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Publications of Ruth W. Grant    :chronological  alphabetical  by type listing:

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@article{fds355667,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Reflections on a Career},
   Journal = {Perspectives on Political Science},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {154-157},
   Year = {2021},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10457097.2021.1897333},
   Doi = {10.1080/10457097.2021.1897333},
   Key = {fds355667}
}

@article{fds341049,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Incentives and praise compared: the ethics of
             motivation},
   Journal = {International Review of Economics},
   Volume = {66},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {17-28},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12232-018-0293-z},
   Doi = {10.1007/s12232-018-0293-z},
   Key = {fds341049}
}

@article{fds320143,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Homo politicus: Reflections on the passions and the
             interests},
   Journal = {Research in the History of Economic Thought and
             Methodology},
   Volume = {34B},
   Pages = {123-137},
   Publisher = {Emerald Group Publishing Limited},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/S0743-41542016000034B009},
   Abstract = {In The Passions and the Interests, Hirschman explored a
             movement in 18th century thought whose aim was to shape
             human motivations by establishing the prominence of
             interests, particularly material interests, in order to
             diminish the negative effects of the passions in political
             life. If the pursuit of gain could replace the pursuit of
             glory, for example, commercial transactions might replace
             bloody wars as a means of resolving conflict. Hirschman
             finds this claim overly optimistic. And, in his view, in
             making their case, these thinkers oversimplified and
             impoverished our understanding of human psychology by
             reducing all motivation to interest - a problem that
             persists in contemporary social science. After exploring
             Hirschman's account of 18th century thinkers, this paper
             attempts a discussion of a richer psychology identifying the
             variety of passions that motivate action toward different
             political goals; viz. status, justice, solidarity, and
             security. These political passions - including ambition,
             compassion, righteous indignation, loyalty, and fear - can
             have positive as well as negative political
             consequences.},
   Doi = {10.1108/S0743-41542016000034B009},
   Key = {fds320143}
}

@misc{fds331124,
   Author = {Grant, RW and Hertzberg, BR},
   Title = {Locke on Education},
   Pages = {448-465},
   Booktitle = {A Companion to Locke},
   Publisher = {JOHN WILEY & SONS INC},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {October},
   ISBN = {9781405178150},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781118328705.ch23},
   Abstract = {John Locke's Some Thoughts Concerning Education began as a
             series of letters to his friend, Sir Edward Clarke. Written
             during the same period he was writing the final draft of An
             Essay Concerning Human Understanding, the Thoughts was first
             published in 1693. Locke was as concerned with cultivating
             the minds of adults as he was with childhood education. Of
             the Conduct of the Understanding addresses this concern.
             Locke's thoughts on education are part of his comprehensive
             epistemological, moral, and political reflections. For this
             reason, this chapter begins by considering the Thoughts and
             the Conduct in turn for what they reveal of Locke's
             educational principles and recommended practices. Then, it
             turns to address the ways in which these writings on
             education can deepen our understanding of unresolved
             theoretical problems in Locke's thought, of key concepts
             such as freedom and reasonableness, and of the degree of
             coherence of his philosophy altogether.},
   Doi = {10.1002/9781118328705.ch23},
   Key = {fds331124}
}

@misc{fds249775,
   Author = {Grant, RW and Hertzberg, B},
   Title = {Education},
   Volume = {13},
   Pages = {544 pages},
   Booktitle = {A Companion to Locke},
   Publisher = {WILEY-BLACKWELL},
   Editor = {Stuart, M},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {March},
   ISBN = {1405178159},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00131724909342067},
   Abstract = {This collection of 29 original essays examines the diverse
             scope of John Locke's contributions as a celebrated
             philosopher, empiricist, and father of modern political
             theory.},
   Doi = {10.1080/00131724909342067},
   Key = {fds249775}
}

