. Similarly, drawing attention to
             alternative uses of money before asking for price estimates
             influenced selling prices more than buying
             prices.},
   Doi = {10.1086/317590},
   Key = {fds266002}
}

@article{fds266003,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Levav, J},
   Title = {Sequential choice in group settings: Taking the road less
             traveled and less enjoyed},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Research},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {279-290},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0093-5301},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000165697600001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Many individual decisions take place in a group context
             wherein group members voice their choices sequentially. In
             this article we examine the impact of this dynamic decision
             process on individuals' choices and satisfaction with their
             outcomes. We propose that choices reflect a balancing of two
             classes of goals: goals that are strictly individual and
             goals that are triggered by the existence of the group. The
             latter sometimes results in choices that undermine personal
             satisfaction and increase regret. We find support for goal
             balancing in three studies in which we tracked consumers'
             orders of dishes and drinks. In the Lunch study we found
             that real groups (tables) choose more varied dishes than
             would be expected by random sampling of the population of
             all individual choices across all tables. The Beer study
             demonstrates that this group-level variety seeking is
             attributable to the interaction - implicit or explicit -
             among group members, and can be dissipated when the group is
             forced to "disband" and its members make strictly individual
             choices. Finally, the Wine study demonstrated that
             individual choices in a group context are also aimed at
             satisfying goals of information gathering and
             self-presentation in the form of uniqueness.},
   Doi = {10.1086/317585},
   Key = {fds266003}
}

@article{fds266004,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Controlling the information flow: Effects on consumers'
             decision making and preferences},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Research},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {233-248},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0093-5301},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000089309300006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {One of the main objectives facing marketers is to present
             consumers with information on which to base their decisions.
             In doing so, marketers have to select the type of
             information system they want to utilize in order to deliver
             the most appropriate information to their consumers. One of
             the most interesting and distinguishing dimensions of such
             information systems is the level of control the consumer has
             over the information system. The current work presents and
             tests a general model for understanding the advantages and
             disadvantages of information control on consumers' decision
             quality, memory, knowledge, and confidence. The results show
             that controlling the information flow can help consumers
             better match their preferences, have better memory and
             knowledge about the domain they are examining, and be more
             confident in their judgments. However, it is also shown that
             controlling the information flow creates demands on
             processing resources and therefore under some circumstances
             can have detrimental effects on consumers' ability to
             utilize information. The article concludes with a summary of
             the findings, discussion of their application for electronic
             commerce, and suggestions for future research
             avenues.},
   Doi = {10.1086/314322},
   Key = {fds266004}
}

@article{fds266011,
   Author = {Lynch, JG and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Wine online: Search costs affect competition on price,
             quality, and distribution},
   Journal = {Marketing Science},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {83-103},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0732-2399},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000087056200006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {A fundamental dilemma confronts retailers with stand-alone
             sites on the World Wide Web and those attempting to build
             electronic malls for delivery via the Internet, online
             services, or interactive television (Alba et al. 1997). For
             consumers, the main potential advantage of electronic
             shopping over other channels is a reduction in search costs
             for products and product-related information. Retailers,
             however, fear that such lowering of consumers' search costs
             will intensify competition and lower margins by expanding
             the scope of competition from local to national and
             international. Some retailers' electronic offerings have
             been constructed to thwart comparison shopping and to ward
             off price competition, dimming the appeal of many initial
             electronic shopping services. Ceteris paribus, if electronic
             shopping lowers the cost of acquiring price information, it
             should increase price sensitivity, just as is the case for
             price advertising. In a similar vein, though, electronic
             shopping can lower the cost of search for quality
             information. Most analyses ignore the offsetting potential
             of the latter effect to lower price sensitivity in the
             current period. They also ignore the potential of maximally
             transparent shopping systems to produce welfare gains that
             give consumers a long-term reason to give repeat business to
             electronic merchants (cf. Alba et al. 1997, Bakos 1997). We
             test conditions under which lowered search costs should
             increase or decrease price sensitivity. We conducted an
             experiment in which we varied independently three different
             search costs via electronic shopping: search cost for price
             information, search cost for quality information within a
             given store, and search cost for comparing across two
             competing electronic wine stores. Consumers spent their own
             money purchasing wines from two competing electronic
             merchants selling some overlapping and some unique wines. We
             show four primary empirical results. First, for
             differentiated products like wines, lowering the cost of
             search for quality information reduced price sensitivity.
             Second, price sensitivity for wines common to both stores
             increased when cross-store comparison was made easy, as many
             analysts have assumed. However, easy cross-store comparison
             had no effect on price sensitivity for unique wines. Third,
             making information environments more transparent by lowering
             all three search costs produced welfare gains for consumers.
             They liked the shopping experience more, selected wines they
             liked more in subsequent tasting, and their retention
             probability was higher when they were contacted two months
             later and invited to continue using the electronic shopping
             service from home. Fourth, we examined the implications of
             these results for manufacturers and examined how market
             shares of wines sold by two stores or one were affected by
             search costs. When store comparison was difficult, results
             showed that the market share of common wines was
             proportional to share of distribution; but when store
             comparison was made easy, the market share returns to
             distribution decreased significantly. All these results
             suggest incentives for retailers carrying differentiated
             goods to make information environments maximally
             transparent, but to avoid price competition by carrying more
             unique merchandise.},
   Doi = {10.1287/mksc.19.1.83.15183},
   Key = {fds266011}
}

@article{fds266022,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Au, WT and Bender, RH and Budescu, DV and Dietz, CB and Gu,
             H and Wallsten, TS and Zauberman, G},
   Title = {The effects of averaging subjective probability estimates
             between and within judges.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {130-147},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {1076-898X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10937317},
   Abstract = {The average probability estimate of J > 1 judges is
             generally better than its components. Two studies test 3
             predictions regarding averaging that follow from theorems
             based on a cognitive model of the judges and idealizations
             of the judgment situation. Prediction 1 is that the average
             of conditionally pairwise independent estimates will be
             highly diagnostic, and Prediction 2 is that the average of
             dependent estimates (differing only by independent error
             terms) may be well calibrated. Prediction 3 contrasts
             between- and within-subject averaging. Results demonstrate
             the predictions' robustness by showing the extent to which
             they hold as the information conditions depart from the
             ideal and as J increases. Practical consequences are that
             (a) substantial improvement can be obtained with as few as
             2-6 judges and (b) the decision maker can estimate the
             nature of the expected improvement by considering the
             information conditions.},
   Doi = {10.1037//1076-898x.6.2.130},
   Key = {fds266022}
}

@article{fds266021,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Loewenstein, G},
   Title = {When does duration matter in judgment and decision
             making?},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology. General},
   Volume = {129},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {508-523},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0096-3445},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11142865},
   Abstract = {Research on sequences of outcomes shows that people care
             about features of an experience, such as improvement or
             deterioration over time, and peak and end levels, which the
             discounted utility model (DU) assumes they do not care
             about. In contrast to the finding that some attributes are
             weighted more than DU predicts, Kahneman and coauthors have
             proposed that there is one feature of sequences that DU
             predicts people should care about but that people in fact
             ignore or underweight: duration. In this article, the
             authors extend this line of research by investigating the
             role of conversational norms (H. P. Grice, 1975), and
             scale-norming (D. Kahneman & T. D. Miller, 1986). The impact
             of these 2 factors are examined in 4 parallel studies that
             manipulate these factors orthogonally. The major finding is
             that response modes that reduce reliance on conversational
             norms or standard of comparison also increase the attention
             that participants pay to duration.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0096-3445.129.4.508},
   Key = {fds266021}
}

@article{fds266024,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Kahneman, D and Loewenstein, G},
   Title = {Joint comment on "when does duration matter in judgment and
             decision making?" (Ariely & Loewenstein,
             2000).},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology. General},
   Volume = {129},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {524-529},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0096-3445},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11142866},
   Abstract = {Recent research has demonstrated that people care about the
             temporal relationships within a sequence of experiences.
             There is considerable evidence that people pay particular
             attention to the way experiences improve or deteriorate over
             time and to their maximum (peak) and final values. D.
             Kahneman and coauthors suggested in earlier articles that
             people ignore or severely underweight duration (which they
             referred to as duration neglect). In the preceding article,
             D. Ariely and G. Loewenstein (2000) challenged the
             generalizability of these findings and their normative
             implications. In the current commentary, D. Ariely, D.
             Kahneman, and G. Loewenstein jointly examine the issue to
             provide a better understanding of what they feel they have
             learned from this literature and to discuss the remaining
             open questions.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0096-3445.129.4.524},
   Key = {fds266024}
}

@article{fds266023,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Seeing sets: representation by statistical
             properties.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {157-162},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11340926},
   Abstract = {Sets of similar objects are common occurrences--a crowd of
             people, a bunch of bananas, a copse of trees, a shelf of
             books, a line of cars. Each item in the set may be distinct,
             highly visible, and discriminable. But when we look away
             from the set, what information do we have? The current
             article starts to address this question by introducing the
             idea of a set representation. This idea was tested using two
             new paradigms: mean discrimination and member
             identification. Three experiments using sets of
             different-sized spots showed that observers know a set's
             mean quite accurately but know little about the individual
             items, except their range. Taken together, these results
             suggest that the visual system represents the overall
             statistical, and not individual, properties of
             sets.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-9280.00327},
   Key = {fds266023}
}

@article{fds266026,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Zakay, D},
   Title = {A timely account of the role of duration in decision
             making.},
   Journal = {Acta Psychologica},
   Volume = {108},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {187-207},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0001-6918},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11569762},
   Abstract = {The current work takes a general perspective on the role of
             time in decision making. There are many different
             relationships and interactions between time and decision
             making, and no single summary can do justice to this topic.
             In this paper we will describe a few of the aspects in which
             time and decision making are interleaved: (a) temporal
             perspectives of decisions--the various temporal orientations
             that decision-makers may adopt while making decisions, and
             the impact of such temporal orientations on the decision
             process and its outcomes; (b) time as a medium within which
             decisions take place--the nature of decision processes that
             occur along time; (c) time as a resource and as a contextual
             factor--the implications of shortage in time resources and
             the impact of time limits on decision making processes and
             performance; (d) time as a commodity--time as the subject
             matter of decision making. The paper ends with a few general
             questions on the role of duration in decision
             making.},
   Doi = {10.1016/s0001-6918(01)00034-8},
   Key = {fds266026}
}

@article{fds266025,
   Author = {Aharon, I and Etcoff, N and Ariely, D and Chabris, CF and O'Connor, E and Breiter, HC},
   Title = {Beautiful faces have variable reward value: fMRI and
             behavioral evidence.},
   Journal = {Neuron},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {537-551},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0896-6273},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11709163},
   Abstract = {The brain circuitry processing rewarding and aversive
             stimuli is hypothesized to be at the core of motivated
             behavior. In this study, discrete categories of beautiful
             faces are shown to have differing reward values and to
             differentially activate reward circuitry in human subjects.
             In particular, young heterosexual males rate pictures of
             beautiful males and females as attractive, but exert effort
             via a keypress procedure only to view pictures of attractive
             females. Functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T shows
             that passive viewing of beautiful female faces activates
             reward circuitry, in particular the nucleus accumbens. An
             extended set of subcortical and paralimbic reward regions
             also appear to follow aspects of the keypress rather than
             the rating procedures, suggesting that reward circuitry
             function does not include aesthetic assessment.},
   Doi = {10.1016/s0896-6273(01)00491-3},
   Key = {fds266025}
}

@article{fds265934,
   Author = {Tewari, G and Maes, P and Ariely, D},
   Title = {A visual preference-modeling and decision-support technique
             for buyers of multi- Attribute products},
   Journal = {Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
             Proceedings},
   Pages = {339-340},
   Publisher = {ACM Press},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/634067.634268},
   Abstract = {We describe an intuitive, visual technique by which buyers
             of multi-attribute goods and services in electronic
             marketplaces can express their preferences, and receive
             real-time feedback about which transaction partners can most
             suitably meet their needs. Our work embodies a novel
             approach towards the visualization and conceptualization of
             multi-attribute spaces. Our system gives users the option of
             being able to iteratively refine their preferences based
             upon dynamically generated decision-support feedback.
             Copyright © 2012 ACM, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1145/634067.634268},
   Key = {fds265934}
}

@article{fds265989,
   Author = {Huber, J and Ariely, D and Fischer, G},
   Title = {Expressing preferences in a principal-agent task: A
             comparison of choice, rating, and matching},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {87},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {66-90},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0749-5978},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/obhd.2001.2955},
   Abstract = {One of the more disturbing yet important findings in the
             social sciences is the observation that alternative tasks
             result in different expressed preferences among choice
             alternatives. We examine this problem not from the
             perspective of an individual making personal decisions, but
             from the perspective of an agent trying to follow the known
             values of a principal. In two studies, we train people to
             evaluate outcomes described by specific attributes and them
             examine their ability to express these known values with
             three common tasks: ratings of individual alternatives,
             choices among triples of alternatives, and matching pairs of
             alternatives to indifference. We find that each preference
             assessment method has distinct strengths and weaknesses.
             Ratings are quick, robust at following known values, and are
             perceived as an easy task by respondents. However, because
             ratings require projection to an imprecise response scale,
             respondents have difficulty when applying them to more
             complex preference structures. Further, they place too much
             weight on negative information, a result that is consistent
             with reference-dependent loss aversion. Choice is perceived
             as the most realistic task and the one about which people
             feel the most confident. However, choices exhibit the most
             negativity, which, in addition to flowing from the same
             perceptual bias of ratings, may be exacerbated by a
             screening strategy that excludes alternatives possessing the
             lowest level of an attribute. Finally, the matching task
             takes the most time and is perceived to be the most
             difficult. It shows minimal biases, except for one glaring
             flaw, a substantial overweighting of the matching variable.
             This bias is consistent with a well-known compatibility bias
             and suggests that agents can learn to use a matching task
             appropriately for all attributes except the matching
             variable itself. The article concludes with a discussion of
             the theoretical mechanisms by which these biases infiltrate
             different elicitation modes and a summary of managerial
             implications of these results. © 2001 Elsevier
             Science.},
   Doi = {10.1006/obhd.2001.2955},
   Key = {fds265989}
}

@article{fds266027,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Wertenbroch, K},
   Title = {Procrastination, deadlines, and performance: self-control by
             precommitment.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {219-224},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12009041},
   Abstract = {Procrastination is all too familiar to most people. People
             delay writing up their research (so we hear!), repeatedly
             declare they will start their diets tomorrow, or postpone
             until next week doing odd jobs around the house. Yet people
             also sometimes attempt to control their procrastination by
             setting deadlines for themselves. In this article, we pose
             three questions: (a) Are people willing to self-impose
             meaningful (i.e., costly) deadlines to overcome
             procrastination? (b) Are self-imposed deadlines effective in
             improving task performance? (c) When self-imposing
             deadlines, do people set them optimally, for maximum
             performance enhancement? A set of studies examined these
             issues experimentally, showing that the answer is "yes" to
             the first two questions, and "no" to the third. People have
             self-control problems, they recognize them, and they try to
             control them by self-imposing costly deadlines. These
             deadlines help people control procrastination, hit they are
             not as effective as some externally imposed deadlines in
             improving task performance.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-9280.00441},
   Key = {fds266027}
}

@article{fds265965,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Simonson, I},
   Title = {Buying, bidding, playing, or competing? Value assessment and
             decision dynamics in online auctions},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {113-123},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1057-7408},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000183066500011&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {We propose an analytical framework for studying bidding
             behavior in online auctions. The framework focuses on three
             key dimensions: the multi-stage process, the types of
             value-signals employed at each phase, and the dynamics of
             bidding behavior whereby early choices impact subsequent
             bidding decisions. We outline a series of propositions
             relating to the auction entry decision, bidding decisions
             during the auction, and bidding behavior at the end of an
             auction. In addition, we present the results of three
             preliminary field studies that investigate factors that
             influence consumers' value assessments and bidding
             decisions. In particular, (a) due to a focus on the narrow
             auction context, consumers under-search and, consequently,
             overpay for widely available commodities (CDs, DVDs) and (b)
             higher auction starting prices tend to lead to higher
             winning bids, particularly when comparable items are not
             available in the immediate context. We discuss the
             implications of this research with respect to our
             understanding of the key determinants of consumer behavior
             in this increasingly important arena of purchase
             decisions.},
   Doi = {10.1207/153276603768344834},
   Key = {fds265965}
}

@article{fds265995,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Zauberman, G},
   Title = {Differential partitioning of extended experiences},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {91},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {128-139},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0749-5978},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000184165900002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {This article focuses on the effect of the perceived
             cohesiveness of experiences, whether composed of single or
             multiple parts, on their overall hedonic evaluations. Four
             experiments demonstrate the effects of partitioning on
             decision makers' evaluation of extended experiences. First,
             patterns (i.e., improving vs. deteriorating trends) strongly
             influence how experiences are evaluated. Second, increased
             partitioning of an experience reduces the effect of the
             overall trend and results in more equal weighting of its
             parts. Third, breaking experiences at strategic points
             (i.e., local maxima and minima) influences the overall
             evaluation of experiences as well as the prediction of their
             future levels. These results suggest that components of
             sequences are evaluated similarly to the way whole sequences
             are evaluated and that experiences composed of multiple
             components are evaluated relatively more on the basis of
             their individual intensity and less based on their overall
             pattern. © 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0749-5978(03)00061-X},
   Key = {fds265995}
}

@article{fds266006,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Loewenstein, G and Prelec, D},
   Title = {“Coherent arbitrariness”: Stable demand curves without
             stable preferences},
   Journal = {The Quarterly Journal of Economics},
   Volume = {118},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {73-105},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0033-5533},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000181053200003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {In six experiments we show that initial valuations of
             familiar products and simple hedonic experiences are
             strongly influenced by arbitrary "anchors" (sometimes
             derived from a person'S social security number). Because
             subsequent valuations are also coherent with respect to
             salient differences in perceived quality or quantity of
             these products and experiences, the entire pattern of
             valuations can easily create an illusion of order, as if it
             is being generated by stable underlying preferences. The
             experiments show that this combination of coherent
             arbitrariness (1) cannot be interpreted as a rational
             response to information, (2) does not decrease as a result
             of experience with a good, (3) is not necessarily reduced by
             market forces, and (4) is not unique to cash prices. The
             results imply that demand curves estimated from market data
             need not reveal true consumer preferences, in any
             normatively significant sense of the term.},
   Doi = {10.1162/00335530360535153},
   Key = {fds266006}
}

@article{fds265935,
   Author = {Heyman, JE and Orhun, Y and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Auction fever: The effect of opponents and quasi-endowment
             on product valuations},
   Journal = {Journal of Interactive Marketing},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {7-21},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1094-9968},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dir.20020},
   Abstract = {The wide adoption of dynamic second-price auctions as the
             format of choice for Internet-based (online) transactions
             has created an interest in understanding how individuals
             behave in such environments. The current work concentrates
             on two dynamic effects, which we call quasi-endowment and
             opponent effect, and finds that these effects may result in
             over-bidding. The results of two experimental auctions - one
             involving hypothetical bids and the other real-money bids -
             demonstrate that bids reflect valuations that include the
             nonnormative influences of the two factors. Quasi-endowment
             and opponent effects could lead to the behaviors of repeated
             bidding and sniping commonly observed in second-price online
             auctions such as eBay. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and
             Direct Marketing Educational Foundation,
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/dir.20020},
   Key = {fds265935}
}

@article{fds265958,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Lynch, JG and Aparicio IV and M},
   Title = {Learning by Collaborative and Individual-Based
             Recommendation Agents},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {81-95},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1057-7408},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000220653900009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Intelligent recommendation systems can be based on 2 basic
             principles: collaborative filters and individual-based
             agents. In this work we examine the learning function that
             results from these 2 general types of learning-smart agents.
             There has been significant work on the predictive properties
             of each type, but no work has examined the patterns in their
             learning from feedback over repeated trials. Using
             simulations, we create clusters of "consumers" with
             heterogeneous utility functions and errorful reservation
             utility thresholds. The consumers go shopping with one of
             the designated smart agents, receive recommendations from
             the agents, and purchase products they like and reject ones
             they do not. Based on the purchase-no purchase behavior of
             the consumers, agents learn about the consumers and
             potentially improve the quality of their recommendations. We
             characterize learning curves by modified exponential
             functions with an intercept for percentage of
             recommendations accepted at Trial 0, an asymptotic rate of
             recommendation acceptance, and a rate at which learning
             moves from intercept to asymptote. We compare the learning
             of a baseline random recommendation agent, an
             individual-based logistic-regression agent, and two types of
             collaborative filters that rely on K-mean clustering
             (popular in most commercial applications) and
             nearest-neighbor algorithms. Compared to the collaborative
             filtering agents, the individual agent (a) learns more
             slowly, initially, but performs better in the long run when
             the environment is stable; (b) is less negatively affected
             by permanent changes in the consumer's utility function; and
             (c) is less adversely affected by error in the reservation
             threshold to which consumers compare a recommended product's
             utility. The K-mean agent reaches a lower asymptote but
             approaches it faster, reflecting a surprising stickiness of
             target classifications after feedback from recommendations
             made under initial (incorrect) hypotheses.},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15327663jcp1401&2_10},
   Key = {fds265958}
}

@article{fds266017,
   Author = {Shin, J and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Keeping doors open: The effect of unavailability on
             incentives to keep options viable},
   Journal = {Management Science},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {575-586},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.1030.0148},
   Abstract = {Many of the options available to decision makers, such as
             college majors and romantic partners, can become unavailable
             if sufficient effort is not invested in them (taking
             classes, sending flowers). The question asked in this work
             is whether a threat of disappearance changes the way people
             value such options. In four experiments using "door games,"
             we demonstrate that options that threaten to disappear cause
             decision makers to invest more effort and money in keeping
             these options open, even when the options themselves seem to
             be of little interest. This general tendency is shown to be
             resilient to information about the outcomes, to increased
             experience, and to the saliency of the cost. The last
             experiment provides initial evidence that the mechanism
             underlying the tendency to keep doors open is a type of
             aversion to loss rather than a desire for
             flexibility.},
   Doi = {10.1287/mnsc.1030.0148},
   Key = {fds266017}
}

@article{fds265960,
   Author = {Norton, MI and DiMicco, JM and Caneel, R and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {AntiGroupWare and second messenger},
   Journal = {Bt Technology Journal},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {83-88},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1358-3948},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000224961900013&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Decision-making in groups has great potential due to the
             possibilities for pooling ideas and sharing knowledge, but
             also great drawbacks due to the social pressures inherent in
             these situations that can limit free exchange of these ideas
             and knowledge. This paper presents two technology-based
             approaches to improving group decision-making, Second
             Messenger and AntiGroupWare. Second Messenger - A system
             that encourages groups to change their interaction styles
             during meetings - is designed to improve meetings, while
             AntiGroup Ware - an on-line polling system that allows
             companies to gather information through flexible, iterative
             polling of its employees - is designed to avoid them
             altogether.},
   Doi = {10.1023/B:BTTJ.0000047586.77595.87},
   Key = {fds265960}
}

@article{fds266028,
   Author = {Heyman, J and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Effort for payment. A tale of two markets.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {787-793},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15482452},
   Abstract = {The standard model of labor is one in which individuals
             trade their time and energy in return for monetary rewards.
             Building on Fiske's relational theory (1992), we propose
             that there are two types of markets that determine
             relationships between effort and payment: monetary and
             social. We hypothesize that monetary markets are highly
             sensitive to the magnitude of compensation, whereas social
             markets are not. This perspective can shed light on the
             well-established observation that people sometimes expend
             more effort in exchange for no payment (a social market)
             than they expend when they receive low payment (a monetary
             market). Three experiments support these ideas. The
             experimental evidence also demonstrates that mixed markets
             (markets that include aspects of both social and monetary
             markets) more closely resemble monetary than social
             markets.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.0956-7976.2004.00757.x},
   Key = {fds266028}
}

@article{fds265986,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Huber, J and Wertenbroch, K},
   Title = {When do losses loom larger than gains?},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {134-138},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0022-2437},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1509/jmkr.42.2.134.62283},
   Abstract = {In defining limits to loss aversion, Novemsky and Kahneman
             (2005) offer important new data and a needed summary of
             appropriate ways to think about loss aversion. In this
             comment to Novemsky and Kahneman's article, the authors
             consider the new empirical results that involve
             probabilistic buying and selling, suggesting caution in
             generalizing the results to nonprobabilistic commerce. The
             authors expand Novemsky and Kahneman's summary by exploring
             two critical constructs that help define the boundaries of
             loss aversion: emotional attachment and cognitive
             perspective. Emotional attachment alters loss aversion by
             moderating the degree to which parting with an item involves
             a loss, whereas shifts in cognitive perspective explain why
             items typically viewed as a loss are given more or less
             weight. The goal is to use these constructs to characterize
             more specifically contexts in which losses loom larger than
             gains and to suggest specific ways that research into loss
             aversion could evolve.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmkr.42.2.134.62283},
   Key = {fds265986}
}

