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Publications of Philip R. Costanzo    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds343344,
   Author = {Peairs, KF and Sheppard, CS and Putallaz, M and Costanzo,
             PR},
   Title = {Leader of the Pack: Academic Giftedness and Leadership in
             Early Adolescence},
   Journal = {Journal of Advanced Academics},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1932202X19847667},
   Abstract = {© The Author(s) 2019. The present study expanded our
             current understanding of leadership among academically
             gifted seventh-grade students by examining peer-identified
             leaders of naturally occurring social groups in a mixed
             ability setting. Three consecutive cohorts of seventh-grade
             students (N = 474; 57% female; 43% European American)
             attending a public magnet secondary school participated.
             Results indicated that gifted students were more apt to be
             identified as leaders than nongifted youth and both
             conventional and unconventional styles of leadership related
             similarly to higher social standing and influence in the
             peer network. Nongifted leaders displayed a mixed profile of
             prosocial and more risky deviant behavior, whereas gifted
             leaders displayed a primarily prosocial leadership style.
             However, gifted leaders perceived themselves to be more
             influential and intimidating than other students and also
             endorsed sensation seeking tendencies more than other
             students. Findings underscore the heterogeneity of
             leadership during young adolescence and the distinct profile
             of gifted leaders compared with other leaders and gifted
             peers.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1932202X19847667},
   Key = {fds343344}
}

@article{fds342431,
   Author = {Peairs, KF and Putallaz, M and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {From A (Aggression) to V (Victimization): Peer Status and
             Adjustment Among Academically Gifted Students in Early
             Adolescence},
   Journal = {Gifted Child Quarterly},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0016986219838973},
   Abstract = {© 2019 National Association for Gifted Children. Peer
             status is an important indicator and predictor of
             adjustment. While gifted children tend to enjoy favorable
             peer status, their social functioning during adolescence is
             less clear. The current study seeks to enhance this
             understanding by examining both preference- and
             reputation-based peer status of gifted adolescents. Peer
             nominations were used to assess the peer status, aggression,
             victimization, and prosocial leadership of 327 public school
             seventh graders (44% male; 42% White). School records
             provided giftedness information, course grade, and
             standardized test scores, and substance use was
             self-reported. Gifted students were viewed as less
             aggressive and more prosocial and had higher academic
             achievement than nonidentified students. Giftedness
             moderated the peer status–adjustment relationship.
             Rejection related to higher victimization and test scores,
             but these associations were most exaggerated for gifted
             students. Popularity positively related to aggression and
             substance use; however, the associations were greatly
             attenuated for gifted students. Findings underscore the
             heterogeneity of gifted adolescents’ social
             experiences.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0016986219838973},
   Key = {fds342431}
}

@article{fds335642,
   Author = {Hussong, AM and Langley, HA and Rothenberg, WA and Coffman, JL and Halberstadt, AG and Costanzo, PR and Mokrova, I},
   Title = {Raising grateful children one day at a time},
   Journal = {Applied Developmental Science},
   Pages = {1-14},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2018.1441713},
   Abstract = {© 2018 Taylor & Francis We examined micro developmental
             processes related to the socialization of children's
             gratitude by testing whether parents who engage in more
             frequent daily socialization practices targeting children's
             gratitude reported more frequent gratitude displays by their
             children after controlling for potential confounds. 101
             parent-child dyads completed a baseline lab visit followed
             by a seven-day diary study. Using multi-level modeling, we
             found that parents who engaged in more frequent gratitude
             socialization acts reported more frequent displays of
             gratitude by their children across the seven-days
             (between-dyad effect) and that on days when a parent engaged
             in more socialization acts than usual parents reported
             relative increases in gratitude displays by their children
             (within-dyad effect). These findings show that parent
             socialization acts are associated with children’s
             displayed gratitude and point to the need for future work to
             explore reactive and proactive parent-child interactions
             that may underlie these associations as well as associations
             between micro-developmental and macro-developmental
             processes.},
   Doi = {10.1080/10888691.2018.1441713},
   Key = {fds335642}
}

@article{fds337726,
   Author = {Hussong, AM and Langley, HA and Thomas, TE and Coffman, JL and Halberstadt, AG and Costanzo, PR and Rothenberg,
             WA},
   Title = {Measuring gratitude in children},
   Journal = {The Journal of Positive Psychology},
   Pages = {1-13},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17439760.2018.1497692},
   Abstract = {© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &
             Francis Group. Gratitude is a rich socioemotional construct
             that emerges over development beginning in early childhood.
             Existing measures of children’s gratitude as a trait or
             behavior may be limited because they do not capture
             different aspects of gratitude moments (i.e. awareness,
             thoughts, feelings, and actions) and the way that these
             facets appear in children. The current study evaluates a
             battery of new measures assessing children’s gratitude to
             address these limitations. Parent-child dyads (N = 101;
             children aged 6–9) completed a lab-based assessment
             followed by a 7-day online parental diary and 18-month
             follow-up survey. In addition to newly developed measures of
             children’s gratitude, the battery included indicators of
             convergent, concurrent, divergent, and predictive validity.
             Results demonstrate the complexity of gratitude as a
             construct and the relative benefits and limits of various
             assessment modalities. Implications for the measurement of
             children’s gratitude and suggestions for future research
             on the development of gratitude are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1080/17439760.2018.1497692},
   Key = {fds337726}
}

@article{fds326697,
   Author = {Golonka, MM and Peairs, KF and Malone, PS and Grimes, CL and Costanzo,
             PR},
   Title = {Natural Peer Leaders as Substance Use Prevention Agents: the
             Teens' Life Choice Project.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science : the Official Journal of the Society for
             Prevention Research},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {555-566},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-017-0790-4},
   Abstract = {In adolescent social groups, natural peer leaders have been
             found to engage in more frequent experimentation with
             substance use and to possess disproportionate power to
             affect the behavior and social choices of their associated
             peer followers. In the current exploratory study, we used
             sociometrics and social cognitive mapping to identify
             natural leaders of cliques in a seventh grade population and
             invited the leaders to develop anti-drug presentations for
             an audience of younger peers. The program employed
             social-psychological approaches directed at having leaders
             proceed from extrinsic inducements to intrinsic
             identification with their persuasive products in the context
             of the group intervention process. The goals of the
             intervention were to induce substance resistant
             self-persuasion in the leaders and to produce a spread of
             this resistance effect to their peer followers. To test the
             intervention, we compared the substance use behaviors of the
             selected leaders and their peers to a control cohort. The
             study found preliminary support that the intervention
             produced changes in the substance use behavior among the
             leaders who participated in the intervention, but did not
             detect a spread to non-leader peers in the short term. This
             descriptive study speaks to the plausibility of employing
             self-persuasion paradigms to bring about change in high-risk
             behaviors among highly central adolescents. In addition, it
             highlights the viability of applying social psychological
             principles to prevention work and calls for more research in
             this area.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-017-0790-4},
   Key = {fds326697}
}

@article{fds331136,
   Author = {Rothenberg, WA and Hussong, AM and Langley, HA and Egerton, GA and Halberstadt, AG and Coffman, JL and Mokrova, I and Costanzo,
             PR},
   Title = {Grateful parents raising grateful children: Niche selection
             and the socialization of child gratitude.},
   Journal = {Applied Developmental Science},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {106-120},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888691.2016.1175945},
   Abstract = {Given that children's exposure to gratitude-related
             activities may be one way that parents can socialize
             gratitude in their children, we examined whether parents'
             niche selection (i.e., tendency to choose perceived
             gratitude-inducing activities for their children) mediates
             the association between parents' reports of their own and
             their children's gratitude. Parent-child dyads (N =101;
             children aged 6-9; 52% girls; 80% Caucasian; 85% mothers)
             participated in a laboratory visit and parents also
             completed a seven-day online diary regarding children's
             gratitude. Decomposing specific indirect effects within a
             structural equation model, we found that parents high in
             gratitude were more likely to set goals to use niche
             selection as a gratitude socialization strategy, and thereby
             more likely to place their children in gratitude-related
             activities. Placement in these activities, in turn, was
             associated with more frequent expression of gratitude in
             children. We describe future directions for research on
             parents' role in socializing gratitude in their
             children.},
   Doi = {10.1080/10888691.2016.1175945},
   Key = {fds331136}
}

@article{fds322492,
   Author = {Gohar, D and Leary, MR and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Self-presentational congruence and psychosocial adjustment:
             A test of three models},
   Journal = {Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {589-608},
   Publisher = {Guilford Publications},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1521/jscp.2016.35.7.589},
   Abstract = {© 2016 Guilford Publications, Inc. People regularly monitor
             and control the impressions others form of them but differ
             in the degree to which they both convey impressions that are
             consistent with their private self-views
             (self-presentational congruence) and present different
             images of themselves to different targets
             (self-presentational variability). This study examined the
             implications of self-presentational congruence and
             variability for psychological and social well-being.
             Participants rated the impressions that they tried to make
             on nine individuals in their lives and completed measures of
             psychosocial well-being. Results indicated that
             self-presentational congruence predicted psychosocial
             adjustment (higher subjective well-being, social support
             quality, social efficacy, and self-esteem; and lower
             anxiety, depression, and loneliness) beyond personality
             variables such as self-consciousness, fear of negative
             evaluation, and Machiavellianism. Self-presentational
             variability across targets also predicted better
             psychosocial adjustment, with variability across
             nonintimates being most predictive. Thus,
             self-presentational flexibility may promote psychosocial
             well-being as long as people's projected images are
             reasonably congruent with their private self-views.},
   Doi = {10.1521/jscp.2016.35.7.589},
   Key = {fds322492}
}

@article{fds340256,
   Author = {Halberstadt, AG and Langley, HA and Hussong, AM and Rothenberg, WA and Coffman, JL and Mokrova, I and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Parents' understanding of gratitude in children: A thematic
             analysis},
   Journal = {Early Childhood Research Quarterly},
   Volume = {36},
   Pages = {439-451},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2016.01.014},
   Abstract = {© 2016 Elsevier Inc.. Current definitions of gratitude are
             based primarily on research with adults about their own
             experiences of gratitude, yet what children are grateful
             for, and how they understand, experience, and express
             gratitude may be very different. To better understand the
             forms that gratitude may take in children, we asked 20
             parents in six focus groups to talk about their views of
             gratitude in young children. Parents had at least one child
             who was 6-years old. Sessions were conducted in the
             children's schools and lasted for one hour. Transcripts were
             examined using inductive analysis and three types of
             saturation were achieved. Parents described children as
             grateful for both tangible and intangible gifts, and
             identified multiple cognitive, emotional, and behavioral
             aspects of gratitude in their children. Gratitude was
             understood to be a momentary experience, a more enduring
             feeling, and a way of being, suggesting a more continuous
             perspective regarding the duration of gratitude. Parents
             identified four cognitive and emotional barriers that are
             effectively opposites of gratitude. Parents also recognized
             that gratitude develops in children over time. Implications
             for understanding gratitude from a developmental
             perspective, as well as suggestions for future research in
             the development of children's gratitude are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.ecresq.2016.01.014},
   Key = {fds340256}
}

@article{fds322493,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Conscientiousness in life course context: a
             commentary.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {50},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1460-1464},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036024},
   Abstract = {In this commentary, the common themes from the interesting
             articles in this special section of Developmental Psychology
             are considered as they illuminate the potential ontogenetic
             sources of the conscientiousness-well-being-longevity
             interconnections that have emerged in recent research. In
             particular, consideration is given to the changing nature of
             the expression of conscientiousness over the life course and
             the importance of the causally linked chain of developmental
             events associated with the sustenance of this trait from
             early childhood to later life. Methodological as well as
             conceptual issues are part of the common thematic analysis
             provided. In addition, several more or less neglected issues
             are addressed in the commentary. These include an
             examination of the potential roles of self-presentation
             social context and social aggregation in the developmentally
             emergent conscientiousness-well-being relationship. Further,
             the potential downside of the moral tinge of the
             conscientiousness construct is considered, as is the
             cultural variation in the benefits of conscientiousness to
             well-being. Finally, the applied significance of research on
             the conscientiousness-well-being link to health promotion
             over the life course is addressed. The commentary concludes
             with reflections on the transformation of 1970s trait-like
             conceptions as unbending tautological predictors of behavior
             into the situationally and developmentally nuanced
             conceptions of conscientiousness provided in these collected
             articles.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0036024},
   Key = {fds322493}
}

