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Publications of John D. Coie    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds339299,
   Author = {Kassing, F and Godwin, J and Lochman, JE and Coie, JD and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Using Early Childhood Behavior Problems to Predict Adult
             Convictions.},
   Journal = {J Abnorm Child Psychol},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {765-778},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-018-0478-7},
   Abstract = {The current study examined whether teacher and parent
             ratings of externalizing behavior during kindergarten and
             1st grade accurately predicted the presence of adult
             convictions by age 25. Data were collected as part of the
             Fast Track Project. Schools were identified based on poverty
             and crime rates in four locations: Durham, NC, Nashville,
             TN, Seattle, WA, and rural, central PA. Teacher and parent
             screening measures of externalizing behavior were collected
             at the end of kindergarten and 1st grade. ROC curves were
             used to visually depict the tradeoff between sensitivity and
             specificity and best model fit was determined. Five of the
             six combinations of screen scores across time points and
             raters met both the specificity and sensitivity cutoffs for
             a well-performing screening tool. When data were examined
             within each site separately, screen scores performed better
             in sites with high base rates and models including single
             teacher screens accurately predicted convictions. Similarly,
             screen scores performed better and could be used more
             parsimoniously for males, but not females (whose base rates
             were lower in this sample). Overall, results indicated that
             early elementary screens for conduct problems perform
             remarkably well when predicting criminal convictions
             20 years later. However, because of variations in base
             rates, screens operated differently by gender and location.
             The results indicated that for populations with high base
             rates, convictions can be accurately predicted with as
             little as one teacher screen taken during kindergarten or
             1st grade, increasing the cost-effectiveness of preventative
             interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-018-0478-7},
   Key = {fds339299}
}

@article{fds334888,
   Author = {Zheng, Y and Albert, D and McMahon, RJ and Dodge, K and Dick, D and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1) Gene Polymorphism Moderate
             Intervention Effects on the Developmental Trajectory of
             African-American Adolescent Alcohol Abuse.},
   Journal = {Prev Sci},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {79-89},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-016-0726-4},
   Abstract = {Accumulative evidence from recent genotype × intervention
             studies suggests that individuals carrying susceptible
             genotypes benefit more from intervention and provides one
             avenue to identify subgroups that respond differentially to
             intervention. This study examined the moderation by
             glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) gene variants of
             intervention effects on the developmental trajectories of
             alcohol abuse through adolescence. Participants were
             randomized into Fast Track intervention and control groups
             self-reported past-year alcohol abuse annually from grade 7
             through 2 years post-high school and provided genotype data
             at age 21 (69% males; European Americans [EAs] = 270,
             African-Americans [AAs] = 282). Latent growth curve
             models were fit to examine developmental trajectories of
             alcohol abuse. The interactions of 10 single nucleotide
             polymorphisms (SNPs) in NR3C1 with intervention were
             examined separately. Both EAs and AAs showed significant
             increases in past-year alcohol abuse with substantial
             inter-individual differences in rates of linear growth. AAs
             showed lower general levels and slower rates of linear
             growth than EAs. Adjusting for multiple tests, one NR3C1 SNP
             (rs12655166) significantly moderated intervention effects on
             the developmental trajectories of alcohol abuse among AAs.
             Intervention effects on the rates of linear growth were
             stronger among AAs carrying minor alleles than those not
             carrying minor alleles. The findings highlight the
             importance of taking a developmental perspective on
             adolescent alcohol use and have implications for future
             intervention design and evaluation by identifying subgroups
             that could disproportionally benefit from
             intervention.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-016-0726-4},
   Key = {fds334888}
}

@article{fds334889,
   Author = {Sorensen, LC and Dodge, KA and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {How Does the Fast Track Intervention Prevent Adverse
             Outcomes in Young Adulthood?},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {87},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {429-445},
   Year = {2016},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12467},
   Abstract = {Numerous studies have shown that childhood interventions can
             foster improved outcomes in adulthood. Less well understood
             is precisely how-that is, through which developmental
             pathways-these interventions work. This study assesses
             mechanisms by which the Fast Track project (n = 891), a
             randomized intervention in the early 1990s for high-risk
             children in four communities (Durham, NC; Nashville, TN;
             rural PA; and Seattle, WA), reduced delinquency, arrests,
             and general and mental health service utilization in
             adolescence through young adulthood (ages 12-20). A
             decomposition of treatment effects indicates that about a
             third of Fast Track's impact on later crime outcomes can be
             accounted for by improvements in social and self-regulation
             skills during childhood (ages 6-11), such as prosocial
             behavior, emotion regulation, and problem solving. These
             skills proved less valuable for the prevention of general
             and mental health problems.},
   Doi = {10.1111/cdev.12467},
   Key = {fds334889}
}

@article{fds334890,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Impact of early intervention on psychopathology, crime, and
             well-being at age 25.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Psychiatry},
   Volume = {172},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {59-70},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2014.13060786},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: This randomized controlled trial tested the
             efficacy of early intervention to prevent adult
             psychopathology and improve well-being in early-starting
             conduct-problem children. METHOD: Kindergarteners (N=9,594)
             in three cohorts (1991-1993) at 55 schools in four
             communities were screened for conduct problems, yielding 979
             early starters. A total of 891 (91%) consented (51% African
             American, 47% European American; 69% boys). Children were
             randomly assigned by school cluster to a 10-year
             intervention or control. The intervention goal was to
             develop social competencies in children that would carry
             them throughout life, through social skills training, parent
             behavior-management training with home visiting, peer
             coaching, reading tutoring, and classroom social-emotional
             curricula. Manualization and supervision ensured program
             fidelity. Ninety-eight percent participated during grade 1,
             and 80% continued through grade 10. At age 25, arrest
             records were reviewed (N=817, 92%), and condition-blinded
             adults psychiatrically interviewed participants (N=702; 81%
             of living participants) and a peer (N=535) knowledgeable
             about the participant. RESULTS: Intent-to-treat logistic
             regression analyses indicated that 69% of participants in
             the control arm displayed at least one externalizing,
             internalizing, or substance abuse psychiatric problem (based
             on self- or peer interview) at age 25, in contrast with 59%
             of those assigned to intervention (odds ratio=0.59,
             CI=0.43-0.81; number needed to treat=8). This pattern also
             held for self-interviews, peer interviews, scores using an
             "and" rule for self- and peer reports, and separate tests
             for externalizing problems, internalizing problems, and
             substance abuse problems, as well as for each of three
             cohorts, four sites, male participants, female participants,
             African Americans, European Americans, moderate-risk, and
             high-risk subgroups. Intervention participants also received
             lower severity-weighted violent (standardized
             estimate=-0.37) and drug (standardized estimate=-0.43) crime
             conviction scores, lower risky sexual behavior scores
             (standardized estimate=-0.24), and higher well-being scores
             (standardized estimate=0.19). CONCLUSIONS: This study
             provides evidence for the efficacy of early intervention in
             preventing adult psychopathology among high-risk
             early-starting conduct-problem children.},
   Doi = {10.1176/appi.ajp.2014.13060786},
   Key = {fds334890}
}

@article{fds334891,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Trajectories of risk for early sexual activity and early
             substance use in the Fast Track prevention
             program.},
   Journal = {Prev Sci},
   Volume = {15 Suppl 1},
   Pages = {S33-S46},
   Year = {2014},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11121-012-0328-8},
   Abstract = {Children who exhibit early-starting conduct problems are
             more likely than their peers to initiate sexual activity and
             substance use at an early age, experience pregnancy, and
             contract a sexually-transmitted disease [STD], placing them
             at risk for HIV/AIDS. Hence, understanding the development
             of multi-problem profiles among youth with early-starting
             conduct problems may benefit the design of prevention
             programs. In this study, 1,199 kindergarten children (51%
             African American; 47% European American; 69% boys)
             over-sampled for high rates of aggressive-disruptive
             behavior problems were followed through age 18. Latent class
             analyses (LCA) were used to define developmental profiles
             associated with the timing of initiation of sexual activity,
             tobacco and alcohol/drug use and indicators of risky
             adolescent sex (e.g. pregnancy and STD). Half of the
             high-risk children were randomized to a multi-component
             preventive intervention (Fast Track). The intervention did
             not significantly reduce membership in the classes
             characterized by risky sex practices. However, additional
             analyses examined predictors of poor outcomes, which may
             inform future prevention efforts.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11121-012-0328-8},
   Key = {fds334891}
}

@article{fds334892,
   Author = {Makin-Byrd, K and Bierman, KL and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Individual and family predictors of the perpetration of
             dating violence and victimization in late
             adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {536-550},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-012-9810-7},
   Abstract = {Teen dating violence is a crime of national concern with
             approximately one-fourth of adolescents reporting
             victimization of physical, psychological, or sexual dating
             violence each year. The present study examined how
             aggressive family dynamics in both childhood and early
             adolescence predicted the perpetration of dating violence
             and victimization in late adolescence. Children (n = 401, 43
             % female) were followed from kindergarten entry to the age
             of 18 years. Early adolescent aggressive-oppositional
             problems at home and aggressive-oppositional problems at
             school each made unique predictions to the emergence of
             dating violence in late adolescence. The results suggest
             that aggressive family dynamics during childhood and early
             adolescence influence the development of dating violence
             primarily by fostering a child's oppositional-aggressive
             responding style initially in the home, which is then
             generalized to other contexts. Although this study is
             limited by weaknesses detailed in the discussion, the
             contribution of longitudinal evidence including parent,
             teacher, and adolescent reports from both boys and girls, a
             dual-emphasis on the prediction of perpetration and
             victimization, as well as an analysis of both relations
             between variables and person-oriented group comparisons
             combine to make a unique contribution to the growing
             literature on adolescent partner violence.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10964-012-9810-7},
   Key = {fds334892}
}

@article{fds334893,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Godwin, J and Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {Social-information-processing patterns mediate the impact of
             preventive intervention on adolescent antisocial
             behavior.},
   Journal = {Psychol Sci},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {456-465},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797612457394},
   Abstract = {In the study reported here, we tested the hypothesis that
             the Fast Track preventive intervention's positive impact on
             antisocial behavior in adolescence is mediated by its impact
             on social-cognitive processes during elementary school. Fast
             Track is the largest and longest federally funded preventive
             intervention trial for children showing aggressive behavior
             at an early age. Participants were 891 high-risk
             kindergarten children (69% male, 31% female; 49% ethnic
             minority, 51% ethnic majority) who were randomly assigned to
             an intervention or a control group by school cluster.
             Multiyear intervention addressed social-cognitive processes
             through social-skill training groups, parent groups,
             classroom curricula, peer coaching, and tutoring. Assigning
             children to the intervention decreased their mean
             antisocial-behavior score after Grade 9 by 0.16 standardized
             units (p < .01). Structural equation models indicated that
             27% of the intervention's impact on antisocial behavior was
             mediated by its impact on three social-cognitive processes:
             reducing hostile-attribution biases, increasing competent
             response generation to social problems, and devaluing
             aggression. These findings support a model of antisocial
             behavioral development mediated by social-cognitive
             processes, and they guide prevention planners to focus on
             these processes.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0956797612457394},
   Key = {fds334893}
}