@article{fds266030,
   Author = {Elman, I and Ariely, D and Mazar, N and Aharon, I and Lasko, NB and Macklin, ML and Orr, SP and Lukas, SE and Pitman,
             RK},
   Title = {Probing reward function in post-traumatic stress disorder
             with beautiful facial images.},
   Journal = {Psychiatry Research},
   Volume = {135},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {179-183},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0165-1781},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15993948},
   Abstract = {Reward dysfunction may be implicated in post-traumatic
             stress disorder (PTSD). This study applied a behavioral
             probe, known to activate brain reward regions, to subjects
             with PTSD. Male heterosexual Vietnam veterans with (n = 12)
             or without (n = 11) current PTSD were administered two
             tasks: (a) key pressing to change the viewing time of
             average or beautiful female or male facial images, and (b)
             rating the attractiveness of these images. There were no
             significant group differences in the attractiveness ratings.
             However, PTSD patients expended less effort to extend the
             viewing time of the beautiful female faces. These findings
             suggest a reward deficit in PTSD.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psychres.2005.04.002},
   Key = {fds266030}
}

@article{fds265973,
   Author = {Shiv, B and Carmon, Z and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Ruminating about placebo effects of marketing
             actions},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {410-414},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0022-2437},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000233183100006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {In Shiv, Carmon, and Ariely (2005), the authors demonstrate
             that marketing actions such as price promotions and
             advertising evoke consumer expectations, which can alter the
             actual efficacy of the marketed product, a phenomenon they
             call "placebo effects of marketing actions." In this
             rejoinder, they build on the preceding commentaries and
             refine their framework to account more fully for factors
             that may influence this placebo effect, and they describe
             directions for further research in this new topic area. ©
             2005, American Marketing Association.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmkr.2005.42.4.410},
   Key = {fds265973}
}

@article{fds265982,
   Author = {Shiv, B and Carmon, Z and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Placebo effects of marketing actions: Consumers may get what
             they pay for},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {383-393},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0022-2437},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000233183100001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The authors demonstrate that marketing actions, such as
             pricing, can alter the actual efficacy of products to which
             they are applied. These placebo effects stem from activation
             of expectancies about the efficacy of the product, a process
             that appears not to be conscious. In three experiments, the
             authors show that consumers who pay a discounted price for a
             product (e.g., an energy drink thought to increase mental
             acuity) may derive less actual benefit from consuming this
             product (e.g., they are able to solve fewer puzzles) than
             consumers who purchase and consume the exact same product
             but pay its regular price. The studies consistently support
             the role of expectancies in mediating this placebo effect.
             The authors conclude with a discussion of theoretical,
             managerial, and public policy implications of the findings.
             © 2005, American Marketing Association.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmkr.2005.42.4.383},
   Key = {fds265982}
}

@article{fds266008,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Ockenfels, A and Roth, AE},
   Title = {An experimental analysis of ending rules in Internet
             auctions},
   Journal = {The Rand Journal of Economics},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {890-907},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0741-6261},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000237400400009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {A great deal of late bidding has been observed on eBay,
             which employs a second price auction with a fixed deadline.
             Much less late bidding has been observed on Amazon, which
             can only end when ten minutes have passed without a bid. In
             controlled experiments, we find that the difference in the
             ending rules is sufficient by itself to produce the
             differences in late bidding observed in the field data. The
             data also allow us to examine bid amounts in relation to
             private values, and how behavior is shaped by the different
             opportunities for learning provided in the auction
             conditions. Copyright © 2005, RAND.},
   Key = {fds266008}
}

@article{fds265957,
   Author = {Zauberman, G and Diehl, K and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Hedonic versus informational evaluations: Task dependent
             preferences for sequences of outcomes},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Decision Making},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {191-211},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0894-3257},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000239034500001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {This work examines how people form evaluations of extended
             experiences that vary in valence and intensity. It is
             documented that when people retrospectively evaluate such
             experiences, not all information is weighted equally. Some
             prior research demonstrates that earlier parts are weighted
             more than later parts, while other research shows the
             opposite. In this paper we suggest that differences in
             evaluation tasks shift the focus to different aspects of the
             experience, causing individuals to be differentially
             influenced by earlier or later parts of the experience. We
             show that ratings of feelings (hedonic evaluation tasks)
             lead to stronger preferences for improving experiences than
             do evaluative judgments (informational evaluation tasks),
             suggesting that later aspects of the experience are weighted
             more heavily in affective tasks. In addition, we investigate
             other evaluation tasks, demonstrating that whether the task
             is descriptive or predictive and whether the target of the
             evaluation is the source of the experience or the experience
             itself also alter the weight given to different parts of the
             experience. Our studies demonstrate systematic shifts driven
             by these different evaluation task, revealing changes in
             overall evaluations as well as changes in the underlying
             weighting of key characteristics of the experience (i.e.,
             start, end, and trend). Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons,
             Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/bdm.516},
   Key = {fds265957}
}

@article{fds265980,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Loewenstein, G},
   Title = {The heat of the moment: The effect of sexual arousal on
             sexual decision making},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Decision Making},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {87-98},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0894-3257},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000236946100002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Despite the social importance of decisions taken in the
             "heat of the moment," very little research has examined the
             effect of sexual arousal on judgment and decision making.
             Here we examine the effect of sexual arousal, induced by
             self-stimulation, on judgments and hypothetical decisions
             made by male college students. Students were assigned to be
             in either a state of sexual arousal or a neutral state and
             were asked to: (1) indicate how appealing they find a wide
             range of sexual stimuli and activities, (2) report their
             willingness to engage in morally questionable behavior in
             order to obtain sexual gratification, and (3) describe their
             willingness to engage in unsafe sex when sexually aroused.
             The results show that sexual arousal had a strong impact on
             all three areas of judgment and decision making,
             demonstrating the importance of situational forces on
             preferences, as well as subjects' inability to predict these
             influences on their own behavior. Copyright © 2005 John
             Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/bdm.501},
   Key = {fds265980}
}

@article{fds266001,
   Author = {Lee, L and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Shopping goals, goal concreteness, and conditional
             promotions},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Research},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {60-70},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0093-5301},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000238584600010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {We propose a two-stage model to describe the increasing
             concreteness of consumers' goals during the shopping
             process, testing the model with a series of field
             experiments at a convenience store. Using a number of
             different process measures (experiment 1), we first
             established that consumers are less certain of their
             shopping goals and construe products in less concrete terms
             when they are in the first (vs. second) stage of the
             shopping process. The results of experiments 2 and 3 next
             demonstrate that goal-evoking marketing promotions (e.g.,
             conditional coupons) are more effective in influencing
             consumers' spending when consumers' goals are less concrete.
             © 2006 by JOURNAL OF CONSUMER RESEARCH,
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1086/504136},
   Key = {fds266001}
}

@article{fds265991,
   Author = {Hoeffler, S and Ariely, D and West, P},
   Title = {Path dependent preferences: The role of early experience and
             biased search in preference development},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {101},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {215-229},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0749-5978},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000242818300006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {What is the role of early experiences in shaping
             preferences? What are the mechanisms by which such early
             encounters influence the way preferences are formed? In this
             research, we examine the impact of the entry position and
             favorability of initial (and ongoing) experiences on
             preference development. We predict that the starting point
             will heavily influence which particular region people select
             from initially, and favorableness of early experiences and
             myopic search will both limit their search to that
             particular region. Across four studies, we find that when
             the initial experiences are favorable, subjects engage in
             lower levels of search, experience only a narrow breadth of
             possible alternatives, demonstrate less ongoing
             experimentation, and have a reduction in the amount of
             preference development. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.obhdp.2006.04.002},
   Key = {fds265991}
}

@article{fds266029,
   Author = {Norton, MI and Sommers, SR and Apfelbaum, EP and Pura, N and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Color blindness and interracial interaction: playing the
             political correctness game.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {949-953},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17176425},
   Abstract = {Two experiments explored the ramifications of endorsing
             color blindness as a strategy for appearing unprejudiced. In
             Study 1, Whites proved adept at categorizing faces on the
             basis of race, but understated their ability to do so. In
             Study 2, Whites playing the Political Correctness Game--a
             matching task that requires describing other
             individuals--were less likely to use race as a descriptor
             when paired with a Black partner than when paired with a
             White partner, a strategy that impaired communication and
             performance. In addition, avoidance of race was associated
             with Whites making less eye contact with and appearing less
             friendly toward Black partners.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01810.x},
   Key = {fds266029}
}

@article{fds266033,
   Author = {Lee, L and Frederick, S and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Try it, you'll like it: the influence of expectation,
             consumption, and revelation on preferences for
             beer.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1054-1058},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17201787},
   Abstract = {Patrons of a pub evaluated regular beer and "MIT brew"
             (regular beer plus a few drops of balsamic vinegar) in one
             of three conditions. One group tasted the samples blind (the
             secret ingredient was never disclosed). A second group was
             informed of the contents before tasting. A third group
             learned of the secret ingredient immediately after tasting,
             but prior to indicating their preference. Not surprisingly,
             preference for the MIT brew was higher in the blind
             condition than in either of the two disclosure conditions.
             However, the timing of the information mattered
             substantially. Disclosure of the secret ingredient
             significantly reduced preference only when the disclosure
             preceded tasting, suggesting that disclosure affected
             preferences by influencing the experience itself, rather
             than by acting as an independent negative input or by
             modifying retrospective interpretation of the
             experience.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01829.x},
   Key = {fds266033}
}

@article{fds266031,
   Author = {Norton, MI and Frost, JH and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Less is more: the lure of ambiguity, or why familiarity
             breeds contempt.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {92},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {97-105},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17201545},
   Abstract = {The present research shows that although people believe that
             learning more about others leads to greater liking, more
             information about others leads, on average, to less liking.
             Thus, ambiguity--lacking information about another--leads to
             liking, whereas familiarity--acquiring more information--can
             breed contempt. This "less is more" effect is due to the
             cascading nature of dissimilarity: Once evidence of
             dissimilarity is encountered, subsequent information is more
             likely to be interpreted as further evidence of
             dissimilarity, leading to decreased liking. The authors
             document the negative relationship between knowledge and
             liking in laboratory studies and with pre- and postdate data
             from online daters, while showing the mediating role of
             dissimilarity.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-3514.92.1.97},
   Key = {fds266031}
}

@article{fds265976,
   Author = {Amir, O and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Decisions by rules: The case of unwillingness to pay for
             beneficial delays},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {142-152},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-2437},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000244158500015&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Since the emergence of neoclassical economics, individual
             decision making has been viewed largely from an
             outcome-maximizing perspective. Building on previous work,
             the authors suggest that when people make payment decisions,
             they consider not only their preferences for different
             alternatives but also guiding principles and behavioral
             rules. The authors describe and test two characteristics
             pertaining to one specific rule that dictates that consumers
             should not pay for delays, even if they are beneficial: rule
             invocation and rule override. The results show that money
             can function as the invoking cue for this rule, that the
             reliance on this rule can undermine utility maximization,
             and that this rule may be used as a first response to the
             decision problem but can be overridden. The article
             concludes with a discussion of more general applications of
             such rules, which may explain some of the seemingly
             systematic inconsistencies in the ways consumers behave. ©
             2007, American Marketing Association.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmkr.44.1.142},
   Key = {fds265976}
}

@article{fds266034,
   Author = {Eastwick, PW and Finkel, EJ and Mochon, D and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Selective versus unselective romantic desire: not all
             reciprocity is created equal.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {317-319},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17470256},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9280.2007.01897.x},
   Key = {fds266034}
}

@article{fds265998,
   Author = {Shampanier, K and Mazar, N and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Zero as a special price: The true value of free
             products},
   Journal = {Marketing Science},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {742-757},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0732-2399},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000252167800002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {When faced with a choice of selecting one of several
             available products (or possibly buying nothing), according
             to standard theoretical perspectives, people will choose the
             option with the highest cost-benefit difference. However, we
             propose that decisions about free (zero price) products
             differ, in that people do not simply subtract costs from
             benefits but instead they perceive the benefits associated
             with free products as higher. We test this proposal by
             contrasting demand for two products across conditions that
             maintain the price difference between the goods, but vary
             the prices such that the cheaper good in the set is priced
             at either a low positive or zero price. In contrast with a
             standard cost-benefit perspective, in the zero-price
             condition, dramatically more participants choose the cheaper
             option, whereas dramatically fewer participants choose the
             more expensive option. Thus, people appear to act as if zero
             pricing of a good not only decreases its cost, but also adds
             to its benefits. After documenting this basic effect, we
             propose and test several psychological antecedents of the
             effect, including social norms, mapping difficulty, and
             affect. Affect emerges as the most likely account for the
             effect. © 2007 INFORMS.},
   Doi = {10.1287/mksc.1060.0254},
   Key = {fds265998}
}

@article{fds265936,
   Author = {Frost, J and Norton, MI and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Improving online dating with virtual dates},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the Asist Annual Meeting},
   Volume = {44},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1550-8390},
   Abstract = {Online dating, a practice where singles visit a website to
             locate other singles, frequently fails to meet users'
             expectations. We suggest that this disappointment is due in
             part to online dating websites' failure to simulate
             face-to-face interactions, an essential component of the
             acquaintanceship process. We document users' general
             disappointment with online dating (Study 1) and their
             disappointment with specific dates arranged through an
             online dating website (Study 2). In Study 3 we introduce the
             Virtual Date, on which potential dating partners explore a
             virtual environment in an interaction analogous to a real
             first date (such as going to a museum), a pre-meeting
             intervention that led to greater liking after meetings had
             occurred (during speed-dates) than standard online
             dating.},
   Key = {fds265936}
}

@article{fds265971,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {The customers' revenge},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {85},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {31-36},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000251075600014&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Venerable Detroit automaker Atida Motors has a new call
             center in Bangalore that the company hopes will raise its
             reputation for customer service. But it doesn't appear to be
             doing so yet. Complaints about the Andromeda XL - the hip
             new model Atida hopes will capture the imagination of Wall
             Street - are flooding the call center. Call backlogs are
             building, and letters of complaint are piling up. One loyal
             Atida customer is so upset about getting the brush-off that
             he's not only talking to a lawyer but threatening to go on
             YouTube and take his case to the court of public opinion. In
             the internet age, does Atida need a new way to deal with
             unhappy customers? Tom Farmer, the creator of the
             unintentionally viral PowerPoint presentation "Yours Is a
             Very Bad Hotel," says that Atida needs to stop defining
             customer service solely as a response to bad news and nip
             problems in the bud by making online dialogue intrinsic to
             the brand experience. Nate Bennett, of Georgia Tech, and
             Chris Martin, of Centenary College, observe that Atida has
             violated its customers' sense of fairness within three
             dimensions - distributive, procedural, and interactional -
             thus increasing their desire for revenge. Lexus Vice
             President for Customer Service Nancy Fein thinks Atida isn't
             even in the ballpark when it comes to world-class customer
             service. She offers as an example a Lexus rep who drove 80
             miles to deliver $1,000 to a stranded Lexus owner whose
             purse had been stolen. Barak Libai, of Tel Aviv University
             and MIT's Sloan School, suggests that Atida invest in a CRM
             system so that it can determine which customers have enough
             purchasing and referral value to be given the red carpet
             treatment and which should be gently let
             go.},
   Key = {fds265971}
}

@article{fds265975,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Norton, MI},
   Title = {Psychology and experimental economics: A gap in
             abstraction},
   Journal = {Current Directions in Psychological Science},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {336-339},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0963-7214},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000251186100010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Experimental economics and social psychology share an
             interest in a widening subset of topics, relying on similar
             lab-based methods to address similar questions about human
             behavior, yet dialogue between the two fields remains in its
             infancy. We propose a framework for understanding this
             disconnect: The different approaches the disciplines take to
             translating real-world behavior into the laboratory create a
             "gap in abstraction," which contributes to crucial
             differences in philosophy about the roles of deception and
             incentives in experiments and limits cross-pollination. We
             review two areas of common interest - altruism and
             group-based discrimination - which demonstrate this gap yet
             also reveal ways in which the two approaches might be seen
             as complementary rather than contradictory. Copyright ©
             2007 Association for Psychological Science.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8721.2007.00531.x},
   Key = {fds265975}
}

@article{fds265981,
   Author = {Frost, JH and Chance, Z and Norton, MI and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {People are experience goods: Improving online dating with
             virtual dates},
   Journal = {Journal of Interactive Marketing},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {51-61},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1094-9968},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000255505500005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {We suggest that online dating frequently fails to meet user
             expectations because people, unlike many commodities
             available for purchase online, are experience goods: Daters
             wish to screen potential romantic partners by experiential
             attributes (such as sense of humor or rapport), but online
             dating Web sites force them to screen by searchable
             attributes (such as income or religion). We demonstrate that
             people spend too much time searching for options online for
             too little payoff in offline dates (Study 1), in part
             because users desire information about experiential
             attributes, but online dating Web sites contain primarily
             searchable attributes (Study 2). Finally, we introduce and
             beta test the Virtual Date, offering potential dating
             partners the opportunity to acquire experiential information
             by exploring a virtual environment in interactions analogous
             to real first dates (such as going to a museum), an online
             intervention that led to greater liking after offline
             meetings (Study 3). © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and
             Direct Marketing Educational Foundation,
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1002/dir.20107},
   Key = {fds265981}
}

@article{fds266014,
   Author = {Simonsohn, U and Karlsson, N and Loewenstein, G and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {The tree of experience in the forest of information:
             Overweighing experienced relative to observed
             information},
   Journal = {Games and Economic Behavior},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {263-286},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geb.2007.03.010},
   Abstract = {Standard economic models assume that the weight given to
             information from different sources depends exclusively on
             its diagnosticity. In this paper we study whether the same
             piece of information is weighted more heavily simply because
             it arose from direct experience rather than from
             observation. We investigate this possibility by conducting
             repeated game experiments in which groups of players are
             randomly rematched on every round and receive feedback about
             the actions and outcomes of all players. We find that
             participants' actions are influenced more strongly by the
             behavior of players they directly interact with than by
             those they only observe. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.geb.2007.03.010},
   Key = {fds266014}
}

@article{fds266032,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Norton, MI},
   Title = {How actions create--not just reveal--preferences.},
   Journal = {Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {13-16},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1364-6613},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18063405},
   Abstract = {The neo-classical economics view that behavior is driven by
             - and reflective of - hedonic utility is challenged by
             psychologists' demonstrations of cases in which actions do
             not merely reveal preferences but rather create them. In
             this view, preferences are frequently constructed in the
             moment and are susceptible to fleeting situational factors;
             problematically, individuals are insensitive to the impact
             of such factors on their behavior, misattributing utility
             caused by these irrelevant factors to stable underlying
             preferences. Consequently, subsequent behavior might reflect
             not hedonic utility but rather this erroneously imputed
             utility that lingers in memory. Here we review the roles of
             these streams of utility in shaping preferences, and discuss
             how neuroimaging offers unique possibilities for
             disentangling their independent contributions to
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.tics.2007.10.008},
   Key = {fds266032}
}

@article{fds311634,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {How honest people cheat},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {86},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {24-24},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000252544200007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311634}
}

@article{fds266035,
   Author = {Waber, RL and Shiv, B and Carmon, Z and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Commercial features of placebo and therapeutic
             efficacy.},
   Journal = {Jama},
   Volume = {299},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1016-1017},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18319411},
   Doi = {10.1001/jama.299.9.1016},
   Key = {fds266035}
}

@article{fds265972,
   Author = {Levy, B and Ariely, D and Mazar, N and Chi, W and Lukas, S and Elman,
             I},
   Title = {Gender differences in the motivational processing of facial
             beauty.},
   Journal = {Learning and Motivation},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {136-145},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0023-9690},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000256005800003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Gender may be involved in the motivational processing of
             facial beauty. This study applied a behavioral probe, known
             to activate brain motivational regions, to healthy
             heterosexual subjects. Matched samples of men and women were
             administered two tasks: (a) key pressing to change the
             viewing time of average or beautiful female or male facial
             images, and (b) rating the attractiveness of these images.
             Men expended more effort (via the key-press task) to extend
             the viewing time of the beautiful female faces. Women
             displayed similarly increased effort for beautiful male and
             female images, but the magnitude of this effort was
             substantially lower than that of men for beautiful females.
             Heterosexual facial attractiveness ratings were comparable
             in both groups. These findings demonstrate heterosexual
             specificity of facial motivational targets for men, but not
             for women. Moreover, heightened drive for the pursuit of
             heterosexual beauty in the face of regular valuational
             assessments, displayed by men, suggests a gender-specific
             incentive sensitization phenomenon.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.lmot.2007.09.002},
   Key = {fds265972}
}

@article{fds266036,
   Author = {Lee, L and Loewenstein, G and Ariely, D and Hong, J and Young,
             J},
   Title = {If I'm not hot, are you hot or not? Physical attractiveness
             evaluations and dating preferences as a function of one's
             own attractiveness.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {669-677},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18727782},
   Abstract = {Prior research has established that people's own physical
             attractiveness affects their selection of romantic partners.
             This article provides further support for this effect and
             also examines a different, yet related, question: When less
             attractive people accept less attractive dates, do they
             persuade themselves that the people they choose to date are
             more physically attractive than others perceive them to be?
             Our analysis of data from the popular Web site
             http://HOTorNOT.com suggests that this is not the case: Less
             attractive people do not delude themselves into thinking
             that their dates are more physically attractive than others
             perceive them to be. Furthermore, the results also show that
             males, compared with females, are less affected by their own
             attractiveness when choosing whom to date.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02141.x},
   Key = {fds266036}
}

@article{fds265963,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Kamenica, E and Prelec, D},
   Title = {Man's search for meaning: The case of Legos},
   Journal = {Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {3-4},
   Pages = {671-677},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0167-2681},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000259665400009&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {We investigate how perceived meaning influences labor
             supply. In a laboratory setting, we manipulate the perceived
             meaning of simple, repetitive tasks and find a strong
             influence on subjects' labor supply. Despite the fact that
             the wage and the task are identical across the conditions in
             each experiment, subjects in the less meaningful conditions
             exhibit reservation wages that are consistently much higher
             than the subjects in the more meaningful conditions. The
             result replicates across different types of tasks. Moreover,
             in the more meaningful conditions, subjects' productivity
             influences labor supply more strongly. © 2008 Elsevier B.V.
             All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jebo.2008.01.004},
   Key = {fds265963}
}

@article{fds266016,
   Author = {Simonsohn, U and Ariely, D},
   Title = {When rational sellers face nonrational buyers: Evidence from
             herding on eBay},
   Journal = {Management Science},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1624-1637},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.1080.0881},
   Abstract = {People often observe others' decisions before deciding
             themselves. Using eBay data for DVD auctions we explore the
             consequences of neglecting nonsalient information when
             making such inferences. We show that bidders herd into
             auctions with more existing bids, even if these are a signal
             of no-longer-available lower starting prices rather than of
             higher quality. Bidders bidding a given dollar amount are
             less likely to win low starting price auctions, and pay more
             for them when they do win. Experienced bidders are less
             likely to bid on low starting price auctions. Remarkably,
             the seller side of the market is in equilibrium, because
             expected revenues are nearly identical for high and low
             starting prices. © 2008 INFORMS.},
   Doi = {10.1287/mnsc.1080.0881},
   Key = {fds266016}
}

@article{fds266037,
   Author = {Amir, O and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Resting on laurels: the effects of discrete progress markers
             as subgoals on task performance and preferences.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and
             Cognition},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1158-1171},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0278-7393},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18763898},
   Abstract = {This article investigates the influence of progress
             certainty and discrete progress markers (DPMs) on
             performance and preferences. The authors suggest that the
             effects of DPMs depend on whether progress certainty is high
             or low. When the distance to the goal is uncertain, DPMs can
             help reduce uncertainty and thus improve performance and
             increase preference. However, when the distance to the goal
             is certain, DPMs may generate complacency, sway motivation
             away from the end goal, and decrease performance in the
             task, as well as its appeal. Therefore, the addition of more
             information, feedback, or progress indicators may not always
             improve task performance and preference for the task. The
             authors validate these claims in 4 experiments.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0012857},
   Key = {fds266037}
}