@article{fds251599,
   Author = {Armstrong, JM and Ruttle, PL and Burk, LR and Costanzo, PR and Strauman,
             TJ and Essex, MJ},
   Title = {Early risk factors for alcohol use across high school and
             its covariation with deviant friends.},
   Journal = {Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {746-756},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23948534},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:Past research has associated childhood
             characteristics and experiences with alcohol use at single
             time points in adolescence. Other work has focused on
             drinking trajectories across adolescence but with risk
             factors typically no earlier than middle or high school.
             Similarly, although the connection between underage drinking
             and affiliation with deviant friends is well established,
             early risk factors for their covariation across adolescence
             are uncertain. The present study examines the influence of
             early individual and contextual factors on (a) trajectories
             across high school of per-occasion alcohol use and (b) the
             covariation of alcohol use and deviant friends over time.
             METHOD:In a longitudinal community sample (n = 374; 51%
             female), temperamental disinhibition, authoritarian and
             authoritative parenting, and parental alcohol use were
             assessed during childhood, and adolescents reported on
             alcohol use and affiliation with deviant friends in the
             spring of Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12. RESULTS:Early parental
             alcohol use predicted the intercept of adolescent drinking.
             Subsequent patterns of adolescent alcohol use were predicted
             by sex and interactions of sex and childhood disinhibition
             with early authoritarian parenting. Additionally, childhood
             disinhibition interacted with parental alcohol use to
             moderate the covariation of drinking and deviant friends.
             CONCLUSIONS:These findings highlight early individual and
             contextual risk factors for alcohol use across high school,
             extending previous work and underscoring the importance of
             developmental approaches and longitudinal techniques for
             understanding patterns of growth in underage
             drinking.},
   Doi = {10.15288/jsad.2013.74.746},
   Key = {fds251599}
}

@article{fds251600,
   Author = {Richman, LS and Boynton, MH and Costanzo, P and Banas,
             K},
   Title = {Interactive Effects of Discrimination and Racial Identity on
             Alcohol-Related Thoughts and Use},
   Journal = {Basic and Applied Social Psychology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {396-407},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {July},
   ISSN = {0197-3533},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000321687100007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The interrelationships among racial discrimination, non
             race-based rejection, racial identity (RI), and alcohol
             cognitions and use were assessed in this research. In Study
             1, individuals who experienced overt discrimination and who
             were high in RI were less likely than those low in RI to
             meet criteria for alcohol abuse disorder. In Study 2,
             discrimination and rejection were causally related to a
             faster reaction time in a lexical decision task to
             alcohol-related concepts as compared to neutral words,
             especially for those low in RI. Implications of
             discrimination and rejection on substance use and other
             risky health behaviors are discussed. © 2013 Copyright
             Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.},
   Doi = {10.1080/01973533.2013.803966},
   Key = {fds251600}
}

@article{fds251632,
   Author = {Fuemmeler, BF and Yang, C and Costanzo, P and Hoyle, RH and Siegler, IC and Williams, RB and Ostbye, T},
   Title = {Parenting styles and body mass index trajectories from
             adolescence to adulthood.},
   Journal = {Health Psychology},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {441-449},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22545979},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: Parenting styles such as authoritarian,
             disengaged, or permissive are thought to be associated with
             greater adolescent obesity risk than an authoritative style.
             This study assessed the relationship between parenting
             styles and changes in body mass index (BMI) from adolescence
             to young adulthood. METHOD: The study included self-reported
             data from adolescents in the National Longitudinal Study of
             Adolescent Health. Factor mixture modeling, a data-driven
             approach, was used to classify participants into parenting
             style groups based on measures of acceptance and control.
             Latent growth modeling (LGM) identified patterns of
             developmental changes in BMI. After a number of potential
             confounders were controlled for, parenting style variables
             were entered as predictors of BMI trajectories. Analyses
             were also conducted for male and female individuals of 3
             racial-ethnic groups (Hispanic, black, white) to assess
             whether parenting styles were differentially associated with
             BMI trajectories in these 6 groups. RESULTS: Parenting
             styles were classified into 4 groups: authoritarian,
             disengaged, permissive, and balanced. Compared with the
             balanced parenting style, authoritarian and disengaged
             parenting styles were associated with a less steep average
             BMI increase (linear slope) over time, but also less
             leveling off (quadratic) of BMI over time. Differences in
             BMI trajectories were observed for various genders and
             races, but the differences did not reach statistical
             significance. CONCLUSION: Adolescents who reported having
             parents with authoritarian or disengaged parenting styles
             had greater increases in BMI as they transitioned to young
             adulthood despite having a lower BMI trajectory through
             adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0027927},
   Key = {fds251632}
}

@article{fds251630,
   Author = {Sheppard, CS and Golonka, M and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Evaluating the impact of a substance use intervention
             program on the peer status and influence of adolescent peer
             leaders.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science : the Official Journal of the Society for
             Prevention Research},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {75-85},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21935657},
   Abstract = {The current study involved an examination of the impact of a
             peer-led substance use intervention program on the peer
             leaders beyond the substance use-related goals of the
             intervention. Specifically, unintended consequences of an
             adult-sanctioned intervention on the targeted peer leader
             change agents were investigated, including whether their
             participation affected their peer status, social influence,
             or self perceptions. Twenty-two 7th grade peer-identified
             intervention leaders were compared to 22 control leaders
             (who did not experience the intervention) and 146 cohort
             peers. Three groups of measures were employed: sociometric
             and behavioral nominations, social cognitive mapping, and
             leadership self-perceptions. Results indicated that
             unintended consequences appear to be a legitimate concern
             for females. Female intervention leaders declined in
             perceived popularity and liked most nominations over time,
             whereas males increased in total leader nominations.
             Explanations for these results are discussed and further
             directions suggested.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-011-0248-z},
   Key = {fds251630}
}

@article{fds251628,
   Author = {Sloan, FA and Costanzo, PR and Belsky, D and Holmberg, E and Malone, PS and Wang, Y and Kertesz, S},
   Title = {Heavy drinking in early adulthood and outcomes at mid
             life.},
   Journal = {Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {600-605},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20713371},
   Abstract = {Heavy drinking in early adulthood among Blacks, but not
             Whites, has been found to be associated with more
             deleterious health outcomes, lower labor market success and
             lower educational attainment at mid-life. This study
             analysed psychosocial pathways underlying racial differences
             in the impact of early heavy alcohol use on occupational and
             educational attainment at mid-life.Outcomes in labor market
             participation, occupational prestige and educational
             attainment were measured in early and mid-adulthood. A
             mixture model was used to identify psychosocial classes that
             explain how race-specific differences in the relationship
             between drinking in early adulthood and occupational
             outcomes in mid-life operate. Data came from Coronary Artery
             Risk Development in Young Adults, a longitudinal
             epidemiologic study.Especially for Blacks, heavy drinking in
             early adulthood was associated with a lower probability of
             being employed in mid-life. Among employed persons, there
             was a link between heavy drinking for both Whites and Blacks
             and decreased occupational attainment at mid-life. We
             grouped individuals into three distinct distress classes
             based on external stressors and indicators of internally
             generated stress. Blacks were more likely to belong to the
             higher distressed classes as were heavy drinkers in early
             adulthood. Stratifying the data by distress class,
             relationships between heavy drinking, race and heavy
             drinking-race interactions were overall weaker than in the
             pooled analysis.Disproportionate intensification of life
             stresses in Blacks renders them more vulnerable to long-term
             effects of heavy drinking.},
   Doi = {10.1136/jech.2009.102228},
   Key = {fds251628}
}

@article{fds251629,
   Author = {Peairs, KF and Eichen, D and Putallaz, M and Costanzo, PR and Grimes,
             CL},
   Title = {Academic Giftedness and Alcohol Use in Early
             Adolescence.},
   Journal = {Gifted Child Quarterly},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {95-110},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0016-9862},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21949444},
   Abstract = {Adolescence is a period of development particularly
             vulnerable to the effects of alcohol use, with recent
             studies underscoring alcohol's effects on adolescent brain
             development. Despite the alarming rates and consequences of
             adolescent alcohol use, gifted adolescents are often
             overlooked as being at risk for early alcohol use. Although
             gifted adolescents may possess protective factors that
             likely inhibit the use of alcohol, some gifted youth may be
             vulnerable to initiating alcohol use during adolescence as
             experimenting with alcohol may be one way gifted youth
             choose to compensate for the social price (whether real or
             perceived) of their academic talents. To address the dearth
             of research on alcohol use among gifted adolescents the
             current study (a) examined the extent to which gifted
             adolescents use alcohol relative to their nongifted peers
             and (b) examined the adjustment profile of gifted
             adolescents who had tried alcohol relative to nongifted
             adolescents who tried alcohol as well as gifted and
             nongifted abstainers. More than 300 students in seventh
             grade (42.5% gifted) participated in the present study.
             Results indicated gifted students have, in fact, tried
             alcohol at rates that do not differ from nongifted students.
             Although trying alcohol was generally associated with
             negative adjustment, giftedness served as a moderating
             factor such that gifted students who had tried alcohol were
             less at risk than their nongifted peers. However, evidence
             also suggests that gifted adolescents who tried alcohol may
             be a part of a peer context that promotes substance use,
             which may place these youth at risk for adjustment
             difficulties in the future.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0016986210392220},
   Key = {fds251629}
}

@article{fds251633,
   Author = {Burk, LR and Armstrong, JM and Goldsmith, HH and Klein, MH and Strauman,
             TJ and Costanzo, P and Essex, MJ},
   Title = {Sex, temperament, and family context: how the interaction of
             early factors differentially predict adolescent alcohol use
             and are mediated by proximal adolescent factors.},
   Journal = {Psychology of Addictive Behaviors : Journal of the Society
             of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-15},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21443307},
   Abstract = {Adolescent alcohol use is common and has serious immediate
             and long-term ramifications. While concurrent individual and
             context factors are robustly associated with adolescent
             alcohol use, the influence of early childhood factors,
             particularly in interaction with child sex, are less clear.
             Using a prospective community sample of 362 (190 girls),
             this study investigated sex differences in the joint
             influence of distal childhood and proximal adolescent
             factors on Grade 10 alcohol use. All risk factors and
             two-way early individual-by-context interactions, and
             interactions of each of these with child sex, were entered
             into the initial regression. Significant sex interactions
             prompted the use of separate models for girls and boys. In
             addition to the identification of early (family
             socioeconomic status, authoritative parenting style) and
             proximal adolescent (mental health symptoms, deviant
             friends) risk factors for both girls and boys, results
             highlighted important sex differences. In particular, girls
             with higher alcohol consumption at Grade 10 were
             distinguished by the interaction of early temperamental
             disinhibition and exposure to parental stress; boys with
             higher alcohol consumption at Grade 10 were distinguished
             primarily by early temperamental negative affect. Results
             have implications for the timing and type of interventions
             offered to adolescents.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0022349},
   Key = {fds251633}
}

@article{fds251627,
   Author = {Li, Y and Costanzo, PR and Putallaz, M},
   Title = {Maternal socialization goals, parenting styles, and
             social-emotional adjustment among Chinese and European
             American young adults: testing a mediation
             model.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Genetic Psychology},
   Volume = {171},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {330-362},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0022-1325},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21171548},
   Abstract = {The authors compared the associations among perceived
             maternal socialization goals (self-development, filial
             piety, and collectivism), perceived maternal parenting
             styles (authoritative, authoritarian, and training), and the
             social-emotional adjustment (self-esteem, academic
             self-efficacy, and depression) between Chinese and European
             American young adults. The mediation processes in which
             socialization goals relate to young adults' adjustment
             outcomes through parenting styles were examined. Results
             showed that European American participants perceived higher
             maternal self-development socialization goals, whereas
             Chinese participants perceived higher maternal collectivism
             socialization goals as well as more authoritarian parenting.
             Cross-cultural similarities were found in the associations
             between perceived maternal authoritative parenting and
             socioemotional adjustment (e.g., higher self-esteem and
             higher academic self-efficacy) across the two cultural
             groups. However, perceived maternal authoritarian and
             training parenting styles were found only to be related to
             Chinese participants' adjustment (e.g., higher academic
             self-efficacy and lower depression). The mediation analyses
             showed that authoritative parenting significantly mediated
             the positive associations between the self-development and
             collectivism goal and socioemotional adjustment for both
             cultural groups. Additionally, training parenting
             significantly mediated the positive association between the
             filial piety goal and young adults' academic self-efficacy
             for the Chinese group only. Findings of this study highlight
             the importance of examining parental socialization goals in
             cross-cultural parenting research.},
   Doi = {10.1080/00221325.2010.505969},
   Key = {fds251627}
}