@article{fds334896,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, J and Dodge, K and Greenberg, M and Lochman, J and McMohan, R and Pinderhughes, E and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {School outcomes of aggressive-disruptive children:
             prediction from kindergarten risk factors and impact of the
             fast track prevention program.},
   Journal = {Aggress Behav},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {114-130},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ab.21467},
   Abstract = {A multi-gate screening process identified 891 children with
             aggressive-disruptive behavior problems at school entry.
             Fast Track provided a multi-component preventive
             intervention in the context of a randomized-controlled
             design. In addition to psychosocial support and skill
             training for parents and children, the intervention included
             intensive reading tutoring in first grade, behavioral
             management consultation with teachers, and the provision of
             homework support (as needed) through tenth grade. This study
             examined the impact of the intervention, as well as the
             impact of the child's initial aggressive-disruptive
             behaviors and associated school readiness skills (cognitive
             ability, reading readiness, attention problems) on academic
             progress and educational placements during elementary school
             (Grades 1-4) and during the secondary school years (Grades
             7-10), as well as high school graduation. Child behavior
             problems and skills at school entry predicted school
             difficulties (low grades, grade retention, placement in a
             self-contained classroom, behavior disorder classification,
             and failure to graduate). Disappointingly, intervention did
             not significantly improve these long-term school
             outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1002/ab.21467},
   Key = {fds334896}
}

@article{fds334894,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Assessing findings from the fast track study},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Criminology},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {119-126},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11292-013-9173-4},
   Abstract = {© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013.
             Objectives The aim of this paper is to respond to the
             Commentary, “Reassessing Findings from the Fast Track
             Study: Problems of Methods and Analysis” provided by E.
             Michael Foster (Foster, this issue) to our article “Fast
             Track Intervention Effects on Youth Arrests and
             Delinquency” (Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group
             2010, Journal of Experimental Criminology, 6, 131-157). Our
             response begins with a description of the mission and goals
             of the Fast Track project, and how they guided the original
             design of the study and continue to inform outcome analyses.
             Then, we respond to the Commentary’s five points in the
             order they were raised. Conclusions We agree with the
             Commentary that efforts to prevent crime and delinquency are
             of high public health significance because the costs of
             crime anddelinquency to society are indeed enormous. We
             believe that rigorous, careful intervention research is
             needed to accumulate evidence that informs prevention
             programs and activities. We have appreciated the opportunity
             to respond to the Commentary and to clarify the procedures
             and results that we presented in our paper on Fast Track
             effects on youth arrests and delinquency. Our response has
             clarified the framework for the number of statistical tests
             made, has reiterated the randomization process, has
             supported our tests for site-by-intervention effects, has
             provided our rationale for assuming missing at random, and
             has clarified that the incarceration variable was not
             included as a covariate in the hazard analyses. We stand by
             our conclusion that random assignment to Fast Track had a
             positive impact in preventing juvenile arrests, and we echo
             our additional caveat that it will be essential to determine
             whether intervention produces any longer-term effects on
             adult arrests as the sample transitions into young
             adulthood. We also appreciate the opportunity for open
             scientific debate on the values and risks associated with
             multiple analyses in long-term prevention program designs
             such as Fast Track. We believe that, once collected,
             completed longitudinal intervention datasets should be fully
             used to understand the impact, process, strengths, and
             weaknesses of the intervention approach. We agree with the
             Commentary that efforts to prevent crime and delinquency are
             of high public health significance because the costs of
             crime and delinquency to society are indeed enormous. As a
             result, we argue that it is important to balance the need to
             maintain awareness and caution regarding potential risks in
             the design or approach that may confound interpretation of
             findings, in the manner raised by the Commentator, with the
             need for extended analyses of the available data so we can
             better understand over time how antisocial behavior and
             violence can be effectively reduced.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11292-013-9173-4},
   Key = {fds334894}
}

@article{fds334895,
   Author = {Witkiewitz, K and King, K and McMahon, RJ and Wu, J and Luk, J and Bierman,
             KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {Evidence for a multi-dimensional latent structural model of
             externalizing disorders.},
   Journal = {J Abnorm Child Psychol},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {223-237},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-012-9674-z},
   Abstract = {Strong associations between conduct disorder (CD),
             antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and substance use
             disorders (SUD) seem to reflect a general vulnerability to
             externalizing behaviors. Recent studies have characterized
             this vulnerability on a continuous scale, rather than as
             distinct categories, suggesting that the revision of the
             Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
             (DSM-5) take into account the underlying continuum of
             externalizing behaviors. However, most of this research has
             not included measures of disorders that appear in childhood
             [e.g., attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or
             oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)], nor has it considered
             the full range of possibilities for the latent structure of
             externalizing behaviors, particularly factor mixture models,
             which allow for a latent factor to have both continuous and
             categorical dimensions. Finally, the majority of prior
             studies have not tested multidimensional models. Using
             lifetime diagnoses of externalizing disorders from
             participants in the Fast Track Project (n = 715), we
             analyzed a series of latent variable models ranging from
             fully continuous factor models to fully categorical mixture
             models. Continuous models provided the best fit to the
             observed data and also suggested that a two-factor model of
             externalizing behavior, defined as (1) ODD+ADHD+CD and (2)
             SUD with adult antisocial behavior sharing common variance
             with both factors, was necessary to explain the covariation
             in externalizing disorders. The two-factor model of
             externalizing behavior was then replicated using a
             nationally representative sample drawn from the National
             Comorbidity Survey-Replication data (n = 5,692). These
             results have important implications for the
             conceptualization of externalizing disorders in
             DSM-5.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-012-9674-z},
   Key = {fds334895}
}

@article{fds334897,
   Author = {Kam, C-M and Greenberg, MT and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Foster, ME and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Maternal depressive symptoms and child social preference
             during the early school years: mediation by maternal warmth
             and child emotion regulation.},
   Journal = {J Abnorm Child Psychol},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {365-377},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-010-9468-0},
   Abstract = {This longitudinal study examined processes that mediate the
             association between maternal depressive symptoms and peer
             social preference during the early school years. Three
             hundred and fifty six kindergarten children (182 boys) and
             their mothers participated in the study. During
             kindergarten, mothers reported their level of depressive
             symptomatology. In first grade, teachers rated children's
             emotion regulation at school and observers rated the
             affective quality of mother-child interactions. During
             second grade, children's social preference was assessed by
             peer nomination. Results indicated that mothers' level of
             depressive symptomatology negatively predicted their child's
             social preference 2 years later, controlling for the family
             SES and teacher-rated social preference during kindergarten.
             Among European American families, the association between
             maternal depressive symptoms and social preference was
             partially mediated by maternal warmth and the child's
             emotion regulation. Although the relation between maternal
             depressive symptoms and children peer preference was
             stronger among African American families than Europrean
             American families, its mediation by the maternal warmth and
             child's emotion regulation was not found in African American
             families.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-010-9468-0},
   Key = {fds334897}
}

@article{fds334898,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The effects of the fast track preventive intervention on the
             development of conduct disorder across childhood.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {82},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {331-345},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01558.x},
   Abstract = {The impact of the Fast Track intervention on externalizing
             disorders across childhood was examined. Eight
             hundred-ninety-one early-starting children (69% male; 51%
             African American) were randomly assigned by matched sets of
             schools to intervention or control conditions. The 10-year
             intervention addressed parent behavior-management, child
             social cognitive skills, reading, home visiting, mentoring,
             and classroom curricula. Outcomes included psychiatric
             diagnoses after grades 3, 6, 9, and 12 for conduct disorder,
             oppositional defiant disorder, attention deficit
             hyperactivity disorder, and any externalizing disorder.
             Significant interaction effects between intervention and
             initial risk level indicated that intervention prevented the
             lifetime prevalence of all diagnoses, but only among those
             at highest initial risk, suggesting that targeted
             intervention can prevent externalizing disorders to promote
             the raising of healthy children.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01558.x},
   Key = {fds334898}
}

@article{fds334904,
   Author = {McMahon, RJ and Witkiewitz, K and Kotler, JS and Bierman, KL and Coie,
             JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Predictive validity of callous-unemotional traits measured
             in early adolescence with respect to multiple antisocial
             outcomes},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Psychology},
   Volume = {119},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {752-763},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0020796},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the predictive validity of youth
             callous-unemotional (CU) traits, as measured in early
             adolescence (Grade 7) by the Antisocial Process Screening
             Device (APSD; Frick & Hare, 2001), in a longitudinal sample
             (N = 754). Antisocial outcomes, assessed in adolescence and
             early adulthood, included self-reported general delinquency
             from 7th grade through 2 years post-high school,
             self-reported serious crimes through 2 years post-high
             school, juvenile and adult arrest records through 1 year
             post-high school, and antisocial personality disorder
             symptoms and diagnosis at 2 years post-high school. CU
             traits measured in 7th grade were highly predictive of 5 of
             the 6 antisocial outcomes-general delinquency, juvenile and
             adult arrests, and early adult antisocial personality
             disorder criterion count and diagnosis-over and above prior
             and concurrent conduct problem behavior (i.e., criterion
             counts of oppositional defiant disorder and conduct
             disorder) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
             (criterion count). Incorporating a CU traits specifier for
             those with a diagnosis of conduct disorder improved the
             positive prediction of antisocial outcomes, with a very low
             false-positive rate. There was minimal evidence of
             moderation by sex, race, or urban/rural status. Urban/rural
             status moderated one finding, with being from an urban area
             associated with stronger relations between CU traits and
             adult arrests. Findings clearly support the inclusion of CU
             traits as a specifier for the diagnosis of conduct disorder,
             at least with respect to predictive validity. © 2010
             American Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0020796},
   Key = {fds334904}
}

@article{fds334899,
   Author = {Wu, J and Witkiewitz, K and McMahon, RJ and Dodge, KA and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {A parallel process growth mixture model of conduct problems
             and substance use with risky sexual behavior.},
   Journal = {Drug Alcohol Depend},
   Volume = {111},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {207-214},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.04.013},
   Abstract = {Conduct problems, substance use, and risky sexual behavior
             have been shown to coexist among adolescents, which may lead
             to significant health problems. The current study was
             designed to examine relations among these problem behaviors
             in a community sample of children at high risk for conduct
             disorder. A latent growth model of childhood conduct
             problems showed a decreasing trend from grades K to 5.
             During adolescence, four concurrent conduct problem and
             substance use trajectory classes were identified (high
             conduct problems and high substance use, increasing conduct
             problems and increasing substance use, minimal conduct
             problems and increasing substance use, and minimal conduct
             problems and minimal substance use) using a parallel process
             growth mixture model. Across all substances (tobacco, binge
             drinking, and marijuana use), higher levels of childhood
             conduct problems during kindergarten predicted a greater
             probability of classification into more problematic
             adolescent trajectory classes relative to less problematic
             classes. For tobacco and binge drinking models, increases in
             childhood conduct problems over time also predicted a
             greater probability of classification into more problematic
             classes. For all models, individuals classified into more
             problematic classes showed higher proportions of early
             sexual intercourse, infrequent condom use, receiving money
             for sexual services, and ever contracting an STD.
             Specifically, tobacco use and binge drinking during early
             adolescence predicted higher levels of sexual risk taking
             into late adolescence. Results highlight the importance of
             studying the conjoint relations among conduct problems,
             substance use, and risky sexual behavior in a unified
             model.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.04.013},
   Key = {fds334899}
}

@article{fds334900,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The Difficulty of Maintaining Positive Intervention Effects:
             A Look at Disruptive Behavior, Deviant Peer Relations, and
             Social Skills During the Middle School Years.},
   Journal = {The Journal of Early Adolescence},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {593-624},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0272431609340513},
   Abstract = {This paper examines the effects of the Fast Track preventive
             intervention on youths' functioning in three domains:
             disruptive behavior problems, involvement with deviant
             peers, and social skills during the middle school years.
             Eight hundred ninety-one children had been randomly assigned
             by sets of schools within four sites to intervention (n =
             445) or to control (n = 446) conditions. In contrast to
             prior findings of the effectiveness of the Fast Track
             intervention during the elementary school years, the current
             findings indicate that Fast Track had little overall impact
             on children's functioning in these domains during this age
             period. There were positive intervention effects on only 2
             of 17 outcomes examined. Although the intervention had
             positive impact on children's hyperactive and self-reported
             delinquent behaviors in seventh grade, there were no
             intervention effects on other externalizing behavior
             problems or on social skills, and there was a negative
             intervention effect on children's involvement with deviant
             peers during this age period.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0272431609340513},
   Key = {fds334900}
}