@article{fds266038,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Better than average? When can we say that subsampling of
             items is better than statistical summary
             representations?},
   Journal = {Perception & Psychophysics},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {1325-1326},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0031-5117},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18927014},
   Abstract = {Myczek and Simons (2008) have described a computational
             model that subsamples a few items from a set with high
             accuracy, showing that this approach can do as well as, or
             better than, a model that captures statistical
             representations of the set. Although this is an intriguing
             existence proof, some caution should be taken before we
             consider their approach as a model for human behavior. In
             particular, I propose that such simulation-based research
             should be based on a more expanded range of phenomena and
             that it should include more accurate representations of
             errors in judgments.},
   Doi = {10.3758/pp.70.7.1325},
   Key = {fds266038}
}

@article{fds265990,
   Author = {Mochon, D and Norton, MI and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Getting off the hedonic treadmill, one step at a time: The
             impact of regular religious practice and exercise on
             well-being},
   Journal = {Journal of Economic Psychology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {632-642},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0167-4870},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000260976500003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Many studies have shown that few events in life have a
             lasting impact on subjective well-being because of people's
             tendency to adapt quickly; worse, those events that do have
             a lasting impact tend to be negative. We suggest that while
             major events may not provide lasting increases in
             well-being, certain seemingly minor events - such as
             attending religious services or exercising - may do so by
             providing small but frequent boosts: if people engage in
             such behaviors with sufficient frequency, they may
             cumulatively experience enough boosts to attain higher
             well-being. In Study 1, we surveyed places of worship for 12
             religions and found that people did receive positive boosts
             for attending service, and that these boosts appeared to be
             cumulative: the more they reported attending, the happier
             they were. In Study 2, we generalized these effects to other
             regular activities, demonstrating that people received
             boosts for exercise and yoga, and that these boosts too had
             a cumulative positive impact on well-being. We suggest that
             shifting focus from the impact of major life changes on
             well-being to the impact of seemingly minor repeated
             behaviors is crucial for understanding how best to improve
             well-being. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.joep.2007.10.004},
   Key = {fds265990}
}

@article{fds266013,
   Author = {Amir, O and Ariely, D and Carmon, Z},
   Title = {The dissociation between monetary assessment and predicted
             utility},
   Journal = {Marketing Science},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1055-1064},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mksc.1080.0364},
   Abstract = {We study the dissociation between two common measures of
             value - monetary assessment of purchase options versus the
             predicted utility associated with owning or consuming those
             options, a disparity that is reflected in well-known
             judgment anomalies and that is important for interpreting
             market research data. We propose that a significant cause of
             this dissociation is the difference in how these two types
             of evaluations are formed - each is informed by different
             types of information. Thus, dissociation between these two
             types of measures should not be interpreted as failure to
             map utility onto money, as such mapping is not really
             attempted. We suggest that monetary assessment tends to
             focus on the transaction in which the purchase alternative
             would be acquired or forgone (e.g., how fair the transaction
             seems), failing to adequately reflect the purchase
             alternative itself (e.g., the expected pleasure of owning or
             consuming it), which is what informs predicted utility
             judgments. We illustrate the value of this idea by deriving
             and testing empirical predictions of disparities in the
             impact of different types of information and manipulations
             on the two types of value assessment. © 2008
             INFORMS.},
   Doi = {10.1287/mksc.1080.0364},
   Key = {fds266013}
}

@article{fds265977,
   Author = {Mazar, N and Amir, O and Ariely, D},
   Title = {More ways to cheat: Expanding the scope of
             dishonesty},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {650-653},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-2437},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000261527000004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds265977}
}

@article{fds265983,
   Author = {Ratner, R and Soman, D and Zauberman, G and Ariely, D and Carmon, Z and Keller, P and Kim, B and Lin, F and Malkoc, S and Small, D and Wertenbroch,
             K},
   Title = {How behavioral decision research can enhance consumer
             welfare: From freedom of choice to paternalistic
             intervention},
   Journal = {Marketing Letters},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {383-397},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0923-0645},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000260250300014&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Decision-making researchers have largely focused on showing
             errors and biases in consumers' decision-making processes
             without paying much attention to the social welfare and
             policy implications of these systematic behaviors. In this
             paper, we explore how findings and methods in behavioral
             decision research can be used to help consumers improve
             their decision making and enhance their well-being. We first
             review select findings in behavioral decision research to
             explain why consumers need help in decisions, and based on
             these findings, suggest various interventions that could be
             effective within the scope of libertarian paternalism.
             Ethics and effectiveness of the interventions are also
             discussed. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media,
             LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11002-008-9044-3},
   Key = {fds265983}
}

@article{fds265984,
   Author = {Mazar, N and Amir, O and Ariely, D},
   Title = {The dishonesty of honest people: A theory of self-concept
             maintenance},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {633-644},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-2437},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000261527000001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {People like to think of themselves as honest. However,
             dishonesty pays-and it often pays well. How do people
             resolve this tension? This research shows that people behave
             dishonestly enough to profit but honestly enough to delude
             themselves of their own integrity. A little bit of
             dishonesty gives a taste of profit without spoiling a
             positive self-view. Two mechanisms allow for such
             self-concept maintenance: inattention to moral standards and
             categorization malleability. Six experiments support the
             authors' theory of self-concept maintenance and offer
             practical applications for curbing dishonesty in everyday
             life. © 2008, American Marketing Association.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmkr.45.6.633},
   Key = {fds265984}
}

@article{fds266000,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Gneezy, U and Loewenstein, G and Mazar,
             N},
   Title = {Large Stakes and Big Mistakes},
   Journal = {The Review of Economic Studies},
   Volume = {76},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {451-469},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000264739100002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Workers in a wide variety of jobs are paid based on
             performance, which is commonly seen as enhancing effort and
             productivity relative to non-contingent pay schemes.
             However, psychological research suggests that excessive
             rewards can, in some cases, result in a decline in
             performance. To test whether very high monetary rewards can
             decrease performance, we conducted a set of experiments in
             the U.S. and in India in which subjects worked on different
             tasks and received performance-contingent payments that
             varied in amount from small to very large relative to their
             typical levels of pay. With some important exceptions, very
             high reward levels had a detrimental effect on performance.
             Copyright , Wiley-Blackwell.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-937X.2009.00534.x},
   Key = {fds266000}
}

@article{fds266039,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Norton, MI},
   Title = {Conceptual consumption.},
   Journal = {Annual Review of Psychology},
   Volume = {60},
   Pages = {475-499},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0066-4308},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18764765},
   Abstract = {As technology has simplified meeting basic needs, humans
             have cultivated increasingly psychological avenues for
             occupying their consumption energies, moving from consuming
             food to consuming concepts; we propose that consideration of
             such "conceptual consumption" is essential for understanding
             human consumption. We first review how four classes of
             conceptual consumption-consuming expectancies, goals,
             fluency, and regulatory fit-impact physical consumption.
             Next, we benchmark the power of conceptual consumption
             against physical consumption, reviewing research in which
             people forgo positive physical consumption-and even choose
             negative physical consumption-in order to engage in
             conceptual consumption. Finally, we outline how conceptual
             consumption informs research examining both preference
             formation and virtual consumption, and how it may be used to
             augment efforts to enhance consumer welfare.},
   Doi = {10.1146/annurev.psych.60.110707.163536},
   Key = {fds266039}
}

@article{fds266043,
   Author = {Mead, NL and Baumeister, RF and Gino, F and Schweitzer, ME and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Too Tired to Tell the Truth: Self-Control Resource Depletion
             and Dishonesty.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {594-597},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-1031},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20047023},
   Abstract = {The opportunity to profit from dishonesty evokes a
             motivational conflict between the temptation to cheat for
             selfish gain and the desire to act in a socially appropriate
             manner. Honesty may depend on self-control given that
             self-control is the capacity that enables people to override
             antisocial selfish responses in favor of socially desirable
             responses. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that
             dishonesty would increase when people's self-control
             resources were depleted by an initial act of self-control.
             Depleted participants misrepresented their performance for
             monetary gain to a greater extent than did non-depleted
             participants (Experiment 1). Perhaps more troubling,
             depleted participants were more likely than non-depleted
             participants to expose themselves to the temptation to
             cheat, thereby aggravating the effects of depletion on
             cheating (Experiment 2). Results indicate that dishonesty
             increases when people's capacity to exert self-control is
             impaired, and that people may be particularly vulnerable to
             this effect because they do not predict it.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2009.02.004},
   Key = {fds266043}
}

@article{fds266010,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Bracha, A and Meier, S},
   Title = {Doing good or doing well? Image motivation and monetary
             incentives in behaving prosocially},
   Journal = {American Economic Review},
   Volume = {99},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {544-555},
   Publisher = {American Economic Association},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0002-8282},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000264785500022&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1257/aer.99.1.544},
   Key = {fds266010}
}

@article{fds266042,
   Author = {Gino, F and Ayal, S and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Contagion and differentiation in unethical behavior: the
             effect of one bad apple on the barrel.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {393-398},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19254236},
   Abstract = {In a world where encounters with dishonesty are frequent, it
             is important to know if exposure to other people's unethical
             behavior can increase or decrease an individual's
             dishonesty. In Experiment 1, our confederate cheated
             ostentatiously by finishing a task impossibly quickly and
             leaving the room with the maximum reward. In line with
             social-norms theory, participants' level of unethical
             behavior increased when the confederate was an in-group
             member, but decreased when the confederate was an out-group
             member. In Experiment 2, our confederate instead asked a
             question about cheating, which merely strengthened the
             saliency of this possibility. This manipulation decreased
             the level of unethical behavior among the other group
             members. These results suggest that individuals'
             unethicality does not depend on the simple calculations of
             cost-benefit analysis, but rather depends on the social
             norms implied by the dishonesty of others and also on the
             saliency of dishonesty.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9280.2009.02306.x},
   Key = {fds266042}
}

@article{fds265993,
   Author = {Andrade, EB and Ariely, D},
   Title = {The enduring impact of transient emotions on decision
             making},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {109},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-8},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0749-5978},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000266114800001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {People often do not realize they are being influenced by an
             incidental emotional state. As a result, decisions based on
             a fleeting incidental emotion can become the basis for
             future decisions and hence outlive the original cause for
             the behavior (i.e., the emotion itself). Using a sequence of
             ultimatum and dictator games, we provide empirical evidence
             for the enduring impact of transient emotions on economic
             decision making. Behavioral consistency and false consensus
             are presented as potential underlying processes. © 2009
             Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.obhdp.2009.02.003},
   Key = {fds265993}
}

@article{fds266015,
   Author = {Maciejovsky, B and Budescu, DV and Ariely, D},
   Title = {The researcher as a consumer of scientific publications: How
             do name-ordering conventions affect inferences about
             contribution credits?},
   Journal = {Marketing Science},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {589-598},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mksc.1080.0406},
   Abstract = {When researchers from different fields with different norms
             collaborate, the question arises of how name-ordering
             conventions are chosen and how they affect contribution
             credits. In this paper, we answer these questions by
             studying two disciplines that exemplify the two cornerstones
             of name-ordering conventions: lexicographical ordering
             (i.e., alphabetical ordering, endorsed in economics) and
             nonlexicographical ordering (i.e., ordering according to
             individual contributions, endorsed in psychology).
             Inferences about credits are unambiguous in the latter
             arrangement but imperfect in the former, because
             alphabetical listing can reflect ordering according to
             individual contributions by chance. We contrast the fields
             of economics and psychology with marketing, a discipline
             heavily influenced by both. Based on archival data,
             consisting of more than 38,000 journal articles, we show
             that the three fields have different ordering practices. In
             two empirical studies with 351 faculty and graduate student
             participants from all three disciplines, as well as in a
             computer simulation, we show that ordering practices
             systematically affect and shape the allocation of perceived
             contributions and credit. Whereas strong disciplinary norms
             in economics and psychology govern the allocation of
             contribution credits, a more heterogeneous picture emerges
             for marketing. This lack of strong norms has detrimental
             effects in terms of assigned contribution credits. © 2009
             INFORMS.},
   Doi = {10.1287/mksc.1080.0406},
   Key = {fds266015}
}

@article{fds265979,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Norton, MI},
   Title = {How concepts affect consumption},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {87},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {14-+},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000266153200002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds265979}
}

@article{fds266005,
   Author = {Bertini, M and Ofek, E and Ariely, D},
   Title = {The impact of add-on features on consumer product
             evaluations},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Research},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {17-28},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0093-5301},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000265388900002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The research presented in this article provides evidence
             that add-on features sold to enhance a product can be more
             than just discretionary benefits. We argue that consumers
             draw inferences from the mere availability of add-ons, which
             in turn lead to significant changes in the perceived utility
             of the base good itself. Specifically, we propose that the
             improvements supplied by add-ons can be classified as either
             alignable or nonalignable and that they have opposing
             effects on evaluation. A set of four experiments with
             different product categories confirms this prediction. In
             addition, we show that the amount of product information
             available to consumers and expectations about product
             composition play important moderating roles. From a
             practical standpoint, these results highlight the need for
             firms to be mindful of the behavioral implications of making
             add-ons readily available in the marketplace. © 2008 by
             Journal Of Consumer Research.},
   Doi = {10.1086/596717},
   Key = {fds266005}
}

@article{fds266040,
   Author = {Yamamoto, R and Ariely, D and Chi, W and Langleben, DD and Elman,
             I},
   Title = {Gender differences in the motivational processing of babies
             are determined by their facial attractiveness.},
   Journal = {Plos One},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {e6042},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19554100},
   Abstract = {This study sought to determine how esthetic appearance of
             babies may affect their motivational processing by the
             adults.Healthy men and women were administered two
             laboratory-based tasks: a) key pressing to change the
             viewing time of normal-looking babies and of those with
             abnormal facial features (e.g., cleft palate, strabismus,
             skin disorders, Down's syndrome and fetal alcohol syndrome)
             and b) attractiveness ratings of these images. Exposure to
             the babies' images produced two different response patterns:
             for normal babies, there was a similar effort by the two
             groups to extend the visual processing with lower
             attractiveness ratings by men; for abnormal babies, women
             exerted greater effort to shorten the viewing time despite
             attractiveness ratings comparable to the men.These results
             indicate that gender differences in the motivational
             processing of babies include excessive (relative to the
             esthetic valuation) motivation to extend the viewing time of
             normal babies by men vs. shortening the exposure to the
             abnormal babies by women. Such gender-specific incentive
             sensitization phenomenon may reflect an evolutionary-derived
             need for diversion of limited resources to the nurturance of
             healthy offspring.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0006042},
   Key = {fds266040}
}

@article{fds265937,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {The end of rational economics},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {87},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {78-+},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000267409600016&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Standard economic theory assumes that human beings are
             capable of making rational decisions and that markets and
             institutions, in the aggregate, are healthily
             self-regulating. But the global economic crisis, argues
             Ariely, has shattered, these two articles of faith and
             forced, us to confront our false assumptions about the way
             markets, companies, and people work. So where do corporate
             managers-who are schooled in rational assumptions but run
             messy, often unpredictable businesses-go from here? In this
             lively article, the author, a professor of behavioral
             economics at Duke University, shows how the emerging
             discipline of behavioral economics can help businesses
             better defend, against foolishness and waste. Smart
             organizations will develop a behavioral economics capability
             by hiring qualified experimenters and conducting small
             trials that build on one another, revealing a radically
             different view of how people make decisions. Revenge and
             cheating are only two of the irrational behaviors that
             companies will find underlying their employees' and
             customers' actions. Once an understanding of irrationality
             is embedded in the fabric of an organization, a behavioral
             economics approach can be applied to virtually every area of
             the business, from governance and employee relations to
             marketing and customer service. © 2009 Harvard Business
             School Publishing Corporation. All rights
             reserved.},
   Key = {fds265937}
}

@article{fds265987,
   Author = {Lee, L and Amir, O and Ariely, D},
   Title = {In search of homo economicus: Cognitive noise and the role
             of emotion in preference consistency},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Research},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {173-187},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0093-5301},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000269564200003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Understanding the role of emotion in forming preferences is
             critical in helping firms choose effective marketing
             strategies and consumers make appropriate consumption
             decisions. In five experiments, participants made a set of
             binary product choices under conditions designed to induce
             different degrees of emotional decision processing. The
             results consistently indicate that greater reliance on
             emotional reactions during decision making is associated
             with greater preference consistency and less cognitive
             noise. Additionally, the results of a meta-analytical study
             based on data from all five experiments further show that
             products that elicit a stronger emotional response are more
             likely to yield consistent preferences. © 2009 by JOURNAL
             OF CONSUMER RESEARCH, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1086/597160},
   Key = {fds265987}
}

@article{fds265967,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {A Manager s guide to human irrationalities},
   Journal = {Mit Sloan Management Review},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {53-+},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1532-9194},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000262600500018&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Ariely's insights should make executives think twice about
             the wisdom of the decisions they regularly make - as well as
             the inner processes they rely on to make those decisions.
             Why, for example, will managers veto a 10% cost increase for
             a $1 million project while thinking nothing of a 1% overrun
             on a $10 million budget - even though the actual amount is
             the same? Why will they often agonize trying to choose
             between two close alternatives when they're frequently
             better off just flipping a coin? In this wide-ranging
             interview, Ariely talks about how Apple Inc.'s initial
             decision to price the iPhone at $600 only to drop it to $400
             soon after might not have been a mistake but instead a very
             shrewd marketing maneuver. He also explains why a product
             monopoly might not necessarily be desirable because it can
             lead to consumer confusion, resulting in slow sales. With
             regards to hiring practices, Ariely strongly questions the
             interviewing processes routinely used and asserts that some
             companies might be better off hiring graduates from
             reputable colleges at random. Toward the end of the
             interview, he describes his research that has investigated
             ways in which teams might be better able to make group
             decisions. Lastly, Ariely explains one of his most valuable
             managerial insights - that adding even just a little meaning
             to employees' work will often increase their motivation
             enormously. Copyright © Massachusetts Institute of
             Technology, 2009. All rights reserved.},
   Key = {fds265967}
}

@article{fds265938,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Column: The long-term effects of short-term
             emotions},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {1-2},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   Key = {fds265938}
}

@article{fds266044,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {The long-term effects of short-term emotions.},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {38},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20088370},
   Key = {fds266044}
}

@article{fds266049,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {The long-term effects of short-term emotions.},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {38},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20648875},
   Key = {fds266049}
}

@article{fds266009,
   Author = {Hitsch, GJ and Hortaçsu, A and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Matching and sorting in online dating},
   Journal = {American Economic Review},
   Volume = {100},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {130-163},
   Publisher = {American Economic Association},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0002-8282},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000276580100005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Using data on user attributes and interactions from an
             online dating site, we estimate mate preferences, and use
             the Gale-Shapley algorithm to predict stable matches. The
             predicted matches are similar to the actual matches achieved
             by the dating site, and the actual matches are approximately
             efficient. Out-of-sample predictions of offline matches,
             i.e., marriages, exhibit assortative mating patterns similar
             to those observed in actual marriages. Thus, mate
             preferences, without resort to search frictions, can
             generate sorting in marriages. However, we underpredict some
             of the correlation patterns; search frictions may play a
             role in explaining the discrepancy.},
   Doi = {10.1257/aer.100.1.130},
   Key = {fds266009}
}

@article{fds266041,
   Author = {Addessi, E and Mancini, A and Crescimbene, L and Ariely, D and Visalberghi, E},
   Title = {How to spend a token? Trade-offs between food variety and
             food preference in tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus
             apella).},
   Journal = {Behavioural Processes},
   Volume = {83},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {267-275},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20026196},
   Abstract = {Humans and non-human animals often choose among different
             alternatives by seeking variety. Here we assessed whether
             variety-seeking, i.e. the tendency to look for diversity in
             services and goods, occurs in capuchin monkeys--South-American
             primates which--as humans--are omnivorous and susceptible to
             food monotony. Capuchins chose between a Variety-token, that
             allowed to select one among 10 different foods (one
             more-preferred and nine less-preferred) and a
             Monotony-token, that--upon exchange with the
             experimenter--either allowed to select one among 10 units of
             the same more-preferred food or gave access to one unit of
             the more-preferred food. To examine how food preference
             affects variety-seeking, in the B-condition we presented
             nine moderately preferred foods, whereas in the C-condition
             we presented nine low-preferred foods. Overall, capuchins
             preferred the Variety-token over the Monotony-token and
             often selected one of the less-preferred foods. These
             results suggest that variety-seeking is rooted in our
             evolutionary history, and that it satisfies the need of
             experiencing stimulation from the environment; at the
             ultimate level, variety-seeking may allow the organism to
             exploit novel foods and obtain a correct nutritional intake.
             Finally, variety-seeking could have contributed to the
             transition from barter to money in many human
             cultures.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.beproc.2009.12.012},
   Key = {fds266041}
}

@article{fds265939,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Column: Why businesses don't experiment},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {4},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   Key = {fds265939}
}

@article{fds266046,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Berns, GS},
   Title = {Neuromarketing: the hope and hype of neuroimaging in
             business.},
   Journal = {Nature Reviews. Neuroscience},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {284-292},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20197790},
   Abstract = {The application of neuroimaging methods to product marketing
             - neuromarketing - has recently gained considerable
             popularity. We propose that there are two main reasons for
             this trend. First, the possibility that neuroimaging will
             become cheaper and faster than other marketing methods; and
             second, the hope that neuroimaging will provide marketers
             with information that is not obtainable through conventional
             marketing methods. Although neuroimaging is unlikely to be
             cheaper than other tools in the near future, there is
             growing evidence that it may provide hidden information
             about the consumer experience. The most promising
             application of neuroimaging methods to marketing may come
             before a product is even released - when it is just an idea
             being developed.},
   Doi = {10.1038/nrn2795},
   Key = {fds266046}
}

@article{fds311632,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Why Businesses Don't Experiment},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {34-34},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000275778200020&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311632}
}

@article{fds266045,
   Author = {Gino, F and Norton, MI and Ariely, D},
   Title = {The counterfeit self: the deceptive costs of faking
             it.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {712-720},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20483851},
   Abstract = {Although people buy counterfeit products to signal positive
             traits, we show that wearing counterfeit products makes
             individuals feel less authentic and increases their
             likelihood of both behaving dishonestly and judging others
             as unethical. In four experiments, participants wore
             purportedly fake or authentically branded sunglasses. Those
             wearing fake sunglasses cheated more across multiple tasks
             than did participants wearing authentic sunglasses, both
             when they believed they had a preference for counterfeits
             (Experiment 1a) and when they were randomly assigned to wear
             them (Experiment 1b). Experiment 2 shows that the effects of
             wearing counterfeit sunglasses extend beyond the self,
             influencing judgments of other people's unethical behavior.
             Experiment 3 demonstrates that the feelings of
             inauthenticity that wearing fake products engenders-what we
             term the counterfeit self-mediate the impact of counterfeits
             on unethical behavior. Finally, we show that people do not
             predict the impact of counterfeits on ethicality; thus, the
             costs of counterfeits are deceptive.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0956797610366545},
   Key = {fds266045}
}

@article{fds265940,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Column: You are what you measure},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {6},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   Key = {fds265940}
}

@article{fds266050,
   Author = {Dai, X and Brendl, CM and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Wanting, liking, and preference construction.},
   Journal = {Emotion},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {324-334},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20515222},
   Abstract = {According to theories on preference construction, multiple
             preferences result from multiple contexts (e.g., loss vs.
             gain frames). This implies that people can have different
             representations of a preference in different contexts.
             Drawing on Berridge's (1999) distinction between unconscious
             liking and wanting, we hypothesize that people may have
             multiple representations of a preference toward an object
             even within a single context. Specifically, we propose that
             people can have different representations of an object's
             motivational value, or incentive value, versus its emotional
             value, or likability, even when the object is placed in the
             same context. Study 1 establishes a divergence between
             incentive value and likability of faces using behavioral
             measures. Studies 2A and 2B, using self-report measures,
             provide support for our main hypothesis that people are
             perfectly aware of these distinct representations and are
             able to access them concurrently at will. We also discuss
             implications of our findings for the truism that people seek
             pleasure and for expectancy-value theories.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0017987},
   Key = {fds266050}
}

@article{fds311638,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {You Are What You Measure},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {38-38},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000277761400019&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311638}
}

@article{fds311636,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Want People to Save? Force Them},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {36-36},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000281093900010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311636}
}

@article{fds265942,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Column: Work Pray Love},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {12},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   Key = {fds265942}
}