@article{fds251626,
   Author = {Platt, A and Sloan, FA and Costanzo, P},
   Title = {Alcohol-consumption trajectories and associated
             characteristics among adults older than age
             50.},
   Journal = {Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs},
   Volume = {71},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {169-179},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20230713},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:This study examined changes in drinking behavior
             after age 50 and baseline personal characteristics and
             subsequent life events associated with different
             alcohol-consumption trajectories during a 14-year follow-up
             period. METHOD:Data were taken from the Health and
             Retirement Study. The study sample included individuals ages
             51-61 in 1992 who survived the sample period (1992-2006) and
             had at least five interviews with alcohol consumption
             information, yielding an analysis sample of 6,787 (3,760
             women). We employed linear regression to determine drinking
             trajectories over 1992-2006. Based on these findings, each
             sample person was classified into one of five drinking
             categories. We used multinomial logit analysis to assess the
             relationship between personal demographic, income, health,
             and attitudinal characteristics as well as life events and
             drinking-trajectory category. RESULTS:Overall, alcohol
             consumption declined. However, rates of decline differed
             appreciably among sample persons, and for a minority,
             alcohol consumption increased. Persons with increasing
             consumption over time were more likely to be affluent
             (relative-risk ratio [RRR] = 1.09, 95% CI [1.05, 1.12]),
             highly educated (RRR = 1.20, 95% CI [1.09, 1.31]), male,
             White (RRR = 3.54, 95% CI [1.01, 12.39]), unmarried, less
             religious, and in excellent to good health. A history of
             problem drinking before baseline was associated with
             increases in alcohol use, whereas the reverse was true for
             persons with histories of few or no drinking problems.
             CONCLUSIONS:There are substantial differences in drinking
             trajectories at the individual level in midlife and late
             life. A problem-drinking history is predictive of alcohol
             consumption patterns in later life.},
   Doi = {10.15288/jsad.2010.71.169},
   Key = {fds251626}
}

@article{fds251641,
   Author = {Sloan, FA and Malone, PS and Kertesz, SG and Wang, Y and Costanzo,
             PR},
   Title = {Racial differences in the relationship between alcohol
             consumption in early adulthood and occupational attainment
             at midlife.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Public Health},
   Volume = {99},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {2261-2267},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19834006},
   Abstract = {We assessed the relationship between alcohol consumption in
             young adulthood (ages 18-30 years) and occupational success
             15 years later among Blacks and Whites.We analyzed data from
             the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study
             on employment status and occupational prestige at year 15
             from baseline. The primary predictor was weekly alcohol use
             at baseline, after stratification by race and adjustment for
             socioeconomic factors.We detected racial differences in the
             relationship between alcohol use in early adulthood and
             employment status at midlife. Blacks who were very heavy
             drinkers at baseline were more than 4 times as likely as
             Blacks who were occasional drinkers to be unemployed at year
             15 (odds ratio [OR]=4.34; 95% confidence interval [CI]=2.22,
             8.47). We found no statistically significant relationship
             among Whites. Occupational prestige at midlife was
             negatively related to very heavy drinking, but after
             adjustment for marital status, active coping, life stress,
             and educational attainment, this relationship was
             statistically significant only among Blacks.Heavy drinking
             during young adulthood was negatively associated with labor
             market success at midlife, especially among
             Blacks.},
   Doi = {10.2105/ajph.2007.127621},
   Key = {fds251641}
}

@article{fds304676,
   Author = {Miller, S and Lansford, JE and Costanzo, P and Malone, PS and Golonka,
             M and Killeya-Jones, LA},
   Title = {Early Adolescent Romantic Partner Status, Peer Standing, and
             Problem Behaviors.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Early Adolescence},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {839-861},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0272-4316},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0272431609332665},
   Abstract = {This study examined associations among early adolescent
             romantic relationships, peer standing, problem behaviors,
             and gender as a moderator of these associations, in a sample
             of 320 seventh-grade students. Popular and controversial
             status youth were more likely to have a romantic partner,
             whereas neglected status youth were less likely to have a
             romantic partner. Similarly, youth perceived as conventional
             and unconventional leaders were also more likely to have a
             romantic partner than were non-leaders. Youth who had a
             romantic partner drank more alcohol and were more aggressive
             than were youth who did not have a romantic partner. Among
             those youth who had romantic partners, those who reported
             having more deviance-prone partners were themselves more
             likely to use alcohol and to be more aggressive, and those
             who engaged in deviant behavior with their partners used
             more alcohol. However, these associations varied somewhat by
             gender. These findings underscore the salience of early
             romantic partner relationships in the adjustment of early
             adolescents.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0272431609332665},
   Key = {fds304676}
}

@article{fds251642,
   Author = {Quinlan, NP and Hoy, MB and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Sticks and Stones: The Effects of Teasing on Psychosocial
             Functioning in an Overweight Treatment-seeking
             Sample.},
   Journal = {Social Development (Oxford, England)},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {978-1001},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {November},
   ISSN = {0961-205X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9507.2008.00521.x},
   Abstract = {This self-report and observational study explores the
             relationship between perceptions of different kinds of
             teasing experiences and psychosocial functioning in an
             overweight treatment-seeking adolescent population.
             Participants were 96 adolescents enrolled in a residential
             weight-loss camp program. Prior to the start of treatment,
             participants' weight status was measured by trained program
             staff, and participants' perceptions of teasing experiences
             and psychosocial functioning were assessed through
             self-report questionnaires. Controlling for body mass index,
             more frequent and upsetting weight-related teasing
             experiences were associated with worse psychological
             functioning. Adolescents most distressed by weight-related
             teasing exhibited lower self-esteem and higher depressive
             symptoms regardless of reported frequency of weight-related
             teasing. Competence-related teasing was also associated with
             more worries about weight, greater depressive symptoms, and
             more negative anti-fat attitudes. Weight-related teasing,
             but not competence-related teasing, was associated with
             lower levels of program and social involvement for heavier
             adolescents.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9507.2008.00521.x},
   Key = {fds251642}
}

@article{fds251646,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Killeya-Jones, LA and Miller, S and Costanzo,
             PR},
   Title = {Early adolescents' social standing in peer groups:
             behavioral correlates of stability and change.},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1084-1095},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19636773},
   Abstract = {Sociometric nominations, social cognitive maps, and
             self-report questionnaires were completed in consecutive
             years by 327 students (56% girls) followed longitudinally
             from grade 7 to grade 8 to examine the stability of social
             standing in peer groups and correlates of changes in social
             standing. Social preference, perceived popularity, network
             centrality, and leadership were moderately stable from grade
             7 to grade 8. Alcohol use and relational aggression in grade
             7 predicted changes in social preference and centrality,
             respectively, between grade 7 and grade 8, but these effects
             were moderated by gender and ethnicity. Changes in social
             standing from grade 7 to grade 8 were unrelated to grade 8
             physical aggression, relational aggression, and alcohol use
             after controlling for the grade 7 corollaries of these
             behaviors. Results are discussed in terms of their
             implications for understanding links between social standing
             and problem behaviors during adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10964-009-9410-3},
   Key = {fds251646}
}

@article{fds251645,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Costanzo, PR and Grimes, C and Putallaz, M and Miller,
             S and Malone, PS},
   Title = {Social Network Centrality and Leadership Status: Links with
             Problem Behaviors and Tests of Gender Differences.},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-25},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0272-930X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19763241},
   Abstract = {Seventh-grade students (N = 324) completed social cognitive
             maps to identify peer groups and peer group leaders,
             sociometric nominations to describe their peers' behaviors,
             and questionnaires to assess their own behaviors. Peer group
             members resembled one another in levels of direct and
             indirect aggression and substance use; girls' cliques were
             more behaviorally homogenous than were boys' cliques. On
             average, leaders (especially if they were boys) were
             perceived as engaging in more problem behaviors than were
             nonleaders. In girls' cliques, peripheral group members were
             more similar to their group leader on indirect aggression
             than were girls who were more central to the clique. Peer
             leaders perceived themselves as being more able to influence
             peers but did not differ from nonleaders in their perceived
             susceptibility to peer influence. The findings contribute to
             our understanding of processes through which influence may
             occur in adolescent peer groups.},
   Doi = {10.1353/mpq.0.0014},
   Key = {fds251645}
}

@article{fds251647,
   Author = {Dunsmore, JC and Bradburn, IS and Costanzo, PR and Fredrickson,
             BL},
   Title = {Mothers' expressive style and emotional responses to
             children's behavior predict children's prosocial and
             achievement-related self-ratings},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Development},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {253-264},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0165-0254},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0165025408098025},
   Abstract = {In this study we investigated whether mothers' typical
             expressive style and specific emotional responses to
             children's behaviors are linked to children's prosocial and
             competence self-ratings. Eight-to 12-year-old children and
             their mothers rated how mothers had felt when children
             behaved pro-socially and antisocially, achieved and failed
             to achieve. Children rated self-descriptiveness of prosocial
             and achievement-related traits. Mothers' positive
             expressiveness was associated with children's higher
             achievement-related self-ratings. Mothers' positive- and
             negative-dominant expressiveness was associated with
             children's lower prosocial self-ratings. Mothers' happiness
             about both children's prosocial and achievement-related
             behavior was associated with children's higher self-ratings
             for both domains. Mothers' anger about children's antisocial
             behavior was related to children's lower self-ratings for
             both domains. When mothers were higher in
             negative-submissive expressiveness, and responded with more
             sadness to children's failure to achieve, children reported
             lower achievement self-ratings. Results support the
             importance of multidimensional assessment of self-concept
             and suggest that parents' typical expressive style moderates
             the influence of parents' specific emotional responses on
             children's self-ratings. © 2009 The International Society
             for the Study of Behavioural Development.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0165025408098025},
   Key = {fds251647}
}

@article{fds251643,
   Author = {Quinlan, NP and Kolotkin, RL and Fuemmeler, BF and Costanzo,
             PR},
   Title = {Psychosocial outcomes in a weight loss camp for overweight
             youth},
   Journal = {International Journal of Pediatric Obesity},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {124-142},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19107660},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: There is good evidence that youth attending
             weight loss camps in the UK and US are successful at
             achieving weight loss. Limited research suggests improvement
             in body image and self-esteem as well. This study evaluated
             changes in eight psychosocial variables following
             participation in a weight loss camp and examined the role of
             gender, age, length of stay, and body mass index (BMI) in
             these changes. METHODS: This was an observational and
             self-report study of 130 participants (mean age = 12.8; mean
             BMI = 33.5; 70% female; 77% Caucasian). The program
             consisted of an 1800 kcal/day diet, daily supervised
             physical activities, cooking/nutrition classes, and weekly
             psycho-educational/support groups led by psychology staff.
             Participants completed measures of anti-fat attitudes,
             values (e.g., value placed on appearance, athletic ability,
             popularity), body- and self-esteem, weight- and
             health-related quality of life, self-efficacy, and
             depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Participants experienced
             significant BMI reduction (average decrease of 7.5 kg
             [standard deviation, SD = 4.2] and 2.9 BMI points [SD =
             1.4]). Participants also exhibited significant improvements
             in body esteem, self-esteem, self-efficacy, generic and
             weight-related quality of life, anti-fat attitudes, and the
             importance placed on appearance. Changes in self-efficacy,
             physical functioning and social functioning remained
             significant even after adjusting for initial zBMI, BMI
             change, and length of stay. Gender differences were found on
             changes in self-efficacy, depressive symptoms, and social
             functioning. CONCLUSION: Participation in weight loss
             programs in a group setting, such as a camp, may have added
             benefit beyond BMI reduction. Greater attention to changes
             in psychosocial variables may be warranted when designing
             such programs for youth.},
   Doi = {10.1080/17477160802613372},
   Key = {fds251643}
}

@article{fds251644,
   Author = {Miller Johnson and S and Lansford, JE and Costanzo, PR and Malone, PS and Golonka, M and Killeya Jones and LA},
   Title = {Early adolescent dating relationships, peer standing, and
             risk-taking behaviors},
   Journal = {Journal of Early Adolescence},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {839-861},
   Year = {2009},
   ISSN = {0272-4316},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0272431609332665},
   Abstract = {This study examined associations among early adolescent
             romantic relationships, peer standing, problem behaviors,
             and gender as a moderator of these associations, in a sample
             of 320 seventh-grade students. Popular and controversial
             status youth were more likely to have a romantic partner,
             whereas neglected status youth were less likely to have a
             romantic partner. Similarly, youth perceived as conventional
             and unconventional leaders were also more likely to have a
             romantic partner than were non-leaders. Youth who had a
             romantic partner drank more alcohol and were more aggressive
             than were youth who did not have a romantic partner. Among
             those youth who had romantic partners, those who reported
             having more deviance-prone partners were themselves more
             likely to use alcohol and to be more aggressive, and those
             who engaged in deviant behavior with their partners used
             more alcohol. However, these associations varied somewhat by
             gender. These findings underscore the salience of early
             romantic partner relationships in the adjustment of early
             adolescents. © 2009 SAGE Publications.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0272431609332665},
   Key = {fds251644}
}