@article{fds249772,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Rethinking the Ethics of Incentives},
   Journal = {Journal of the International Network of Economic
             Methods},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {354-372},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1350-178X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1350178X.2015.1071506},
   Abstract = {Incentives are typically conceived as a form of trade, and
             so voluntariness appears to be the only ethical concern. As
             a consequence, incentives are often considered ethically
             superior to regulations because they are voluntary rather
             than coercive. But incentives can also be viewed as one way
             to get others to do what they otherwise would not; that is,
             as a form of power. When incentives are viewed in this
             light, many ethical questions arise in addition to
             voluntariness: What are the responsibilities of the powerful
             in using incentives? Can incentives be manipulative or
             exploitative, even if people are free to refuse them? Like
             all other forms of power, incentives can be abused. This
             paper develops criteria for distinguishing their legitimate
             from their illegitimate uses, viz. legitimacy of purpose,
             voluntariness, and effect on character. The criteria are
             then applied to three cases: plea bargaining, recruiting
             medical research subjects, and motivating children to learn.
             Thinking of incentives in terms of power relations, rather
             than as a form of trade, yields a strikingly different
             account of the ethical issues involved in their
             use.},
   Doi = {10.1080/1350178X.2015.1071506},
   Key = {fds249772}
}

@article{fds249789,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {John Locke on Custom's Power and Reason's
             Authority},
   Journal = {Review of Politics},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {607-629},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {Fall},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0034670512000770},
   Abstract = {Locke stresses the power of custom in shaping opinion and
             behavior, though this aspect of his thought has been
             underappreciated. Recognizing its importance raises critical
             issues, particularly the relation between custom and reason
             and the role of authoritative custom in supporting political
             and social power. Locke explains in detail the various
             psychological and sociological mechanisms by which the power
             of custom is manifested; but he nonetheless consistently and
             emphatically rejects its authority. Instead, Locke is a
             champion of the authority of reason. Because custom is
             powerful, but reason is authoritative, Locke attempts to
             enlist the power of custom in the service of reason and of
             reasonable politics, and because custom is powerful and its
             impact unavoidable, individual intellectual independence
             cannot mean being without cultural prejudices. At best, it
             means the ability to gain some critical distance from them.
             These observations place Locke's relation to the
             Enlightenment in a new perspective. © 2012 University of
             Notre Dame.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0034670512000770},
   Key = {fds249789}
}

@book{fds208419,
   Author = {R.W. Grant},
   Title = {Strings Attached: Untangling t he Ethics of
             Incentives},
   Publisher = {Princeton University Press and Russell Sage
             Foundation},
   Year = {2012},
   Key = {fds208419}
}

@book{fds249787,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Strings attached: Untangling the ethics of
             incentives},
   Pages = {1-202},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {November},
   ISBN = {9780691151601},
   Abstract = {Incentives can be found everywhere--in schools, businesses,
             factories, and government--influencing people's choices
             about almost everything, from financial decisions and
             tobacco use to exercise and child rearing. So long as people
             have a choice, incentives seem innocuous. ButStrings
             Attacheddemonstrates that when incentives are viewed as a
             kind of power rather than as a form of exchange, many
             ethical questions arise: How do incentives affect character
             and institutional culture? Can incentives be manipulative or
             exploitative, even if people are free to refuse them? What
             are the responsibilities of the powerful in using
             incentives? Ruth Grant shows that, like all other forms of
             power, incentives can be subject to abuse, and she
             identifies their legitimate and illegitimate uses. Grant
             offers a history of the growth of incentives in early
             twentieth-century America, identifies standards for judging
             incentives, and examines incentives in four areas--plea
             bargaining, recruiting medical research subjects,
             International Monetary Fund loan conditions, and motivating
             students. In every case, the analysis of incentives in terms
             of power yields strikingly different and more complex
             judgments than an analysis that views incentives as trades,
             in which the desired behavior is freely exchanged for the
             incentives offered. Challenging the role and function of
             incentives in a democracy,Strings Attachedquestions whether
             the penchant for constant incentivizing undermines active,
             autonomous citizenship. Readers of this book are sure to
             view the ethics of incentives in a new light. © 2011 by
             Russell Sage Foundation and Princeton University Press. All
             Rights Reserved.},
   Key = {fds249787}
}

@misc{fds249776,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Generous to a Fault: Altruism and Psychic
             Health},
   Pages = {177 pages},
   Booktitle = {In Search of Goodness},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Editor = {Grant, RW},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {April},
   ISBN = {0226306836},
   Abstract = {The eight essays in this volume challenge the dichotomies
             that usually govern how goodness has been discussed in the
             past: altruism versus egoism; reason versus emotion; or
             moral choice versus moral character.},
   Key = {fds249776}
}