@article{fds265988,
   Author = {Hitsch, GJ and Hortaçsu, A and Ariely, D},
   Title = {What makes you click?-mate preferences in online
             dating},
   Journal = {Quantitative Marketing and Economics},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {393-427},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1570-7156},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000285201300001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010. We estimate
             mate preferences using a novel data set from an online
             dating service. The data set contains detailed information
             on user attributes and the decision to contact a potential
             mate after viewing his or her profile. This decision
             provides the basis for our preference estimation approach. A
             potential problem arises if the site users strategically
             shade their true preferences. We provide a simple test and a
             bias correction method for strategic behavior. The main
             findings are (i) There is no evidence for strategic
             behavior. (ii) Men and women have a strong preference for
             similarity along many (but not all) attributes. (iii) In
             particular, the site users display strong same-race
             preferences. Race preferences do not differ across users
             with different age, income, or education levels in the case
             of women, and differ only slightly in the case of men. For
             men, but not for women, the revealed same-race preferences
             correspond to the same-race preference stated in the
             users’ profile. (iv) There are gender differences in mate
             preferences; in particular, women have a stronger preference
             than men for income over physical attributes.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11129-010-9088-6},
   Key = {fds265988}
}

@article{fds311639,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Good Decisions. Bad Outcomes.},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {40-40},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000284393900033&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311639}
}

@article{fds265941,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Brown, T and Capelli, P and Davenport, TH and Duflo, E and Araoz, CF and Gratton, L and Govindarajan, V and Hackman, JR and Ibarra,
             H and Kedrosky, P and Lafley, AG and Li, C and Ma, J and Manzoni, JF and Pink,
             D and Porter, ME and Schein, EH and Schmidt, E and Schwab, K and Shirky, C and Stiglitz, JE and Sutton, RI and Tyson, LD},
   Title = {The HBR agenda},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {1-2},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   Key = {fds265941}
}

@article{fds265970,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Norton, MI},
   Title = {From thinking too little to thinking too much: a continuum
             of decision making.},
   Journal = {Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Cognitive
             Science},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {39-46},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1939-5078},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000298174800004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Due to the sheer number and variety of decisions that people
             make in their everyday lives-from choosing yogurts to
             choosing religions to choosing spouses-research in judgment
             and decision making has taken many forms. We suggest,
             however, that much of this research has been conducted under
             two broad rubrics: The study of thinking too little (as with
             the literature on heuristics and biases), and the study of
             thinking too much (as with the literature on decision
             analysis). In this review, we focus on the different types
             of decision errors that result from both modes of thought.
             For thinking too little, we discuss research exploring the
             ways in which habits can lead people to make suboptimal
             decisions; for thinking too much, we discuss research
             documenting the ways in which careful consideration of
             attributes, and careful consideration of options, can do the
             same. We end by suggesting that decision makers may do well,
             when making any decision, to consider whether they are
             facing a 'thinking too much' or 'thinking too little'
             problem and adjust accordingly. WIREs Cogn Sci 2011 2 39-46
             DOI: 10.1002/wcs.90 For further resources related to this
             article, please visit the WIREs website.},
   Doi = {10.1002/wcs.90},
   Key = {fds265970}
}

@article{fds265985,
   Author = {Norton, MI and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Building a Better America-One Wealth Quintile at a
             Time.},
   Journal = {Perspectives on Psychological Science : a Journal of the
             Association for Psychological Science},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {9-12},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1745-6916},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000287080100003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Disagreements about the optimal level of wealth inequality
             underlie policy debates ranging from taxation to welfare. We
             attempt to insert the desires of "regular" Americans into
             these debates, by asking a nationally representative online
             panel to estimate the current distribution of wealth in the
             United States and to "build a better America" by
             constructing distributions with their ideal level of
             inequality. First, respondents dramatically underestimated
             the current level of wealth inequality. Second, respondents
             constructed ideal wealth distributions that were far more
             equitable than even their erroneously low estimates of the
             actual distribution. Most important from a policy
             perspective, we observed a surprising level of consensus:
             All demographic groups-even those not usually associated
             with wealth redistribution such as Republicans and the
             wealthy-desired a more equal distribution of wealth than the
             status quo.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1745691610393524},
   Key = {fds265985}
}

@article{fds265943,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Column: In praise of the handshake},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {3},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   Key = {fds265943}
}

@article{fds265996,
   Author = {Mochon, D and Norton, MI and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Who Benefits from Religion?},
   Journal = {Social Indicators Research},
   Volume = {101},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-15},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0303-8300},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000286832000001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Many studies have documented the benefits of religious
             involvement. Indeed, highly religious people tend to be
             healthier, live longer, and have higher levels of subjective
             well-being. While religious involvement offers clear
             benefits to many, in this paper we explore whether it may
             also be detrimental to some. Specifically, we examine in
             detail the relation between religious involvement and
             subjective well-being. We first replicate prior findings
             showing a positive relation between religiosity and
             subjective well-being. However, our results also suggest
             that this relation may be more complex than previously
             thought. While fervent believers benefit from their
             involvement, those with weaker beliefs are actually less
             happy than those who do not ascribe to any religion-atheists
             and agnostics. These results may help explain why-in spite
             of the well-documented benefits of religion-an increasing
             number of people are abandoning their faith. As commitment
             wanes, religious involvement may become detrimental to
             well-being, and individuals may be better off seeking new
             affiliations. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media
             B.V.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11205-010-9637-0},
   Key = {fds265996}
}

@article{fds311630,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {In Praise of The Handshake},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {40-40},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000287429200040&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311630}
}

@article{fds265944,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Column: The upside of useless stuff},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {5},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   Key = {fds265944}
}

@article{fds311637,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {The Upside of Useless Stuff},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {48-48},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000289708500035&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311637}
}

@article{fds265992,
   Author = {Gino, F and Schweitzer, ME and Mead, NL and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Unable to resist temptation: How self-control depletion
             promotes unethical behavior},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {115},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {191-203},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0749-5978},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000291920100005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Across four experimental studies, individuals who were
             depleted of their self-regulatory resources by an initial
             act of self-control were more likely to " impulsively cheat"
             than individuals whose self-regulatory resources were
             intact. Our results demonstrate that individuals depleted of
             self-control resources were more likely to behave
             dishonestly (Study 1). Depletion reduced people's moral
             awareness when they faced the opportunity to cheat, which,
             in turn, was responsible for heightened cheating (Study 2).
             Individuals high in moral identity, however, did not show
             elevated levels of cheating when they were depleted (Study
             3), supporting our hypothesis that self-control depletion
             increases cheating when it robs people of the executive
             resources necessary to identify an act as immoral or
             unethical. Our results also show that resisting unethical
             behavior both requires and depletes self-control resources
             (Study 4). Taken together, our findings help to explain how
             otherwise ethical individuals predictably engage in
             unethical behavior. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.obhdp.2011.03.001},
   Key = {fds265992}
}

@article{fds265945,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Column: What was the question?},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {9},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   Key = {fds265945}
}

@article{fds266047,
   Author = {Norton, MI and Frost, JH and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Does familiarity breed contempt or liking? Comment on Reis,
             Maniaci, Caprariello, Eastwick, and Finkel
             (2011).},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {101},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {571-574},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21859227},
   Abstract = {Reis, Maniaci, Caprariello, Eastwick, and Finkel (see record
             2011-04644-001) conducted 2 studies that demonstrate that in
             certain cases, familiarity can lead to liking--in seeming
             contrast to the results of our earlier article (see record
             2006-23056-008). We believe that Reis et al. (a) utilized
             paradigms far removed from spontaneous, everyday social
             interactions that were particularly likely to demonstrate a
             positive link between familiarity and liking and (b) failed
             to include and incorporate other sources of data-both
             academic and real-world-showing that familiarity breeds
             contempt. We call for further research exploring when and
             why familiarity is likely to lead to contempt or liking, and
             we suggest several factors that are likely to inform this
             debate.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0023202},
   Key = {fds266047}
}

@article{fds266048,
   Author = {Chance, Z and Norton, MI and Gino, F and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Temporal view of the costs and benefits of
             self-deception.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the
             United States of America},
   Volume = {108 Suppl 3},
   Pages = {15655-15659},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21383150},
   Abstract = {Researchers have documented many cases in which individuals
             rationalize their regrettable actions. Four experiments
             examine situations in which people go beyond merely
             explaining away their misconduct to actively deceiving
             themselves. We find that those who exploit opportunities to
             cheat on tests are likely to engage in self-deception,
             inferring that their elevated performance is a sign of
             intelligence. This short-term psychological benefit of
             self-deception, however, can come with longer-term costs:
             when predicting future performance, participants expect to
             perform equally well-a lack of awareness that persists even
             when these inflated expectations prove costly. We show that
             although people expect to cheat, they do not foresee
             self-deception, and that factors that reinforce the benefits
             of cheating enhance self-deception. More broadly, the
             findings of these experiments offer evidence that debates
             about the relative costs and benefits of self-deception are
             informed by adopting a temporal view that assesses the
             cumulative impact of self-deception over
             time.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.1010658108},
   Key = {fds266048}
}

@article{fds311631,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {What Was The Question?},
   Journal = {Harvard Business Review},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {36-36},
   Publisher = {HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL PUBLISHING CORPORATION},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0017-8012},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000294194600024&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311631}
}

@article{fds311633,
   Author = {Henninger, DE and Whitson, HE and Cohen, H and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {HIGHER MEDICAL MORBIDITY BURDEN IS ASSOCIATED WITH EXTERNAL
             LOCUS OF CONTROL},
   Journal = {Gerontologist},
   Volume = {51},
   Pages = {56-56},
   Publisher = {OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0016-9013},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000303602000255&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311633}
}

@article{fds265968,
   Author = {Amar, M and Ariely, D and Ayal, S and Cryder, CE and Rick,
             SI},
   Title = {Winning the battle but losing the war: The psychology of
             debt management},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {SPEC. ISSUE},
   Pages = {S38-S50},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-2437},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000296317200005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {When consumers carry multiple debts, how do they decide
             which debt to repay first? Normatively, consumers should
             repay the debt with the highest interest rate most quickly.
             However, because people tend to break complicated tasks into
             more manageable parts, and because losses are most
             distressing when segregated, the authors hypothesize that
             people will pay off the smallest loan first to reduce the
             total number of outstanding loans and achieve a sense of
             tangible progress toward debt repayment. To experimentally
             examine how consumers manage multiple debts, the authors
             develop an incentive-compatible debt management game, in
             which participants are saddled with multiple debts and need
             to decide how to repay them over time. Consistent with the
             hypothesis, four experiments reveal evidence of debt account
             aversion: Participants consistently pay off small debts
             first, even though the larger debts have higher interest
             rates. The authors also find that restricting participants'
             ability to completely pay off small debts, and focusing
             their attention on the amount of interest each debt has
             accumulated, helps them reduce overall debt more quickly. ©
             2011, American Marketing Association.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmkr.48.SPL.S38},
   Key = {fds265968}
}

@article{fds265978,
   Author = {Schwartz, J and Luce, MF and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Are consumers too trusting? The effects of relationships
             with expert advisers},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {SPEC. ISSUE},
   Pages = {S163-S174},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-2437},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1509/jmkr.48.SPL.S163},
   Abstract = {Many important and complex consumer decisions rely on the
             advice of trusted professional experts. Many experts,
             however, such as doctors, financial advisers, and
             accountants, may be prone to conflicts of interest. As such,
             consumers may seek a second opinion. A series of studies
             investigate consumers' reluctance to seek additional advice
             in the context of having an ongoing relationship with one
             expert service provider. The authors find evidence in health
             care claims that long-term relationships contribute to more
             expensive, but not necessarily better, treatment. In
             addition, a series of experiments show that people recognize
             when they could benefit from a second opinion but are more
             reluctant to do so when thinking about their own providers
             rather than someone else's. Further studies test a
             relationship maintenance hypothesis and show that consumers'
             reluctance to seek second opinions is partially driven by
             their motivation to preserve relationship harmony, even when
             it is at their own personal expense and well-being. Taken
             together, these results provide important insight into the
             potential limitations and consequences of longstanding
             relationships between consumers and experts. © 2011,
             American Marketing Association.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmkr.48.SPL.S163},
   Key = {fds265978}
}

@article{fds266057,
   Author = {Woolhandler, S and Ariely, D and Himmelstein, DU},
   Title = {Why pay for performance may be incompatible with quality
             improvement.},
   Journal = {Bmj},
   Volume = {345},
   Pages = {e5015},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22893567},
   Doi = {10.1136/bmj.e5015},
   Key = {fds266057}
}

@article{fds266052,
   Author = {Schwartz, J and Riis, J and Elbel, B and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Inviting consumers to downsize fast-food portions
             significantly reduces calorie consumption.},
   Journal = {Health Affairs},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {399-407},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22323171},
   Abstract = {Policies that mandate calorie labeling in fast-food and
             chain restaurants have had little or no observable impact on
             calorie consumption to date. In three field experiments, we
             tested an alternative approach: activating consumers'
             self-control by having servers ask customers if they wanted
             to downsize portions of three starchy side dishes at a
             Chinese fast-food restaurant. We consistently found that
             14-33 percent of customers accepted the downsizing offer,
             and they did so whether or not they were given a nominal
             twenty-five-cent discount. Overall, those who accepted
             smaller portions did not compensate by ordering more
             calories in their entrées, and the total calories served to
             them were, on average, reduced by more than 200. We also
             found that accepting the downsizing offer did not change the
             amount of uneaten food left at the end of the meal, so the
             calorie savings during purchasing translated into calorie
             savings during consumption. Labeling the calorie content of
             food during one of the experiments had no measurable impact
             on ordering behavior. If anything, the downsizing offer was
             less effective in changing customers' ordering patterns with
             the calorie labeling present. These findings highlight the
             potential importance of portion-control interventions that
             specifically activate consumers' self-control.},
   Doi = {10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0224},
   Key = {fds266052}
}

@article{fds265966,
   Author = {Norton, MI and Dunn, EW and Carney, DR and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {The persuasive " power" of stigma?},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {117},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {261-268},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0749-5978},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000300969100003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {We predicted that able-bodied individuals and White
             Americans would have a difficult time saying no to
             persuasive appeals offered by disabled individuals and Black
             Americans, due to their desire to make such interactions
             proceed smoothly. In two experiments, we show that members
             of stigmatized groups have a peculiar kind of persuasive "
             power" in face-to-face interactions with non-stigmatized
             individuals. In Experiment 1, wheelchair-bound confederates
             were more effective in publicly soliciting donations to a
             range of charities than confederates seated in a regular
             chair. In Experiment 2, Whites changed their private
             attitudes more following face-to-face appeals from Black
             than White confederates, an effect mediated by their
             increased efforts to appear agreeable by nodding and
             expressing agreement. This difference was eliminated when
             impression management concerns were minimized - when
             participants viewed the appeals on video. © 2011 Elsevier
             Inc..},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.obhdp.2011.08.002},
   Key = {fds265966}
}

@article{fds266051,
   Author = {Gino, F and Ariely, D},
   Title = {The dark side of creativity: original thinkers can be more
             dishonest.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {102},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {445-459},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22121888},
   Abstract = {Creativity is a common aspiration for individuals,
             organizations, and societies. Here, however, we test whether
             creativity increases dishonesty. We propose that a creative
             personality and a creative mindset promote individuals'
             ability to justify their behavior, which, in turn, leads to
             unethical behavior. In 5 studies, we show that participants
             with creative personalities tended to cheat more than less
             creative individuals and that dispositional creativity is a
             better predictor of unethical behavior than intelligence
             (Experiment 1). In addition, we find that participants who
             were primed to think creatively were more likely to behave
             dishonestly than those in a control condition (Experiment 2)
             and that greater ability to justify their dishonest behavior
             explained the link between creativity and increased
             dishonesty (Experiments 3 and 4). Finally, we demonstrate
             that dispositional creativity moderates the influence of
             temporarily priming creativity on dishonest behavior
             (Experiment 5). The results provide evidence for an
             association between creativity and dishonesty, thus
             highlighting a dark side of creativity.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0026406},
   Key = {fds266051}
}

@article{fds266053,
   Author = {Henninger, DE and Whitson, HE and Cohen, HJ and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Higher medical morbidity burden is associated with external
             locus of control.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Geriatrics Society},
   Volume = {60},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {751-755},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22458257},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVES: To describe the association between an
             increasing number of coexisting conditions and locus of
             control (LOC), a psychological construct reflecting the
             degree to which one perceives circumstances to be controlled
             by personal actions (internal LOC) versus outside factors
             (external LOC) in older adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional
             study using survey data from the North Carolina Established
             Population for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (NC
             EPESE) data set. SETTING: Community. PARTICIPANTS: Three
             thousand two hundred twelve community-dwelling adults aged
             68 and older. MEASUREMENTS: Nine common medical conditions
             were assessed according to self-report. LOC was measured
             using a standard questionnaire. Analyses were adjusted for
             demographics, functional status (self-reported activities of
             daily living), cognition (Short Portable Mental Status
             Questionnaire), and depression score (Center for
             Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale). RESULTS: A higher
             number of chronic conditions was associated with external
             LOC (β = 0.37, P < .001). This relationship persisted after
             adjustment for age, race, sex, functional status, cognition,
             and depression (β = 0.17, P < .001). Most individual
             conditions were not associated with LOC, although vision
             impairment (P < .001) and arthritis (P = .02) were
             associated with more-internal LOC. CONCLUSION: These results
             suggest that medically complex patients tend to exhibit a
             more-external LOC, meaning that they perceive little
             personal control over circumstances and environment.
             Clinicians should be aware of this tendency, because
             external LOC may impede an older adult's willingness to
             engage in the considerable task of managing multiple chronic
             conditions.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1532-5415.2012.03904.x},
   Key = {fds266053}
}

@article{fds265974,
   Author = {Norton, MI and Mochon, D and Ariely, D},
   Title = {The IKEA effect: When labor leads to love},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {453-460},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1057-7408},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000306386800018&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {In four studies in which consumers assembled IKEA boxes,
             folded origami, and built sets of Legos, we demonstrate and
             investigate boundary conditions for the IKEA effect-the
             increase in valuation of self-made products. Participants
             saw their amateurish creations as similar in value to
             experts' creations, and expected others to share their
             opinions. We show that labor leads to love only when labor
             results in successful completion of tasks; when participants
             built and then destroyed their creations, or failed to
             complete them, the IKEA effect dissipated. Finally, we show
             that labor increases valuation for both "do-it-yourselfers"
             and novices. © 2011 Society for Consumer
             Psychology.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jcps.2011.08.002},
   Key = {fds265974}
}

@article{fds265946,
   Author = {Ariely, D},
   Title = {Liar, liar},
   Journal = {Foreign Policy},
   Number = {195},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0015-7228},
   Key = {fds265946}
}

@article{fds266058,
   Author = {Shu, LL and Mazar, N and Gino, F and Ariely, D and Bazerman,
             MH},
   Title = {Signing at the beginning makes ethics salient and decreases
             dishonest self-reports in comparison to signing at the
             end.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the
             United States of America},
   Volume = {109},
   Number = {38},
   Pages = {15197-15200},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22927408},
   Abstract = {Many written forms required by businesses and governments
             rely on honest reporting. Proof of honest intent is
             typically provided through signature at the end of, e.g.,
             tax returns or insurance policy forms. Still, people
             sometimes cheat to advance their financial self-interests-at
             great costs to society. We test an easy-to-implement method
             to discourage dishonesty: signing at the beginning rather
             than at the end of a self-report, thereby reversing the
             order of the current practice. Using laboratory and field
             experiments, we find that signing before-rather than
             after-the opportunity to cheat makes ethics salient when
             they are needed most and significantly reduces
             dishonesty.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.1209746109},
   Key = {fds266058}
}

@article{fds266054,
   Author = {Barkan, R and Ayal, S and Gino, F and Ariely, D},
   Title = {The pot calling the kettle black: distancing response to
             ethical dissonance.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Psychology. General},
   Volume = {141},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {757-773},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22409664},
   Abstract = {Six studies demonstrate the "pot calling the kettle black"
             phenomenon whereby people are guilty of the very fault they
             identify in others. Recalling an undeniable ethical failure,
             people experience ethical dissonance between their moral
             values and their behavioral misconduct. Our findings
             indicate that to reduce ethical dissonance, individuals use
             a double-distancing mechanism. Using an overcompensating
             ethical code, they judge others more harshly and present
             themselves as more virtuous and ethical (Studies 1, 2, 3).
             We show this mechanism is exclusive for ethical dissonance
             and is not triggered by salience of ethicality (Study 4),
             general sense of personal failure, or ethically neutral
             cognitive dissonance (Study 5). Finally, it is characterized
             by some boundary conditions (Study 6). We discuss the
             theoretical contribution of this work to research on moral
             regulation and ethical behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0027588},
   Key = {fds266054}
}

@article{fds265954,
   Author = {Mochon, D and Norton, MI and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Bolstering and restoring feelings of competence via the IKEA
             effect},
   Journal = {International Journal of Research in Marketing},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {363-369},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0167-8116},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000313230000007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {We examine the underlying process behind the IKEA effect,
             which is defined as consumers' willingness to pay more for
             self-created products than for identical products made by
             others, and explore the factors that influence both
             consumers' willingness to engage in self-creation and the
             utility that they derive from such activities. We propose
             that creating products fulfills consumers' psychological
             need to signal competence to themselves and to others, and
             that feelings of competence associated with self-created
             products lead to their increased valuation. We demonstrate
             that the feelings of competence that arise from assembling
             products mediate their increased value (Experiment 1), that
             affirming consumers' sense of self decreases the value they
             derive from their creations (Experiment 2), and that
             threatening consumers' sense of self increases their
             propensity to make things themselves (Experiments 3A and
             3B). © 2012 Elsevier B.V.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ijresmar.2012.05.001},
   Key = {fds265954}
}

@article{fds266056,
   Author = {Mather, M and Mazar, N and Gorlick, MA and Lighthall, NR and Burgeno, J and Schoeke, A and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Risk preferences and aging: the "certainty effect" in older
             adults' decision making.},
   Journal = {Psychology and Aging},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {801-816},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23066800},
   Abstract = {A prevalent stereotype is that people become less risk
             taking and more cautious as they get older. However, in
             laboratory studies, findings are mixed and often reveal no
             age differences. In the current series of experiments, we
             examined whether age differences in risk seeking are more
             likely to emerge when choices include a certain option (a
             sure gain or a sure loss). In four experiments, we found
             that age differences in risk preferences only emerged when
             participants were offered a choice between a risky and a
             certain gamble but not when offered two risky gambles. In
             particular, Experiments 1 and 2 included only gambles about
             potential gains. Here, compared with younger adults, older
             adults preferred a certain gain over a chance to win a
             larger gain and thus, exhibited more risk aversion in the
             domain of gains. But in Experiments 3 and 4, when offered
             the chance to take a small sure loss rather than risking a
             larger loss, older adults exhibited more risk seeking in the
             domain of losses than younger adults. Both their greater
             preference for sure gains and greater avoidance of sure
             losses suggest that older adults weigh certainty more
             heavily than younger adults. Experiment 4 also indicates
             that older adults focus more on positive emotions than
             younger adults do when considering their options, and that
             this emotional shift can at least partially account for age
             differences in how much people are swayed by certainty in
             their choices.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0030174},
   Key = {fds266056}
}

@article{fds265949,
   Author = {Mazar, N and Koszegi, B and Ariely, D},
   Title = {True context-dependent preferences? The causes of
             market-dependent valuations},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Decision Making},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {200-208},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2013},
   ISSN = {0894-3257},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdm.1794},
   Abstract = {A central assumption of neoclassical economics is that
             reservation prices for familiar products express people's
             true preferences for these products; that is, they represent
             the total benefit that a good confers to the consumers and
             are, thus, independent of actual prices in the market.
             Nevertheless, a vast amount of research has shown that
             valuations can be sensitive to other salient prices,
             particularly when individuals are explicitly anchored on
             them. In this paper, the authors extend previous research on
             single-price anchoring and study the sensitivity of
             valuations to the distribution of prices found for a product
             in the market. In addition, they examine its possible
             causes. They find that market-dependent valuations cannot be
             fully explained by rational inferences consumers draw about
             a product's value and are unlikely to be fully explained by
             true market-dependent preferences. Rather, the market
             dependence of valuations likely reflects consumers' focus on
             something other than the total benefit that the product
             confers to them. Furthermore, this paper shows that
             market-dependent valuations persist when - as in many
             real-life settings - individuals make repeated purchase
             decisions over time and infer the distribution of the
             product's prices from their market experience. Finally, the
             authors consider the implications of their findings for
             marketers and consumers. © 2013 John Wiley &amp; Sons,
             Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/bdm.1794},
   Key = {fds265949}
}