@article{fds334901,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Fast Track intervention effects on youth arrests and
             delinquency.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Criminology},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {131-157},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11292-010-9091-7},
   Abstract = {This paper examines the effects of the Fast Track preventive
             intervention on youth arrests and self-reported delinquent
             behavior through age 19. High-risk youth randomly assigned
             to receive a long-term, comprehensive preventive
             intervention from 1st grade through 10th grade at four sites
             were compared to high-risk control youth. Findings indicated
             that random assignment to Fast Track reduced court-recorded
             juvenile arrest activity based on a severity weighted sum of
             juvenile arrests. Supplementary analyses revealed an
             intervention effect on the reduction in the number of
             court-recorded moderate-severity juvenile arrests, relative
             to control children. In addition, among youth with higher
             initial behavioral risk, the intervention reduced the number
             of high-severity adult arrests relative to the control
             youth. Survival analyses examining the onset of arrests and
             delinquent behavior revealed a similar pattern of findings.
             Intervention decreased the probability of any juvenile
             arrest among intervention youth not previously arrested. In
             addition, intervention decreased the probability of a
             self-reported high-severity offense among youth with no
             previous self-reported high-severity offense. Intervention
             effects were also evident on the onset of high-severity
             court-recorded adult arrests among participants, but these
             effects varied by site. The current findings suggest that
             comprehensive preventive intervention can prevent juvenile
             arrest rates, although the presence and nature of
             intervention effects differs by outcome.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11292-010-9091-7},
   Key = {fds334901}
}

@article{fds334902,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The effects of a multiyear universal social-emotional
             learning program: The role of student and school
             characteristics.},
   Journal = {J Consult Clin Psychol},
   Volume = {78},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {156-168},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0018607},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: This article examines the impact of a universal
             social-emotional learning program, the Fast Track PATHS
             (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies) curriculum and
             teacher consultation, embedded within the Fast Track
             selective prevention model. METHOD: The longitudinal
             analysis involved 2,937 children of multiple ethnicities who
             remained in the same intervention or control schools for
             Grades 1, 2, and 3. The study involved a clustered
             randomized controlled trial involving sets of schools
             randomized within 3 U.S. locations. Measures assessed
             teacher and peer reports of aggression, hyperactive-disruptive
             behaviors, and social competence. Beginning in first grade
             and through 3 successive years, teachers received training
             and support and implemented the PATHS curriculum in their
             classrooms. RESULTS: The study examined the main effects of
             intervention as well as how outcomes were affected by
             characteristics of the child (baseline level of problem
             behavior, gender) and by the school environment (student
             poverty). Modest positive effects of sustained program
             exposure included reduced aggression and increased prosocial
             behavior (according to both teacher and peer report) and
             improved academic engagement (according to teacher report).
             Peer report effects were moderated by gender, with
             significant effects only for boys. Most intervention effects
             were moderated by school environment, with effects stronger
             in less disadvantaged schools, and effects on aggression
             were larger in students who showed higher baseline levels of
             aggression. CONCLUSIONS: A major implication of the findings
             is that well-implemented multiyear social-emotional learning
             programs can have significant and meaningful preventive
             effects on the population-level rates of aggression, social
             competence, and academic engagement in the elementary school
             years.},
   Doi = {10.1037/a0018607},
   Key = {fds334902}
}

@article{fds334903,
   Author = {Jones, D and Godwin, J and Dodge, KA and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes,
             EE},
   Title = {Impact of the fast track prevention program on health
             services use by conduct-problem youth.},
   Journal = {Pediatrics},
   Volume = {125},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {e130-e136},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-0322},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: We tested the impact of the Fast Track conduct
             disorder prevention program on the use of pediatric, general
             health, and mental health services in adolescence. PATIENTS
             AND METHODS: Participants were 891 public kindergarten boys
             and girls screened from a population of 9594 children and
             found to be at risk for conduct disorder. They were assigned
             randomly (by school) to intervention or control conditions
             and were followed for 12 years. Intervention lasted 10 years
             and included parent training, child social-cognitive skills
             training, reading tutoring, peer-relations enhancement, and
             classroom curricula and management. Service use was assessed
             through annual interviews of parents and youth. RESULTS:
             Youth assigned to preventive intervention had significantly
             reduced use of professional general health, pediatric, and
             emergency department services relative to control youth on
             the basis of parent-report data. For control-group youth,
             the odds of greater use of general health services for any
             reason and general health services use for mental health
             purposes were roughly 30% higher and 56% higher,
             respectively. On the basis of self-report data, the
             intervention reduced the likelihood of outpatient mental
             health services among older adolescents for whom odds of
             services use were more than 90% higher among control-group
             youth. No differences were found between intervention and
             control youth on the use of inpatient mental health
             services. Statistical models controlled for key study
             characteristics, and potential moderation of the
             intervention effect was assessed. CONCLUSIONS: Random
             assignment to the Fast Track prevention program is
             associated with reduced use of general health and outpatient
             mental health services in adolescents. Future studies should
             examine the mechanism of this impact and service use
             patterns as subjects reach young adulthood.},
   Doi = {10.1542/peds.2009-0322},
   Key = {fds334903}
}

@article{fds334905,
   Author = {Jones, DE and Foster, EM and Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {Service use patterns for adolescents with ADHD and comorbid
             conduct disorder.},
   Journal = {J Behav Health Serv Res},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {436-449},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11414-008-9133-3},
   Abstract = {Service use patterns and costs of youth diagnosed with
             attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid
             conduct disorder (CD) were assessed across adolescence (ages
             12 through 17). Featured service sectors include mental
             health, school services, and the juvenile justice system.
             Data are provided by three cohorts from the Fast Track
             evaluation and are based on parent report. Diagnostic groups
             are identified through a structured assessment. Results show
             that public costs for youth with ADHD exceed $40,000 per
             child on average over a 6-year period, more than doubling
             service expenditures for a non-ADHD group. Public costs for
             children with comorbid ADHD and CD double the costs of those
             with ADHD alone. Varying patterns by service sector,
             diagnosis, and across time indicate different needs for
             youth with different conditions and at different ages and
             can provide important information for prevention and
             treatment researchers.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s11414-008-9133-3},
   Key = {fds334905}
}

@article{fds334909,
   Author = {Schofield, H-LT and Bierman, KL and Heinrichs, B and Nix, RL and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Predicting early sexual activity with behavior problems
             exhibited at school entry and in early adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {8},
   Pages = {1175-1188},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-008-9252-6},
   Abstract = {Youth who initiate sexual intercourse in early adolescence
             (age 11-14) experience multiple risks, including concurrent
             adjustment problems and unsafe sexual practices. The current
             study tested two models describing the links between
             childhood precursors, early adolescent risk factors, and
             adolescent sexual activity: a cumulative model and a
             meditational model. A longitudinal sample of 694 boys and
             girls from four geographical locations was utilized, with
             data collected from kindergarten through high school.
             Structural equation models revealed that, irrespective of
             gender or race, high rates of aggressive disruptive
             behaviors and attention problems at school entry increased
             risk for a constellation of problem behaviors in middle
             school (school maladjustment, antisocial activity, and
             substance use) which, in turn, promoted the early initiation
             of sexual activity. Implications are discussed for
             developmental models of early sexual activity and for
             prevention programming.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-008-9252-6},
   Key = {fds334909}
}

@article{fds334906,
   Author = {Hurley, S and The Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group, and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Disentangling Ethnic and Contextual Influences Among Parents
             Raising Youth in High-Risk Communities.},
   Journal = {Applied Developmental Science},
   Volume = {12},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {211-219},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10888690802388151},
   Abstract = {This article reports on analyses examining contextual
             influences on parenting with an ethnically and
             geographically diverse sample of parents (predominantly
             mothers) raising 387 children (49% ethnic minority; 51%
             male) in high-risk communities. Parents and children were
             followed longitudinally from first through tenth grades.
             Contextual influences included geographical location,
             neighborhood risk, SES, and family stress. The cultural
             variable was racial socialization. Parenting constructs
             created through the consensus decision-making of the
             Parenting Subgroup of the Study Group on Race, Culture, and
             Ethnicity (see Le et al., 2008) included Monitoring,
             Communication, Warmth, Behavioral Control and Parenting
             Efficacy. Hierarchical regressions on each parenting
             construct were conducted for each grade for which data were
             available. Analyses tested for initial ethnic differences
             and then for remaining ethnic differences once contextual
             influences were controlled. For each construct, some ethnic
             differences did remain (Monitoring, ninth grade; Warmth,
             third grade; Communication, kindergarten; Behavioral
             Control, eighth grade; and Parenting Efficacy, kindergarten
             through fifth grade). Ethnic differences were explained by
             contextual differences in the remaining years. Analyses
             examining the impact of cultural influences revealed a
             negative relation between racial socialization messages and
             Communication or Monitoring.},
   Doi = {10.1080/10888690802388151},
   Key = {fds334906}
}

@article{fds334908,
   Author = {Stearns, E and Dodge, KA and Nicholson, M},
   Title = {Peer Contextual Influences on the Growth of
             Authority-Acceptance Problems in Early Elementary
             School.},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {208-231},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/mpq.2008.0018},
   Abstract = {This study investigated the effects of the peer social
             context and child characteristics on the growth of
             authority-acceptance behavior problems across first, second,
             and third grades, using data from the normative sample of
             the Fast Track Project. Three hundred sixty-eight European
             American and African American boys and girls (51% male; 46%
             African American) and their classmates were assessed in each
             grade by teacher ratings on the Teacher Observation of Child
             Adaptation-Revised. Children's growth in
             authority-acceptance behavior problems across time was
             partially attributable to the level of disruptive behavior
             in the class-room peer context into which they were placed.
             Peer-context influence, however, were strongest among
             same-gender peers. Findings held for both boys and girls,
             both European Americans and African Americans, and
             nondeviant, marginally deviant, and highly deviant children.
             Findings suggest that children learn and follow behavioral
             norms from their same-gender peers within the
             classroom.},
   Doi = {10.1353/mpq.2008.0018},
   Key = {fds334908}
}

@article{fds334907,
   Author = {Slough, NM and McMahon, RJ and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Foster, EM and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and Pinderhughes,
             EE},
   Title = {Preventing Serious Conduct Problems in School-Age Youths:
             The Fast Track Program.},
   Journal = {Cognitive and Behavioral Practice},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {3-17},
   Year = {2008},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2007.04.002},
   Abstract = {Children with early-starting conduct Problems have a very
             poor prognosis and exact a high cost to society. The Fast
             Track project is a multisite, collaborative research project
             investigating the efficacy of a comprehensive, long-term,
             multicomponent intervention designed to prevent the
             development of serious conduct problems in high-risk
             children. In this article, we (a) provide an overview of the
             development model that serves as the conceptual foundation
             for the Fast Track intervention and describe its integration
             into the intervention model; (b) outline the research design
             and intervention model, with an emphasis on the elementary
             school phase of the intervention; and (c) summarize findings
             to dale concerning intervention outcomes. We then provide a
             case illustration, and conclude with a discussion of
             guidelines for practitioners who work with children with
             conduct problems.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.cbpra.2007.04.002},
   Key = {fds334907}
}