@article{fds304675,
   Author = {Quinlan, NP and Kolotkin, RL and Fuemmeler, BF and Costanzo,
             PR},
   Title = {Psychosocial outcomes in a weight loss camp for overweight
             youth.},
   Journal = {International Journal of Pediatric Obesity : Ijpo : an
             Official Journal of the International Association for the
             Study of Obesity},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {134-142},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19107660},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: There is good evidence that youth attending
             weight loss camps in the UK and US are successful at
             achieving weight loss. Limited research suggests improvement
             in body image and self-esteem as well. This study evaluated
             changes in eight psychosocial variables following
             participation in a weight loss camp and examined the role of
             gender, age, length of stay, and body mass index (BMI) in
             these changes. METHODS: This was an observational and
             self-report study of 130 participants (mean age = 12.8; mean
             BMI = 33.5; 70% female; 77% Caucasian). The program
             consisted of an 1800 kcal/day diet, daily supervised
             physical activities, cooking/nutrition classes, and weekly
             psycho-educational/support groups led by psychology staff.
             Participants completed measures of anti-fat attitudes,
             values (e.g., value placed on appearance, athletic ability,
             popularity), body- and self-esteem, weight- and
             health-related quality of life, self-efficacy, and
             depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Participants experienced
             significant BMI reduction (average decrease of 7.5 kg
             [standard deviation, SD = 4.2] and 2.9 BMI points [SD =
             1.4]). Participants also exhibited significant improvements
             in body esteem, self-esteem, self-efficacy, generic and
             weight-related quality of life, anti-fat attitudes, and the
             importance placed on appearance. Changes in self-efficacy,
             physical functioning and social functioning remained
             significant even after adjusting for initial zBMI, BMI
             change, and length of stay. Gender differences were found on
             changes in self-efficacy, depressive symptoms, and social
             functioning. CONCLUSION: Participation in weight loss
             programs in a group setting, such as a camp, may have added
             benefit beyond BMI reduction. Greater attention to changes
             in psychosocial variables may be warranted when designing
             such programs for youth.},
   Doi = {10.1080/17477160802613372},
   Key = {fds304675}
}

@article{fds251634,
   Author = {Arredondo, EM and Pollak, K and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Evaluating a stage model in predicting monolingual
             spanish-speaking Latinas' cervical cancer screening
             practices: the role of psychosocial and cultural
             predictors.},
   Journal = {Health Education & Behavior : the Official Publication of
             the Society for Public Health Education},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {791-805},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {1090-1981},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1090198107303250},
   Abstract = {The goals of this study are to evaluate (a) the
             effectiveness of a stage model in predicting Latinas'
             self-report of obtaining a Pap test and (b) the unique role
             of psychosocial/cultural factors in predicting progress
             toward behavior change. One-on-one structured interviews
             with monolingual Spanish-speaking Latinas (n=190) were
             conducted. Most participants (85%) intended to obtain a Pap
             smear within 1 year; therefore, staging women based on
             intention was not possible. Moreover, results from the
             polychotomous hierarchical logistic regression suggest that
             psychosocial and cultural factors were independent
             predictors of Pap test history. A stage model may not be
             appropriate for predicting Pap test screening among Latinas.
             Results suggest that unique cultural, psychosocial, and
             demographic factors may inhibit cervical cancer screening
             practices. Clinicians may need to tailor messages on these
             cultural and psychosocial factors to increase Pap testing
             among Latinas.},
   Doi = {10.1177/1090198107303250},
   Key = {fds251634}
}

@article{fds251638,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR and Hoy, MB},
   Title = {Intergenerational relations: Themes, prospects, and
             possibilities},
   Journal = {Journal of Social Issues},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {885-902},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-4537},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-4560.2007.00542.x},
   Abstract = {This commentary provides an examination of the articles
             within this issue with a focus on common themes throughout.
             Each article is briefly reviewed in the context of how it
             contributes to four overarching themes of current
             intergenerational research. The articles within this issue
             also have implications for developing policy that fosters
             intergenerational relationships. This commentary concludes
             with a discussion of the complex issues that arise in
             creating such policy and utilizes Allport's (1954) "contact
             hypothesis" as a framework to guide future policy work
             addressing the myriad of issues within the realm of
             intergenerational relationships. © 2007 The Society for the
             Psychological Study of Social Issues.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1540-4560.2007.00542.x},
   Key = {fds251638}
}

@article{fds251637,
   Author = {Killeya-Jones, LA and Costanzo, PR and Malone, P and Quinlan, NP and Miller-Johnson, S},
   Title = {Norm-Narrowing and Self- and Other-Perceived Aggression in
             Early-Adolescent Same-Sex and Mixed-Sex Cliques.},
   Journal = {Journal of School Psychology},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {549-565},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18836510},
   Abstract = {We examined the relations between group context and self-
             and other-perceptions of aggressive behavior in an
             ethnically-diverse sample of 168 male and female grade 7
             adolescents. We used self- and peer-reports of aggression in
             high- and average-aggressive mixed-sex and same-sex cliques
             to examine whether group members would assimilate their
             self-report of aggression to the aggression report of their
             peers by way of perceived homophily or, conversely, engage
             in contrast and see their level of aggression as
             comparatively low in the face of high-aggression peers.
             Among boys in mixed-sex groups, comparison with
             highly-aggressive others resulted in a self-perception of
             lower levels of aggression than those perceived by their
             peers. Conversely, girls in mixed-sex groups reported their
             own levels of aggression to be higher than those perceived
             by their peers. We interpret these findings in terms of the
             notion of "norm narrowing": rather than being set by the
             larger social environment, such as the school, norms are
             more narrowly determined within one's immediate peer
             group.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jsp.2007.04.002},
   Key = {fds251637}
}

@article{fds251639,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR and Malone, PS and Belsky, D and Kertesz, S and Pletcher,
             M and Sloan, FA},
   Title = {Longitudinal differences in alcohol use in early
             adulthood.},
   Journal = {Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs},
   Volume = {68},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {727-737},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {1937-1888},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17690807},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE:Research with college populations suggests that
             elevated levels of heavy drinking do not generally persist
             into later adulthood for most individuals. The aims of this
             study were to determine whether this pattern applies to the
             population as a whole and to identify those for whom heavy
             drinking in early adulthood does lead to continued high
             levels of consumption throughout the life course.
             METHOD:Patterns of heavy drinking were assessed, and a
             mixture model was used to evaluate relationships between
             psychological profiles and trajectories of heavy drinking in
             early to middle adulthood for race-gender groups. Subjects
             (N = 5,115; 55% women) were drawn from the longitudinal
             study of Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults
             (CARDIA) conducted in four major U.S. cities from 1985 to
             1995. RESULTS:Patterns of heavy drinking differed by race
             and gender, with higher rates observed among whites and men.
             Heavy drinking was generally most common in the early 20s
             and dropped sharply thereafter. For a subset with
             psychological profiles characterized by elevated levels of
             hostility, anxiety, and depressive symptoms, high rates of
             heavy drinking persisted into later adulthood; 20% of whites
             and 50% of blacks in the overall sample were in this subset.
             Rates of heavy drinking in this group were similar for
             blacks and whites. CONCLUSIONS:At a population level, heavy
             drinking in early adulthood tends not to continue into later
             life. For a subset of psychologically vulnerable
             individuals, however, early adult heavy drinking persists
             into the middle adulthood years.},
   Doi = {10.15288/jsad.2007.68.727},
   Key = {fds251639}
}

@article{fds303795,
   Author = {Humphreys, M and Costanzo, P and Haynie, KL and Ostbye, T and Boly, I and Belsky, D and Sloan, F},
   Title = {Racial disparities in diabetes a century ago: evidence from
             the pension files of US Civil War veterans.},
   Journal = {Social Science & Medicine},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1766-1775},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0277-9536},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17240029},
   Abstract = {Using a comprehensive database constructed from the pension
             files of US Civil War veterans, we explore characteristics
             and occurrence of type 2 diabetes among older black and
             white males, living circa 1900. We find that rates of
             diagnosed diabetes were much lower among males in this
             period than a century later. In contrast to the late 20th
             Century, the rates of diagnosed diabetes were lower among
             black than among white males, suggesting that the reverse
             pattern is of relatively recent origin. Two-thirds of both
             white and black veterans had body-mass indexes (BMIs) in the
             currently recommended weight range, a far higher proportion
             than documented by recent surveys. Longevity among persons
             with diabetes was not reduced among Civil War veterans, and
             those with diabetes suffered comparatively few sequelae of
             the condition. Over 90% of black veterans engaged in low
             paying, high-physical effort jobs, as compared to about half
             of white veterans. High rates of work-related physical
             activity may provide a partial explanation of low rates of
             diagnosed diabetes among blacks. We found no evidence of
             discrimination in testing by race, as indicated by rates of
             examinations in which a urinalysis was performed. This
             dataset is valuable for providing a national benchmark
             against which to compare modern diabetes prevalence
             patterns.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.socscimed.2006.12.004},
   Key = {fds303795}
}

@article{fds251636,
   Author = {Killeya-Jones, LA and Nakajima, R and Costanzo,
             PR},
   Title = {Peer standing and substance use in early-adolescent
             grade-level networks: a short-term longitudinal
             study.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science : the Official Journal of the Society for
             Prevention Research},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {11-23},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {1389-4986},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17013672},
   Abstract = {Two competing hypotheses were tested concerning the
             associations between current alcohol and cigarette use and
             measures of individual, group and network peer standing in
             an ethnically-diverse sample of 156 male and female
             adolescents sampled at two time points in the seventh grade.
             Findings lent greater support to the person hypothesis, with
             early regular substance users enjoying elevated standing
             amongst their peers and maintaining this standing regardless
             of their maintenance of or desistance from current use later
             in the school year. In the fall semester, users (n=20, 13%)
             had greater social impact, were described by their peers as
             more popular, and were more central to the peer network than
             abstainers (i.e., those who did not report current
             use).Conversely, in the spring semester, there were no
             differences between users (n=22, 13%) and abstainers in peer
             ratings of popularity or social impact. Notably, the spring
             semester users group retained fewer than half of the users
             from the fall semester. Further, students who had reported
             current use in the fall, as a group, retained their
             positions of elevated peer standing in the spring, compared
             to all other students, and continued to be rated by their
             peers as more popular and as having greater social impact.
             We discuss the findings in terms of the benefit of employing
             simultaneous systemic and individual measures of peer
             standing or group prominence, which in the case of
             peer-based prevention programs, can help clarify the truly
             influential from the "pretenders" in the case of diffusion
             of risk-related behaviors.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-006-0053-2},
   Key = {fds251636}
}

@article{fds171473,
   Author = {Costanzo, P. and Malone, P. and Belsky, D. and Kertesz, S. and Pletcher, M. and Sloan, F.},
   Title = {Longitudinal differences in alcohol use in early
             adulthood},
   Journal = {Journal of Studies of Alcohol and Drugs},
   Volume = {68},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {727-737},
   Year = {2007},
   Key = {fds171473}
}

@article{fds251635,
   Author = {Humphreys, M and Costanzo, P and Haynie, K and Ostybe, T and Boly, I and Belsky, D and Sloan, F},
   Title = {Racial disparities in diabetes a century ago: Evidence from
             pension files of U.S. Civil war veterans},
   Journal = {Social Science and Medicine},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {11-24},
   Year = {2007},
   ISSN = {0277-9536},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17240029},
   Abstract = {Using a comprehensive database constructed from the pension
             files of US Civil War veterans, we explore characteristics
             and occurrence of type 2 diabetes among older black and
             white males, living circa 1900. We find that rates of
             diagnosed diabetes were much lower among males in this
             period than a century later. In contrast to the late 20th
             Century, the rates of diagnosed diabetes were lower among
             black than among white males, suggesting that the reverse
             pattern is of relatively recent origin. Two-thirds of both
             white and black veterans had body-mass indexes (BMIs) in the
             currently recommended weight range, a far higher proportion
             than documented by recent surveys. Longevity among persons
             with diabetes was not reduced among Civil War veterans, and
             those with diabetes suffered comparatively few sequelae of
             the condition. Over 90% of black veterans engaged in low
             paying, high-physical effort jobs, as compared to about half
             of white veterans. High rates of work-related physical
             activity may provide a partial explanation of low rates of
             diagnosed diabetes among blacks. We found no evidence of
             discrimination in testing by race, as indicated by rates of
             examinations in which a urinalysis was performed. This
             dataset is valuable for providing a national benchmark
             against which to compare modern diabetes prevalence
             patterns.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.socscimed.2006.12.004},
   Key = {fds251635}
}