@article{fds265947,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Bitran, G and e Oliveira, PR},
   Title = {Design to learn: Customizing services when the future
             matters},
   Journal = {Pesquisa Operacional},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {37-61},
   Publisher = {FapUNIFESP (SciELO)},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0101-7438},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0101-74382013000100003},
   Abstract = {Internet-based customization tools can be used to design
             service encounters that maximize customers' utility in the
             present or explore their tastes to provide more value in the
             future, where these two goals conflict with each other.
             Maximizing expected customer satisfaction in the present
             leads to slow rates of learning that may limit the ability
             to provide quality in the future. An emphasis on learning
             can lead to unsatisfied customers that will not only forego
             purchasing in the current period, but, more seriously, never
             return if they lose trust in the service provider's ability
             to meet their needs. This paper describes service design
             policies that balance the objectives of learning and selling
             by characterizing customer lifetime value as a function of
             knowledge. The analysis of the customization problem as a
             dynamic program yields three results. The first result is
             the characterization of customization policies that quantify
             the value of knowledge so as to adequately balance the
             expected revenue of present and future interactions. The
             second result is an analysis of the impact of operational
             decisions on loyalty, learning, and profitability over time.
             Finally, the quantification of the value of knowing the
             customer provides a connection between customer acquisition
             and retention policies, thus enhancing the current
             understanding of the mechanisms connecting service
             customization, value creation, and customer lifetime value.
             © 2013 Brazilian Operations Research Society.},
   Doi = {10.1590/S0101-74382013000100003},
   Key = {fds265947}
}

@article{fds266012,
   Author = {Kotlyar, I and Ariely, D},
   Title = {The effect of nonverbal cues on relationship
             formation},
   Journal = {Computers in Human Behavior},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {544-551},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2012.11.020},
   Abstract = {An unprecedented number of relationships begin online,
             propelling online dating into a billion-dollar industry.
             However, while the online dating industry has created an
             effective mechanism for matching and accessing profiles, it
             has largely neglected the quality of communication between
             individuals. We investigate whether the lack of nonverbal
             cues (inherent in the text-based communication tools
             commonly used by dating sites) hinders communication and
             relationship formation. In this study, members of a dating
             website interacted through one of four randomly assigned
             versions of a text chat, where each version featured an
             increasing number of nonverbal communication cues. A survey
             was then administered regarding users' perceptions of each
             other, the level and quality of information disclosure, and
             their interest in developing a relationship with the other
             person. Results suggest that restoring nonverbal cues
             through the use of avatars can help improve online
             interaction and relationship formation. Chat versions that
             featured more nonverbal cues were associated with more
             favorable perceptions, greater exchange of information, and
             a stronger desire to pursue a relationship. While both
             genders found nonverbal communication conducive to
             developing a relationship, men and women reacted differently
             to certain types of nonverbal communication. © 2012
             Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.chb.2012.11.020},
   Key = {fds266012}
}

@article{fds266055,
   Author = {Inbar, Y and Pizarro, DA and Gilovich, T and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Moral masochism: on the connection between guilt and
             self-punishment.},
   Journal = {Emotion},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {14-18},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22985340},
   Abstract = {Do people sometimes seek to atone for their transgressions
             by harming themselves physically? The current results
             suggest that they do. People who wrote about a past
             guilt-inducing event inflicted more intense electric shocks
             on themselves than did those who wrote about feeling sad or
             about a neutral event. Moreover, the stronger the shocks
             that guilty participants administered to themselves, the
             more their feelings of guilt were alleviated. We discuss how
             this method of atonement relates to other methods examined
             in previous research.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0029749},
   Key = {fds266055}
}

@article{fds266059,
   Author = {Schwartz, J and Hadler, NM and Ariely, D and Huber, JC and Emerick,
             T},
   Title = {Choosing among employer-sponsored health plans: what drives
             employee choices?},
   Journal = {Journal of Occupational and Environmental
             Medicine},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {305-309},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23222507},
   Abstract = {To probe employee basis for choosing health plans.In a Web
             study, 337 employees from large private and public employers
             were asked to choose among health plans varying on several
             common dimensions.On per-dollar basis, respondents were more
             willing to spend $3 to $4 on out-of-pocket copayments than
             $1 on premiums. Nevertheless, sensitivity to monthly premium
             is greatest among those who are younger and cover only
             themselves, whereas sensitivity to the annual deductible is
             greatest among nonwhite families.Employees are facing a
             complicated choice and might be well-served by more
             information about the value of options under different
             likelihood scenarios.},
   Doi = {10.1097/jom.0b013e318279d74c},
   Key = {fds266059}
}

@article{fds265953,
   Author = {Norton, MI and Ariely, D},
   Title = {American's desire for less wealth inequality does not depend
             on how you ask them},
   Journal = {Judgment and Decision Making},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {393-394},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1930-2975},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000319657500015&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {A large body of survey research offers evidence that
             citizens are not always fully aware of the economic and
             political realities in their respective countries. Norton
             and Ariely (2011) extended this research to the domain of
             wealth inequality, showing that Americans were surprisingly
             unaware of the shape of the wealth distribution in America.
             Using an alternative methodology, Eriksson and Simpson
             (2012) found that asking Americans to estimate the average
             wealth of quintiles, rather than the percent of wealth owned
             by each quintile, led to relatively more accurate estimates.
             We note, however, that the Eriksson and Simpson (2012)
             results do not challenge Norton and Ariely's (2011)
             conclusion that Americans desire a much more equal
             distribution of wealth. © 2013. The authors license this
             article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution
             3.0 License.},
   Key = {fds265953}
}

@article{fds265955,
   Author = {Sah, S and Elias, P and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Investigation momentum: the relentless pursuit to resolve
             uncertainty.},
   Journal = {Jama Internal Medicine},
   Volume = {173},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {932-933},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23588200},
   Doi = {10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.401},
   Key = {fds265955}
}

@article{fds265950,
   Author = {Sah, S and Elias, P and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Investigation momentum: the relentless pursuit to resolve
             uncertainty.},
   Journal = {Jama Internal Medicine},
   Volume = {173},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {932-933},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {2168-6114},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.401},
   Doi = {10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.401},
   Key = {fds265950}
}

@article{fds265952,
   Author = {Hoeffler, S and Ariely, D and West, P and Duclos,
             R},
   Title = {Preference exploration and learning: The role of
             intensiveness and extensiveness of experience},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {330-340},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1057-7408},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000320682200005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {In this article, the authors partition the construct of
             experience into intensiveness (i.e., amount) and
             extensiveness (i.e., breadth) and examine the impact of the
             two specific types of experience on preference learning. In
             the first three studies, the authors' theory that experience
             can be partitioned into intensiveness (i.e., amount) and
             extensiveness (i.e., breadth) of experience and that
             extensiveness has a greater impact on preference learning is
             supported in environments where prior experience is
             measured. Further, in study 4 they demonstrate that
             extensiveness or breadth of experience exerts a larger
             influence on preference learning in an experiment where each
             unique type of experience is manipulated as well as
             measured. © 2012 Society for Consumer Psychology.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jcps.2012.10.007},
   Key = {fds265952}
}

@article{fds265932,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Mann, H},
   Title = {A Bird's Eye View of Unethical Behavior: Commentary on
             Trautmann et al. (2013).},
   Journal = {Perspectives on Psychological Science : a Journal of the
             Association for Psychological Science},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {498-500},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {1745-6916},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000324101800002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Results from Trautmann and colleagues' large, representative
             survey of Dutch people suggest a more nuanced relationship
             between class and ethics than previous research has
             demonstrated (Trautmann, Van de Kuilen, & Zeckhauser, 2013,
             this issue). Following their analysis, we suggest that it is
             unlikely that either upper- or lower-class people are
             unequivocally more moral. Rather, several psychological and
             external forces are at play in ethical decision making,
             which likely vary in strength depending on the
             conceptualization of class and the sociocultural context.
             Furthermore, people from different social classes may have
             different ethical standards or different degrees of
             willingness to breach these standards (or both), a
             distinction that should be explored in future
             research.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1745691613498907},
   Key = {fds265932}
}

@article{fds265948,
   Author = {Gino, F and Ayal, S and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Self-Serving Altruism? The Lure of Unethical Actions that
             Benefit Others.},
   Journal = {Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization},
   Volume = {93},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0167-2681},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2013.04.005},
   Abstract = {In three experiments, we propose and find that individuals
             cheat more when others can benefit from their cheating and
             when the number of beneficiaries of wrongdoing increases.
             Our results indicate that people use moral flexibility to
             justify their self-interested actions when such actions
             benefit others in addition to the self. Namely, our findings
             suggest that when people's dishonesty would benefit others,
             they are more likely to view dishonesty as morally
             acceptable and thus feel less guilty about benefiting from
             cheating. We discuss the implications of these results for
             collaborations in the social realm.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jebo.2013.04.005},
   Key = {fds265948}
}

@article{fds265928,
   Author = {Norton, MI and Frost, JH and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Less is often more, but not always: additional evidence that
             familiarity breeds contempt and a call for future
             research.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {105},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {921-923},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24295381},
   Abstract = {Ullrich, Krueger, Brod, and Groschupf (2013)-using a
             replication of the trait paradigm from Norton, Frost, and
             Ariely (2007)-suggest that less information does not always
             equal greater liking. We first ground the current debate in
             a larger historical debate in social psychology regarding
             the merits of configural versus algebraic models of person
             perception. We next review (a) related research that has
             suggested that more information can in some cases lead to
             more liking and (b) a large body of "real world" data-from
             friendships, daters, married couples, employment,
             celebrities, and politics-that suggests that more
             information often leads to less liking. We then provide an
             additional replication of our "less is more" effect, using a
             slight variation of the trait-list paradigm. The existing
             data suggest a need for further integrative explorations of
             when familiarity leads to contempt or liking or has no
             effect.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0034379},
   Key = {fds265928}
}

@article{fds265915,
   Author = {Norton, MI and Neal, DT and Govan, CL and Ariely, D and Holland,
             E},
   Title = {The not-so-common-wealth of Australia: Evidence for a
             cross-cultural desire for a more equal distribution of
             wealth},
   Journal = {Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {339-351},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1529-7489},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/asap.12058},
   Abstract = {© 2014 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social
             Issues. Recent evidence suggests that Americans
             underestimate wealth inequality in the United States and
             favor a more equal wealth distribution (Norton & Ariely,
             2011). Does this pattern reflect ideological dynamics unique
             to the United States, or is the phenomenon evident in other
             developed economies-such as Australia? We assessed
             Australians' perceived and ideal wealth distributions and
             compared them to the actual wealth distribution. Although
             the United States and Australia differ in the degree of
             actual wealth inequality and in cultural narratives around
             economic mobility, the Australian data closely replicated
             the United States findings. Misperceptions of wealth
             inequality as well as preferences for more equal
             distributions may be common across developed economies. In
             addition, beliefs about wealth distribution only weakly
             predicted support for raising the minimum wage, suggesting
             that attitudes toward inequality may not translate into
             preferences for redistributive policies.},
   Doi = {10.1111/asap.12058},
   Key = {fds265915}
}

@article{fds265917,
   Author = {Mann, H and Garcia-Rada, X and Houser, D and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Everybody else is doing it: exploring social transmission of
             lying behavior.},
   Journal = {Plos One},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {e109591},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0109591},
   Abstract = {Lying is a common occurrence in social interactions, but
             what predicts whether an individual will tell a lie? While
             previous studies have focused on personality factors, here
             we asked whether lying tendencies might be transmitted
             through social networks. Using an international sample of
             1,687 socially connected pairs, we investigated whether
             lying tendencies were related in socially connected
             individuals, and tested two moderators of observed
             relationships. Participants recruited through a massive open
             online course reported how likely they would be to engage in
             specific lies; a friend or relative responded to the same
             scenarios independently. We classified lies according to
             their beneficiary (antisocial vs. prosocial lies), and their
             directness (lies of commission vs. omission), resulting in
             four unique lying categories. Regression analyses showed
             that antisocial commission, antisocial omission, and
             prosocial commission lying tendencies were all uniquely
             related in connected pairs, even when the analyses were
             limited to pairs that were not biologically related. For
             antisocial lies of commission, these relationships were
             strongest, and were moderated by amount of time spent
             together. Randomly paired individuals from the same
             countries were also related in their antisocial commission
             lying tendencies, signifying country-level norms. Our
             results indicate that a person's lying tendencies can be
             predicted by the lying tendencies of his or her friends and
             family members.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0109591},
   Key = {fds265917}
}

@article{fds265920,
   Author = {Mazar, N and Koszegi, B and Ariely, D},
   Title = {True context-dependent preferences? The causes of
             market-dependent valuations},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Decision Making},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {200-208},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0894-3257},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdm.1794},
   Abstract = {A central assumption of neoclassical economics is that
             reservation prices for familiar products express people's
             true preferences for these products; that is, they represent
             the total benefit that a good confers to the consumers and
             are, thus, independent of actual prices in the market.
             Nevertheless, a vast amount of research has shown that
             valuations can be sensitive to other salient prices,
             particularly when individuals are explicitly anchored on
             them. In this paper, the authors extend previous research on
             single-price anchoring and study the sensitivity of
             valuations to the distribution of prices found for a product
             in the market. In addition, they examine its possible
             causes. They find that market-dependent valuations cannot be
             fully explained by rational inferences consumers draw about
             a product's value and are unlikely to be fully explained by
             true market-dependent preferences. Rather, the market
             dependence of valuations likely reflects consumers' focus on
             something other than the total benefit that the product
             confers to them. Furthermore, this paper shows that
             market-dependent valuations persist when - as in many
             real-life settings - individuals make repeated purchase
             decisions over time and infer the distribution of the
             product's prices from their market experience. Finally, the
             authors consider the implications of their findings for
             marketers and consumers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons,
             Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/bdm.1794},
   Key = {fds265920}
}

@article{fds265922,
   Author = {Himmelstein, DU and Ariely, D and Woolhandler,
             S},
   Title = {Pay-for-performance: toxic to quality? Insights from
             behavioral economics.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Health Services : Planning,
             Administration, Evaluation},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {203-214},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0020-7314},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2190/hs.44.2.a},
   Abstract = {Pay-for-performance programs aim to upgrade health care
             quality by tailoring financial incentives for desirable
             behaviors. While Medicare and many private insurers are
             charging ahead with pay-for-performance, researchers have
             been unable to show that it benefits patients. Findings from
             the new field of behavioral economics challenge the
             traditional economic view that monetary reward either is the
             only motivator or is simply additive to intrinsic motivators
             such as purpose or altruism. Studies have shown that
             monetary rewards can undermine motivation and worsen
             performance on cognitively complex and intrinsically
             rewarding work, suggesting that pay-for-performance may
             backfire.},
   Doi = {10.2190/hs.44.2.a},
   Key = {fds265922}
}

@article{fds265930,
   Author = {Morewedge, CK and Krishnamurti, T and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Focused on fairness: Alcohol intoxication increases the
             costly rejection of inequitable rewards},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {15-20},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-1031},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2013.08.006},
   Abstract = {This research examined the effect of alcohol intoxication on
             the propensity to behave inequitably and responses to
             inequitable divisions of rewards. Intoxicated and sober
             participants played ten rounds of a modified ultimatum game
             in two studies. Whereas intoxicated and sober participants
             were similarly generous in the proposals they made to their
             partners, intoxicated participants more often rejected
             unfair offers than did sober participants. These results
             were consistent whether alcohol intoxication was
             self-determined (Study 1) or randomly assigned (Study 2).
             The results provide insight into the cognitive processes
             underlying standards of equity and responses to inequity,
             and elucidate how intoxication influences these processes
             and subsequent behavioral responses. © 2013 Elsevier
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2013.08.006},
   Key = {fds265930}
}

@article{fds265927,
   Author = {Schwartz, J and Mochon, D and Wyper, L and Maroba, J and Patel, D and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Healthier by precommitment.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {538-546},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24390824},
   Abstract = {We tested a voluntary self-control commitment device to help
             grocery shoppers make healthier food purchases.
             Participants, who were already enrolled in a large-scale
             incentive program that discounts the price of eligible
             groceries by 25%, were offered the chance to put their
             discount on the line. Agreeing households pledged that they
             would increase their purchases of healthy food by 5
             percentage points above their household baseline for each of
             6 months. If they reached that goal, their discount was
             awarded as usual; otherwise, their discount was forfeited
             for that month. Thirty-six percent of households that were
             offered the binding commitment agreed; they subsequently
             showed an average 3.5-percentage-point increase in healthy
             grocery items purchased in each of the 6 months; households
             that declined the commitment and control-group households
             that were given a hypothetical option to precommit did not
             show such an increase. These results suggest that self-aware
             consumers will seize opportunities to create restrictive
             choice environments for themselves, even at some risk of
             financial loss.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0956797613510950},
   Key = {fds265927}
}

@article{fds265931,
   Author = {Ansher, C and Ariely, D and Nagler, A and Rudd, M and Schwartz, J and Shah,
             A},
   Title = {Better medicine by default.},
   Journal = {Med Decis Making},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {147-158},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24125790},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: American health care is transitioning to
             electronic physician ordering. These computerized systems
             are unique because they allow custom order interfaces.
             Although these systems provide great benefits, there are
             also potential pitfalls, as the behavioral sciences have
             shown that the very format of electronic interfaces can
             influence decision making. The current research specifically
             examines how defaults in electronic order templates affect
             physicians' treatment decisions and medical errors. METHODS:
             Forty-five medical residents completed order sets for 3
             medical case studies. Participants were randomly assigned to
             receive order sets with either "opt-in" defaults (options
             visible but unselected) or "opt-out" defaults (options
             visible and preselected). RESULTS: compare error rates
             between conditions and examine the type and severity of
             errors most often made with opt-in versus opt-out defaults.
             Results. Opt-out defaults resulted in a greater number of
             items ordered and specifically increased commission errors
             (overordering) compared with opt-in defaults. However, while
             opt-in defaults resulted in fewer orders, they also
             increased omission errors. When the severity of the errors
             is taken into account, the default effects seem limited to
             less severe errors. CONCLUSION: The defaults used in
             electronic order sets influence medical treatment decisions
             when the consequences to a patient's health are low. This
             pattern suggests that physicians cognitively override
             incorrect default choices but only to a point, and it
             implies tradeoffs that maximize accuracy and minimize
             cognitive effort. Results indicate that defaults for
             low-impact items on electronic templates warrant careful
             attention because physicians are unlikely to override
             them.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0272989X13507339},
   Key = {fds265931}
}

@article{fds265926,
   Author = {Sharma, E and Mazar, N and Alter, AL and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Financial deprivation selectively shifts moral standards and
             compromises moral decisions},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {123},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {90-100},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0749-5978},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2013.09.001},
   Abstract = {Previous research suggests people firmly value moral
             standards. However, research has also shown that various
             factors can compromise moral behavior. Inspired by the
             recent financial turmoil, we investigate whether financial
             deprivation might shift people's moral standards and
             consequently compromise their moral decisions. Across one
             pilot survey and five experiments, we find that people
             believe financial deprivation should not excuse immoral
             conduct; yet when people actually experience deprivation
             they seem to apply their moral standards more leniently.
             Thus, people who feel deprived tend to cheat more for
             financial gains and judge deprived moral offenders who cheat
             for financial gains less harshly. These effects are mediated
             by shifts in people's moral standards: beliefs in whether
             deprivation is an acceptable reason for immorality. The
             effect of deprivation on immoral conduct diminishes when it
             is explicit that immoral conduct cannot help alleviate
             imbalances in deprived actors' financial states, when
             financial deprivation seems fair or deserved, and when
             acting immorally seems unfair. © 2013 Elsevier
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.obhdp.2013.09.001},
   Key = {fds265926}
}

@article{fds265924,
   Author = {Chan, C and Van Boven and L and Andrade, EB and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {381-386},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {1057-7408},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcps.2013.12.003},
   Abstract = {Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday
             life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and
             deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax
             evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How
             does exposure to moral violations influence consumption?
             Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust
             is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that
             should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that
             moral violations affect a key behavioral response to
             disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments,
             compared with those in control conditions, people drank less
             water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film
             portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about
             moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to
             a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply
             that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar
             to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the
             associations between moral violations, emotions, and
             consumer behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jcps.2013.12.003},
   Key = {fds265924}
}

@article{fds265921,
   Author = {Ainsworth, SE and Baumeister, RF and Vohs, KD and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Ego depletion decreases trust in economic decision
             making.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {54},
   Pages = {40-49},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0022-1031},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2014.04.004},
   Abstract = {Three experiments tested the effects of ego depletion on
             economic decision making. Participants completed a task
             either requiring self-control or not. Then participants
             learned about the trust game, in which senders are given an
             initial allocation of $10 to split between themselves and
             another person, the receiver. The receiver receives triple
             the amount given and can send any, all, or none of the
             tripled money back to the sender. Participants were assigned
             the role of the sender and decided how to split the initial
             allocation. Giving less money, and therefore not trusting
             the receiver, is the safe, less risky response. Participants
             who had exerted self-control and were depleted gave the
             receiver less money than those in the non-depletion
             condition (Experiment 1). This effect was replicated and
             moderated in two additional experiments. Depletion again led
             to lower amounts given (less trust), but primarily among
             participants who were told they would never meet the
             receiver (Experiment 2) or who were given no information
             about how similar they were to the receiver (Experiment 3).
             Amounts given did not differ for depleted and non-depleted
             participants who either expected to meet the receiver
             (Experiment 2) or were led to believe that they were very
             similar to the receiver (Experiment 3). Decreased trust
             among depleted participants was strongest among neurotics.
             These results imply that self-control facilitates behavioral
             trust, especially when no other cues signal decreased social
             risk in trusting, such as if an actual or possible
             relationship with the receiver were suggested.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jesp.2014.04.004},
   Key = {fds265921}
}

@article{fds265925,
   Author = {Hochman, G and Ayal, S and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Keeping your gains close but your money closer: The
             prepayment effect in riskless choices},
   Journal = {Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization},
   Volume = {107},
   Number = {PB},
   Pages = {582-594},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0167-2681},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2014.01.014},
   Abstract = {© 2014 Elsevier B.V. Although research on loss aversion now
             spans more than three decades, researchers are still
             debating whether (or in which cases) the finding holds true
             for money. We contribute to this debate by exploring how
             prepayment affects financial decisions. In one set of
             experiments, we show that when faced with a tradeoff between
             post- and prepayment, participants overvalue prepaid money,
             and sometimes even prefer it over objectively higher gains.
             Importantly, this effect was more pronounced when prepayment
             was more distant from its pure representation in dollars and
             cents (Experiment 1A), as well as when potential losses were
             directly linked to specific options (Experiment 1B). As far
             as the processes involved, our results suggest that
             prepayment leads to increased personal commitment to prepaid
             options (Experiment 1C). In a second set of experiments, we
             show that even when the tradeoff element is eliminated,
             participants are more motivated and engaged in a task that
             is prepaid rather than post-paid (Experiments 2A and 2B).
             Based on our findings, we discuss how firms can use
             prepayment mechanisms to get more out of their agents, and
             how individuals can be motivated to better utilize their
             money.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jebo.2014.01.014},
   Key = {fds265925}
}

@article{fds265913,
   Author = {Anik, L and Norton, MI and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Contingent match incentives increase donations},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {790-801},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-2437},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1509/jmr.13.0432},
   Abstract = {© 2014, American Marketing Association. The authors propose
             a new means by which nonprofits can induce donors to give
             today and commit to giving in the future: contingent match
             incentives, in which matching is made contingent on the
             percentage of others who give (e.g., "if X% of others give,
             we will match all donations"). A field experiment shows that
             a 75% contingent match (such that matches "kick in" only if
             75% of others donate) is most effective in increasing
             commitment to recurring donations. An online experiment
             reveals that the 75% contingent match drives commitment to
             recurring donations because it simultaneously provides
             social proof while offering a low enough target to remain
             plausible that the match will occur. A final online
             experiment demonstrates that the effectiveness of the 75%
             contingent match extends to one-time donations. The authors
             discuss the practical and theoretical implications of
             contingent matches for managers and academics.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmr.13.0432},
   Key = {fds265913}
}

@article{fds265918,
   Author = {Chajut, E and Caspi, A and Chen, R and Hod, M and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {In pain thou shalt bring forth children: the peak-and-end
             rule in recall of labor pain.},
   Journal = {Psychological Science},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {2266-2271},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0956-7976},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797614551004},
   Abstract = {Childbirth is usually the most painful event of a mother's
             life, and resonates in individual and collective memory for
             years. The current study examined the relationship between
             the experience of labor pain and its recollection 2 days and
             2 months after delivery. We found that despite the
             exceptional physical and emotional experiences of
             childbirth, the memory of the pain involved in labor was
             biased toward the average of the peak pain and the end pain,
             whereas the duration of the delivery had a relatively
             negligible effect on the recollected intensity of pain. A
             comparison of mothers whose labor ended with or without
             epidural analgesia corroborated previous findings that the
             level of pain toward the end of an experience greatly
             influences the way the overall experience is remembered.
             Although both short- and long-term retention of memories of
             labor exhibited the peak-and-end effect, having given birth
             before weakened the effect 2 months after
             delivery.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0956797614551004},
   Key = {fds265918}
}