@article{fds334910,
   Author = {Putallaz, M and Grimes, CL and Foster, KJ and Kupersmidt, JB and Coie,
             JD and Dearing, K},
   Title = {Overt and Relational Aggression and Victimization: Multiple
             Perspectives within the School Setting.},
   Journal = {Journal of School Psychology},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {523-547},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2007.05.003},
   Abstract = {The current study involved a comprehensive comparative
             examination of overt and relational aggression and
             victimization across multiple perspectives in the school
             setting (peers, teachers, observers in the lunchroom,
             self-report). Patterns of results involving sociometic
             status, ethnicity and gender were explored among 4(th)
             graders, with particular emphasis on girls. Controversial
             and rejected children were perceived as higher on both forms
             of aggression than other status groups, but only rejected
             children were reported as victims. Both European American
             and African American girls showed a greater tendency toward
             relational aggression and victimization than overt
             aggression or victimization. Results indicated negative
             outcomes associated with both relational and overt
             victimization and especially overt aggression for the target
             girl sample. Poorer adjustment and a socially unskillful
             behavioral profile were found to be associated with these
             three behaviors. However, relational aggression did not
             evidence a similar negative relation to adjustment nor was
             it related to many of the behaviors examined in the current
             study. Implications of these results are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jsp.2007.05.003},
   Key = {fds334910}
}

@article{fds334913,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Fast track randomized controlled trial to prevent
             externalizing psychiatric disorders: findings from grades 3
             to 9.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {46},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1250-1262},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/chi.0b013e31813e5d39},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: This study tests the efficacy of the Fast Track
             Program in preventing antisocial behavior and psychiatric
             disorders among groups varying in initial risk. METHOD:
             Schools within four sites (Durham, NC; Nashville, TN;
             Seattle, WA; and rural central Pennsylvania) were selected
             as high-risk institutions based on neighborhood crime and
             poverty levels. After screening 9,594 kindergarteners in
             these schools, 891 highest risk and moderate-risk children
             (69% male and 51% African American) were randomly assigned
             by matched sets of schools to intervention or control
             conditions. The 10-year intervention (begun in 1991 with
             three yearly cohorts) included parent behavior-management
             training, child social-cognitive skills training, reading
             tutoring, home visiting, mentoring, and a universal
             classroom curriculum. Outcomes included criterion counts and
             psychiatric diagnoses after grades 3, 6, and 9 for conduct
             disorder, oppositional defiant disorder,
             attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, any externalizing
             disorder, and self-reported antisocial behavior. Grade 9
             outcomes were assessed between 2000 and 2003, depending upon
             cohort. RESULTS: Significant interaction effects between
             intervention and initial risk level were found at each age
             but most strongly after grade 9. Assignment to intervention
             had a significant positive effect in lowering criterion
             count scores and diagnoses for conduct disorder,
             attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and any
             externalizing disorder, and lowering antisocial behavior
             scores, but only among those at highest risk initially.
             CONCLUSIONS: Prevention of serious antisocial behavior can
             be efficacious across sex, ethnicity, and urban/rural
             residence, but screening is essential.},
   Doi = {10.1097/chi.0b013e31813e5d39},
   Key = {fds334913}
}

@article{fds334911,
   Author = {Kenny, DA and West, TV and Cillessen, AHN and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Hubbard, JA and Schwartz, D},
   Title = {Accuracy in judgments of aggressiveness.},
   Journal = {Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {9},
   Pages = {1225-1236},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167207303026},
   Abstract = {Perceivers are both accurate and biased in their
             understanding of others. Past research has distinguished
             between three types of accuracy: generalized accuracy, a
             perceiver's accuracy about how a target interacts with
             others in general; perceiver accuracy, a perceiver's view of
             others corresponding with how the perceiver is treated by
             others in general; and dyadic accuracy, a perceiver's
             accuracy about a target when interacting with that target.
             Researchers have proposed that there should be more dyadic
             than other forms of accuracy among well-acquainted
             individuals because of the pragmatic utility of forecasting
             the behavior of interaction partners. We examined behavioral
             aggression among well-acquainted peers. A total of 116
             9-year-old boys rated how aggressive their classmates were
             toward other classmates. Subsequently, 11 groups of 6 boys
             each interacted in play groups, during which observations of
             aggression were made. Analyses indicated strong generalized
             accuracy yet little dyadic and perceiver
             accuracy.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0146167207303026},
   Key = {fds334911}
}

@article{fds334914,
   Author = {McDonald, KL and Putallaz, M and Grimes, CL and Kupersmidt, JB and Coie,
             JD},
   Title = {Girl talk: Gossip, friendship, and sociometric
             status},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {381-411},
   Publisher = {Johns Hopkins University Press},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/mpq.2007.0017},
   Abstract = {This study examined the characteristics of gossip among
             fourth-grade girls and their close friends. Sixty friendship
             dyads were videotaped as they engaged in conversation, and
             their gossip was coded. Analyses revealed gossip to be a
             dominant feature of their interaction and that it was
             primarily neutral in valence. Sociometrically popular girls
             and their friends were observed to gossip more about peers,
             and their gossip was more evaluative than that between
             rejected girls and their friends. Gossip frequency and
             valence related to observed friendship closeness and
             friendship quality. Race differences in the characteristics
             of gossip were also explored. The study results are
             important in our efforts to develop a fuller understanding
             of the important interpersonal process of gossip and the
             functions that it serves in the context of close
             friendships. Copyright © 2007 by Wayne State University
             Press.},
   Doi = {10.1353/mpq.2007.0017},
   Key = {fds334914}
}

@article{fds334912,
   Author = {Muschkin, CG and Malone, PS and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Multiple Teacher Ratings: An evaluation of measurement
             strategies.},
   Journal = {Educational Research and Evaluation : an International
             Journal on Theory and Practice},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {71},
   Year = {2007},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13803610601058215},
   Abstract = {This study addresses the questions that arise when
             collecting, describing, and analyzing information from
             multiple informants regarding attributes of individual
             students. Using data from the Fast Track study, we evaluate
             alternative measurement strategies for using multiple
             teacher ratings of student adjustment to middle school among
             a sample of 326 Grade-6 pupils. One goal of the study was to
             compare the advantages of three measurement strategies using
             multiple and single informants in terms of their correlation
             with contemporaneous measures of behavior and academic
             achievement. Comparisons of residual variance using an
             aggregated rating, the rating from an "optimal informant,"
             and a score selected at random from the response set,
             indicate that aggregation provides the highest
             criterion-related validity. As part of these analyses, we
             explore the significance of inter-rater concordance,
             measured in terms of the intraclass correlation coefficient
             (ICC). Results indicate that for some aggregated scores,
             reliability can significantly limit their interpretability.
             The second main goal of the study was to evaluate the
             effects of variation in die number of teacher ratings on
             residual variance estimates for aggregate measures in
             selected behavioral domains. We conclude that the advantages
             of using multiple ratings are significant with a larger
             number of informants.},
   Doi = {10.1080/13803610601058215},
   Key = {fds334912}
}

@article{fds334918,
   Author = {Foster, EM and Jones, D and Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group},
   Title = {Can a costly intervention be cost-effective?: An analysis of
             violence prevention.},
   Journal = {Archives of General Psychiatry},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {11},
   Pages = {1284-1291},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archpsyc.63.11.1284},
   Abstract = {OBJECTIVES: To examine the cost-effectiveness of the Fast
             Track intervention, a multi-year, multi-component
             intervention designed to reduce violence among at-risk
             children. A previous report documented the favorable effect
             of intervention on the highest-risk group of ninth-graders
             diagnosed with conduct disorder, as well as self-reported
             delinquency. The current report addressed the
             cost-effectiveness of the intervention for these measures of
             program impact. DESIGN: Costs of the intervention were
             estimated using program budgets. Incremental
             cost-effectiveness ratios were computed to determine the
             cost per unit of improvement in the 3 outcomes measured in
             the 10th year of the study. RESULTS: Examination of the
             total sample showed that the intervention was not
             cost-effective at likely levels of policymakers' willingness
             to pay for the key outcomes. Subsequent analysis of those
             most at risk, however, showed that the intervention likely
             was cost-effective given specified willingness-to-pay
             criteria. CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that the
             intervention is cost-effective for the children at highest
             risk. From a policy standpoint, this finding is encouraging
             because such children are likely to generate higher costs
             for society over their lifetimes. However, substantial
             barriers to cost-effectiveness remain, such as the ability
             to effectively identify and recruit such higher-risk
             children in future implementations.},
   Doi = {10.1001/archpsyc.63.11.1284},
   Key = {fds334918}
}

@article{fds334917,
   Author = {Ingoldsby, EM and Kohl, GO and McMahon, RJ and Lengua, L and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Conduct problems, depressive symptomatology and their
             co-occurring presentation in childhood as predictors of
             adjustment in early adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {603-621},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-006-9044-9},
   Abstract = {The present study investigated patterns in the development
             of conduct problems (CP), depressive symptoms, and their
             co-occurrence, and relations to adjustment problems, over
             the transition from late childhood to early adolescence.
             Rates of depressive symptoms and CP during this
             developmental period vary by gender; yet, few studies
             involving non-clinical samples have examined co-occurring
             problems and adjustment outcomes across boys and girls. This
             study investigates the manifestation and change in CP and
             depressive symptom patterns in a large, multisite,
             gender-and ethnically-diverse sample of 431 youth from 5th
             to 7th grade. Indicators of CP, depressive symptoms, their
             co-occurrence, and adjustment outcomes were created from
             multiple reporters and measures. Hypotheses regarding gender
             differences were tested utilizing both categorical (i.e.,
             elevated symptom groups) and continuous analyses (i.e.,
             regressions predicting symptomatology and adjustment
             outcomes). Results were partially supportive of the dual
             failure model (Capaldi, 1991, 1992), with youth with
             co-occurring problems in 5th grade demonstrating
             significantly lower academic adjustment and social
             competence two years later. Both depressive symptoms and CP
             were risk factors for multiple negative adjustment outcomes.
             Co-occurring symptomatology and CP demonstrated more
             stability and was associated with more severe adjustment
             problems than depressive symptoms over time. Categorical
             analyses suggested that, in terms of adjustment problems,
             youth with co-occurring symptomatology were generally no
             worse off than those with CP-alone, and those with
             depressive symptoms-alone were similar over time to those
             showing no symptomatology at all. Few gender differences
             were noted in the relations among CP, depressive symptoms,
             and adjustment over time.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-006-9044-9},
   Key = {fds334917}
}

@article{fds334920,
   Author = {Lansford, JE and Putallaz, M and Grimes, CL and Schiro-Osman, KA and Kupersmidt, JB and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Perceptions of friendship quality and observed behaviors
             with friends: How do sociometrically rejected, average, and
             popular girls differ?},
   Journal = {Merrill Palmer Quarterly},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {694-720},
   Publisher = {Johns Hopkins University Press},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/mpq.2006.0036},
   Abstract = {This study examined associations between sociometric status
             and friendship quality using observational and questionnaire
             data from 139 fourth-grade girls and their friends.
             Multivariate analyses of covariance (controlling for
             ethnicity and socioeconomic status) showed that rejected
             girls and their friends did not differ in their reported
             friendship quality compared to average or popular girls.
             However, coded behavioral observations revealed that
             compared to other girls, rejected girls displayed more
             negative affect, bossiness, and deviance but less positive
             gossip, negative gossip, prosocial behavior, and social
             competence. Furthermore, as a dyad, compared to other girls,
             rejected girls and their friends exhibited less behavioral
             maturity and poorer conflict resolution skills. These
             results are important in advancing understanding of ways in
             which rejected girls may perpetuate their problems in peer
             contexts. Copyright © 2006 by Wayne State University
             Press.},
   Doi = {10.1353/mpq.2006.0036},
   Key = {fds334920}
}