@book{fds309861,
   Title = {In Search of Goodness},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Editor = {Grant, RW},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds309861}
}

@article{fds249792,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Passions and interests revisited: The psychological
             foundations of economics and politics},
   Journal = {Public Choice},
   Volume = {137},
   Number = {3-4},
   Pages = {451-461},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0048-5829},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000260378900003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Homo Politicus, Homo Oeconomicus. Can these two abstract
             human types meaningfully be distinguished? Is there a
             characteristic set of motivations that drive human beings in
             so far as they are political actors and a different set that
             drive their economic lives? What are the psychological
             foundations of economics and politics? The answers to these
             questions have significant implications both for the study
             and the practice of economics and politics. If homo
             politicus is essentially identical to homo oeconomicus, it
             is safe to generalize from the study of economic behavior to
             political phenomena. If not, such a procedure will distort
             our understanding of politics. Similarly, if we design
             political institutions and public policies assuming that
             people will behave as they do when they confront economic
             choices, we may find our intentions thwarted if we have
             neglected the distinctive motivations characteristic of
             political action. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media,
             LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11127-008-9325-7},
   Key = {fds249792}
}

@article{fds249791,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Ethics and incentives: A political approach},
   Journal = {American Political Science Review},
   Volume = {100},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {29-39},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0003-0554},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000235829400004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Understood within an economic framework as a form of trade,
             incentives appear inherently ethical; understood as a form
             of power, incentives seem ethically suspect. Incentives,
             along with coercion and persuasion, are among the ways in
             which some people get others to do what they want them to
             do. This paper analyzes incentives as a form of power in
             order to develop criteria for distinguishing legitimate from
             illegitimate uses of them. Whereas an economic approach
             focuses on voluntariness as the sole criterion in judging
             incentives, this political approach yields three standards:
             purpose, voluntariness, and effect on the character of the
             parties involved. The paper explores issues that arise in
             applying these standards. Framing the problem of incentives
             as a problem of power reveals the ethical issues with
             greater depth and complexity than placing incentives in an
             economic frame of reference.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0003055406061983},
   Key = {fds249791}
}

@article{fds303775,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Ethics and Incentives: A Political Approach},
   Journal = {American Political Science Review},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {1537-5943},
   Key = {fds303775}
}

@misc{fds48289,
   Title = {Naming Evil, Judging Evil},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Editor = {Ruth W. Grant and a forward by Alasdair
             MacIntyre},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds48289}
}

@book{fds50296,
   Author = {Ruth W. Grant},
   Title = {Naming Evil, Judging Evil},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds50296}
}

@misc{fds249781,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Is Humanistic Education Humanizing?},
   Series = {Peter Euben and Elizabeth Kiss, eds.},
   Booktitle = {Debating Moral Education},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds249781}
}

@misc{fds249782,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {The Rousseauan Revolution and the Problem of
             Evil},
   Series = {Ruth W. Grant ed.},
   Booktitle = {Naming Evil, Judging Evil},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds249782}
}

@book{fds311757,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Naming Evil, Judging Evil},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {2006},
   Key = {fds311757}
}

@article{fds249790,
   Author = {Grant, RW and Keohane, RO},
   Title = {Accountability and Abuses of Power in World
             Politics},
   Journal = {American Political Science Review},
   Volume = {99},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {29-43},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0003-0554},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000227684400003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {Debates about globalization have centered on calls to
             improve accountability to limit abuses of power in world
             politics. How should we think about global accountability in
             the absence of global democracy? Who should hold whom to
             account and according to what standards? Thinking clearly
             about these questions requires recognizing a distinction,
             evident in theories of accountability at the nation-state
             level, between "participation" and "delegation" models of
             accountability. The distinction helps to explain why
             accountability is so problematic at the global level and to
             clarify alternative possibilities for pragmatic improvements
             in accountability mechanisms globally. We identify seven
             types of accountability mechanisms and consider their
             applicability to states, NGOs, multilateral organizations,
             multinational corporations, and transgovernmental networks.
             By disaggregating the problem in this way, we hope to
             identify opportunities for improving protections against
             abuses of power at the global level.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0003055405051476},
   Key = {fds249790}
}