@article{fds265901,
   Author = {Carlson, KA and Wolfe, J and Blanchard, SJ and Huber, JC and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {The budget contraction effect: How contracting budgets lead
             to less varied choice},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {337-348},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-2437},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1509/jmr.10.0243},
   Abstract = {© 2015, American Marketing Association. How do consumers
             adjust their spending when their budget changes? A common
             view is that the allocation of one's current budget should
             not depend on previous budget allocations. Contrary to this,
             the authors find that when the budget contracts to a
             particular level, consumers select less variety (as measured
             by the number of different items with some of the budget
             allocated to them) than when their budget expands to that
             same level. This budget contraction effect stems from a
             reduction in variety under the contracting budget, not from
             variety expansion under the expanding budget. Evidence from
             five experiments indicates that the effect is driven by a
             desire to avoid feelings of loss associated with spreading
             allocation cuts (relative to reference quantities from
             previous allocations) across many items.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmr.10.0243},
   Key = {fds265901}
}

@article{fds265903,
   Author = {Hochman, G and Ayal, S and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Fairness requires deliberation: the primacy of economic over
             social considerations.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Psychology},
   Volume = {6},
   Pages = {747},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00747},
   Abstract = {While both economic and social considerations of fairness
             and equity play an important role in financial
             decision-making, it is not clear which of these two motives
             is more primal and immediate and which one is secondary and
             slow. Here we used variants of the ultimatum game to examine
             this question. Experiment 1 shows that acceptance rate of
             unfair offers increases when participants are asked to base
             their choice on their gut-feelings, as compared to when they
             thoroughly consider the available information. In line with
             these results, Experiments 2 and 3 provide process evidence
             that individuals prefer to first examine economic
             information about their own utility rather than social
             information about equity and fairness, even at the price of
             foregoing such social information. Our results suggest that
             people are more economically rational at the core, but
             social considerations (e.g., inequality aversion) require
             deliberation, which under certain conditions override their
             self-interested impulses.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00747},
   Key = {fds265903}
}

@article{fds265914,
   Author = {Finkel, EJ and Norton, MI and Reis, HT and Ariely, D and Caprariello,
             PA and Eastwick, PW and Frost, JH and Maniaci, MR},
   Title = {When does familiarity promote versus undermine interpersonal
             attraction? A proposed integrative model from erstwhile
             adversaries.},
   Journal = {Perspectives on Psychological Science : a Journal of the
             Association for Psychological Science},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3-19},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1745-6916},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1745691614561682},
   Abstract = {This article began as an adversarial collaboration between
             two groups of researchers with competing views on a
             longstanding question: Does familiarity promote or undermine
             interpersonal attraction? As we explored our respective
             positions, it became clear that the limitations of our
             conceptualizations of the familiarity-attraction link, as
             well as the limitations of prior research, were masking a
             set of higher order principles capable of integrating these
             diverse conceptualizations. This realization led us to adopt
             a broader perspective, which focuses on three distinct
             relationship stages-awareness, surface contact, and
             mutuality-and suggests that the influence of familiarity on
             attraction depends on both the nature and the stage of the
             relationship between perceivers and targets. This article
             introduces the framework that emerged from our discussions
             and suggests directions for research to investigate its
             validity.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1745691614561682},
   Key = {fds265914}
}

@article{fds311623,
   Author = {Micucci, A and Gori, E and De Petrillo and F and Truppa, V and Ariely, D and Addessi, E},
   Title = {Does Self-Control Rely on a Limited Resource in Tufted
             Capuchin Monkeys (Sapajus spp.)?},
   Journal = {Folia Primatologica},
   Volume = {86},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {324-324},
   Publisher = {KARGER},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0015-5713},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000363955000154&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311623}
}

@article{fds311625,
   Author = {Petrillo, FD and Micucci, A and Gori, E and Truppa, V and Ariely, D and Addessi, E},
   Title = {Self-control depletion in tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus
             spp.): does delay of gratification rely on a limited
             resource?},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Psychology},
   Volume = {6},
   Pages = {1193},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01193},
   Abstract = {Self-control failure has enormous personal and societal
             consequences. One of the most debated models explaining why
             self-control breaks down is the Strength Model, according to
             which self-control depends on a limited resource. Either
             previous acts of self-control or taking part in highly
             demanding cognitive tasks have been shown to reduce
             self-control, possibly due to a reduction in blood glucose
             levels. However, several studies yielded negative findings,
             and recent meta-analyses questioned the robustness of the
             depletion effect in humans. We investigated, for the first
             time, whether the Strength Model applies to a non-human
             primate species, the tufted capuchin monkey. We tested five
             capuchins in a self-control task (the Accumulation task) in
             which food items were accumulated within individual's reach
             for as long as the subject refrained from taking them. We
             evaluated whether capuchins' performance decreases: (i) when
             tested before receiving their daily meal rather than after
             consuming it (Energy Depletion Experiment), and (ii) after
             being tested in two tasks with different levels of cognitive
             complexity (Cognitive Depletion Experiment). We also tested,
             in both experiments, how implementing self-control in each
             trial of the Accumulation task affected this capacity within
             each session and/or across consecutive sessions. Repeated
             acts of self-control in each trial of the Accumulation task
             progressively reduced this capacity within each session, as
             predicted by the Strength Model. However, neither
             experiencing a reduction in energy level nor taking part in
             a highly demanding cognitive task decreased performance in
             the subsequent Accumulation task. Thus, whereas capuchins
             seem to be vulnerable to within-session depletion effects,
             to other extents our findings are in line with the growing
             body of studies that failed to find a depletion effect in
             humans. Methodological issues potentially affecting the lack
             of depletion effects in capuchins are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01193},
   Key = {fds311625}
}

@article{fds311626,
   Author = {Chance, Z and Gino, F and Norton, MI and Ariely, D},
   Title = {The slow decay and quick revival of self-deception.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Psychology},
   Volume = {6},
   Pages = {1075},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01075},
   Abstract = {People demonstrate an impressive ability to self-deceive,
             distorting misbehavior to reflect positively on
             themselves-for example, by cheating on a test and believing
             that their inflated performance reflects their true ability.
             But what happens to self-deception when self-deceivers must
             face reality, such as when taking another test on which they
             cannot cheat? We find that self-deception diminishes over
             time only when self-deceivers are repeatedly confronted with
             evidence of their true ability (Study 1); this learning,
             however, fails to make them less susceptible to future
             self-deception (Study 2).},
   Doi = {10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01075},
   Key = {fds311626}
}

@article{fds265904,
   Author = {Lee, L and Lee, MP and Bertini, M and Zauberman, G and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Money, time, and the stability of consumer
             preferences},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {184-199},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0022-2437},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1509/jmr.10.0386},
   Abstract = {© 2015, American Marketing Association. Consumers often
             make product choices that involve the consideration of money
             and time. Building on dual-process models, the authors
             propose that these two basic resources activate
             qualitatively different modes of processing: while money is
             processed analytically, time is processed more affectively.
             Importantly, this distinction then influences the stability
             of consumer preferences. An initial set of three experiments
             demonstrates that, compared with a control condition free of
             the consideration of either resource, money consideration
             generates significantly more violations of transitivity in
             product choice, while time consideration has no such impact.
             The next three experiments use multiple approaches to
             demonstrate the role of different processing modes
             associated with money versus time consideration in this
             result. Finally, two additional experiments test ways in
             which the cognitive noise associated with the analytical
             processing that money consideration triggers could be
             reduced, resulting in more consistent preferences.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmr.10.0386},
   Key = {fds265904}
}

@article{fds265902,
   Author = {Gilam, G and Lin, T and Raz, G and Azrielant, S and Fruchter, E and Ariely,
             D and Hendler, T},
   Title = {Neural substrates underlying the tendency to accept
             anger-infused ultimatum offers during dynamic social
             interactions.},
   Journal = {Neuroimage},
   Volume = {120},
   Pages = {400-411},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {1053-8119},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.07.003},
   Abstract = {In managing our way through interpersonal conflict, anger
             might be crucial in determining whether the dispute
             escalates to aggressive behaviors or resolves cooperatively.
             The Ultimatum Game (UG) is a social decision-making paradigm
             that provides a framework for studying interpersonal
             conflict over division of monetary resources. Unfair
             monetary UG-offers elicit anger and while accepting them
             engages regulatory processes, rejecting them is regarded as
             an aggressive retribution. Ventro-medial prefrontal-cortex
             (vmPFC) activity has been shown to relate to idiosyncratic
             tendencies in accepting unfair offers possibly through its
             role in emotion regulation. Nevertheless, standard UG
             paradigms lack fundamental aspects of real-life social
             interactions in which one reacts to other people in a
             response contingent fashion. To uncover the neural
             substrates underlying the tendency to accept anger-infused
             ultimatum offers during dynamic social interactions, we
             incorporated on-line verbal negotiations with an obnoxious
             partner in a repeated-UG during fMRI scanning. We
             hypothesized that vmPFC activity will differentiate between
             individuals with high or low monetary gains accumulated
             throughout the game and reflect a divergence in the
             associated emotional experience. We found that as
             individuals gained more money, they reported less anger but
             also more positive feelings and had slower sympathetic
             response. In addition, high-gain individuals had increased
             vmPFC activity, but also decreased brainstem activity, which
             possibly reflected the locus coeruleus. During the more
             angering unfair offers, these individuals had increased
             dorsal-posterior Insula (dpI) activity which functionally
             coupled to the medial-thalamus (mT). Finally, both vmPFC
             activity and dpI-mT connectivity contributed to increased
             gain, possibly by modulating the ongoing subjective
             emotional experience. These ecologically valid findings
             point towards a neural mechanism that might nurture
             pro-social interactions by modulating an individual's
             dynamic emotional experience.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.07.003},
   Key = {fds265902}
}

@article{fds311622,
   Author = {Ayal, S and Gino, F and Barkan, R and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Three Principles to REVISE People's Unethical
             Behavior.},
   Journal = {Perspectives on Psychological Science : a Journal of the
             Association for Psychological Science},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {738-741},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {1745-6916},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1745691615598512},
   Abstract = {Dishonesty and unethical behavior are widespread in the
             public and private sectors and cause immense annual losses.
             For instance, estimates of U.S. annual losses indicate $1
             trillion paid in bribes, $270 billion lost due to unreported
             income, and $42 billion lost in retail due to shoplifting
             and employee theft. In this article, we draw on insights
             from the growing fields of moral psychology and behavioral
             ethics to present a three-principle framework we call
             REVISE. This framework classifies forces that affect
             dishonesty into three main categories and then redirects
             those forces to encourage moral behavior. The first
             principle, reminding, emphasizes the effectiveness of subtle
             cues that increase the salience of morality and decrease
             people's ability to justify dishonesty. The second
             principle, visibility, aims to restrict anonymity, prompt
             peer monitoring, and elicit responsible norms. The third
             principle, self-engagement, increases people's motivation to
             maintain a positive self-perception as a moral person and
             helps bridge the gap between moral values and actual
             behavior. The REVISE framework can guide the design of
             policy interventions to defeat dishonesty.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1745691615598512},
   Key = {fds311622}
}

@article{fds311624,
   Author = {Mazar, N and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Dishonesty in scientific research.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Clinical Investigation},
   Volume = {125},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {3993-3996},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0021-9738},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/jci84722},
   Abstract = {Fraudulent business practices, such as those leading to the
             Enron scandal and the conviction of Bernard Madoff, evoke a
             strong sense of public outrage. But fraudulent or dishonest
             actions are not exclusive to the realm of big corporations
             or to evil individuals without consciences. Dishonest
             actions are all too prevalent in everyone's daily lives,
             because people are constantly encountering situations in
             which they can gain advantages by cutting corners. Whether
             it's adding a few dollars in value to the stolen items
             reported on an insurance claim form or dropping outlier data
             points from a figure to make a paper sound more interesting,
             dishonesty is part of the human condition. Here, we explore
             how people rationalize dishonesty, the implications for
             scientific research, and what can be done to foster a
             culture of research integrity.},
   Doi = {10.1172/jci84722},
   Key = {fds311624}
}

@article{fds311621,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Popescu, B},
   Title = {Being Irrationally Funny as a Cognitive Psychologist:
             Interview With Dan Ariely.},
   Journal = {Europe'S Journal of Psychology},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {565-570},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5964/ejop.v11i4.1083},
   Abstract = {The idea of interviewing Dan Ariely was somehow latent on my
             mind since I started being interested in cognitive
             psychology and cognitive behavior psychotherapy, but
             actually got more ardent ever since irrationality became a
             research topic for his team at Duke University. I picked him
             as an interviewee thinking not only at his exceptional
             skills as a researcher and as Kahnemann 'disciple', but
             mainly for his fantastic wit, true modesty and utmost
             interest in making people's lives easier and more
             comfortable, by creating awareness on a lot of topics
             otherwise neglected. Dan Ariely's very agreeable personality
             and humor would not let you think of him as a burnt casualty
             who, in his youth struggled to survive a personal drama, so
             well-documented in his paper "Painful lessons" posted on the
             MIT website (http://web.mit.edu/ariely/www/MIT/Papers/mypain.pdf).
             I think reading his paper and also this transcribed
             interview with him would be also comforting for people who
             found out about Bucharest fire incident that rocked our
             society and also for people who are personally related to
             this tragedy.},
   Doi = {10.5964/ejop.v11i4.1083},
   Key = {fds311621}
}

@article{fds265900,
   Author = {Barkan, R and Ayal, S and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Ethical dissonance, justifications, and moral
             behavior},
   Journal = {Current Opinion in Psychology},
   Volume = {6},
   Pages = {157-161},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {2352-250X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.copsyc.2015.08.001},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.copsyc.2015.08.001},
   Key = {fds265900}
}

@article{fds311620,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Lanier, WL},
   Title = {Disturbing Trends in Physician Burnout and Satisfaction With
             Work-Life Balance: Dealing With Malady Among the Nation's
             Healers.},
   Journal = {Mayo Clinic Proceedings},
   Volume = {90},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1593-1596},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0025-6196},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2015.10.004},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.mayocp.2015.10.004},
   Key = {fds311620}
}

@article{fds330852,
   Author = {Barkan, R and Ayal, S and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Revisiting constructed preferences: Extrapolating
             preferences from relevant reminders},
   Journal = {Decision},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {281-294},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dec0000051},
   Abstract = {© 2016 American Psychological Association. Bias and error
             are considered fundamental characteristics of preferences.
             However, daily behavior frequently demonstrates preference
             coherence. We link the leading notions of constructed
             preferences and well-defined values (Payne, Bettman &
             Schkade, 1999) and the demonstration of coherent
             arbitrariness (Ariely, Loewenstein & Prelec, 2003) and
             suggest that they describe a general process where people
             construct preferences from a starting point. We focus on an
             intermediate case where people extrapolate coherent
             preferences from relevant reminders. In 4 studies we
             characterize the unique features of extrapolated preferences
             and compare them to preferences built from scratch. Our
             findings show that the process of extrapolation follows
             linearity rather than diminished sensitivity (Study 1),
             leads to fewer errors, thus resulting in more consistent
             preference sets (Study 2), reduces cognitive effort as the
             quality of the starting point increases (Study 3), and helps
             to maintain transitivity by prioritizing ordered preferences
             over direct but noisy experience (Study 4). We discuss the
             advantages of extrapolated preferences in terms of
             coherence, but also highlight their potential drawbacks in
             terms of compromising authentic experience.},
   Doi = {10.1037/dec0000051},
   Key = {fds330852}
}

@article{fds320745,
   Author = {Ayal, S and Hochman, G and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Editorial: Dishonest Behavior, from Theory to
             Practice.},
   Journal = {Frontiers in Psychology},
   Volume = {7},
   Pages = {1521},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01521},
   Doi = {10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01521},
   Key = {fds320745}
}

@article{fds319050,
   Author = {Lee, C-Y and Hochman, G and Prince, SE and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Past Actions as Self-Signals: How Acting in a
             Self-Interested Way Influences Environmental Decision
             Making.},
   Journal = {Plos One},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {e0158456},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0158456},
   Abstract = {In the last few decades, awareness of environmental issues
             has increased significantly. Little has changed, however, in
             human activities contributing to environmental damage. Why
             is it so difficult for us to change our behavior in a domain
             that is clearly so important to the future of humanity? Here
             we propose and test the possibility that self-signaling, the
             way we view ourselves based on our past behaviors, is one of
             the factors contributing to the difficulty of taking
             environmental action. In three experiments, we show that
             previous self-interested thoughts or behaviors serve as
             important signals that hinder the likelihood of acting in
             line with an individual's reported concern for the
             environment. This study not only helps explain the gap
             between environmental awareness and action, but also
             suggests alternative strategies for policymakers and
             environmental agencies to promote proenvironmental
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0158456},
   Key = {fds319050}
}

@article{fds319049,
   Author = {Zenko, Z and Ekkekakis, P and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Can You Have Your Vigorous Exercise and Enjoy It Too?
             Ramping Intensity Down Increases Postexercise, Remembered,
             and Forecasted Pleasure.},
   Journal = {Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {149-159},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jsep.2015-0286},
   Abstract = {There is a paucity of methods for improving the affective
             experience of exercise. We tested a novel method based on
             discoveries about the relation between exercise intensity
             and pleasure, and lessons from behavioral economics. We
             examined the effect of reversing the slope of pleasure
             during exercise from negative to positive on pleasure and
             enjoyment, remembered pleasure, and forecasted pleasure.
             Forty-six adults were randomly assigned to a 15-min bout of
             recumbent cycling of either increasing intensity (0-120% of
             watts corresponding to the ventilatory threshold) or
             decreasing intensity (120-0%). Ramping intensity down,
             thereby eliciting a positive slope of pleasure during
             exercise, improved postexercise pleasure and enjoyment,
             remembered pleasure, and forecasted pleasure. The slope of
             pleasure accounted for 35-46% of the variance in remembered
             and forecasted pleasure from 15 min to 7 days postexercise.
             Ramping intensity down makes it possible to combine exposure
             to vigorous and moderate intensities with a pleasant
             affective experience.},
   Doi = {10.1123/jsep.2015-0286},
   Key = {fds319049}
}

@article{fds319048,
   Author = {Mann, H and Garcia-Rada, X and Hornuf, L and Tafurt, J and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Cut From the Same Cloth: Similarly Dishonest Individuals
             Across Countries},
   Journal = {Journal of Cross Cultural Psychology},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {858-874},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022022116648211},
   Abstract = {© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. Norms for dishonest
             behaviors vary across societies, but whether this variation
             is related to differences in individuals’ core tendencies
             toward dishonesty is unknown. We compare individual
             dishonesty on a novel task across 10 participant samples
             from five countries varying in corruption and cultural
             values. In each country, a die-rolling task was administered
             to students at major public universities and the general
             public in coffee shops. A separate group of participants in
             each country predicted that dishonesty would vary across
             countries and demonstrated a home country dishonesty bias.
             In contrast to predictions from independent samples,
             observed dishonesty was limited in magnitude and similar
             across countries. We found no meaningful relationships
             between dishonesty on our task and macro-level indicators,
             including corruption ratings and cultural values. These
             findings suggest that individuals around the world are
             similarly dishonest at their core.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0022022116648211},
   Key = {fds319048}
}

@article{fds319047,
   Author = {Williams, EF and Pizarro, D and Ariely, D and Weinberg,
             JD},
   Title = {The Valjean effect: Visceral states and cheating.},
   Journal = {Emotion},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {897-902},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/emo0000158},
   Abstract = {Visceral states like thirst, hunger, and fatigue can alter
             motivations, predictions, and even memory. Across 3 studies,
             we demonstrate that such "hot" states can also shift moral
             standards and increase dishonest behavior. Compared to
             participants who had just eaten or who had not yet
             exercised, hungry and thirsty participants were more likely
             to behave dishonestly to win a prize. Consistent with the
             specificity of motivation that is characteristic of visceral
             states, participants were only more likely to cheat for a
             prize that could alleviate their current deprived state
             (such as a bottle of water). Interestingly, this increase in
             dishonest behavior did not seem to be driven by an increase
             in the perceived monetary value of the prize. (PsycINFO
             Database Record},
   Doi = {10.1037/emo0000158},
   Key = {fds319047}
}

@article{fds319046,
   Author = {Garrett, N and Lazzaro, SC and Ariely, D and Sharot,
             T},
   Title = {The brain adapts to dishonesty.},
   Journal = {Nature Neuroscience},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1727-1732},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn.4426},
   Abstract = {Dishonesty is an integral part of our social world,
             influencing domains ranging from finance and politics to
             personal relationships. Anecdotally, digressions from a
             moral code are often described as a series of small breaches
             that grow over time. Here we provide empirical evidence for
             a gradual escalation of self-serving dishonesty and reveal a
             neural mechanism supporting it. Behaviorally, we show that
             the extent to which participants engage in self-serving
             dishonesty increases with repetition. Using functional MRI,
             we show that signal reduction in the amygdala is sensitive
             to the history of dishonest behavior, consistent with
             adaptation. Critically, the extent of reduced amygdala
             sensitivity to dishonesty on a present decision relative to
             the previous one predicts the magnitude of escalation of
             self-serving dishonesty on the next decision. The findings
             uncover a biological mechanism that supports a 'slippery
             slope': what begins as small acts of dishonesty can escalate
             into larger transgressions.},
   Doi = {10.1038/nn.4426},
   Key = {fds319046}
}

@article{fds311619,
   Author = {Schwartz, JA and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Life is a battlefield},
   Journal = {Independent Review},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {377-382},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1086-1653},
   Abstract = {There are two standard policy alternatives for combating the
             harmful behaviors that commercialism encourages, ineffective
             soft paternalistic requirements mandating that consumers
             receive helpful information, such as calorie counts; and
             hard paternalistic rules that curtail individual choice,
             such as restrictions on sugary soft-drinks and other
             unhealthy options. Perhaps the best approach for dealing
             with the clash between short-term pleasures and long-term
             interests is to take a libertarian path between hard and
             soft paternalism, one that encourages good behavior while
             allowing individual choice. his approach recognizes that big
             obstacles block our good intentions from becoming actual
             behaviors, but it stops short of imposing inflexible
             restrictions or penalties. In the libertarian approach,
             instead of giving people lots of information about
             retirement savings and letting them decide on the right
             mutual fund, we can automatically put them into a good
             mutual fund that performs well for most people and then let
             them opt out if they want something different.},
   Key = {fds311619}
}

@article{fds319051,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Bracha, A and L'Huillier, JP},
   Title = {Public and Private Values},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Decision Making},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {550-555},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdm.1919},
   Abstract = {Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. In this paper, we
             experimentally examine whether looking at other people's
             pricing decisions is a type of a decision rule that people
             over-apply even when it is not applicable, as in the case of
             private-value goods. In Study 1, we find evidence that this
             is indeed the case—individual valuation of a subjective
             experience under full information, elicited using incentive
             compatible mechanism, is highly influenced by values of
             others. In Study 2, we find that people expect to use this
             rule to some degree with respect to actual consumption of
             goods, especially goods with some public value (music), and
             less so for private-value goods (noise). However, people
             expect to use the rule to a very large extent when they are
             required to express their valuation of a good using a dollar
             figure (Study 3). These results can shed light on price
             behavior as rigidities and rents. Copyright © 2015 John
             Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/bdm.1919},
   Key = {fds319051}
}

@article{fds324455,
   Author = {Mazar, N and Shampanier, K and Ariely, D},
   Title = {When retailing and las vegas meet: Probabilistic free price
             promotions},
   Journal = {Management Science},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {250-266},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2015.2328},
   Abstract = {© 2017 INFORMS. A number of retailers offer gambling-or
             lottery-type price promotions with a chance to receive one's
             entire purchase for free. Although these retailers seem to
             share the intuition that probabilistic free price promotions
             are attractive to consumers, it is unclear how they compare
             to traditional sure price promotions of equal expected
             monetary value. We compared these two risky and sure price
             promotions for planned purchases across six experiments in
             the field and in the laboratory. Together, we found that
             consumers are not only more likely to purchase a product
             promoted with a probabilistic free discount over the same
             product promoted with a sure discount but that they are also
             likely to purchase more of it. This preference seems to be
             primarily due to a diminishing sensitivity to the prices. In
             addition, we find that the zero price effect, transaction
             cost, and novelty considerations are likely not
             implicated.},
   Doi = {10.1287/mnsc.2015.2328},
   Key = {fds324455}
}