@article{fds334919,
   Author = {Erath, SA and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Michael Foster,
             E and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes,
             EE},
   Title = {Aggressive marital conflict, maternal harsh punishment, and
             child aggressive-disruptive behavior: Evidence for direct
             and mediated relations},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {20},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {217-226},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.20.2.217},
   Abstract = {Direct associations between aggressive marital conflict and
             child aggressive-disruptive behavior at home and school were
             explored in this cross-sectional study of 360 kindergarten
             children. In addition, mediated pathways linking aggressive
             marital conflict to maternal harsh punishment to child
             aggressive-disruptive behavior were examined. Moderation
             analyses explored how the overall frequency of marital
             disagreement might buffer or exacerbate the impact of
             aggressive marital conflict on maternal harsh punishment and
             child aggressive-disruptive behavior. Hierarchical
             regressions revealed direct pathways linking aggressive
             marital conflict to child aggressive-disruptive behavior at
             home and school and a partially mediated pathway linking
             aggressive marital conflict to child aggressive-disruptive
             behavior at home. Further analyses revealed that rates of
             marital disagreement moderated the association between
             aggressive marital conflict and child aggressive-disruptive
             behavior at home, with an attenuated association at high
             rates of marital disagreement as compared with low rates of
             marital disagreement. Copyright 2006 by the American
             Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.20.2.217},
   Key = {fds334919}
}

@article{fds334921,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Nix, RL and Maples, JJ and Murphy, SA and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Examining clinical judgment in an adaptive intervention
             design: The fast track program.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {468-481},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.74.3.468},
   Abstract = {Although clinical judgment is often used in assessment and
             treatment planning, rarely has research examined its
             reliability, validity, or impact in practice settings. This
             study tailored the frequency of home visits in a prevention
             program for aggressive- disruptive children (n = 410; 56%
             minority) on the basis of 2 kinds of clinical judgment:
             ratings of parental functioning using a standardized
             multi-item scale and global assessments of family need for
             services. Stronger reliability and better concurrent and
             predictive validity emerged for the 1st kind of clinical
             judgment than for the 2nd. Exploratory analyses suggested
             that using ratings of parental functioning to tailor
             treatment recommendations improved the impact of the
             intervention by the end of 3rd grade but using more global
             assessments of family need did not.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-006X.74.3.468},
   Key = {fds334921}
}

@article{fds334916,
   Author = {Milan, S and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Family instability and child maladjustment trajectories
             during elementary school.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {34},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {43-56},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-005-9007-6},
   Abstract = {This study examines the relation between family instability
             and child maladjustment over a 6-year period in 369 children
             from four communities. Measures were collected annually from
             kindergarten through fifth grade. In associative growth
             curve models, family instability trajectories predicted
             children's externalizing and internalizing behavior
             trajectories during this time period. High levels of family
             instability also incrementally predicted the likelihood of
             meeting criteria for a DSM IV diagnosis during elementary
             school, above and beyond prediction from earlier measures of
             maladjustment. However, the timing of family instability had
             a different effect on externalizing versus internalizing
             disorders. In general, stronger relations were found between
             family instability and externalizing behaviors relative to
             internalizing behaviors, although children with comorbid
             disorders experienced the highest levels of family
             instability.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-005-9007-6},
   Key = {fds334916}
}

@article{fds334915,
   Author = {Thomas, DE and Bierman, KL and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {The impact of classroom aggression on the development of
             aggressive behavior problems in children.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {471-487},
   Year = {2006},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579406060251},
   Abstract = {Prior research suggests that exposure to elementary
             classrooms characterized by high levels of student
             aggression may contribute to the development of child
             aggressive behavior problems. To explore this process in
             more detail, this study followed a longitudinal sample of
             4,907 children and examined demographic factors associated
             with exposure to high-aggression classrooms, including
             school context factors (school size, student poverty levels,
             and rural vs. urban location) and child ethnicity (African
             American, European American). The developmental impact of
             different temporal patterns of exposure (e.g., primacy,
             recency, chronicity) to high-aggression classrooms was
             evaluated on child aggression. Analyses revealed that
             African American children attending large, urban schools
             that served socioeconomically disadvantaged students were
             more likely than other students to be exposed to
             high-aggressive classroom contexts. Hierarchical regressions
             demonstrated cumulative effects for temporal exposure,
             whereby children with multiple years of exposure showed
             higher levels of aggressive behavior after 3 years than
             children with primacy, less recent, and less chronic
             exposure, controlling for initial levels of aggression.
             Implications are discussed for developmental research and
             preventive interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579406060251},
   Key = {fds334915}
}

@article{fds334924,
   Author = {Nix, RL and Pinderhughes, EE and Bierman, KL and Maples, JJ and Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Decoupling the relation between risk factors for conduct
             problems and the receipt of intervention services:
             participation across multiple components of a prevention
             program.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {3-4},
   Pages = {307-325},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10464-005-8628-9},
   Abstract = {This study examined whether the link between risk factors
             for conduct problems and low rates of participation in
             mental health treatment could be decoupled through the
             provision of integrated prevention services in multiple
             easily-accessible contexts. It included 445 families of
             first-grade children (55% minority), living in four diverse
             communities, and selected for early signs of conduct
             problems. Results indicated that, under the right
             circumstances, these children and families could be enticed
             to participate at high rates in school-based services,
             therapeutic groups, and home visits. Because different sets
             of risk factors were related to different profiles of
             participation across the components of the prevention
             program, findings highlight the need to offer services in
             multiple contexts to reach all children and families who
             might benefit from them.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10464-005-8628-9},
   Key = {fds334924}
}

@article{fds334923,
   Author = {Lavallee, KL and Bierman, KL and Nix, RL and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The impact of first-grade "friendship group" experiences on
             child social outcomes in the fast track program.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {307-324},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10802-005-3567-3},
   Abstract = {Many interventions for children's behavior problems
             successfully utilize a group format for social skills
             training, providing opportunities for practice and
             performance feedback from peers. Recent studies however,
             suggest that grouping aggressive children together may
             reduce intervention effectiveness or even increase risk. The
             present study examined the relative impact of children's own
             behavior and their experiences with peers in the first-grade
             "friendship groups" of Fast Track, a multi-component
             preventive intervention program. Two-hundred sixty-six
             children (56% minority, 29% female) participated in 55
             friendship groups. Children's own positive and negative
             behavior in friendship groups was related to relative
             improvements in social cognitive skills, prosocial behavior,
             and aggression, assessed through child interviews, teacher
             ratings, and peer sociometric nominations. Results from
             hierarchical linear models also revealed that the amount of
             peer escalation children received for their disruptive
             behavior during sessions impeded some intervention gains,
             whereas mere exposure to other children's positive or
             negative behavior was rarely related to outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1007/s10802-005-3567-3},
   Key = {fds334923}
}

@article{fds334922,
   Author = {Gazelle, H and Putallaz, M and Li, Y and Grimes, CL and Kupersmidt, JB and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Anxious solitude across contexts: girls' interactions with
             familiar and unfamiliar peers.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {76},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {227-246},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2005.00841.x},
   Abstract = {Cross-situational continuity and change in anxious solitary
             girls' behavior and peer relations were examined in
             interactions with familiar versus unfamiliar playmates.
             Fourth-grade girls (N=209, M age=9.77 years, half African
             American, half European American) were identified as anxious
             solitary or behaviorally normative using observed and
             teacher-reported behavior among classmates. Subsequently,
             girls participated in 1-hr play groups containing 5
             same-race familiar or unfamiliar girls for 5 consecutive
             days. Results support both cross-situational continuity and
             change in anxious solitary girls' behavior and peer
             relations. Although anxious solitary girls exhibited
             difficulty interacting with both familiar and unfamiliar
             playmates relative to behaviorally normative girls, elements
             of their behavior improved in unfamiliar play groups, a
             context in which they received less peer
             mistreatment.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.2005.00841.x},
   Key = {fds334922}
}

@article{fds334925,
   Author = {Rabiner, DL and Coie, JD and Miller-Johnson, S and Boykin, ASM and Lochman, JE},
   Title = {Predicting the persistence of aggressive offending of
             African American males from adolescence into young
             adulthood: The importance of peer relations, aggressive
             behavior, and ADHD symptoms},
   Journal = {Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {131-140},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10634266050130030101},
   Abstract = {This study examined the predictors of aggressive offending
             that persisted from adolescence into young adulthood in an
             initial sample of 622 African American youth who were
             interviewed every 2 years between the ages of 12 and 22.
             Participants were classified as persistent aggressive
             offenders (n = 27) if they reported committing a felony
             assault during adolescence and young adulthood; as
             adolescent-only aggressive offenders (n = 65) if they
             reported a felony assault during adolescence but not during
             young adulthood; and as never aggressive (n = 102) if they
             never reported a felony assault. (Participants with missing
             data who could not be accurately classified were excluded
             from the sample.) Compared to aggressive offenders,
             persistent aggressive offenders were more likely to be male
             and to have been rejected by peers in late childhood.They
             also reported more attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
             (ADHD) symptoms in late childhood. Compared to participants
             who never reported an aggressive offense, adolescent-only
             aggressive offenders were rated as more aggressive by peers
             and reported more ADHD symptoms but were not more likely to
             have been rejected.},
   Doi = {10.1177/10634266050130030101},
   Key = {fds334925}
}

@article{fds334926,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Foster, EM and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {The effects of the fast track program on serious problem
             outcomes at the end of elementary school.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the
             Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and
             Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association,
             Division 53},
   Volume = {33},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {650-661},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15374424jccp3304_1},
   Abstract = {This study examines the effects of the Fast Track program,
             which is a multicomponent, intensive intervention for
             children with early-onset conduct problems and continues
             from 1st grade through high school. Prior research has shown
             that Fast Track produces small positive effect sizes on
             children's social and behavioral outcomes at the end of 1st
             and 3rd grades in comparison to control children. This study
             addresses the important question of whether this
             intervention reduces cases of serious problems that can
             occur during the 4th- and 5th-grade years. Fast Track did
             have a significant but modest influence on children's rates
             of social competence and social cognition problems, problems
             with involvement with deviant peers, and conduct problems in
             the home and community, compared to children in the control
             condition. There was no evidence of intervention impact on
             children's serious problems in the school setting at Grades
             4 and 5. This evaluation indicates that Fast Track has
             continued to influence certain key areas of children's
             adjustment throughout the elementary school years, reducing
             children's likelihood of emerging as cases with problems in
             their social, peer, or home functioning. The stage is set to
             examine potential prevention effects on these youths'
             serious antisocial behaviors during adolescence.},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15374424jccp3304_1},
   Key = {fds334926}
}

@article{fds334927,
   Author = {Hill, LG and Coie, JD and Lochman, JE and Greenberg,
             MT},
   Title = {Effectiveness of early screening for externalizing problems:
             issues of screening accuracy and utility.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {72},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {809-820},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-006X.72.5.809},
   Abstract = {Accurate, early screening is a prerequisite for indicated
             interventions intended to prevent development of
             externalizing disorders and delinquent behaviors. Using the
             Fast Track longitudinal sample of 396 children drawn from
             high-risk environments, the authors varied assumptions about
             base rates and examined effects of multiple-time-point and
             multiple-rater screening procedures. The authors also
             considered the practical import of various levels of
             screening accuracy in terms of true and false positive rates
             and their potential costs and benefits. Additional research
             is needed to determine true costs and benefits of early
             screening. However, the results indicate that 1st grade
             single- and multiple-rater screening models effectively
             predicted externalizing behavior and delinquent outcomes in
             4th and 5th grades and that early screening is
             justified.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-006X.72.5.809},
   Key = {fds334927}
}

@article{fds334928,
   Author = {Rabiner, DL and Malone, PS and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {The impact of tutoring on early reading achievement for
             children with and without attention problems.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {273-284},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/b:jacp.0000026141.20174.17},
   Abstract = {This study examined whether the benefits of reading tutoring
             in first grade were moderated by children's level of
             attention problems. Participants were 581 children from the
             intervention and control samples of Fast Track, a
             longitudinal multisite investigation of the development and
             prevention of conduct problems. Standardized reading
             achievement measures were administered after kindergarten
             and 1st grade, and teacher ratings of attention problems
             were obtained during 1st grade. During 1st grade,
             intervention participants received three 30-min tutoring
             sessions per week to promote the development of initial
             reading skills. Results replicated prior findings that
             attention problems predict reduced 1st grade reading
             achievement, even after controlling for IQ and earlier
             reading ability. Intervention was associated with modest
             reading achievement benefits for inattentive children
             without early reading difficulties, and substantial benefits
             for children with early reading difficulties who were not
             inattentive. It had no discernible impact, however, for
             children who were both inattentive and poor early readers.
             Results underscore the need to develop effective academic
             interventions for inattentive children, particularly for
             those with co-occurring reading difficulties.},
   Doi = {10.1023/b:jacp.0000026141.20174.17},
   Key = {fds334928}
}