@article{fds251640,
   Author = {Friedman, KE and Reichmann, SK and Costanzo, PR and Zelli, A and Ashmore, JA and Musante, GJ},
   Title = {Weight stigmatization and ideological beliefs: relation to
             psychological functioning in obese adults.},
   Journal = {Obesity Research},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {907-916},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {May},
   ISSN = {1071-7323},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15919845},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the relation among
             weight-based stigmatization, ideological beliefs about
             weight, and psychological functioning in an obese,
             treatment-seeking sample. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURE:
             Ninety-three obese, treatment-seeking adults (24 men and 69
             women) completed a battery of self-report questionnaires
             measuring psychological adjustment, attitudes about weight,
             belief in the controllability of weight, and the frequency
             of weight-based stigmatization. RESULTS: Weight-based
             stigmatization was a common experience for participants.
             Frequency of stigmatizing experiences was positively
             associated with depression, general psychiatric symptoms,
             and body image disturbance, and negatively associated with
             self-esteem. Further, participants' own negative attitudes
             about weight problems were associated with their
             psychological distress and moderated the relation between
             the experience of stigmatization and body image. DISCUSSION:
             Weight-based stigmatization is a common experience for obese
             individuals seeking weight loss treatment and appears to
             contribute to poor mental health adjustment. The negative
             effects of these experiences are particularly damaging for
             those who hold strong antifat beliefs.},
   Doi = {10.1038/oby.2005.105},
   Key = {fds251640}
}

@article{fds6829,
   Author = {Miller- Johnson and S., Costanzo and P.R.},
   Title = {If you can't beat 'em --- induce them to join you: Peer
             based interventions during adolescence},
   Booktitle = {Developmental Psychopathology: A Festchift in honor of John
             Coie},
   Publisher = {NY: Cambridge},
   Editor = {K. Dodge and J. Kupersmidt},
   Year = {2004},
   Key = {fds6829}
}

@article{fds251652,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, S and Costanzo, PR and Coie, JD and Rose, MR and Browne,
             DC and Johnson, C},
   Title = {Peer Social Structure and Risk-Taking Behaviors among
             African American Early Adolescents},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {375-384},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature America, Inc},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0047-2891},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1024926132419},
   Abstract = {This study investigated associations between peer status,
             peer group social influences, and risk-taking behaviors in
             an urban sample of 647 African American seventh-grade
             students. The highest rates of problem behaviors were seen
             in the controversial peer status group, or those youth who
             were both highly liked and highly disliked by other youth.
             Findings also revealed contrasting patterns of peer group
             leadership. The more conventional, positive leadership style
             predicted lower rates, and the less mainstream,
             unconventional style predicted higher rates of involvement
             in problem behaviors. Conventional leaders were most likely
             to be popular status youth, while unconventional leaders
             were mostly to be both controversial and popular status
             youth. Controversial status youth were also more likely to
             be involved in deviant peer groups. Results highlight the
             importance of controversial status students as key influence
             agents during early adolescence. We discuss the implications
             of these results for preventive interventions to reduce
             adolescent problem behaviors.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1024926132419},
   Key = {fds251652}
}

@article{fds251653,
   Author = {Arredondo, EM and Pollak, KI and Costanzo, P and McNeilly, M and Myers,
             E},
   Title = {Primary care residents' characteristics and motives for
             providing differential medical treatment of cervical cancer
             screening},
   Journal = {Journal of the National Medical Association},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {577-584},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {July},
   Abstract = {Background: Cervical cancer screening rates in the United
             States are sub-optimal. Physician factors likely contribute
             to these lower rates. Previous studies provide inconclusive
             evidence about the association between physician
             characteristics and the likelihood of addressing cervical
             cancer. This report assesses potential mechanisms that
             explain why certain providers do not address cervical cancer
             screening, Methods: One hundred primary care residents from
             various specialties were asked to indicate the preventive
             topics they would address with a hypothetical white female
             in her early 20s, who was portrayed as living a "high risk"
             lifestyle, and visiting her provider only for acute care
             reasons. Results: Among the provider characteristics
             assessed, only residents' ethnicity was associated with the
             likelihood of and time spent addressing cervical cancer
             screening. In particular, Asian-American residents were
             least likely to address cervical cancer, while
             African-American residents were most likely. A mediation
             analyses revealed that perceived barriers for addressing
             cervical cancer accounted for this difference. Conclusions:
             Study results suggest that there may be cultural factors
             among health care providers that may account for
             differential referral and treatment practices. Findings from
             this study may help identify factors that explain why
             cervical cancer screening rates are not higher.},
   Key = {fds251653}
}

@article{fds39584,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Arrendondo, E. and Pollak, K.I. and McNeilly, M. and Myers,
             E.},
   Title = {Primary care residents' characteristics and motives for
             providing differential medical treatment of cervical cancer
             screening},
   Journal = {Journal of the National Medical Association},
   Volume = {95},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {577-585},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds39584}
}

@article{fds251659,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Miller Johnson and S and Costanzo, PR and Coie, J and Browne,
             D},
   Title = {Peer relations and involvement in problem behaviors among
             African-American adolescents},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Year = {2003},
   Key = {fds251659}
}

@article{fds251621,
   Author = {Costanzo, P},
   Title = {Social exchange and the developing syntax of moral
             orientation.},
   Journal = {New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development},
   Number = {95},
   Pages = {41-52},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cd.36},
   Doi = {10.1002/cd.36},
   Key = {fds251621}
}

@article{fds251657,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Friedman, KE and Reichmann, SK and Costanzo, PR and Musante,
             GJ},
   Title = {Body image partially mediates the relationship between
             obesity and psychological distress.},
   Journal = {Obesity Research},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {33-41},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {1071-7323},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11786599},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: Body image is considered as a potential mediator
             of the relationship between obesity and psychological
             distress. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: One hundred ten
             men and women in a residential weight control facility
             completed the Multidimensional Body Self-Relations
             Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Rosenberg
             Self-Esteem Scale, and the Binge Eating Scale. RESULTS: For
             both men and women, body-image satisfaction partially
             mediated the relationship between degree of overweight and
             depression/self-esteem. DISCUSSION: Sociodemographic factors
             that may influence the relationships among weight, body
             image, and depression/self-esteem are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1038/oby.2002.5},
   Key = {fds251657}
}

@article{fds6827,
   Author = {Costanzo, P.R.},
   Title = {Social exchange and the development of moral orientation in
             Children},
   Booktitle = {New Directions in Child Development},
   Publisher = {NY: Wiley},
   Editor = {W. Graziano and B. Laursen},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds6827}
}

@article{fds251622,
   Author = {Pollak, KI and Arredondo, EM and Yarnall, KSH and Lipkus, I and Myers,
             E and McNeilly, M and Costanzo, P},
   Title = {Influence of stereotyping in smoking cessation counseling by
             primary care residents.},
   Journal = {Ethnicity & Disease},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {578-585},
   Year = {2002},
   ISSN = {1049-510X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12477145},
   Abstract = {This study examined racial differences in primary care
             residents' rates of addressing smoking cessation. We
             expected residents to have higher rates of addressing
             cessation with White female patients as compared with
             African-American or Hispanic female patients, due, in part,
             to residents having higher outcome expectancies,
             self-efficacy, lower barriers, and less reliance on
             stereotypes. Residents (N = 90) were an average of 31 years
             old; two-thirds were White internal medicine residents.
             Residents viewed a video of a lower-middle class White,
             African-American, or Hispanic female interacting with her
             physician about stomach pain. Results indicate that
             residents were very likely to address smoking cessation,
             regardless of patients' race. Compared to residents assigned
             to an ethnic minority patient, residents assigned to the
             White patient were less likely to believe the patient would
             follow their advice (P < .03) and also perceived more
             barriers to address smoking cessation (P < .04). Reliance on
             the stereotype of Whites mediated the racial difference in
             outcome expectancies. Implications are that residents may be
             relying on stereotypes when they assess lower-middle class
             White female patients' receptivity to smoking cessation
             advice. Future research on the role of stereotyping in
             medical settings is warranted.},
   Key = {fds251622}
}

@article{fds251658,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Kern, LS and Friedman, KE and Reichmann, SK and Costanzo, PR and Musante, GJ},
   Title = {Changing eating behavior: a preliminary study to consider
             broader measures of weight control treatment
             success.},
   Journal = {Eating Behaviors},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {113-121},
   Year = {2002},
   ISSN = {1471-0153},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15001008},
   Abstract = {This study evaluated changes in the self-reported eating
             behaviors (snacking, binge eating, portion sizes, and meal
             skipping) of 52 obese adults (33 women and 19 men) attending
             a residential weight loss facility on two consecutive
             occasions. For each of the eating patterns studied, subjects
             reported engaging in the behavior significantly less
             frequently at the time of their return visit. It is proposed
             that changes in eating behaviors provide a useful and
             appropriate nonweight based outcome measure for estimating
             treatment success in diet-seeking clients.},
   Doi = {10.1016/s1471-0153(01)00048-4},
   Key = {fds251658}
}

@article{fds251660,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Arrendondo, E and Pollak, K and Lipkus, I and Myers,
             E},
   Title = {The influence of patient’s ethnicity on cervical medical
             treatment},
   Journal = {Journal of the National Medical Association},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds251660}
}

@article{fds251661,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Pollack, K and Arrendondo, EM and Yarnall, KS and Lipkus, I and Myers,
             E and McNeilly, M},
   Title = {How do residents' prioritize smoking cessation for young
             "high-risk" women?},
   Journal = {Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {33},
   Pages = {292-299},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds251661}
}

@article{fds251662,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Pollack, K and Arrendondo, EM and Yarnall, KS and Lipkus, I and Myers,
             E and McNeilly, M},
   Title = {Influence of stereotyping on primary care residents' smoking
             cessation counseling},
   Journal = {Ethnicity and Disease},
   Volume = {12},
   Pages = {578-585},
   Year = {2002},
   Key = {fds251662}
}

@article{fds251619,
   Author = {Pollak, KI and Arredondo, EM and Yarnall, KS and Lipkus, I and Myers, E and McNeilly, M and Costanzo, P},
   Title = {How do residents prioritize smoking cessation for young
             "high-risk" women? Factors associated with addressing
             smoking cessation.},
   Journal = {Preventive Medicine},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {292-299},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0091-7435},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11570833},
   Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Sixty-seven percent of physicians report
             advising their smoking patients to quit. Primary care
             residents' priorities for preventive health for a young
             "high-risk" female are unknown. Factors related to residents
             addressing smoking also need examining. METHODS: One hundred
             residents completed a survey about preventive health issues
             for a woman in her 20s "who leads a high-risk lifestyle."
             Residents indicated which topics they would address, and the
             likelihood that they would address each of 12 relevant
             preventive health topics, their outcome expectancies that
             the patient would follow their advice on each topic, their
             confidence that they could address the topic, and perceived
             barriers for addressing the topic. RESULTS: Residents listed
             STD prevention most frequently. Drug use and smoking
             cessation were second and third most frequently listed.
             Residents who believed that the patient would follow their
             advice were more likely to list smoking cessation than
             residents who had lower outcome expectancies for that
             patient. Higher barriers were negatively related to
             addressing smoking cessation. CONCLUSIONS: When time is not
             a barrier, residents are likely to address smoking
             cessation. Teaching residents how to incorporate this
             subject into their clinical practice is needed. Raising
             residents' outcome expectancies may increase their
             likelihood of addressing smoking cessation.},
   Doi = {10.1006/pmed.2001.0884},
   Key = {fds251619}
}

@article{fds251655,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Costanzo, PR and Reichmann, SK and Friedman, KE and Musante,
             GJ},
   Title = {The mediating effect of eating self-efficacy on the
             relationship between emotional arousal and overeating in the
             treatment-seeking obese.},
   Journal = {Eating Behaviors},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {363-368},
   Year = {2001},
   ISSN = {1471-0153},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15001029},
   Abstract = {In this study, we tested the proposition that the
             emotion-based eating of obese individuals is mediated by the
             effects of emotional arousal tendencies on brittle dieting
             self-restraint. Our indices of emotion-aroused eating,
             overeating, and brittle restraint were derived from a set of
             measures administered to 632 female and 254 male
             participants in a residential weight control and lifestyle
             change program. Mediation analyses indicated that (a) the
             relationship between positive emotion and overeating was
             entirely mediated by restraint tendencies and (b) the
             relationship between negative emotion eating and overeating
             was only partially mediated by brittle restraint. These
             findings held for both males and females. The results are
             discussed in relation to the viability of the psychosomatic
             hypothesis for understanding the relationship between
             emotions and overeating.},
   Doi = {10.1016/s1471-0153(01)00042-3},
   Key = {fds251655}
}