@article{fds324456,
   Author = {Mochon, D and Schwartz, J and Maroba, J and Patel, D and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Gain without pain: The extended effects of a behavioral
             health intervention},
   Journal = {Management Science},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {58-72},
   Publisher = {Institute for Operations Research and the Management
             Sciences (INFORMS)},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2015.2322},
   Abstract = {© 2017 INFORMS. We examine the extended effects of an
             incentive-based behavioral health intervention designed to
             improve nutrition behavior. Although the intervention
             successfully improved the target behavior, less is known
             about any spillovers, positive or negative, that impacted
             the program's net benefit. This novel examination presents
             an opportunity to advance our knowledge of this important
             question, particularly because many theories predict that
             balancing behaviors in other domains (e.g., reduced
             exercise) can occur. Our results show a positive and
             long-lasting persistence effect for the treatment group,
             even after the incentive was removed. Moreover, we observe
             no negative spillover effects into related domains such as
             exercise, and no negative impact on customer loyalty. These
             results support the use of incentive-based interventions and
             highlight the importance, for both theory and practice, of
             examining their extended effects.},
   Doi = {10.1287/mnsc.2015.2322},
   Key = {fds324456}
}

@article{fds323703,
   Author = {Bareket-Bojmel, L and Hochman, G and Ariely, D},
   Title = {It’s (Not) All About the Jacksons: Testing Different Types
             of Short-Term Bonuses in the Field},
   Journal = {Journal of Management},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {534-554},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0149206314535441},
   Abstract = {© 2014, © The Author(s) 2014. The use of short-term
             bonuses to motivate employees has become an organizational
             regularity, but a thorough understanding of the relationship
             between these incentives and actual performance is lacking.
             We aim to advance this understanding by examining how three
             types of bonuses (cash, family meal voucher, and verbal
             reward) affect employees’ productivity in a field
             experiment conducted in a high-tech manufacturing factory.
             While all types of bonuses increased performance by over 5%,
             nonmonetary short-term bonuses had a slight advantage over
             monetary bonuses. In addition, the removal of the bonuses
             led to decreased productivity for monetary bonuses but not
             for the verbal reward. However, this negative effect of
             monetary short-term bonuses diminishes when a cash bonus is
             chosen by employees rather than granted by default.
             Theoretical implications about the effect of short-term
             bonuses on intrinsic motivation and reciprocity, as well as
             practical applications of short-term bonus plans that stem
             from our findings, are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0149206314535441},
   Key = {fds323703}
}

@article{fds323516,
   Author = {Jahedi, S and Deck, C and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Arousal and economic decision making},
   Journal = {Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization},
   Volume = {134},
   Pages = {165-189},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2016.10.008},
   Abstract = {© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Previous experiments have found that
             subjecting participants to cognitive load leads to poorer
             decision making, consistent with dual-system models of
             behavior. Rather than taxing the cognitive system, this
             paper reports the results of an experiment that takes a
             complementary approach: arousing the emotional system. The
             results indicate that exposure to arousing visual stimuli as
             compared to neutral images has a negligible impact on
             performance in arithmetic tasks, impatience, risk taking in
             the domain of losses, and snack choice although we find that
             arousal modestly increases risk-taking in the gains domain
             and increases susceptibility to anchoring effects. We find
             the effect of arousal on decision making to be smaller and
             less consistent then the effect of increased cognitive load
             for the same tasks.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jebo.2016.10.008},
   Key = {fds323516}
}

@article{fds316892,
   Author = {Grinstein-Weiss, M and Russell, BD and Gale, WG and Key, C and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Behavioral Interventions to Increase Tax-Time Saving:
             Evidence from a National Randomized Trial},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Affairs},
   Volume = {51},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3-26},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0022-0078},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joca.12114},
   Abstract = {Copyright 2016 by The American Council on Consumer Interests
             We provide new large-scale experimental evidence on policies
             that aim to boost household saving out of income tax
             refunds. Households that filed income tax returns with an
             online tax preparer and chose to receive their refund
             electronically were randomized into eight treatment groups,
             which received different combinations of motivational saving
             prompts and suggested shares of the refund to save—25% and
             75%—and a control group, which received neither. In
             treatment conditions where they were presented, motivational
             prompts focused on various savings goals: general,
             retirement, or emergency. Analysis reveals that higher
             suggested that allocations generated increased allocations
             of the refund to savings but that prompts for different
             reasons to save did not. These interventions, which draw on
             lessons from behavioral economics, represent potentially
             low-cost, scalable tools for policy makers interested in
             helping low- and moderate-income households build
             savings.},
   Doi = {10.1111/joca.12114},
   Key = {fds316892}
}

@article{fds324454,
   Author = {Mitkidis, P and Ayal, S and Shalvi, S and Heimann, K and Levy, G and Kyselo, M and Wallot, S and Ariely, D and Roepstorff,
             A},
   Title = {The effects of extreme rituals on moral behavior: The
             performers-observers gap hypothesis},
   Journal = {Journal of Economic Psychology},
   Volume = {59},
   Pages = {1-7},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joep.2016.12.007},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Religious rituals are found all over
             the world. Some cultures engage in extreme religious rituals
             in which individuals take on forms of bodily harm to
             demonstrate their devotion. Such rituals entail excessive
             costs in terms of physical pain and effort, but the
             equivalent societal benefits remain unclear. The field
             experiment reported here examined the interplay between
             extreme rituals and moral behavior. Using a die-roll task to
             measure honest behavior, we tested whether engaging or
             observing others engaging in extreme ritual activities
             affects subsequent moral behavior. Strikingly, the results
             showed that extreme rituals promote moral behavior among
             ritual observers, but not among ritual performers. The
             discussion centres on the moral effects of rituals within
             the broader social context in which they occur. Extreme
             religious rituals appear to have a moral cleansing effect on
             the numerous individuals observing the rituals, which may
             imply that these rituals evolved to advance and maintain
             moral societies.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.joep.2016.12.007},
   Key = {fds324454}
}

@article{fds326921,
   Author = {Mochon, D and Johnson, K and Schwartz, J and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {What are likes worth? A facebook page field
             experiment},
   Journal = {Journal of Marketing Research},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {306-317},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1509/jmr.15.0409},
   Abstract = {© 2017, American Marketing Association. Despite the
             tremendous resources devoted to marketing on Facebook,
             little is known about its actual effect on customers.
             Specifically, can Facebook page likes affect offline
             customer behavior, and if so, how? To answer these
             questions, the authors conduct a field experiment on
             acquired Facebook page likes and find them to have a
             positive causal effect on offline customer behavior.
             Importantly, these likes are found to be most effective when
             the Facebook page is used as a platform for firm-initiated
             promotional communications. No effect of acquired page likes
             is found when customers interact organically with the firm's
             page, but a significant effect is found when the firm pays
             to boost its page posts and thus uses its Facebook page as a
             platform for paid advertising. These results demonstrate the
             value of likes beyond Facebook activity itself and highlight
             the conditions under which acquiring likes is most valuable
             for firms.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jmr.15.0409},
   Key = {fds326921}
}

@article{fds328282,
   Author = {Hassidim, A and Korach, T and Shreberk-Hassidim, R and Thomaidou, E and Uzefovsky, F and Ayal, S and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Prevalence of Sharing Access Credentials in Electronic
             Medical Records.},
   Journal = {Healthcare Informatics Research},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {176-182},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4258/hir.2017.23.3.176},
   Abstract = {Confidentiality of health information is an important aspect
             of the physician patient relationship. The use of digital
             medical records has made data much more accessible. To
             prevent data leakage, many countries have created
             regulations regarding medical data accessibility. These
             regulations require a unique user ID for each medical staff
             member, and this must be protected by a password, which
             should be kept undisclosed by all means.We performed a
             four-question Google Forms-based survey of medical staff. In
             the survey, each participant was asked if he/she ever
             obtained the password of another medical staff member. Then,
             we asked how many times such an episode occurred and the
             reason for it.A total of 299 surveys were gathered. The
             responses showed that 220 (73.6%) participants reported that
             they had obtained the password of another medical staff
             member. Only 171 (57.2%) estimated how many time it
             happened, with an average estimation of 4.75 episodes. All
             the residents that took part in the study (45, 15%) had
             obtained the password of another medical staff member, while
             only 57.5% (38/66) of the nurses reported this.The use of
             unique user IDs and passwords to defend the privacy of
             medical data is a common requirement in medical
             organizations. Unfortunately, the use of passwords is doomed
             because medical staff members share their passwords with one
             another. Strict regulations requiring each staff member to
             have it's a unique user ID might lead to password sharing
             and to a decrease in data safety.},
   Doi = {10.4258/hir.2017.23.3.176},
   Key = {fds328282}
}

@article{fds329297,
   Author = {Chang, LL and DeVore, AD and Granger, BB and Eapen, ZJ and Ariely, D and Hernandez, AF},
   Title = {Leveraging Behavioral Economics to Improve Heart Failure
             Care and Outcomes.},
   Journal = {Circulation},
   Volume = {136},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {765-772},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/circulationaha.117.028380},
   Abstract = {Behavioral challenges are often present in human illness, so
             behavioral economics is increasingly being applied in
             healthcare settings to better understand why patients choose
             healthy or unhealthy behaviors. The application of
             behavioral economics to healthcare settings parallels recent
             shifts in policy and reimbursement structures that hold
             providers accountable for outcomes that are dependent on
             patient behaviors. Numerous studies have examined the
             application of behavioral economics principles to policy
             making and health behaviors, but there are limited data on
             applying these concepts to the management of chronic
             conditions, such as heart failure (HF). Given its increasing
             prevalence and high associated cost of care, HF is a
             paradigm case for studying novel approaches to improve
             health care; therefore, if we can better understand why
             patients with HF make the choices they do, then we may be
             more poised to help them manage their medications, influence
             daily behaviors, and encourage healthy decision making. In
             this article, we will give a brief explanation of the core
             behavioral economics concepts that apply to patients with
             HF. We will also examine how to craft these concepts into
             tools such as financial incentives and social networks that
             may improve the management of patients with HF. We believe
             that behavioral economics can help us understand barriers to
             change, encourage positive behaviors, and offer additional
             approaches to improving the outcomes of patients with
             HF.},
   Doi = {10.1161/circulationaha.117.028380},
   Key = {fds329297}
}

@article{fds327324,
   Author = {Zenko, Z and O'Brien, JD and Berman, CJ and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Comparison of affect-regulated, self-regulated, and
             heart-rate regulated exercise prescriptions: Protocol for a
             randomized controlled trial},
   Journal = {Psychology of Sport and Exercise},
   Volume = {32},
   Pages = {124-130},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.06.010},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Recent evidence has highlighted the
             potential benefits of affect- and self-regulated exercise
             prescriptions for the promotion of physical activity and
             exercise behavior (Baldwin et al., 2016; Williams et al.,
             2015, 2016). However, questions remain about which
             characteristics of the exercise prescriptions make them more
             effective. Objectives This study will compare exercise
             prescriptions with and without choice, and with and without
             an emphasis on affective valence, to determine which method
             of intensity regulation is most effective for increasing
             walking behavior. Design Parallel-groups randomized
             controlled trial. Methods Insufficiently active (less than
             90 min per week of moderate-intensity activity) adults will
             be recruited to participate in a six-week study consisting
             of a two-week baseline period and four-week intervention.
             Walking behavior will be measured objectively using
             consumer-based activity monitors, and based on self-reported
             data. Other outcome measures will include affective
             attitudes, variables related to intrinsic motivation,
             self-reported compliance, resting heart rate, and weight.
             Participants will be randomized to one of four walking
             programs that either regulate intensity based on the choice
             of the intensity or based on heart rate, and either have or
             lack an emphasis on the affective valence of exercise.
             Conclusions Recruitment and onboarding has begun. Results of
             this randomized controlled trial are expected to be
             available by the middle of 2018.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.06.010},
   Key = {fds327324}
}

@article{fds329772,
   Author = {Tan, J and Ariely, D and Hare, B},
   Title = {Bonobos respond prosocially toward members of other
             groups.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {14733},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-15320-w},
   Abstract = {Modern humans live in an "exploded" network with unusually
             large circles of trust that form due to prosociality toward
             unfamiliar people (i.e. xenophilia). In a set of experiments
             we demonstrate that semi-free ranging bonobos (Pan paniscus)
             - both juveniles and young adults - also show spontaneous
             responses consistent with xenophilia. Bonobos voluntarily
             aided an unfamiliar, non-group member in obtaining food even
             when he/she did not make overt requests for help. Bonobos
             also showed evidence for involuntary, contagious yawning in
             response to videos of yawning conspecifics who were complete
             strangers. These experiments reveal that xenophilia in
             bonobos can be unselfish, proactive and automatic. They
             support the first impression hypothesis that suggests
             xenophilia can evolve through individual selection in social
             species whenever the benefits of building new bonds outweigh
             the costs. Xenophilia likely evolved in bonobos as the risk
             of intergroup aggression dissipated and the benefits of
             bonding between immigrating members increased. Our findings
             also mean the human potential for xenophilia is either
             evolutionarily shared or convergent with bonobos and not
             unique to our species as previously proposed.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-15320-w},
   Key = {fds329772}
}

@article{fds326509,
   Author = {Banker, S and Ainsworth, SE and Baumeister, RF and Ariely, D and Vohs,
             KD},
   Title = {The Sticky Anchor Hypothesis: Ego Depletion Increases
             Susceptibility to Situational Cues},
   Journal = {Journal of Behavioral Decision Making},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1027-1040},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdm.2022},
   Abstract = {Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Self-control
             depletion has been linked both to increased selfish behavior
             and increased susceptibility to situational cues. The
             present research tested two competing hypotheses about the
             consequence of depletion by measuring how people allocate
             rewards between themselves and another person. Seven
             experiments analyzed behavior in standard dictator games and
             reverse dictator games, settings in which participants could
             take money from another person. Across all of these
             experiments, depleted participants made smaller changes to
             the initial allocation, thereby sticking closer to the
             default position (anchor) than non-depleted participants.
             These findings provide support for a “sticky anchor
             hypothesis,” which states that the effects of depletion on
             behavior are influenced by the proximal situational cues
             rather than by directly stimulating selfishness per se.
             Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/bdm.2022},
   Key = {fds326509}
}

@article{fds340375,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Holzwarth, A},
   Title = {The choice architecture of privacy decision-making},
   Journal = {Health and Technology},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {415-422},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12553-017-0193-3},
   Abstract = {© 2017, IUPESM and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
             ‘Choice architects’ are responsible for designing
             environments that guide decision-making, and thus must
             consider the inherent tradeoffs that accompany every choice.
             This examination of privacy decision-making places privacy
             considerations into context, and accordingly recommends a
             method (signal detection theory) for choice architects to
             define and weigh the tradeoffs ingrained in private and
             public situations in order to design decision environments
             that are reflective of their respective costs and
             benefits.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s12553-017-0193-3},
   Key = {fds340375}
}

@article{fds332055,
   Author = {LeBlanc, TW and Bloom, N and Wolf, SP and Lowman, SG and Pollak, KI and Steinhauser, KE and Ariely, D and Tulsky, JA},
   Title = {Triadic treatment decision-making in advanced cancer: a
             pilot study of the roles and perceptions of patients,
             caregivers, and oncologists.},
   Journal = {Support Care Cancer},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1197-1205},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-017-3942-y},
   Abstract = {PURPOSE: The research on cancer treatment decision-making
             focuses on dyads; the full "triad" of patients, oncologists,
             and caregivers remains largely unstudied. We investigated
             how all members of this triad perceive and experience
             decisions related to treatment for advanced cancer. METHODS:
             At an academic cancer center, we enrolled adult patients
             with advanced gastrointestinal or hematological
             malignancies, their caregivers, and their oncologists. Triad
             members completed a semi-structured qualitative interview
             and a survey measuring decisional conflict and perceived
             influence of the other triad members on treatment decisions.
             RESULTS: Seventeen patients, 14 caregivers, and 10
             oncologists completed the study. Patients and caregivers
             reported little decisional regret and voiced high
             satisfaction with their decisions, but levels of decisional
             conflict were high. We found sizeable disagreement among
             triad members' perceptions and preferences. For example,
             patients and oncologists disagreed about the caregiver's
             influence on the decision 56% of the time. In addition, many
             patients and caregivers preferred to defer to their
             oncologist about treatment decisions, felt like no true
             decision existed, and disagreed with their oncologist about
             how many treatment options had been presented. CONCLUSIONS:
             Patients, caregivers, and oncologists have discordant
             perceptions of the cancer treatment decision-making process,
             and bring different preferences about how they want to make
             decisions. These data suggest that oncologists should assess
             patients' and caregivers' decisional preferences, explicitly
             signal that a decision needs to be made whenever approaching
             an important crossroads in treatment and ensure that
             patients and caregivers understand the full range of
             presented options.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s00520-017-3942-y},
   Key = {fds332055}
}

@article{fds335814,
   Author = {Hahn, E and Ariely, D and Tannock, I and Fyles, A and Corn,
             BW},
   Title = {Slogans and donor pages of cancer centres: do they convey
             discordant messages?},
   Journal = {The Lancet. Oncology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {447-448},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1470-2045(18)30203-1},
   Doi = {10.1016/s1470-2045(18)30203-1},
   Key = {fds335814}
}

@article{fds333286,
   Author = {Amar, M and Ariely, D and Carmon, Z and Yang, H},
   Title = {How Counterfeits Infect Genuine Products: The Role of Moral
             Disgust},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {329-343},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcpy.1036},
   Abstract = {© 2018 The Authors. Journal of Consumer Psychology
             published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society
             for Consumer Psychology. We argue that moral disgust toward
             counterfeiting can degrade both the efficacy of products
             perceived to be counterfeits and that of genuine products
             resembling them. Five studies support our propositions and
             highlight the infectious nature of counterfeiting:
             Perceiving a product as a counterfeit made disgust more
             mentally accessible, and led participants to disinfect the
             item more and reduce how long they remained in physical
             contact with it (Study 1). Participants who perceived a
             mouse as a counterfeit, performed less well in a computer
             game using the mouse and expressed greater moral disgust,
             which mediated lowered performance (Study 2). Exposure to a
             supposedly counterfeit fountain pen in an unrelated prior
             task infected participants’ performance using a genuine
             ballpoint pen resembling the “counterfeit;” individual
             differences in moral attitudes moderated the effect (Study
             3). Exposure to a supposedly counterfeit mouse infected
             performance with a genuine mouse of the same brand; moral
             disgust mediated this effect (Study 4). Finally, moral
             disgust mediated lowered efficacy of a supposed counterfeit
             and that of a genuine item resembling the “counterfeit”
             (Study 5).},
   Doi = {10.1002/jcpy.1036},
   Key = {fds333286}
}

@article{fds332183,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Gneezy, U and Haruvy, E},
   Title = {Social Norms and the Price of Zero},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {180-191},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcpy.1018},
   Abstract = {© 2017 Society for Consumer Psychology The standard
             economic model assumes that demand is weakly decreasing in
             price. While empirical evidence shows that this is true for
             most price levels, it might not hold for the price of zero,
             where social norms are not entirely compatible with the
             self-maximizing economic agent. A set of experiments shows
             that switching from a low price to a price of zero has two
             effects on behavior: First, in accordance with the economic
             theory, more people demand the product. Second, whereas in
             the low price case some individuals demand high quantities
             of the product, in the zero price case most people take only
             one unit of the product. As a result, lowering the price to
             zero may lead to a net decrease in the total amount demanded
             in the market. We further show that polite priming results
             in higher demand than ethical priming in both zero price and
             1¢ conditions.},
   Doi = {10.1002/jcpy.1018},
   Key = {fds332183}
}

@article{fds332890,
   Author = {Mazar, N and Mochon, D and Ariely, D},
   Title = {If You Are Going to Pay Within the Next 24 Hours, Press 1:
             Automatic Planning Prompt Reduces Credit Card
             Delinquency},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {466-476},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcpy.1031},
   Abstract = {© 2018 The Authors. Journal of Consumer Psychology
             published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society
             for Consumer Psychology. People often form intentions but
             fail to follow through on them. Mounting evidence suggests
             that such intention-action gaps can be narrowed with prompts
             to make concrete plans about when, where, and how to act to
             achieve the intention. In this paper, we pushed the notion
             of plan-concreteness to test the efficacy of a prompt under
             a minimalist automated calling setting, where respondents
             were only prompted to indicate a narrower duration within
             which they intent to act. In a field experiment, this
             planning prompt significantly helped people to pay their
             past dues and get out of debt delinquency. These results
             suggest that minimalist automatic planning prompts are a
             scalable, cost-effective intervention.},
   Doi = {10.1002/jcpy.1031},
   Key = {fds332890}
}

@article{fds335813,
   Author = {O'Brien, JD and Kahn, RM and Zenko, Z and Fernandez, JR and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Naïve models of dietary splurges: Beliefs about caloric
             compensation and weight change following non-habitual
             overconsumption.},
   Journal = {Appetite},
   Volume = {128},
   Pages = {321-332},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2018.06.016},
   Abstract = {The mechanisms that lead to overeating and the consumption
             of tempting, unhealthy foods have been studied extensively,
             but the compensatory actions taken afterwards have not. Here
             we describe the naïve models individuals hold around
             dietary splurges (single bouts of overeating) and associated
             weight changes. Across six online experiments, we found
             that, following a hypothetical dietary splurge, participants
             did not plan to adequately adjust calorie consumption to
             account for the additional calories consumed (Studies 1 and
             2), and this pattern was worse following hypothetical
             splurges characterized by a large amount of food consumed in
             a single bout (Study 3). Participants expected weight
             changes to happen faster than they do in reality (Study 4)
             and they expected that weight gained from a dietary splurge
             would disappear on its own without explicit compensation
             attempts through diet or exercise (Study 5). Similarly,
             participants expected that when compensation attempts were
             made through calorie restriction, the rate of weight loss
             would be faster following a dietary splurge compared to
             normal eating (Study 6). This research contributes novel
             data demonstrating an important mechanism that likely
             contributes to weight gain and failed weight loss
             attempts.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.appet.2018.06.016},
   Key = {fds335813}
}

@article{fds339755,
   Author = {Turner, MC and O'Brien, JD and Kahn, RM and Mantyh, CR and Migaly, J and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Impact of Disgust on Intentions to Undergo Colorectal
             Surgery.},
   Journal = {Dis Colon Rectum},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {1386-1392},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000001254},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Surgeons present patients with complex
             information at the perioperative appointment. Emotions
             likely play a role in surgical decision-making, and disgust
             is an emotion of revulsion at a stimulus that can lead to
             avoidance. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to
             determine the impact of disgust on intention to undergo
             surgical resection for colorectal cancer and recall of
             perioperative instructions. DESIGN: This was a
             cross-sectional observational study conducted online using
             hypothetical scenarios with nonpatient subjects. SETTINGS:
             The study was conducted using Amazon's Mechanical Turk.
             PATIENTS: Survey respondents were living in the United
             States. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Surgery intention and recall
             of perioperative instructions were measured. RESULTS: A
             total of 319 participants met the inclusion criteria.
             Participants in the experimental condition, who were
             provided with detailed information and pictures about stoma
             care, had significantly lower surgery intentions (mean ±
             SD, 4.60 ± 1.15) compared with the control condition
             with no stoma prompt (mean ± SD, 5.14 ± 0.91; p =
             0.05) and significantly lower recall for preoperative
             instructions (mean ± SD, 13.75 ± 2.38) compared with
             the control condition (mean ± SD, 14.36 ± 2.19; p =
             0.03). Those within the experimental conditions also
             reported significantly higher state levels of disgust (mean
             ± SD, 4.08 ± 1.74) compared with a control condition
             (mean ± SD, 2.35 ± 1.38; p < 0.001). State-level
             disgust was found to fully mediate the relationship between
             condition and recall (b = -0.31) and to partially mediate
             the effect of condition on surgery intentions (b = 0.17).
             LIMITATIONS: It is unknown whether these results will
             replicate with patients and the impact of competing emotions
             in clinical settings. CONCLUSIONS: Intentions to undergo
             colorectal surgery and recall of preoperative instructions
             are diminished in patients who experience disgust when
             presented with stoma information. Surgeons and care teams
             must account for this as they perform perioperative
             counseling to minimize interference with recall of important
             perioperative information. See Video Abstract at
             http://links.lww.com/DCR/A776.},
   Doi = {10.1097/DCR.0000000000001254},
   Key = {fds339755}
}