@article{fds336504,
   Author = {Bagwell, CL and Coie, JD},
   Title = {The best friendships of aggressive boys: relationship
             quality, conflict management, and rule-breaking
             behavior.},
   Journal = {Journal of Experimental Child Psychology},
   Volume = {88},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {5-24},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {May},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2003.11.004},
   Abstract = {The current study examined the best friendships of
             aggressive and nonaggressive boys (N = 96 boys, 48 dyads,
             mean age = 10.6 years). Friends completed self-report
             measures of friendship quality, and their interactions were
             observed in situations that required conflict management and
             provided opportunities for rule-breaking behavior. Although
             there were no differences in boys' self-reports of
             friendship quality, observers rated nonaggressive boys and
             their friends as showing greater positive engagement,
             on-task behavior, and reciprocity in their interactions
             compared with aggressive boys and their friends. Aggressive
             boys and their friends provided more enticement for rule
             violations and engaged in more rule-breaking behavior than
             did nonaggressive boys and their friends. Also, the
             intensity of negative affect in observed conflicts between
             aggressive boys and their friends was greater than that
             between nonaggressive boys and their friends. The findings
             suggest that friendships may provide different developmental
             contexts for aggressive and nonaggressive
             boys.},
   Doi = {10.1016/j.jecp.2003.11.004},
   Key = {fds336504}
}

@article{fds334929,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, S and Winn, DMC and Coie, JD and Malone, PS and Lochman,
             J},
   Title = {Risk factors for adolescent pregnancy reports among African
             American males},
   Journal = {Journal of Research on Adolescence},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {471-495},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-7795.2004.00083.x},
   Abstract = {This study examined childhood and adolescent risk factors
             for males' reports of getting someone pregnant during
             adolescence. These questions were examined in an urban
             sample of 335 African American males involved in a
             prospective, longitudinal study. Childhood aggression
             significantly predicted reported pregnancies during
             adolescence. Boys who were stably aggressive across 3rd
             through 5th grades were at particularly high risk for
             reporting getting a female pregnant. Adolescent substance
             use and deviant peer involvement incrementally added to the
             prediction of pregnancy reports over and above the effects
             of childhood aggression. Adolescent aggressive problems did
             not contribute to reports of pregnancy once childhood
             aggression was accounted for in the model. These results
             highlight that precursors for males' pregnancy reports can
             be identified by as early as age 8. Findings also emphasize
             the importance of an expanded developmental focus to
             understand risk factors for adolescent pregnancy. The
             implications of these results are discussed for preventive
             interventions to reduce adolescent pregnancy.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1532-7795.2004.00083.x},
   Key = {fds334929}
}

@article{fds334932,
   Author = {McCarty, CA and McMahon, RJ and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Mediators of the relation between maternal depressive
             symptoms and child internalizing and disruptive behavior
             disorders.},
   Journal = {Journal of Family Psychology : Jfp : Journal of the Division
             of Family Psychology of the American Psychological
             Association (Division 43)},
   Volume = {17},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {545-556},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.17.4.545},
   Abstract = {Drawing on a normative sample of 224 youth and their
             biological mothers, this study tested 4 family variables as
             potential mediators of the relationship between maternal
             depressive symptoms in early childhood and child
             psychological outcomes in preadolescence. The mediators
             examined included mother-child communication, the quality of
             the mother-child relationship, maternal social support, and
             stressful life events in the family. The most parsimonious
             structural equation model suggested that having a more
             problematic mother-child relationship mediated disruptive
             behavior-disordered outcomes for youths, whereas less
             maternal social support mediated the development of
             internalizing disorders. Gender and race were tested as
             moderators, but significant model differences did not emerge
             between boys and girls or between African American and
             Caucasian youths.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0893-3200.17.4.545},
   Key = {fds334932}
}

@article{fds334931,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, S and Costanzo, PR and Coie, JD and Rose, MR and Browne,
             DC and Johnson, C},
   Title = {Peer Social Structure and Risk-Taking Behaviors among
             African American Early Adolescents},
   Journal = {Journal of Youth and Adolescence},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {375-384},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature America, Inc},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1024926132419},
   Abstract = {This study investigated associations between peer status,
             peer group social influences, and risk-taking behaviors in
             an urban sample of 647 African American seventh-grade
             students. The highest rates of problem behaviors were seen
             in the controversial peer status group, or those youth who
             were both highly liked and highly disliked by other youth.
             Findings also revealed contrasting patterns of peer group
             leadership. The more conventional, positive leadership style
             predicted lower rates, and the less mainstream,
             unconventional style predicted higher rates of involvement
             in problem behaviors. Conventional leaders were most likely
             to be popular status youth, while unconventional leaders
             were mostly to be both controversial and popular status
             youth. Controversial status youth were also more likely to
             be involved in deviant peer groups. Results highlight the
             importance of controversial status students as key influence
             agents during early adolescence. We discuss the implications
             of these results for preventive interventions to reduce
             adolescent problem behaviors.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1024926132419},
   Key = {fds334931}
}

@article{fds334930,
   Author = {Flanagan, KS and Bierman, KL and Kam, C-M},
   Title = {Identifying at-risk children at school entry: the usefulness
             of multibehavioral problem profiles.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the
             Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and
             Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association,
             Division 53},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {396-407},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15374424JCCP3203_08},
   Abstract = {Found that 1st-grade teacher ratings of aggressive,
             hyperactive-inattentive, and low levels of prosocial
             behaviors made unique contributions to the prediction of
             school outcomes (measured 2 years later) for 755 children.
             Person-oriented analyses compared the predictive utility of
             5 screening strategies based on child problem profiles to
             identify children at risk for school problems. A broad
             screening strategy, in which children with elevations in any
             1 of the 3 behavior problem dimensions were identified as
             "at-risk," showed lower specificity but superior
             sensitivity, odds ratios, and overall accuracy in the
             prediction of school outcomes than the other screening
             strategies that were more narrowly focused or were based on
             a total problem score. Results are discussed in terms of
             implications for the screening and design of preventive
             interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1207/S15374424JCCP3203_08},
   Key = {fds334930}
}

@article{fds334939,
   Author = {Jones, D and Dodge, KA and Foster, EM and Nix, R and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Early identification of children at risk for costly mental
             health service use.},
   Journal = {Prevention Science : the Official Journal of the Society for
             Prevention Research},
   Volume = {3},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {247-256},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1020896607298},
   Abstract = {Children and adolescents with serious and persistent conduct
             problems often require large public expenditures.
             Successfully diverting one high risk child from unfortunate
             outcomes may result in a net savings to society of nearly $2
             million, not to mention improving the life of that child and
             his or her family. This figure highlights the potential of
             prevention, which often rests on the ability to identify
             these children at a young age. This study examined the
             ability of a short conduct-problems screening procedure to
             predict future need for mental health assistance, special
             education services, and the juvenile justice system during
             elementary school ages. The screen was based on teacher and
             parent report of child behavioral habits in kindergarten,
             and was used to identify children as either at risk or not
             at risk for behavioral problems. Service outcomes were
             derived from a service-use assessment administered to
             parents at the end of the sixth grade, while special
             education information was gathered through a survey of
             school records. Study participants (463 kindergarten
             children; 54% male, 44% African American) were from
             economically disadvantaged neighborhoods in four diverse
             communities across the United States. Results indicated
             that, while controlling for demographic background
             variables, the risk indicator strongly predicted which
             children would require services related to conduct disorder
             or behavioral/emotional problems. Additional analyses
             revealed that the dichotomous high risk indicator was nearly
             as strong as the continuous screening variable in predicting
             the service-use outcomes, and that the screening of both
             parents and teachers may not be necessary for determining
             risk status.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1020896607298},
   Key = {fds334939}
}

@article{fds334938,
   Author = {Farmer, AD and Bierman, KL and Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group},
   Title = {Predictors and consequences of aggressive-withdrawn problem
             profiles in early grade school.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the
             Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and
             Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association,
             Division 53},
   Volume = {31},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {299-311},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15374424JCCP3103_02},
   Abstract = {Identified first-grade children who exhibited 4 different
             behavior problem profiles from an initial sample of 754:
             aggressive-withdrawn (n = 63.8%) aggressive only (n = 165,
             22%), withdrawn only (n = 94, 12%), and nonproblem (n = 432,
             57%). Group comparisons revealed that children who became
             aggressive-withdrawn in first grade exhibited deficits in
             attention and social skills in kindergarten. Furthermore,
             these kindergarten deficits contributed to the emergence of
             their aggressive-withdrawn behavior problems in first grade,
             after accounting for kindergarten levels of aggressive and
             withdrawn behaviors. In later grades, aggressive-withdrawn
             first-grade children were more likely than children in any
             other group to demonstrate poor peer relations and poor
             academic performance. In addition, kindergarten skill
             deficits added to first-grade aggressive and withdrawn
             behavior problems to predict third-grade social and academic
             adjustment difficulties. The results document the key role
             of early inattention and social skill deficits in the
             prediction of aggressive-withdrawn problem profiles,
             validate the significance of this problem profile at school
             entry, and identify potential developmental mechanisms that
             have implications for preventive interventions.},
   Doi = {10.1207/S15374424JCCP3103_02},
   Key = {fds334938}
}

@article{fds334933,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, S and Coie, JD and Maumary-Gremaud, A and Bierman, K and Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Peer rejection and aggression and early starter models of
             conduct disorder.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {217-230},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1015198612049},
   Abstract = {Peer rejection and aggression in the early school years were
             examined for their relevance to early starting conduct
             problems. The sample of 657 boys and girls from 4
             geographical locations was followed from 1st through 4th
             grades. Peer rejection in 1st grade added incrementally to
             the prediction of early starting conduct problems in 3rd and
             4th grades, over and above the effects of aggression. Peer
             rejection and aggression in 1st grade were also associated
             with the impulsive and emotionally reactive behaviors found
             in older samples. Being rejected by peers subsequent to 1st
             grade marginally added to the prediction of early starting
             conduct problems in 3rd and 4th grades, controlling for 1st
             grade ADHD symptoms and aggression. Furthermore, peer
             rejection partially mediated the predictive relation between
             early ADHD symptoms and subsequent conduct problems. These
             results support the hypothesis that the experience of peer
             rejection in the early school years adds to the risk for
             early starting conduct problems.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1015198612049},
   Key = {fds334933}
}

@article{fds334940,
   Author = {Kaplow, JB and Curran, PJ and Dodge, KA and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Child, parent, and peer predictors of early-onset substance
             use: a multisite longitudinal study.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {199-216},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1015183927979},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this study was to identify kindergarten-age
             predictors of early-onset substance use from demographic,
             environmental, parenting, child psychological, behavioral,
             and social functioning domains. Data from a longitudinal
             study of 295 children were gathered using
             multiple-assessment methods and multiple informants in
             kindergarten and 1st grade. Annual assessments at ages 10,
             11, and 12 reflected that 21% of children reported having
             initiated substance use by age 12. Results from longitudinal
             logistic regression models indicated that risk factors at
             kindergarten include being male, having a parent who abused
             substances, lower levels of parental verbal reasoning,
             higher levels of overactivity, more thought problems, and
             more social problem solving skills deficits. Children with
             no risk factors had less than a 10% chance of initiating
             substance use by age 12, whereas children with 2 or more
             risk factors had greater than a 50% chance of initiating
             substance use. Implications for typology, etiology, and
             prevention are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1015183927979},
   Key = {fds334940}
}