@misc{fds249780,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Ethics and Politics: Institutional Solutions and Their
             Limits},
   Volume = {2},
   Booktitle = {Faces of Man: the Dr. Eric Williams Memorial Lectures
             1993-2004},
   Publisher = {Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds249780}
}

@article{fds249799,
   Author = {Grant, RW and Sugarman, J},
   Title = {Ethics in human subjects research: do incentives
             matter?},
   Journal = {Journal of Medicine and Philosophy},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {717-738},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0360-5310},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15590518},
   Abstract = {There is considerable confusion regarding the ethical
             appropriateness of using incentives in research with human
             subjects. Previous work on determining whether incentives
             are unethical considers them as a form of undue influence or
             coercive offer. We understand the ethical issue of undue
             influence as an issue, not of coercion, but of corruption of
             judgment. By doing so we find that, for the most part, the
             use of incentives to recruit and retain research subjects is
             innocuous. But there are some instances where it is not.
             Specifically, incentives become problematic when conjoined
             with the following factors, singly or in combination with
             one another: where the subject is in a dependency
             relationship with the researcher, where the risks are
             particularly high, where the research is degrading, where
             the participant will only consent if the incentive is
             relatively large because the participant's aversion to the
             study is strong, and where the aversion is a principled one.
             The factors we have identified and the kinds of judgments
             they require differ substantially from those considered
             crucial in most previous discussions of the ethics of
             employing incentives in research with human
             subjects.},
   Doi = {10.1080/03605310490883046},
   Key = {fds249799}
}

@misc{fds249779,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Political theory, political science, and
             politics},
   Pages = {174-192},
   Booktitle = {What is Political Theory},
   Publisher = {SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780761942610},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781446215425.n9},
   Doi = {10.4135/9781446215425.n9},
   Key = {fds249779}
}

@article{fds303774,
   Author = {Grant, RW and Sugarman, J},
   Title = {Ethics in Human Subjects Research: Do Incentives
             Matter?},
   Journal = {The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: a Forum for
             Bioethics and Philosophy of Medicine},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {6},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2004},
   ISSN = {1744-5019},
   Key = {fds303774}
}

@book{fds320144,
   Author = {Locke, J and Shapiro, I and Dunn, J and Grant, R},
   Title = {Two treatises of government and a letter concerning
             toleration},
   Pages = {1-359},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9780300100174},
   Abstract = {Among the most influential writings in the history of
             Western political thought, John Locke's Two Treatises of
             Government and A Letter Concerning Toleration remain vital
             to political debates today, more than three centuries after
             they were written. The complete texts appear in this volume,
             accompanied by interpretive essays by three prominent Locke
             scholars. Ian Shapiro's introduction places Locke's
             political writings in historical and biographical context.
             John Dunn explores both the intellectual context in which
             Locke wrote the 'Two Treatises of Government and A Letter
             Concerning Toleration' and the major interpretive
             controversies surrounding their meaning. Ruth Grant offers a
             discussion of Locke's views on women and the family, and
             Shapiro contributes an essay on the democratic elements of
             Locke's political theory. Taken together, the texts and
             essays in this volume offer invaluable insights into the
             history of ideas and the enduring influence of Locke's
             political thought. © 2003 by Yale University. All rights
             reserved.},
   Key = {fds320144}
}

@misc{fds249778,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {John Locke on Women and the Family},
   Booktitle = {John Locke, Two Treaties of Government and Letter Concerning
             Toleration},
   Publisher = {Yale University Press},
   Editor = {Shapiro, I},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds249778}
}

@article{fds249798,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Political theory, political science, and
             politics},
   Journal = {Political Theory},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {577-595},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0090-5917},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000176785000007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1177/0090591702030004007},
   Key = {fds249798}
}

@article{fds249801,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {The ethics of incentives: Historical origins and
             contemporary understandings},
   Journal = {Economics and Philosophy},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {111-139},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0266-2671},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000175194800010&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0266267102001104},
   Key = {fds249801}
}