@article{fds251620,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR and Musante, GJ and Friedman, KE and Kern, LS and Tomlinson, K},
   Title = {The gender specificity of emotional, situational, and
             behavioral indicators of binge eating in a diet-seeking
             obese population.},
   Journal = {The International Journal of Eating Disorders},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {205-210},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0276-3478},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10422610},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the unique gender
             correlates of binge eating severity in a diet-seeking
             population. METHOD: This sample consisted of 288
             self-admitted patients enrolled in a residential weight loss
             program between 1996 and 1997. Subjects were administered
             several questionnaires including (a) the Binge Eating Scale,
             (b) the Beck Depression Inventory, (c) the Rosenberg
             Self-Esteem Scale, (d) 5-point scales of eating related
             foci, and (e) 7-point scales of subject confidence in
             controlling their eating under various circumstances. Data
             were analyzed in terms of stepwise regression analyses.
             RESULTS: Regression results revealed that while men and
             women share some common predictors of binge eating severity,
             there are also some gender-specific correlates. Men in our
             sample were prone to binge eat because of negative emotions
             (i.e., depression and anger), while binge eating severity
             for women in our sample was most strongly related to diet
             failure and tests of moderate eating. DISCUSSION: The
             strength of the distinctive gender-specific regressions for
             binge eating severity suggests that the problems of binging
             in obese males and females are derivatives of differential
             sex role expectations. This interpretation and clinical
             implications are the focus of the discussion.},
   Doi = {10.1002/(sici)1098-108x(199909)26:2<205::aid-eat10>3.0.co;2-},
   Key = {fds251620}
}

@article{fds251654,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Costanzo, PR and Musante, G and Freidman, M and Kern, L and Tomlinson,
             K},
   Title = {The gender specificity of emotional, situational, and
             behavioral indicators of binge-eating},
   Journal = {International Journal of Eating Disorders},
   Volume = {23},
   Pages = {65-75},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds251654}
}

@article{fds251618,
   Author = {Putallaz, M and Costanzo, PR and Grimes, CL and Sherman,
             DM},
   Title = {Intergenerational continuities and their influences on
             children's social development},
   Journal = {Social Development (Oxford, England)},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {388-427},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {December},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive
             review of the recent efforts by psychologists to explore
             intergenerational continuities and their influences on
             children's social development. A primary criterion for
             inclusion in the review was use of three generations of
             subjects represented in the research, although two
             generation studies were included to supplement or expand
             upon the conclusions drawn from three generation studies.
             The following domains of research were reviewed: (1)
             literature regarding the repetition of child abuse across
             generations, (2) research examining the intergenerational
             continuity of attachment status, (3) investigations of the
             continuity of parenting and childrearing behavior parents
             experienced with their own parents, (4) research examining
             inter generational continuities in parenting involving
             non-human primates, and (5) investigations of
             intergenerational continuities in both peer and sibling
             relationships. Across all literatures reviewed, evidence was
             found for intergenerational continuity with gender of parent
             affecting results. Two primary mechanisms for transmission
             appear to be cognitive schemas of relationships and
             modeling. A paradigm is proposed describing possible means
             of intergenerational transmission of influence on the social
             development of children.},
   Key = {fds251618}
}

@article{fds251648,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Musante, GJ and Costanzo, PR and Friedman, KE},
   Title = {The comorbidity of depression and eating dysregulation
             processes in a diet-seeking obese population: a matter of
             gender specificity.},
   Journal = {The International Journal of Eating Disorders},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {65-75},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0276-3478},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9429920},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To explore gender differences in depression
             vulnerability among an obese, treatment-seeking population
             and to discern those components of eating-related phenomena
             that discriminate the depression-comorbid obese from their
             noncomorbid counterparts. METHOD: This sample consisted of
             1,184 self-admitted patients enrolled in a residential
             weight loss program between 1990 and 1995. Subjects were
             administered several questionnaires including (a) the Beck
             Depression Inventory, (b) 5-point scales of eating-related
             foci, and (c) 7-point scales of subject's confidence in
             their eating control under various circumstances. Data were
             analyzed via analyses of variance (ANOVAs) and stepwise
             regression. RESULTS: Greater depression was accompanied by
             more disruptive, dysregulatory eating tendencies, and
             stronger inclination to engage in affectively and socially
             disrupted eating. Regression results revealed
             gender-specific predictors of comorbid depression. For obese
             females, negative-emotion disrupted eating and binge-purge
             behaviors were prominent predictors of depression. For
             males, eating induced by experiences of social or physical
             inadequacy and fasting relating to eating behaviors were the
             depression-relevant variables. DISCUSSION: These results are
             discussed in terms of their theoretical implications for
             gender-mediated models of obesity-depression comorbidity,
             and in terms of their clinical significance.},
   Doi = {10.1002/(sici)1098-108x(199801)23:1<65::aid-eat8>3.0.co;2-#},
   Key = {fds251648}
}

@article{fds251665,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Putallaz, M and Costanzo, PR and Grimes, CL and Sherman,
             DM},
   Title = {Intergenerational continuities and their influences on
             children's social development},
   Journal = {Social Development (Oxford, England)},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {389-427},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9507.00074},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-9507.00074},
   Key = {fds251665}
}

@article{fds38472,
   Author = {M. Putallaz and P.R. Costanzo and C. Grimes and D.
             Lipton},
   Title = {Intergenerational influences on children's social
             development.},
   Journal = {Social Development},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {390-427},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds38472}
}

@article{fds251651,
   Author = {Musante, G and Costanzo, PR and Freidman, K},
   Title = {The commorbidity of depression and eating disregulation in a
             diet-seeking obese population: A matter of gender
             specificity},
   Journal = {International Journal of Eating Disorders},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {65-77},
   Year = {1998},
   Key = {fds251651}
}

@article{fds251631,
   Author = {March, JS and Amaya-Jackson, L and Terry, R and Costanzo,
             P},
   Title = {Posttraumatic symptomatology in children and adolescents
             after an industrial fire.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1080-1088},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {August},
   ISSN = {0890-8567},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9256587},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: This investigation evaluated the extent and
             nature of posttraumatic symptomatology (PTS) in children and
             adolescents 9 months after an industrial fire at the
             imperial Foods chicken-processing plant in Hamlet, North
             Carolina, caused extensive loss of life. METHOD: Using a PTS
             self-report measure plus self- and teacher reports of
             comorbid symptoms the authors surveyed 1,019 fourth- to
             ninth-grade students in the community where the fire
             occurred. RESULTS: Three factors comprising PTS were
             identified: reexperiencing, avoidance and hyperarousal.
             Reexperiencing and avoidance were positively correlated;
             hyperarousal proved weakly correlated with reexperiencing,
             perhaps because exposure was largely indirect. Using a T
             score cutoff of 65 on the reexperiencing factor as
             indicative of PTS 9.7% of subjects met criteria for PTS;
             11.9% met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
             using DSM-III-R PTSD criteria. Degree of exposure was the
             most powerful predictor of PTS. Race (African-American) and
             gender (female) posed significant risk factors for PTS.
             Self-reported internalizing symptoms and teacher-reported
             externalizing symptoms were positively predicted by
             intercurrent PTS, and independently of PTS, by degree of
             exposure. Comorbid symptoms showed interesting interactions
             with exposure, race, and gender. Lack of self-attributed
             personal efficacy predicted PTS but did not moderate the
             effects of race or gender on PTS risk. CONCLUSIONS: This
             study, which used a population-based sampling strategy,
             strengthens and extends findings from earlier literature on
             pediatric PTSD in showing that (1) PTS and comorbid
             internalizing and externalizing symptoms rise in direct
             proportion to degree of exposure; (2) gender and race show
             variable effects on risk for PTS and comorbid symptoms; and
             (3) comorbid symptoms are positively correlated with PTS and
             may represent primary outcomes of traumatic exposure in
             their own right.},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004583-199708000-00015},
   Key = {fds251631}
}

@article{fds39586,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and March, J.S. and Amaya-Jackson, L. and Terry,
             R.},
   Title = {Post-Traumatic symptomatology in children and adolescents
             following an industrial fire in Hamlet, North
             Carolina},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {36},
   Pages = {1080-1088},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds39586}
}

@article{fds251650,
   Author = {March, JS and Amaya Jackson and L and Costanzo, PR and Terry,
             R},
   Title = {Post-Traumatic symptomatology in children and adolescents
             following an industrial fire in Hamlet, North
             Carolina},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {36},
   Pages = {1080-1088},
   Year = {1997},
   Key = {fds251650}
}

@article{fds251649,
   Author = {Wilson, JS and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {A preliminary study of attachment, attention, and schizotypy
             in early adulthood},
   Journal = {Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {231-260},
   Publisher = {Guilford Publications},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1521/jscp.1996.15.2.231},
   Abstract = {Both heritable neurocognitive impairments and interpersonal
             stressors are widely thought to be involved in the etiology
             of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In this exploratory
             study, we measured attachment (as an index of chronic
             interpersonal stress) and schizotypal tendencies in 273
             young adults. Of these participants, 57 also completed an
             adaptive-rate Continuous Performance Test, which measured
             ability to sustain attention (as an index of neurocognitive
             functioning). Psychometric properties of our measures and
             the relationships between attachment, attention, and
             schizotypy were then examined. Our analyses confirmed the
             usefulness of the classical trichotomous division of
             attachment into secure, avoidant, and anxious-ambivalent
             styles, as well as the presence of two dimensions of
             schizotypy underlying positive and negative (anhedonic)
             symptomatology. Four findings are central to our
             investigation. First, secure attachment was associated with
             low positive and low negative schizotypy; anxious attachment
             was associated with positive schizotypy, and avoidant
             attachment was associated with both positive and negative
             schizotypy. Second, when both negative and positive
             schizotypy were heightened, attentional performance was
             lowered. Third, no relationship between attachment and
             attention emerged. Fourth, attentional performance and
             attachment interacted to predict negative schizotypy, such
             that the presence of either good attentional performance or
             good attachment processes buffered individuals from
             anhedonia. Although methodological limitations qualify our
             findings, we suggest that, consistent with the
             diathesis-stress model of schizophrenia, future exploration
             of interactions between interpersonal and neurocognitive
             measures may provide important leads in both developmental
             psychopathology and normative development.},
   Doi = {10.1521/jscp.1996.15.2.231},
   Key = {fds251649}
}

@article{fds6087,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Costanzo, P. R. and Miller-Johnson, S. and Wencel,
             H.},
   Title = {Social developmental contributions to the study of childhood
             anxiety disorders: Emerging perspectives},
   Booktitle = {Handbook of Childhood Anxiety},
   Publisher = {New York: Guilford Press},
   Editor = {J. March},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds6087}
}

@article{fds251656,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Thompson, E and Boggiano, A and Costanzo, PR and Matter, J and Ruble,
             D},
   Title = {Age related changes in children's orientation to strategic
             peer interaction},
   Journal = {Social Cognition},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds251656}
}

@article{fds251663,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Wilson, J},
   Title = {Attachment, attention and schizotypy: Converging measures
             and connections},
   Journal = {Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds251663}
}

@article{fds251664,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Putallaz, M and Klein, TP and Efron, LA},
   Title = {Intergenerational and temporal continuities in peer
             relationships},
   Journal = {Social Development},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds251664}
}

@article{fds321834,
   Author = {Putallaz, M and Klein, TP and Costanzo, PR and Hedges,
             LA},
   Title = {Relating mothers' social framing to their children's entry
             competence with peers},
   Journal = {Social Development (Oxford, England)},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {222-237},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9507.1994.tb00042.x},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this study was to examine how mothers view
             and construct meaning their children's social interactions,
             and to understand the interpretive frames they bring to
             filtering the social world and conveying meaning to their
             children. Maternal narrations to their children' videotaped
             entry behavior revealed narration patterns related to their
             children' entry behavior and the group's response.
             Generally, when their children were behaving competently,
             mothers appeared to have a broad based, context embedded
             view of the interaction, but focused more specifially when
             difficulties arose, These narration patterns were influenced
             ny the mothers' own remembered childhood social competence
             and recollections of positive and anxious peer experiences.
             Implications of these results for the socialization process
             were discussed. Copyright © 1994, Wiley Blackwell. All
             rights reserved},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9507.1994.tb00042.x},
   Key = {fds321834}
}

@article{fds251616,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR and Siegel, AW},
   Title = {Social Context, Social Behavior, and Socialization:
             Investigating the Child′s Developing Organization of the
             Behavioral Field},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Child Psychology},
   Volume = {55},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {127-130},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0022-0965},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/jecp.1993.1006},
   Doi = {10.1006/jecp.1993.1006},
   Key = {fds251616}
}