@article{fds334934,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Laird, R and Lochman, JE and Zelli, A and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Multidimensional latent-construct analysis of children's
             social information processing patterns: correlations with
             aggressive behavior problems.},
   Journal = {Psychological Assessment},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {60-73},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//1040-3590.14.1.60},
   Abstract = {Social information processing (SIP) patterns were
             conceptualized in orthogonal domains of process and context
             and measured through responses to hypothetical vignettes in
             a stratified sample of 387 children (50% boys; 49% minority)
             from 4 geographical sites followed from kindergarten through
             3rd grade. Multidimensional, latent-construct, confirmatory
             factor analyses supported the within-construct internal
             consistency, cross-construct discrimination, and
             multidimensionality of SIP patterns. Contrasts among nested
             structural equation models indicated that SIP constructs
             significantly predicted children's aggressive behavior
             problems as measured by later teacher reports. The findings
             support the multidimensional construct validity of
             children's social cognitive patterns and the relevance of
             SIP patterns in children's aggressive behavior
             problems.},
   Doi = {10.1037//1040-3590.14.1.60},
   Key = {fds334934}
}

@article{fds334935,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Evaluation of the first 3 years of the Fast Track prevention
             trial with children at high risk for adolescent conduct
             problems.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {19-35},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1014274914287},
   Abstract = {Fast Track is a conduct-problem prevention trial that
             derives its intervention from longitudinal research on how
             serious and chronic adolescent problem behaviors develop.
             Over 9,000 kindergarten children at 4 sites in 3 cohorts
             were screened, and 891 were identified as high risk and then
             randomly assigned to intervention or control groups.
             Beginning in Grade 1, high-risk children and their parents
             were asked to participate in a combination of social skills
             and anger-control training, academic tutoring, parent
             training, and home visiting. A multiyear universal classroom
             program was delivered to the core schools attended by these
             high-risk children. By the end of third grade, 37% of the
             intervention group was determined to be free of serious
             conduct-problem dysfunction, in contrast with 27% of the
             control group. Teacher ratings of conduct problems and
             official records of use of special education resources gave
             modest effect-size evidence that the intervention was
             preventing conduct problem behavior at school. Parent
             ratings provided additional support for prevention of
             conduct problems at home. Parenting behavior and children's
             social cognitive skills that had previously emerged as
             proximal outcomes at the end of the 1st year of intervention
             continued to show positive effects of the intervention at
             the end of third grade.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1014274914287},
   Key = {fds334935}
}

@article{fds334936,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE},
   Title = {Predictor variables associated with positive Fast Track
             outcomes at the end of third grade.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {37-52},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1014227031125},
   Abstract = {Progress has been made in understanding the outcome effects
             of preventive interventions and treatments designed to
             reduce children's conduct problems. However, limited
             research has explored the factors that may affect the degree
             to which an intervention is likely to benefit particular
             individuals. This study examines selected child, family, and
             community baseline characteristics that may predict proximal
             outcomes from the Fast Track intervention. The primary goal
             of this study was to examine predictors of outcomes after 3
             years of intervention participation, at the end of 3rd
             grade. Three types of proximal outcomes were examined:
             parent-rated aggression, teacher-rated oppositional-aggressive
             behavior, and special education involvement. The relation
             between 11 risk factors and these 3 outcomes was examined,
             with separate regression analyses for the intervention and
             control groups. Moderate evidence of prediction of outcome
             effects was found, although none of the baseline variables
             were found to predict all 3 outcomes, and different patterns
             of prediction emerged for home versus school
             outcomes.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1014227031125},
   Key = {fds334936}
}

@article{fds334937,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, E},
   Title = {The implementation of the Fast Track program: an example of
             a large-scale prevention science efficacy
             trial.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-17},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1014292830216},
   Abstract = {In 1990, the Fast Track Project was initiated to evaluate
             the feasibility and effectiveness of a comprehensive,
             multicomponent prevention program targeting children at risk
             for conduct disorders in four demographically diverse
             American communities (Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group [CPPRG], 1992). Representing a prevention science
             approach toward community-based preventive intervention, the
             Fast Track intervention design was based upon the available
             data base elucidating the epidemiology of risk for conduct
             disorder and suggesting key causal developmental influences
             (R. P. Weissberg & M. T. Greenberg, 1998). Critical
             questions about this approach to prevention center around
             the extent to which such a science-based program can be
             effective at (1) engaging community members and
             stakeholders, (2) maintaining intervention fidelity while
             responding appropriately to the local norms and needs of
             communities that vary widely in their demographic and
             cultural/ethnic composition, and (3) maintaining community
             engagement in the long-term to support effective and
             sustainable intervention dissemination. This paper discusses
             these issues, providing examples from the Fast Track project
             to illustrate the process of program implementation and the
             evidence available regarding the success of this
             science-based program at engaging communities in sustainable
             and effective ways as partners in prevention
             programming.},
   Doi = {10.1023/A:1014292830216},
   Key = {fds334937}
}

@article{fds334941,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Using the Fast Track randomized prevention trial to test the
             early-starter model of the development of serious conduct
             problems.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {925-943},
   Year = {2002},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579402004133},
   Abstract = {The Fast Track prevention trial was used to test hypotheses
             from the Early-Starter Model of the development of chronic
             conduct problems. We randomly assigned 891 high-risk
             first-grade boys and girls (51% African American) to receive
             the long-term Fast Track prevention or not. After 4 years,
             outcomes were assessed through teacher ratings, parent
             ratings, peer nominations, and child self-report. Positive
             effects of assignment to intervention were evident in
             teacher and parent ratings of conduct problems, peer social
             preference scores, and association with deviant peers.
             Assessments of proximal goals of intervention (e.g., hostile
             attributional bias, problem-solving skill, harsh parental
             discipline, aggressive and prosocial behavior at home and
             school) collected after grade 3 were found to partially
             mediate these effects. The findings are interpreted as
             consistent with developmental theory.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579402004133},
   Key = {fds334941}
}

@article{fds334942,
   Author = {Murphy, SA and Van der Laan and MJ and Robins, JM and Bierman, KL and Coie,
             JD and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes,
             E},
   Title = {Marginal mean models for dynamic regimes},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Statistical Association},
   Volume = {96},
   Number = {456},
   Pages = {1410-1423},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1198/016214501753382327},
   Abstract = {A dynamic treatment regime is a list of rules for how the
             level of treatment will be tailored through time to an
             individual's changing severity. In general, individuals who
             receive the highest level of treatment are the individuals
             with the greatest severity and need for treatment. Thus,
             there is planned selection of the treatment dose. In
             addition to the planned selection mandated by the treatment
             rules, staff judgment results in unplanned selection of the
             treatment level. Given observational longitudinal data or
             data in which there is unplanned selection of the treatment
             level, the methodology proposed here allows the estimation
             of a mean response to a dynamic treatment regime under the
             assumption of sequential randomization. © 2001, Taylor &
             Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1198/016214501753382327},
   Key = {fds334942}
}

@article{fds334944,
   Author = {Pinderhughes, EE and Nix, R and Foster, EM and Jones, D and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, M and Lochman, JE and McMahon,
             RJ},
   Title = {Parenting in context: Impact of neighborhood poverty,
             residential stability, public services, social networks, and
             danger on parental behaviors},
   Journal = {Journal of Marriage and the Family},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {941-953},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2001.00941.x},
   Abstract = {This prospective longitudinal study examined the unique and
             combined effects of neighborhood characteristics on parental
             behaviors in the context of more distal and more proximal
             influences. With a sample of 368 mothers from high-risk
             communities in 4 parts of the United States, this study
             examined relations between race (African American or
             European American), locality (urban or rural), neighborhood
             characteristics, family context, and child problem
             behaviors, and parental warmth, appropriate and consistent
             discipline, and harsh interactions. Analyses testing
             increasingly proximal influences on parenting revealed that
             initial race differences in warmth and consistent discipline
             disappeared when neighborhood influences were considered.
             Although generally culture and context did not moderate
             other relations found between neighborhood characteristics,
             family context, and child behaviors, the few interactions
             found highlight the complex influences on
             parenting.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1741-3737.2001.00941.x},
   Key = {fds334944}
}

@article{fds334943,
   Author = {Hubbard, JA and Dodge, KA and Cillessen, AH and Coie, JD and Schwartz,
             D},
   Title = {The dyadic nature of social information processing in boys'
             reactive and proactive aggression.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {80},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {268-280},
   Year = {2001},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.80.2.268},
   Abstract = {The correlation between boys' social cognitions and their
             aggressive behavior toward peers was examined as being actor
             driven, partner driven, or dyadic relationship driven.
             Eleven groups of 6 familiar boys each (N = 165 dyads) met
             for 5 consecutive days to participate in play sessions and
             social-cognitive interviews. With a variance partitioning
             procedure, boys' social-cognitive processes were found to
             vary reliably across their dyadic relationships.
             Furthermore, mixed models regression analyses indicated that
             hostile attributional biases toward a particular peer were
             related to directly observed reactive aggression toward that
             peer even after controlling for actor and partner effects,
             suggesting that these phenomena are dyadic or relationship
             oriented. On the other hand, the relation between outcome
             expectancies for aggression and the display of proactive
             aggression appeared to be more actor driven and partner
             driven that dyadic.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-3514.80.2.268},
   Key = {fds334943}
}

@article{fds334945,
   Author = {Kohl, GO and Lengua, LJ and McMahon, RJ and Bierman, K and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and Pinderhughes,
             EE},
   Title = {Parent involvement in school conceptualizing multiple
             dimensions and their relations with family and demographic
             risk factors},
   Journal = {Journal of School Psychology},
   Volume = {38},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {501-523},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-4405(00)00050-9},
   Abstract = {Parent involvement (PI) in school is associated with more
             positive academic performance and social competence in
             children. However, there are inadequacies in current
             measures of PI and a need for a better understanding of
             predictors of PI. In this study, measures were obtained from
             a normative sample of 387 children in kindergarten and first
             grade from high-risk neighborhoods in 4 different sites.
             First, a confirmatory factor analysis of a theoretical
             factor model of PI identified 6 reliable multiple-reporter
             PI factors: Parent-Teacher Contact, Parent Involvement at
             School, Quality of Parent-Teacher Relationship, Teacher's
             Perception of the Parent, Parent Involvement at Home, and
             Parent Endorsement of School. Next, the relations among 3
             specific family and demographic risk factors-parental
             education level, maternal depression, and single-parent
             status-and these 6 PI factors were examined using path
             analyses in structural equation modeling. Results indicated
             that the 3 risk factors were differentially associated with
             the 6 PI factors: Parental education was significantly
             associated with 4 PI outcomes, maternal depression was
             significantly associated with 5 PI outcomes, and
             single-parent status was significantly associated with 3 PI
             outcomes. No significant ethnic group differences between
             African American and Caucasian families were found in these
             relations. © 2000 Society for the Study of School
             Psychology. Published by Elsevier Science
             Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1016/S0022-4405(00)00050-9},
   Key = {fds334945}
}

@article{fds334948,
   Author = {Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group},
   Title = {Merging universal and indicated prevention programs: the
             Fast Track model. Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {Addictive Behaviors},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {913-927},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0306-4603(00)00120-9},
   Abstract = {Fast Track is a multisite, multicomponent preventive
             intervention for young children at high risk for long-term
             antisocial behavior. Based on a comprehensive developmental
             model, this intervention includes a universal-level
             classroom program plus social-skill training, academic
             tutoring, parent training, and home visiting to improve
             competencies and reduce problems in a high-risk group of
             children selected in kindergarten. The theoretical
             principles and clinical strategies utilized in the Fast
             Track Project are described to illustrate the interplay
             between basic developmental research, the understanding of
             risk and protective factors, and a research-based model of
             preventive intervention that integrates universal and
             indicated models of prevention.},
   Doi = {10.1016/s0306-4603(00)00120-9},
   Key = {fds334948}
}