@article{fds309863,
   Title = {Rousseau and the Ancients},
   Booktitle = {North American Society for the Study of Jean-Jacques
             Rousseau},
   Editor = {Grant, RW and Stewart, P},
   Year = {2001},
   Key = {fds309863}
}

@article{fds8294,
   Title = {Nomos XL: Integrity and Conscience},
   Journal = {American Political Science Review},
   Editor = {Ian Shapiro and Robert Adams},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds8294}
}

@article{fds249784,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Review of Nomos XL: Integrity and Conscience (Ian Shapiro
             and Robert Adams, eds.)},
   Journal = {American Political Science Review},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {September},
   Key = {fds249784}
}

@book{fds249786,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau and the
             Ethics of Politics},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds249786}
}

@article{fds249796,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {The ethics of talk: Classroom conversation and democratic
             politics},
   Journal = {Teachers College Record},
   Volume = {97},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {470-482},
   Publisher = {TEACHERS COLL OF COLUMBIA UNIV},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {Spring},
   ISSN = {0161-4681},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996UF73100006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds249796}
}

@article{fds249797,
   Author = {Grant, RW and Orr, M},
   Title = {Language, Race and Politics: From “Black” to
             “African-American”},
   Journal = {Politics & Society},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {137-152},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0032-3292},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996UQ54100003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1177/0032329296024002004},
   Key = {fds249797}
}

@book{fds309864,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {John Locke, Some Thoughts Concerning Education and of the
             Conduct of the Understanding},
   Publisher = {Hackett Publishing},
   Editor = {Grant, RW and Tarcov, N},
   Year = {1996},
   Key = {fds309864}
}

@article{fds249795,
   Author = {GRANT, RW},
   Title = {Integrity and Politics},
   Journal = {Political Theory},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {414-443},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0090-5917},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0090591794022003003},
   Doi = {10.1177/0090591794022003003},
   Key = {fds249795}
}

@article{fds249794,
   Author = {Aldrich, JH and Grant, RW},
   Title = {The Antifederalists, the First Congress, and the First
             Parties},
   Journal = {Journal of Politics},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {295-326},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {0022-3816},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2132267},
   Doi = {10.2307/2132267},
   Key = {fds249794}
}

@article{fds249800,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {The Exclusionary Rule and the Meaning of Separation of
             Powers},
   Journal = {Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {Winter},
   Key = {fds249800}
}

@article{fds18913,
   Author = {Michael Walzer},
   Title = {Interpretation and Social Criticism},
   Journal = {Journal of Politics},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds18913}
}

@article{fds249788,
   Author = {Grant, RW and Kautz, S},
   Title = {Review of Interpretation and Social Criticism by Michael
             Walzer},
   Journal = {Journal of Politics},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {259-262},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-3816},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=A1988M945100026&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.2307/2131060},
   Key = {fds249788}
}

@article{fds249793,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Locke's Political Anthropology and Lockean
             Individualism},
   Journal = {Journal of Politics},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {42-63},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {February},
   ISSN = {0022-3816},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2131040},
   Doi = {10.2307/2131040},
   Key = {fds249793}
}

@article{fds38446,
   Author = {Book Note: David Wootton},
   Title = {Divine Right and Democracy},
   Journal = {Ethics},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {Fall},
   Key = {fds38446}
}

@article{fds249783,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {Notes on Divine Right and Democracy by David
             Wooton},
   Journal = {Ethics},
   Year = {1987},
   Key = {fds249783}
}

@book{fds249785,
   Author = {Grant, RW},
   Title = {John Locke’s Liberalism},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Year = {1987},
   Key = {fds249785}
}

@article{fds331125,
   Author = {Grant, R},
   Title = {Advice to dissertation writers},
   Journal = {Ps: Political Science & Politics},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {64-65},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1986},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049096500017194},
   Doi = {10.1017/S1049096500017194},
   Key = {fds331125}
}

@misc{fds249777,
   Author = {Grant, RW and Grant, S},
   Title = {The Madisonian Presidency},
   Booktitle = {The Presidency in the Constitutional Order},
   Publisher = {Louisiana State University Press},
   Editor = {Bessette, J and Tulis, J},
   Year = {1981},
   Key = {fds249777}
}


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