@article{fds321835,
   Author = {Putallaz, M and Costanzo, PR and Smith, RB},
   Title = {Maternal recollections of childhood peer relationships:
             Implications for their children's social
             competence},
   Journal = {Journal of Social and Personal Relationships},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {403-422},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0265407591083006},
   Abstract = {The relations between mothers’ recollections of their
             childhood peer relationships and their child-rearing
             intentions, parenting behaviors and their preschoolers’
             social competence were examined. Mothers with predominantly
             anxious/lonely peer recollections appeared to take the most
             active role in their children's social development and had
             the most socially competent children as compared to mothers
             reporting either predominantly positive or negative peer
             recollections. This pat- tern of effects was influenced by
             the sex of the child. Implications of these results for a
             gender-moderated model of socialization were discussed. ©
             1991, Sage Publications. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0265407591083006},
   Key = {fds321835}
}

@article{fds251617,
   Author = {Woody, EZ and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Does Marital Agony Precede Marital Ecstasy? A Comment on
             Gottman and Krokoff's "Marital Interaction and Satisfaction:
             A Longitudinal View"},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {58},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {499-501},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.58.4.499},
   Abstract = {In a recent article, Gottman and Krokoff (1989) presented a
             fascinating and counterintuitive portrayal of a temporally
             related dynamic relationship of marital conflict and marital
             satisfaction. Unfortunately the results from which their
             conclusions spring are quite problematic. In a 2-wave,
             extreme-groups design, Gottman and Krokoff used raw change
             in satisfaction as a correlate of Time 1 conflict variables
             for purposes of analysis. Serious psychometric questions
             arise with this approach to the causal assessment of change.
             Given the considerations raised, there is a high likelihood
             that Gottman and Krokoff's data result from statistical
             artifact. Alternative approaches to the measurement of
             change are discussed in the context of illustrating the
             problematic components of Gottman and Krokoff's
             analysis.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-006X.58.4.499},
   Key = {fds251617}
}

@article{fds251614,
   Author = {WARWICK, ZS and COSTANZO, PR and GILL, JM and SCHIFFMAN,
             SS},
   Title = {Eating Restraint, Presentation Order, and Time of Day Are
             Related to Sweet Taste Preferences},
   Journal = {Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
   Volume = {575},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {588-591},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0077-8923},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1989.tb53305.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1749-6632.1989.tb53305.x},
   Key = {fds251614}
}

@article{fds251615,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR and Schiffman, SS},
   Title = {Thinness--not obesity--has a genetic component.},
   Journal = {Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {55-58},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0149-7634},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2671834},
   Abstract = {The body mass of adoptees was compared with the body mass of
             both biologic and adoptive parents using data from the
             Danish Adoption Register. Chi-square analyses revealed that
             biologic heritability is small and is confined to thin, not
             obese body mass. It is probable that the inheritance of thin
             body mass constitutes a mild protective factor that
             mitigates against development of obesity caused by
             environmental factors.},
   Doi = {10.1016/s0149-7634(89)80052-1},
   Key = {fds251615}
}

@article{fds251612,
   Author = {Woody, EZ and Costanzo, PR and Liefer, H and Conger,
             J},
   Title = {The effects of taste and caloric perceptions on the eating
             behavior of restrained and unrestrained subjects},
   Journal = {Cognitive Therapy and Research},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {381-390},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {1981},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0147-5916},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01173690},
   Abstract = {The present study explored the phenomenon of
             counterregulatory eating in chronic dieters by manipulating
             taste and caloric-information cues of a preload and taste of
             subsequent ad lib food. The results replicated the
             "restraint breaking" phenomenon reported by Herman and Mack
             (1975) and supported the hypothesis that this behavioral
             pattern is cognitively mediated. In addition, sensitivity to
             taste was found in restrained subjects when their chronic
             restraints were bypassed. These results were related to
             previous eating research, and their implications for
             self-control and dieting were examined. © 1981 Plenum
             Publishing Corporation.},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF01173690},
   Key = {fds251612}
}

@article{fds251613,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Costanzo, PR and Cox, GB},
   Title = {Behavioral determinants of mental illness concerns: a
             comparison of community subcultures.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {537-555},
   Year = {1980},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0091-0562},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7424839},
   Abstract = {A stratified sample (race, sex, and social class) of 469
             laymen from two North Carolina communities responded to a
             190-item MMPI-based questionnaire with the degree of mental
             illness concern evoked by each item. The results reflected
             systematic race and social class differences in the
             behavioral bases for mental illness attributions--differences
             not explainable by overall differences in toleration for
             deviance. Although laymen had roughly similar rank orderings
             for the 13 homogeneous clusters of items, blacks indicated
             greater concern over breakdowns in social orientation than
             whites, while the opposite pattern held for traditionally
             defined psychopathy (internal distresses). Upper-class
             concerns were, comparatively, with cognitive dysfunction,
             middle-class with moral and social responsibility, and
             lower-class with social inadequacies.},
   Doi = {10.1007/bf00912591},
   Key = {fds251613}
}

@article{fds251611,
   Author = {Conger, JC and Conger, AJ and Costanzo, PR and Wright, KL and Matter,
             JA},
   Title = {The effect of social cues on the eating behavior of obese
             and normal subjects.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {258-271},
   Year = {1980},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6494.1980.tb00832.x},
   Abstract = {Schachter's externality hypothesis suggests that overweight
             individuals are more likely to be induced to eat by salient
             external cues than normal weight individuals. While a range
             of studies have demonstrated the plausibility of this
             hypothesis in the case of sensory stimuli (e.g., taste
             cues), there is little evidence that the hypothesis applies
             to social stimuli. The current study examines this latter
             proposition by exposing male and female, overweight and
             normal weight subjects to a same-sex or opposite-sex peer
             model. Under the guise of engaging in a taste experiment,
             the subjects were either exposed to a model who tasted no
             crackers (no eat), one cracker (low eat), or twenty crackers
             (high eat). In addition, control model-absent conditions
             were also run for purposes of establishing baseline eating
             rates. If the externality hypotheses were to prevail in
             social domains, one would expect overweight subjects to be
             more prone to model the cracker-eating behavior of the peer
             than normal weight individuals. However, the findings
             indicate that all subject groups regardless of weight
             evidence a rather clear modeling effect and all subjects
             evidence social inhibition effects on their eating behavior
             as well. Several intriguing interactions among subject sex,
             model sex, subject weight, and social condition were also
             found. The discussion explores the relevance of an
             externality model of overweight eating in social domains,
             and focuses upon the interesting and somewhat distinct
             pattern of socially mediated eating exhibited by overweight
             females.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-6494.1980.tb00832.x},
   Key = {fds251611}
}

@article{fds251609,
   Author = {Alexander, IE and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Death anxiety, dissent, and competence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {734-751},
   Year = {1979},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6494.1979.tb00218.x},
   Abstract = {A total of 64 male undergraduates were administered a
             multistage interview which was structured to assess (a)
             their level of overtly expressed death anxiety, (b) covert
             (GSR) arousal to death stimuli (c) self-perceived
             competence, and (d) agreement with or dissent from life
             threatening national policies. The analyses that followed
             were concerned with examining the relationships among these
             variables. In previous studies of this kind it had been
             typically found that (1) self-perceived competence and
             magnitude of expressed death concern are inversely related
             and (2) overt expressions of death concern and covert
             physiological arousal to death cues are inversely related.
             Psychodynamic formulations centering on the ego-defensive
             nature of inhibited expressions of death anxiety have been
             cited to explain these past data. The current investigation
             proposed that the magnitude of expressed death concern would
             bear an inverse relationship to both felt competence and
             covert death arousal only when the level of overt concern
             was not contingent upon the individual's attitudes
             concerning the imminence of real life threatening
             circumstances in the environment. The rationale behind these
             predictions inheres in the notion that the neurotic
             components of strongly expressed death anxiety derive from
             its lack of anchoring in "real" external threats.
             Conversely, the expression of low death fear can only be
             regarded as "defensive" when real threats are perceived and
             acknowledged. The obtained results strongly support this
             rationale and the discussion centers on the impact of social
             conditions on psychodynamic processes.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-6494.1979.tb00218.x},
   Key = {fds251609}
}

@article{fds251610,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR and Woody, EZ},
   Title = {Externality as a function of obesity in children: pervasive
             style or eating-specific attribute?},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {37},
   Number = {12},
   Pages = {2286-2296},
   Year = {1979},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-3514.37.12.2286},
   Abstract = {The developmental sources of the link between stylistic
             externality and food-related externality found in the obese
             by Schacter and others were explored by testing whether the
             externality phenomena that have been found to differentiate
             obese and normal adults are also discriminators of obese and
             normal children. The results suggest that obese children as
             young as 7-12 years of age show an external responsiveness
             to salient food cues but not yet a generally external
             perceptual style. The implications of these findings for the
             development of obese externality are examined.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.37.12.2286},
   Key = {fds251610}
}

@article{fds322494,
   Author = {Lakin, M and Lakin, MG and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Group processes in early childhood: A dimension of human
             development},
   Journal = {International Journal of Behavioral Development},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {171-183},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1979},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/016502547900200205},
   Abstract = {A family-centered view of socialization has dominated child
             development research literature. Particularly lacking is
             knowledge of the influences of group participation where it
             is available and encouraged. The investigators carried out
             an observational field study in group optimizing settings in
             Israel. Variables were age and setting and the study
             included 32 groups of children aged 11-31 divided among four
             age categories in two types of communal settlement with
             differing amounts of group exposure. Differences in group
             behaviors were primarily related to developmental level but
             setting effects were apparent. The implications of such
             early appearances of group behaviors are considered. ©
             1979, Sage Publications. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/016502547900200205},
   Key = {fds322494}
}

@article{fds251601,
   Author = {Cox, G and Costanzo, PR and Coie, JD},
   Title = {A survey instrument for the assessment of popular
             conceptions of mental illness.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {901-909},
   Year = {1976},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/993428},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-006x.44.6.901},
   Key = {fds251601}
}

@article{fds251608,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Costanzo, PR and Cox, G},
   Title = {Behavioral determinants of mental illness concerns: a
             comparison of "gatekeeper" professions.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {626-636},
   Year = {1975},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0022-006X},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1176676},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-006x.43.5.626},
   Key = {fds251608}
}

@article{fds251607,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR and Grumet, JF and Brehm, SS},
   Title = {The effects of choice and source of constraint on children's
             attributions of preference},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Social Psychology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {352-364},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {1974},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-1031},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0022-1031(74)90031-6},
   Abstract = {One hundred and twenty female children (40 each from the
             first, third, and sixth grades) were presented with
             videotaped presentations of a female child choosing between
             two toys. Depending upon condition, subjects then viewed the
             actor either playing with her initially preferred toy
             (Unconstrained choice) or being forced to play with her
             initially non-preferred toy (Constrained choice).
             Additionally, the source of the actor's freedom or
             constraint was represented as either adult mediated or
             environmentally mediated. All subjects rated the actor's
             liking for each of the toys, how much the actor wanted to
             play with each toy, and which toy the actor would choose to
             take home with her. The two major findings which emerged
             were: (1) Contrary to prediction, children of all three age
             levels tended to use cues reflecting both the actor's choice
             and the actor's behavior in inferring her liking for each of
             the toys. (2) As predicted, the degree to which observers'
             attributions of toy liking corresponded to inferred attitude
             of the adult (who either approved or prohibited the actor's
             choice) was an inverse function of age. The similarities
             between the findings of this study and the data from studies
             of adult attitude attribution and children's moral
             attributions are considered in the discussion. ©
             1974.},
   Doi = {10.1016/0022-1031(74)90031-6},
   Key = {fds251607}
}

@article{fds251605,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Costanzo, PR and Farnill, D},
   Title = {Specific transitions in the development of spatial
             perspective-taking ability},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {167-177},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0012-1649},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0035062},
   Abstract = {90 5-11 yr olds were tested on 2 variations of Piaget's
             spatial perspective task. The predominance of each of 4
             kinds of spatial errors (interposition, aspect, distance,
             and right-left) was found to be differentially related both
             to age and overall task performance. The significance of
             this developmental sequence and the method of error analysis
             employed are discussed in the context of the earlier work of
             Piaget and B. Inhelder. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006
             APA, all rights reserved). © 1973 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0035062},
   Key = {fds251605}
}

@article{fds251606,
   Author = {Wortman, CB and Costanzo, PR and Witt, TR},
   Title = {Effect of anticipated performance on the attributions of
             causality to self and others.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {372-381},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0034949},
   Abstract = {Required 40 senior high school boys to take a test of social
             perceptiveness containing 5 sample and 10 official
             questions. Half of the Ss were led to do well on the sample
             questions, while half were led to do poorly. Half of the Ss
             anticipated continuing with the official questions, while
             half did not. In addition, all Ss were faced with a
             successful other. Ss were asked to make causal attributions
             to both themselves and to the other. Consistent with
             previous research, Ss who failed assigned causality for
             their performance to external factors. They also viewed
             themselves as less motivated and the task as less important
             than successful Ss. As predicted, Ss who anticipated future
             performance attributed significantly less ability to
             themselves than Ss who did not. In addition, they viewed the
             task as more difficult and their resources as less adequate
             than Ss in the nonanticipation condition. While
             success-failure and anticipation-nonanticipation produced
             strong effects on self-attribution, they had relatively
             little impact on the Ss' attributions about a successful
             other. (19 ref.) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all
             rights reserved). © 1973 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0034949},
   Key = {fds251606}
}