@article{fds341526,
   Author = {Garcia-Rada, X and Anik, L and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Consuming together (versus separately) makes the heart grow
             fonder},
   Journal = {Marketing Letters},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {27-43},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11002-019-09479-7},
   Abstract = {© 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of
             Springer Nature. Across three studies, we investigate how
             consumers in romantic relationships make decisions when
             choosing an item to share with their partner. We show that
             consumers will forgo their preferred alternative for an
             option that is more aligned with the preferences of their
             partner when consuming the same item together vs.
             separately. We theorize and show that when consuming
             together (vs. separately), consumers’ purchase motivation
             shifts from being utilitarian (e.g., satisfying one’s
             hunger) to hedonic (e.g., having an enjoyable evening).
             Consequently, when consuming together (vs. separately),
             consumers weigh more highly their partner’s affective
             reactions to the item and overall experience—leading them
             to pick a less preferred option in an effort to please their
             partner. In sum, we provide a framework that contributes
             novel insight into the trade-offs consumers make between
             their preferences and the preferences of
             others.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11002-019-09479-7},
   Key = {fds341526}
}

@article{fds342495,
   Author = {Akbaş, M and Ariely, D and Yuksel, S},
   Title = {When is inequality fair? An experiment on the effect of
             procedural justice and agency},
   Journal = {Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization},
   Volume = {161},
   Pages = {114-127},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2019.02.014},
   Abstract = {© 2019 Elsevier B.V. We investigate how the perceived
             fairness of an income distribution depends on the beliefs
             about the process that generates the inequality.
             Specifically, we examine how two crucial features of this
             process affect fairness views: (1) Procedural justice -
             equal treatment of all; (2) Agency – one's ability to
             determine his/her income. We do this in a lab experiment by
             differentially varying subjects’ ability to influence
             their earnings. Comparison of ex-post redistribution
             decisions of total earnings under different conditions
             indicate both agency and procedural justice to matter for
             fairness. Highlighting the importance of agency, we observe
             lower redistribution of unequal earnings resulting from risk
             when risk is chosen freely. Highlighting the importance of
             procedural justice, we find introduction of inequality of
             opportunity to significantly increase redistribution.
             Despite this increase, under inequality of opportunity, the
             share of subjects redistributing none remain close to the
             share of subjects redistributing fully revealing an
             underlying heterogeneity in the population about how
             fairness views should account for inequality of
             opportunity.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jebo.2019.02.014},
   Key = {fds342495}
}

@article{fds341346,
   Author = {Yang, H and Carmon, Z and Ariely, D and Norton, MI},
   Title = {The Feeling of Not Knowing It All},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Psychology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {455-462},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcpy.1089},
   Abstract = {© 2019 Society for Consumer Psychology How do consumers
             assess their mastery of knowledge they have learned? We
             explore this question by investigating a common knowledge
             consumption situation: encountering opportunities for
             further learning. We argue and show that such opportunities
             can trigger a feeling-of-not-knowing-it-all (FONKIA), which
             lowers consumers’ confidence in their mastery of the
             knowledge they already possess. Specifically, listing
             optional follow-up readings at the conclusion of a course
             lowered students’ confidence in their mastery of the
             course material they had already learned (Study 1).
             Encountering an optional learning opportunity increased the
             FONKIA, which mediated the decreased confidence (Studies 2
             and 3). We also document two moderators consistent with our
             conceptualization. First, participants primed with mastery
             (vs. instrumental) motivation were more negatively impacted
             when they encountered optional learning opportunities.
             Second, the more related the optional opportunities were to
             the target topic, the lower participants’ confidence in
             their mastery of what they had already learned. We conclude
             by discussing the implications of these findings, such as
             encouraging further learning or harming teaching
             evaluations.},
   Doi = {10.1002/jcpy.1089},
   Key = {fds341346}
}

@article{fds342496,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Garcia-Rada, X and Gödker, K and Hornuf, L and Mann,
             H},
   Title = {The impact of two different economic systems on
             dishonesty},
   Journal = {European Journal of Political Economy},
   Volume = {59},
   Pages = {179-195},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2019.02.010},
   Abstract = {© 2019 The Authors Using an artefactual field experiment,
             this paper tests the long-term implications of living in a
             specific economic system on individual dishonesty. By
             comparing cheating behaviour across individuals from the
             former socialist East of Germany with those of the
             capitalist West of Germany, we examine behavioural
             differences within a single country. We find long-term
             implications of living in a specific economic system for
             individual dishonesty when social interactions are possible:
             participants with an East German background cheated
             significantly more on an abstract die-rolling task than
             those with a West German background, but only when exposed
             to the enduring system of former West Germany. Moreover, our
             results indicate that the longer individuals had experienced
             socialist East Germany, the more likely they were to cheat
             on the behavioural task.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2019.02.010},
   Key = {fds342496}
}

@article{fds346416,
   Author = {Frank, D-A and Chrysochou, P and Mitkidis, P and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {Human decision-making biases in the moral dilemmas of
             autonomous vehicles.},
   Journal = {Scientific Reports},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {13080},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-49411-7},
   Abstract = {The development of artificial intelligence has led
             researchers to study the ethical principles that should
             guide machine behavior. The challenge in building machine
             morality based on people's moral decisions, however, is
             accounting for the biases in human moral decision-making. In
             seven studies, this paper investigates how people's personal
             perspectives and decision-making modes affect their
             decisions in the moral dilemmas faced by autonomous
             vehicles. Moreover, it determines the variations in people's
             moral decisions that can be attributed to the situational
             factors of the dilemmas. The reported studies demonstrate
             that people's moral decisions, regardless of the presented
             dilemma, are biased by their decision-making mode and
             personal perspective. Under intuitive moral decisions,
             participants shift more towards a deontological doctrine by
             sacrificing the passenger instead of the pedestrian. In
             addition, once the personal perspective is made salient
             participants preserve the lives of that perspective, i.e.
             the passenger shifts towards sacrificing the pedestrian, and
             vice versa. These biases in people's moral decisions
             underline the social challenge in the design of a universal
             moral code for autonomous vehicles. We discuss the
             implications of our findings and provide directions for
             future research.},
   Doi = {10.1038/s41598-019-49411-7},
   Key = {fds346416}
}

@article{fds346575,
   Author = {Berman, CJ and O'Brien, JD and Zenko, Z and Ariely,
             D},
   Title = {The Limits of Cognitive Reappraisal: Changing Pain Valence,
             but not Persistence, during a Resistance Exercise
             Task.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Environmental Research and Public
             Health},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {19},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193739},
   Abstract = {Physiological discomfort is commonly cited as a barrier for
             initiating and persisting with exercise. Although
             individuals may think of physiological discomfort as
             determined by physical sensations, it can also be influenced
             by cognitive and emotional factors. We explored the impacts
             of interpreting the purpose of pain as a sign of muscle
             building (helpful) vs. a sign of muscle tearing and possible
             injury (harmful) and tested the effect of cognitive
             reappraisals, or shifting interpretations of pain, on
             exercise persistence and the subjective experience of
             discomfort during exercise. Seventy-eight participants were
             randomized to listen to voice recordings that framed
             exercise-related pain as helpful vs. harmful before
             participating in a standard muscular endurance test using
             the YMCA protocol. Although the two experimental groups did
             not differ in the overall number of resistance training
             repetitions achieved, participants who were asked to think
             about the benefits (rather than the negative consequences)
             of pain reported less negative pain valence during exercise.
             Thus, the experience of pain was influenced by appraisals of
             the meaning of pain, but differences in pain valence did not
             impact exercise persistence. Theoretical implications and
             applications for affect-based exercise interventions are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.3390/ijerph16193739},
   Key = {fds346575}
}

@article{fds347136,
   Author = {Navajas, J and Álvarez Heduan, F and Garrido, JM and Gonzalez, PA and Garbulsky, G and Ariely, D and Sigman, M},
   Title = {Reaching Consensus in Polarized Moral Debates.},
   Journal = {Current Biology : Cb},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {23},
   Pages = {4124-4129.e6},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2019.10.018},
   Abstract = {The group polarization phenomenon is a widespread human bias
             with no apparent geographical or cultural boundaries [1].
             Although the conditions that breed extremism have been
             extensively studied [2-5], comparably little research has
             examined how to depolarize attitudes in people who already
             embrace extreme beliefs. Previous studies have shown that
             deliberating groups may shift toward more moderate opinions
             [6], but why deliberation is sometimes effective although
             other times it fails at eliciting consensus remains largely
             unknown. To investigate this, we performed a large-scale
             behavioral experiment with live crowds from two countries.
             Participants (N = 3,288 in study 1 and N = 582 in study 2)
             were presented with a set of moral scenarios and asked to
             judge the acceptability of a controversial action. Then they
             organized in groups of three and discussed their opinions to
             see whether they agreed on common values of acceptability.
             We found that groups succeeding at reaching consensus
             frequently had extreme participants with low confidence and
             a participant with a moderate view but high confidence.
             Quantitative analyses showed that these "confident grays"
             exerted the greatest weight on group judgements and suggest
             that consensus was driven by a mediation process [7, 8].
             Overall, these findings shed light on the elements that
             allow human groups to resolve moral disagreement.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cub.2019.10.018},
   Key = {fds347136}
}

@article{fds345454,
   Author = {Fitz, N and Kushlev, K and Jagannathan, R and Lewis, T and Paliwal, D and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Batching smartphone notifications can improve
             well-being},
   Journal = {Computers in Human Behavior},
   Volume = {101},
   Pages = {84-94},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2019.07.016},
   Abstract = {© 2019 Every day, billions of us receive smartphone
             notifications. Designed to distract, these interruptions
             capture and monetize our time and attention. Though
             smartphones are incredibly helpful, their current
             notification systems impose underappreciated, yet
             considerable, mental costs; like a slot machine, they
             exploit our inherent psychological bias for variable
             rewards. With an app that we developed, we conducted a
             randomized field experiment (n = 237) to test whether
             batching notifications—delivering notifications in
             predictable intervals throughout the day—could improve
             psychological well-being. Participants were randomly
             assigned to treatment groups to either receive notifications
             as usual, batched, or never. Using daily diary surveys, we
             measured a range of psychological and health outcomes, and
             through our app system, we collected data on phone use
             behaviors. Compared to those in the control condition,
             participants whose notifications were batched
             three-times-a-day felt more attentive, productive, in a
             better mood, and in greater control of their phones.
             Participants in the batched group also reported lower
             stress, lower productivity, and fewer phone interruptions.
             In contrast, participants who did not receive notifications
             at all reaped few of those benefits, but experienced higher
             levels of anxiety and “fear of missing out” (FoMO). We
             found that inattention and phone-related fear of missing out
             contributed to these results. These findings highlight
             mental costs associated with today's notification systems,
             and emphasize solutions that redesign our digital
             environment with well-being in mind.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.chb.2019.07.016},
   Key = {fds345454}
}

@article{fds347137,
   Author = {DeVore, AD and Granger, BB and Fonarow, GC and Al-Khalidi, HR and Albert, NM and Lewis, EF and Butler, J and Piña, IL and Heidenreich,
             PA and Allen, LA and Yancy, CW and Cooper, LB and Felker, GM and Kaltenbach, LA and McRae, AT and Lanfear, DE and Harrison, RW and Kociol, RD and Disch, M and Ariely, D and Miller, JM and Granger, CB and Hernandez, AF},
   Title = {Care Optimization Through Patient and Hospital Engagement
             Clinical Trial for Heart Failure: Rationale and design of
             CONNECT-HF.},
   Journal = {American Heart Journal},
   Volume = {220},
   Pages = {41-50},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2019.09.012},
   Abstract = {Many therapies have been shown to improve outcomes for
             patients with heart failure (HF) in controlled settings, but
             there are limited data available to inform best practices
             for hospital and post-discharge quality improvement
             initiatives. The CONNECT-HF study is a prospective,
             cluster-randomized trial of 161 hospitals in the United
             States with a 2×2 factorial design. The study is designed
             to assess the effect of a hospital and post-discharge
             quality improvement intervention compared with usual care
             (primary objective) on HF outcomes and quality-of-care, as
             well as to evaluate the effect of hospitals implementing a
             patient-level digital intervention compared with usual care
             (secondary objective). The hospital and post-discharge
             intervention includes audit and feedback on HF clinical
             process measures and outcomes for patients with HF with
             reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) paired with education to
             sites and clinicians by a trained, nationally representative
             group of HF and quality improvement experts. The
             patient-level digital intervention is an optional ancillary
             study and includes a mobile application and behavioral tools
             that are intended to facilitate improved use of
             guideline-directed recommendations for self-monitoring and
             self-management of activity and medications for HFrEF. The
             effects of the interventions will be measured through an
             opportunity-based composite score on quality and
             time-to-first HF readmission or death among patients with
             HFrEF who present to study hospitals with acute HF and who
             consent to participate. The CONNECT-HF study is evaluating
             approaches for implementing HF guideline recommendations
             into practice and is one of the largest HF implementation
             science trials performed to date.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ahj.2019.09.012},
   Key = {fds347137}
}

@article{fds349131,
   Author = {Kristal, AS and Whillans, AV and Bazerman, MH and Gino, F and Shu, LL and Mazar, N and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Signing at the beginning versus at the end does not decrease
             dishonesty.},
   Journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the
             United States of America},
   Volume = {117},
   Number = {13},
   Pages = {7103-7107},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1911695117},
   Abstract = {Honest reporting is essential for society to function well.
             However, people frequently lie when asked to provide
             information, such as misrepresenting their income to save
             money on taxes. A landmark finding published in PNAS [L. L.
             Shu, N. Mazar, F. Gino, D. Ariely, M. H. Bazerman, Proc.
             Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 15197-15200 (2012)] provided
             evidence for a simple way of encouraging honest reporting:
             asking people to sign a veracity statement at the beginning
             instead of at the end of a self-report form. Since this
             finding was published, various government agencies have
             adopted this practice. However, in this project, we failed
             to replicate this result. Across five conceptual
             replications (n = 4,559) and one highly powered,
             preregistered, direct replication (n = 1,235) conducted with
             the authors of the original paper, we observed no effect of
             signing first on honest reporting. Given the policy
             applications of this result, it is important to update the
             scientific record regarding the veracity of these
             results.},
   Doi = {10.1073/pnas.1911695117},
   Key = {fds349131}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds265959,
   Author = {Sedikides, C and Ariely, D and Olsen, N},
   Title = {Contextual and procedural determinants of partner selection:
             Of asymmetric dominance and prominence},
   Journal = {Social Cognition},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {118-139},
   Publisher = {Guilford Publications},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0278-016X},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000081823600002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The early stage of partner selection is conceptualized as a
             decision-making process amenable to at least two types of
             influence: contextual and procedural. An example of
             contextual influence is the asymmetric dominance effect.
             According to this effect, introduction in a two-person field
             of eligibles of a third eligible, who is dominated (i.e., is
             inferior) on an attribute by the first eligible but not by
             the second one, will tip the scale toward selecting the
             first eligible. An example of procedural influence is the
             prominence effect. According to this effect, participants
             will be more likely to select in choice rather than in
             matching the eligible who is superior on an attribute
             important to the participants. On the other hand,
             participants will be more likely to select in matching
             rather than in choice the eligible who is superior on an
             attribute unimportant to the participants. Two experiments
             demonstrated these contextual and procedural
             influences.},
   Doi = {10.1521/soco.1999.17.2.118},
   Key = {fds265959}
}

@misc{fds265905,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Schooler, J and Loewenstein, G},
   Title = {The Pursuit and Assessment of Happiness Can be
             Self-Defeating},
   Booktitle = {The Psychology of Economic Decisions},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Editor = {Broacs, I and Carrillo, J},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds265905}
}

@misc{fds265906,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Carmon, Z},
   Title = {The Sum Reflects only Some of Its Parts: A Critical Overview
             of Research on Summary Assessment of Experiences},
   Booktitle = {Time and Decisions},
   Publisher = {Russell Sage Foundation Press},
   Editor = {Baumeister, R and Loewenstein, G and Read, D},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds265906}
}

@misc{fds265908,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Loewenstein, G and Prelec, D},
   Title = {"Coherent Arbitrariness": Stable Demand Curves Without
             Stable Preferences},
   Volume = {118},
   Pages = {73-106},
   Booktitle = {The Construction of Preference},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Editor = {Lichtenstein, S and Slovic, P},
   Year = {2003},
   Abstract = {In six experiments we show that initial valuations of
             familiar products and simple hedonic experiences are
             strongly influenced by arbitrary "anchors" (sometimes
             derived from a person's social security number). Because
             subsequent valuations are also coherent with respect to
             salient differences in perceived quality or quantity of
             these products and experiences, the entire pattern of
             valuations can easily create an illusion of order, as if it
             is being generated by stable underlying preferences. The
             experiments show that this combination of coherent
             arbitrariness (1) cannot be interpreted as a rational
             response to information, (2) does not decrease as a result
             of experience with a good, (3) is not necessarily reduced by
             market forces, and (4) is not unique to cash prices. The
             results imply that demand curves estimated from market data
             need not reveal true consumer preferences, in any
             normatively significant sense of the term.},
   Key = {fds265908}
}

@misc{fds327325,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Carmon, Z},
   Title = {Summary assessment of experiences: The whole is different
             from the sum of its parts},
   Pages = {323-349},
   Booktitle = {Time and Decision: Economic and Psychological Perspectives
             on Intertemporal Choice},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {0871545497},
   Key = {fds327325}
}

@misc{fds265916,
   Author = {Amir, O and Lobel, O and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Making consumption decisions by following personal
             rules},
   Pages = {86-101},
   Booktitle = {Inside Consumption: Consumer Motives, Goals, and
             Desires},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {August},
   ISBN = {9780203481295},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780203481295},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780203481295},
   Key = {fds265916}
}

@misc{fds265962,
   Author = {Amir, O and Ariely, D and Cooke, A and Dunning, D and Epley, N and Gneezy,
             U and Koszegi, B and Lichtenstein, D and Mazar, N and Mullainathan, S and Prelec, D and Shafir, E and Silva, J},
   Title = {Psychology, behavioral economics, and public
             policy},
   Journal = {Marketing Letters},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {3-4},
   Pages = {443-454},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0923-0645},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000235114600021&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Economics has typically been the social science of choice to
             inform public policy and policymakers. In the current paper
             we contemplate the role behavioral science can play in
             enlightening policymakers. In particular, we provide some
             examples of research that has and can be used to inform
             policy, reflect on the kind of behavioral science that is
             important for policy, and approaches for convincing
             policy-makers to listen to behavioral scientists. We suggest
             that policymakers are unlikely to invest the time
             translating behavioral research into its policy
             implications, and researchers interested in influencing
             public policy must therefore invest substantial effort, and
             direct that effort differently than in standard research
             practices. © 2005 Springer Science + Business Media,
             Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11002-005-5904-2},
   Key = {fds265962}
}

@misc{fds266007,
   Author = {Mazar, N and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Dishonesty in everyday life and its policy
             implications},
   Pages = {117-126},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000237894300010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Dishonest acts are all too prevalent in day-to-day life.
             This article examines some possible psychological causes for
             dishonesty that go beyond the standard economic
             considerations of probability and value of external payoffs.
             The authors propose a general model of dishonest behavior
             that includes internal psychological reward mechanisms for
             honesty and dishonesty, and they discuss the implications of
             this model in terms of curbing dishonesty. © 2006, American
             Marketing Association.},
   Doi = {10.1509/jppm.25.1.117},
   Key = {fds266007}
}

@misc{fds265907,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Loewenstein, G and Prelec, D},
   Title = {Tom Sawyer and the construction of value},
   Volume = {60},
   Pages = {1-10},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {fds265907}
}

@misc{fds265999,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Loewenstein, G and Prelec, D},
   Title = {Tom Sawyer and the construction of value},
   Pages = {1-10},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000237361800001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {This paper challenges the common assumption that economic
             agents know their tastes. After reviewing previous research
             showing that valuation of ordinary products and experiences
             can be manipulated by non-normative cues, we present three
             studies showing that in some cases people do not have a
             pre-existing sense of whether an experience is good or
             bad-even when they have experienced a sample of it. © 2005
             Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jebo.2004.10.003},
   Key = {fds265999}
}

@misc{fds314353,
   Author = {Frost, J and Norton, MI and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Virtual dates: Bridging the online and offline dating
             gap},
   Journal = {Acm Siggraph 2006 Research Posters, Siggraph
             2006},
   Publisher = {ACM Press},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {July},
   ISBN = {1595933646},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1179622.1179780},
   Doi = {10.1145/1179622.1179780},
   Key = {fds314353}
}

@misc{fds311628,
   Author = {Norton, MI and Ariely, D},
   Title = {"The "IKEA Effect": Why Labor Leads to Love"},
   Journal = {Advances in Consumer Research},
   Volume = {35},
   Pages = {153-153},
   Publisher = {ASSOC CONSUMER RESEARCH},
   Editor = {Lee, AY and Soman, D},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {978-0-915552-61-0},
   ISSN = {0098-9258},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000272788200110&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311628}
}

@misc{fds311629,
   Author = {Mazar, N and Ariely, D},
   Title = {"Probabilistic Discounts: When Retailing and Las Vegas
             Meet"},
   Journal = {Advances in Consumer Research},
   Volume = {35},
   Pages = {186-187},
   Publisher = {ASSOC CONSUMER RESEARCH},
   Editor = {Lee, AY and Soman, D},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {978-0-915552-61-0},
   ISSN = {0098-9258},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000272788200141&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311629}
}

@misc{fds311635,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Gneezy, U and Haruvy, E},
   Title = {"On the Discontinuity of Demand Curves Around Zero: Charging
             More and Selling More"},
   Journal = {Advances in Consumer Research},
   Volume = {35},
   Pages = {38-38},
   Publisher = {ASSOC CONSUMER RESEARCH},
   Editor = {Lee, AY and Soman, D},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {978-0-915552-61-0},
   ISSN = {0098-9258},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000272788200018&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311635}
}

@misc{fds265961,
   Author = {Tal, A and Ariely, D},
   Title = {I really want to like it: Motivated liking},
   Journal = {Advances in Consumer Research},
   Volume = {36},
   Pages = {937-939},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   ISBN = {978-0-915552-63-4},
   ISSN = {0098-9258},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000272831500424&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds265961}
}

@misc{fds311627,
   Author = {Carlson, KA and Wolfe, J and Ariely, D and Huber,
             J},
   Title = {The Budget Contraction Effect: Cutting Categories to Cope
             with Shrinking Budgets},
   Journal = {Advances in Consumer Research},
   Volume = {37},
   Pages = {720-720},
   Publisher = {ASSOC CONSUMER RESEARCH},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {978-0-915552-65-8},
   ISSN = {0098-9258},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000315535000244&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds311627}
}

@misc{fds314352,
   Author = {Grinstein-Weiss, M and Comer, K and Russell, B and Key, C and Perantie,
             D and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Refund to savings: Creating contingency savings at tax
             time},
   Pages = {87-106},
   Booktitle = {A Fragile Balance: Emergency Savings and Liquid Resources
             for Low-Income Consumers},
   Publisher = {Palgrave Macmillan},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781137487810},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/9781137482372.0009},
   Doi = {10.1057/9781137482372.0009},
   Key = {fds314352}
}

@misc{fds316020,
   Author = {Grinstein-Weiss, M and Comer, K and Russell, B and Key, C and Perantie,
             D and Ariely, D},
   Title = {Refund to Savings: Creating Contingency Savings at Tax
             Time},
   Pages = {87-106},
   Booktitle = {A Fragile Balance: Emergency Savings and Liquid Resources
             for Low-Income Consumers},
   Publisher = {Palgrave Macmillan US},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {March},
   ISBN = {9781349503988},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/9781137482372_6},
   Doi = {10.1057/9781137482372_6},
   Key = {fds316020}
}

@misc{fds326222,
   Author = {Ariely, D and Trower, M and Grüneisen, A},
   Title = {Irrational attachment (why we love what we
             own)},
   Pages = {69-89},
   Booktitle = {Critical Mindfulness: Exploring Langerian
             Models},
   Publisher = {Springer International Publishing},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9783319307817},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-30782-4_5},
   Abstract = {© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016. Ellen
             Langer’s early observation that people feel a false sense
             of connection to uncontrollable events has led to a long
             line of research, originating with Langer’s illusion of
             control and spanning a wide array of studies on the
             endowment effect, the IKEA effect, and the not-invented-here
             bias. Ellen Langer’s contributions to the study of
             irrational behavior and attachment have helped form the
             foundation of behavioral economics, inspiring researchers to
             this day.},
   Doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-30782-4_5},
   Key = {fds326222}
}


Duke University * Arts & Sciences * Economics * Faculty * Research * Staff * Master's * Ph.D. * Reload * Login