@article{fds251604,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR and Coie, JD and Grumet, JF and Farnill,
             D},
   Title = {A reexamination of the effects of intent and consequence on
             children's moral judgments.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {154-161},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {March},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4706063},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1973.tb02127.x},
   Key = {fds251604}
}

@article{fds322495,
   Author = {Margulis, ST and Costanzo, PR and Klein, AL},
   Title = {Impression change and favorableness of first impressions: A
             study of population and of commitment effects},
   Journal = {Psychonomic Science},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {318-320},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {1971},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/BF03332600},
   Abstract = {The present study replicated and extended Briscoe, Woodyard,
             & Shaw’s (1967) study of impression formation. The
             replication yielded overall recency effects and did not find
             that initially unfavorable first impressions were more
             resistant to change. This failure to replicate was not due
             to initial differences in impressions and was attributed to
             hypothesized population differences. The extension, on
             commitment, indicated that commitment was greatest for Ss
             who made covert initial ratings and least for those who made
             public initial ratings. The commitment effects were related
             to Kiesler’s (1968) commitment theory. © 1971,
             Psychonomic Journals, Inc.. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.3758/BF03332600},
   Key = {fds322495}
}

@article{fds251602,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Conformity development as a function of self-blame.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {366-374},
   Year = {1970},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0028983},
   Abstract = {Administered a self-blame scale devised by the author to 490
             Ss from 4 age levels ranging from 7-21. From this
             population, 144 Ss were selected: 12 high-blame, 12
             middle-blame, and 12 low-blame Ss from each age group.
             Conformity score was computed as the frequency with which
             the selected Ss conformed to the erroneous line judgments of
             a simulated peer majority in the R. S. Crutchfield (see
             30:2) situation. Findings suggest that self-blame and
             conformity are highly interrelated processes. Conformity was
             also found to be related to a self-blame minus other-blame
             score. Relationships among conformity, self-blame,
             self-esteem, and peer orientation are discussed. (PsycINFO
             Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). © 1970
             American Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0028983},
   Key = {fds251602}
}

@article{fds251603,
   Author = {Costanzo, FS and Markel, NN and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Voice quality profile and perceived emotion},
   Journal = {Journal of Counseling Psychology},
   Volume = {16},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {267-270},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1969},
   ISSN = {0022-0167},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0027355},
   Abstract = {Obtained speech samples by having 23 students read
             paragraphs indicating anger, contempt, indifference, love,
             and grief. A "test passage" was embedded in each paragraph.
             44 students listened to the test passages and judged which 1
             of the 5 emotions was being portrayed. 7 students rated the
             test passages for pitch, loudness, and tempo; each voice was
             then classified as peak pitch, loudness, or tempo.
             Statistical analysis indicated that peak-pitch voices were
             judged as portraying grief; peak loudness as anger or
             contempt, and peak tempo as indifference. It is suggested
             that the 3 voice quality profiles represent 3 modes of
             interpersonal orientation, and that they are a behavioral
             link between transitory emotional states and stable
             personality dispositions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006
             APA, all rights reserved). © 1969 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0027355},
   Key = {fds251603}
}

@article{fds331137,
   Author = {Goldman, J and Costanzo, PR and Lehrke, SA},
   Title = {Semantic satiation as a function of type of
             associate},
   Journal = {Psychonomic Science},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {267-268},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {1968},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/BF03331303},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the relative strength of verbal
             association in common verbal associates, semantic space
             verbal associates, and non-associates. Repetition-satiation
             inhibition procedures were used in the test period. It was
             found that common associates and semantic space associates
             show equivalent inhibition effects and both showed
             significantly less inhibition than non-associates.
             Interference in the form of noise during repetition did not
             significantly affect the course of inhibition. © 1968,
             Psychonomic Journals. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.3758/BF03331303},
   Key = {fds331137}
}

@article{fds322496,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR and Reitan, HT and Shaw, ME},
   Title = {Conformity as a function of experimentally induced minority
             and majority competence},
   Journal = {Psychonomic Science},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {329-330},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {1968},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/BF03331545},
   Abstract = {Two levels of minority competence and four levels of
             majority competence were induced by means of bogus feedback
             on 10 nonpressure perceptual trials. On the ensuing 15
             conformity pressure trials it was found that high competent
             minority Ss conformed less than low competent Ss, and there
             was a direct relationship between the conformity behavior of
             the minority Ss and the number of purportedly high competent
             subjects in the majority. © 1968, Psychonomic Journals. All
             rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.3758/BF03331545},
   Key = {fds322496}
}


%% Books   
@book{fds171463,
   Author = {Strauman T. ;Costanzo P. and Garber J.},
   Title = {Depression in Adolescent Girls: Science and
             Prevention},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Address = {New York},
   Editor = {Strauman, T.J. and Costanzo, P.R. and Garber,
             J.},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds171463}
}

@book{fds171469,
   Author = {Darity S. and Bonilla-Silva, E. and Costanzo, P. and McClain, P.E. and Mason, P. and Singleton, M. and Scott, W.},
   Title = {The Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences},
   Publisher = {MacMillan},
   Address = {New York},
   Year = {2007},
   Key = {fds171469}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds335643,
   Author = {Hussong, AM and Langley, HA and Coffman, JL and Halberstadt, AG and Costanzo, PR},
   Title = {Parent socialization of children’s gratitude},
   Pages = {199-219},
   Booktitle = {Developing Gratitude in Children and Adolescents},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {9781107182721},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/9781316863121.010},
   Abstract = {© Cambridge University Press 2018. Parent Socialization of
             Children’s Gratitude Thank-You Note I wanted small pierced
             earrings (gold), You gave me slippers (gray). My mother said
             that she would scold Unless I wrote to say How much I like
             them. Not much. -Judith Viorst The desire to cultivate
             gratitude in ourselves and others dates back centuries, as
             is evident in the early writings of Aristotle on virtues
             (Thomson, 1955), although our understanding of what
             gratitude means continues to evolve through ongoing
             scholarly debate and societal discourse (Kapp, 2013; Reiser,
             2014). One of the voices in this debate comes from social
             psychologists affiliated with the Positive Psychology
             movement who spearheaded research that has shaped our
             understanding of gratitude in adults. These researchers
             differentially adopt the view of gratitude as a life
             orientation (Wood, Froh, & Geraghty, 2010); a character,
             virtue, or personality trait (Froh, Sefick, & Emmons, 2008);
             and a mood or emotional state (McCullough, Emmons, & Tsang,
             2002). Research based on this view shows that adults and
             adolescents who more strongly endorse gratitude traits also
             report greater life satisfaction, better health outcomes,
             and more successful relationships (see Algoe, Haidt, &
             Gable, 2008; Bausert et al., Chapter 7, this volume; Emmons
             & McCullough, 2003; Froh, Kashdan, Ozimkowski, & Miller,
             2009; Wood et al., 2010). Similar research with children has
             lagged behind that with adults, although this volume is one
             of a handful of recent works demonstrating growing interest
             in this topic. As with other areas of research, the
             psychological study of gratitude has largely followed a
             downward extension model with the goal of uncovering how
             early in childhood scientists can replicate findings from
             adult samples. This approach to understanding gratitude in
             children aligns with that from the classic descriptive focus
             of developmental psychology that seeks to identify at what
             ages a given competency emerges. More recent approaches to
             understanding development, such as the developmental science
             framework (Cairns & Elder, 2001), eschew age difference
             findings as an end goal in favor of understanding how a
             given competency emerges over ontogeny and what form it
             takes within the system of influences from which that
             competency might arise. To meet this aim, a developmental
             science approach must squarely tackle the issues of what
             gratitude is at its core, how it changes with ontogeny, and
             how we best capture its elements as they emerge first in a
             nascent and then in a mature form.},
   Doi = {10.1017/9781316863121.010},
   Key = {fds335643}
}

@misc{fds251598,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR and Hoyle, RH and Leary, MR},
   Title = {Personality, Social Psychology, and Psychopathology:
             Reflections on a Lewinian Vision},
   Booktitle = {The Oxford Handbook of Personality and Social
             Psychology},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2012},
   Month = {September},
   ISBN = {9780195398991},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195398991.013.0023},
   Abstract = {© 2012 by Oxford University Press, Inc. All rights
             reserved. In this chapter, we first consider the historical
             and conceptual roots of the tripartite, but at times rocky,
             marriage of the fields of personality, social, and abnormal
             psychology. After briefly describing the hopes of early
             20th-century scholars to array the study of normal and
             abnormal behavior, thought, and feeling on the same
             conceptual continua, we call for the rekindling of these
             conjunctive hopes. Indeed, we argue that with the advent of
             current cross-cutting developments in cognitive,
             socioemotional, and biological perspectives in the broader
             domain of the behavioral sciences, that the time is ripe for
             rearranging the marriage among these fields. In order to
             provide a conceptual frame for such a conjunctive effort, we
             return to Lewinian field theory and its definition of forces
             of locomotion in the life space as a particularly notable
             way to put the examination of normal and abnormal psychology
             in the same theoretical space. By addressing some critical
             ideational themes in the domains of personality and social
             psychology, we attempt to illustrate the overlap of these
             themes with the ideas and questions of scholars of abnormal
             behavior. Of course, in deploying a Lewinian model our
             analyses turn to the dynamics of person x environment
             interactions in the regions of the life space. In doing so
             we define the phenomena of meaning-making and the multiple
             "worldview" existential models in social and personality
             psychology as the forces constituting the primary dynamics
             defining the permeability of adaptive regions of the "life
             space" or phenomenal field. We illustrate these dynamics by
             detailed consideration of human adaptation in two critical
             regions or domains of life experience in the behavioral
             field: the domain of regulatory transactions and the domain
             of acceptance, social affection, and relationships. While
             these domains certainly do not exhaust all regions of the
             life space, we argue that they are particularly pertinent
             for parsing continua of normal-to-abnormal adaptation and
             conjoining the nature of psychopathology with the everyday
             struggles of personal and social significance to all humans.
             We conclude our analysis by rather unabashed advocacy, not
             specifically for the model we explore, but for scholarship
             that is aimed at developing models that link the normal to
             what we refer to as the abnormal or psychopathological. As
             humans, the cloths of our selves and our environments are
             made from common as well as individually unique fibers. We
             conclude that to disambiguate how such fibers are woven
             together to frame the forces driving our travels from
             blissful adaptation to painful maladjustment should be a
             primary agenda for our interconnected sciences of human
             behavior.},
   Doi = {10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195398991.013.0023},
   Key = {fds251598}
}

@misc{fds171464,
   Author = {Costanzo, P.R. and Hoyle, R.},
   Title = {The role of research in personality and social psychology
             for illuminating psychopathology and its
             contexts},
   Booktitle = {Oxford Handbook of Personality and Social
             Psychology},
   Publisher = {Oxford Press},
   Address = {New York},
   Editor = {K. Deaux, and M. Snyder},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds171464}
}

@misc{fds171465,
   Author = {Costanzo, P.R.},
   Title = {The nature and nurture of morality and goodness},
   Booktitle = {In Search of Goodness},
   Publisher = {University of Chicago Press},
   Address = {Chicago},
   Editor = {Ruth Grant},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds171465}
}

@misc{fds171467,
   Author = {Strauman, T. and Costanzo, P. and Merril, K. and Jones, N.},
   Title = {The Applications of Social Psychology to Clinical
             Psychology},
   Booktitle = {Social Psychology: A Handbook of Basic Principles},
   Publisher = {Guilford Press},
   Address = {New York},
   Editor = {E.T. Higgins and A.W. Kruglanski},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds171467}
}


%% Articles Submitted   
@article{fds6859,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo and Putallaz, M. and Costanzo, P. R. and Klein, T.P. and Efron,
             L.A.},
   Title = {Intergenerational and temporal continuities in peer
             relationships},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Year = {1995},
   Key = {fds6859}
}


%% Book Reviews   
@article{fds206447,
   Author = {P.R. Costanzo},
   Title = {A View from the Bridge: Connecting Social and Clinical
             Psychology (A review of J. Maddux and J. Tangney (Eds): The
             Social Psychological Foundations of Clinical
             Psychology)},
   Journal = {PsycCritiques},
   Volume = {56},
   Number = {4},
   Year = {2011},
   Key = {fds206447}
}


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