@article{fds334949,
   Author = {Rabiner, D and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Early attention problems and children's reading achievement:
             a longitudinal investigation. The Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent
             Psychiatry},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {859-867},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00004583-200007000-00014},
   Abstract = {To determine whether attention problems predict the
             development of reading difficulties and examine whether
             screening for attention problems could be of practical value
             in identifying children at risk for reading
             underachievement.Three hundred eighty-seven children were
             monitored from kindergarten through fifth grade.
             Standardized assessments of attention problems and reading
             achievement were conducted at multiple time points.Attention
             problems predicted reading achievement even after
             controlling for prior reading achievement, IQ, and other
             behavioral difficulties. Inattentive first graders with
             normal reading scores after kindergarten were at risk for
             poor reading outcomes.Attention problems play an important
             role in the development of reading difficulties for some
             children, and screening for attention problems may help
             identify children at risk for reading difficulties.},
   Doi = {10.1097/00004583-200007000-00014},
   Key = {fds334949}
}

@article{fds334947,
   Author = {Bellanti, CJ and Bierman, KL},
   Title = {Disentangling the impact of low cognitive ability and
             inattention on social behavior and peer relationships.
             Conduct Problems Prevention Re search Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child Psychology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {66-75},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15374424jccp2901_7},
   Abstract = {Examined the shared and unique contributions of low
             cognitive ability and inattention to the development of
             social behavior problems and peer relationships of children
             at the time of school entry. Kindergarten and first-grade
             assessments of cognitive ability, inattention and prosocial
             and aggressive behavior were collected for a multisite,
             normative sample. Sociometric assessments of peer
             relationships were collected at the end of first grade.
             Cognitive ability and inattention both contributed to the
             prediction of social behavior and peer relationships. Low
             cognitive ability was particularly predictive of prosocial
             skill deficits, and social behavior mediated the relation
             between cognitive ability and social preference. Inattention
             predicted both prosocial skill deficits and elevated
             aggressive-disruptive behavior problems. Behavior problems
             partially mediated the relation between inattention and
             social preference. Identified subgroups of children with
             elevated levels of inattention or low cognitive ability
             showed different patterns of peer problems, with low
             acceptance characteristic of the low cognitive ability
             (only) group and high dislike ratings characteristic of the
             inattentive and inattentive/low-ability group. Implications
             are discussed for the design of early intervention and
             prevention programs.},
   Doi = {10.1207/S15374424jccp2901_7},
   Key = {fds334947}
}

@article{fds334950,
   Author = {Stormshak, EA and Bierman, KL and McMahon, RJ and Lengua,
             LJ},
   Title = {Parenting practices and child disruptive behavior problems
             in early elementary school. Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Clinical Child Psychology},
   Volume = {29},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {17-29},
   Year = {2000},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15374424jccp2901_3},
   Abstract = {Examined the hypothesis that distinct parenting practices
             may be associated with type and profile of a child's
             disruptive behavior problems (e.g., oppositional,
             aggressive, hyperactive). Parents of 631 behaviorally
             disruptive children described the extent to which they
             experienced warm and involved interactions with their
             children and the extent to which their discipline strategies
             were inconsistent and punitive and involved spanking and
             physical aggression. As expected from a developmental
             perspective, parenting practices that included punitive
             interactions were associated with elevated rates of all
             child disruptive behavior problems. Low levels of warm
             involvement were particularly characteristic of parents of
             children who showed elevated levels of oppositional
             behaviors. Physically aggressive parenting was linked more
             specifically with child aggression. In general, parenting
             practices contributed more to the prediction of oppositional
             and aggressive behavior problems than to hyperactive
             behavior problems, and parenting influences were fairly
             consistent across ethnic groups and sex.},
   Doi = {10.1207/S15374424jccp2901_3},
   Key = {fds334950}
}

@article{fds334951,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Grp, CPPR},
   Title = {Initial impact of the Fast Track prevention trial for
             conduct problems: I. The high-risk sample. Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {631-647},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {October},
   Abstract = {Fast Track is a multisite, multicomponent preventive
             intervention for young children at high risk for long-term
             antisocial behavior. Based on a comprehensive developmental
             model, intervention included a universal-level classroom
             program plus social skills training, academic tutoring,
             parent training, and home visiting to improve competencies
             and reduce problems in a high-risk group of children
             selected in kindergarten. At the end of Grade 1, there were
             moderate positive effects on children's social, emotional,
             and academic skills; peer interactions and social status;
             and conduct problems and special-education use. Parents
             reported less physical discipline and greater parenting
             satisfaction/ease of parenting and engaged in more
             appropriate/consistent discipline, warmth/positive
             involvement, and involvement with the school. Evidence of
             differential intervention effects across child gender, race,
             site, and cohort was minimal.},
   Key = {fds334951}
}

@article{fds334952,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and McMahon, RJ and Pinderhughes, EE and Grp, CPPR},
   Title = {Initial impact of the Fast Track prevention trial for
             conduct problems: II. Classroom effects. Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {648-657},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {October},
   Abstract = {This study examined the effectiveness of the universal
             component of the Fast Track prevention model: the PATHS
             (Promoting Alternative THinking Strategies) curriculum and
             teacher consultation. This randomized clinical trial
             involved 198 intervention and 180 comparison classrooms from
             neighborhoods with greater than average crime in 4 U.S.
             locations. In the intervention schools, Grade 1 teachers
             delivered a 57-lesson social competence intervention focused
             on self-control, emotional awareness, peer relations, and
             problem solving. Findings indicated significant effects on
             peer ratings of aggression and hyperactive-disruptive
             behavior and observer ratings of classroom atmosphere.
             Quality of implementation predicted variation in assessments
             of classroom functioning. The results are discussed in terms
             of both the efficacy of universal, school-based prevention
             models and the need to examine comprehensive, multiyear
             programs.},
   Key = {fds334952}
}

@article{fds334953,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Cillessen, AH and Dodge, KA and Hubbard, JA and Schwartz,
             D and Lemerise, EA and Bateman, H},
   Title = {It takes two to fight: a test of relational factors and a
             method for assessing aggressive dyads.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1179-1188},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0012-1649.35.5.1179},
   Abstract = {Observations of aggressive interactions in boys' laboratory
             play groups were used to evaluate the relative importance of
             relational and individual factors in accounting for
             aggressive acts. A classroom peer-rating method for
             identifying mutually aggressive dyads was validated in 11
             5-session play groups, composed of 2 mutually aggressive
             boys and 4 randomly selected male classmates from 11
             predominately African American 3rd-grade classrooms. When
             the social relations model was used, relationship effects
             accounted for equally as much of the variance in total
             aggression and proactive aggression as either actor or
             target effects. Mutually aggressive dyads displayed twice as
             much total aggression as randomly selected dyads. Members of
             mutually aggressive dyads attributed greater hostile
             intentions toward each other than did randomly selected
             dyads, which may serve to explain their greater aggression
             toward each other. The importance of studying relational
             factors, including social histories and social-cognitive
             processes, is discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0012-1649.35.5.1179},
   Key = {fds334953}
}

@article{fds336505,
   Author = {Sandstrom, MJ and Coie, JD},
   Title = {A developmental perspective on peer rejection: mechanisms of
             stability and change.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {955-966},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00069},
   Abstract = {This study examines factors associated with the relative
             stability of peer rejection among elementary school-aged
             children. Forty-four initially rejected children (some of
             whom improved their social status while others remained
             rejected over a 2-year period) were recruited from a larger
             sociometric sample. Prospective analyses were conducted to
             determine whether peer nominated aggression and children's
             perceptions of their own status in fourth grade were
             predictive of status improvement by the end of fifth grade.
             In addition to prospective analyses, initially rejected
             children and their mothers were invited to participate in a
             retrospective interview about their social experiences over
             the past 2 school years. Results of prospective and
             retrospective analyses suggested that perceived social
             status, participation in extracurricular activities, locus
             of control, and parental monitoring were all positively
             related to status improvement among initially rejected
             children. Surprisingly, aggressive behavior also was
             positively related to status improvement among initially
             rejected boys.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00069},
   Key = {fds336505}
}

@article{fds334955,
   Author = {Zelli, A and Dodge, KA and Lochman, JE and Laird,
             RD},
   Title = {The distinction between beliefs legitimizing aggression and
             deviant processing of social cues: testing measurement
             validity and the hypothesis that biased processing mediates
             the effects of beliefs on aggression. Conduct Problems
             Prevention Research Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {77},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {150-166},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-3514.77.1.150},
   Abstract = {In 2 studies the authors examined knowledge and social
             information-processing mechanisms as 2 distinct sources of
             influence on child aggression. Data were collected from 387
             boys and girls of diverse ethnicity in 3 successive years.
             In Study 1, confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated the
             discriminant validity of the knowledge construct of
             aggression beliefs and the processing constructs of hostile
             intent attributions, accessing of aggressive responses, and
             positive evaluation of aggressive outcomes. In Study 2,
             structural equation modeling analyses were used to test the
             mediation hypothesis that aggression beliefs would influence
             child aggression through the effects of deviant processing.
             A stronger belief that aggressive retaliation is acceptable
             predicted more deviant processing 1 year later and more
             aggression 2 years later. However, this latter effect was
             substantially accounted for by the intervening effects of
             deviant processing on aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.77.1.150},
   Key = {fds334955}
}

@article{fds334956,
   Author = {Greenberg, MT and Lengua, LJ and Coie, JD and Pinderhughes,
             EE},
   Title = {Predicting developmental outcomes at school entry using a
             multiple-risk model: four American communities. The Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group.},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {35},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {403-417},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0012-1649.35.2.403},
   Abstract = {The contributions of different risk factors in predicting
             children's psychological and academic outcomes at the end of
             1st grade were examined. Using a regression model, levels of
             ecobehavioral risk were assessed in the following order:
             specific demographics, broad demographics, family
             psychosocial status, mother's depressive symptoms, and
             neighborhood quality. Participants were 337 families from 4
             American communities. Predictor variables were assessed in
             kindergarten, and teacher, parent, and child outcomes
             (behavioral and academic) were assessed at the end of 1st
             grade. Results indicated that (a) each level of analysis
             contributed to prediction of most outcomes, (b) 18%-29% of
             the variance was predicted in outcomes, (c) a common set of
             predictors predicted numerous outcomes, (d) ethnicity showed
             little unique prediction, and (e) the quality of the
             neighborhood showed small but unique prediction to
             externalizing problems.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0012-1649.35.2.403},
   Key = {fds334956}
}

@article{fds334954,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, S and Coie, JD and Maumary-Gremaud, A and Lochman, J and Terry, R},
   Title = {Relationship between Childhood Peer Rejection and Aggression
             and Adolescent Delinquency Severity and Type among African
             American Youth},
   Journal = {Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {137-146},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/106342669900700302},
   Abstract = {This prospective, longitudinal study examined peer rejection
             and aggression in childhood as predictors of the severity
             and type of delinquency during adolescence. Sociometric
             surveys were completed at third grade for a predominantly
             low-socioeconomic status, urban sample of African American
             boys and girls, and youth reports of delinquency were
             gathered at Grades 6, 8, and 10. Patterns of association
             between childhood peer rejection and aggression and
             delinquency severity varied by gender. For boys, the
             additive effect of childhood peer rejection and aggression
             was a strong predictor of more serious delinquency, whereas
             for girls only aggression predicted more serious
             delinquency. For boys, the combination of peer rejection and
             aggression was associated with felony assaults, and
             aggression was associated with a wide diversity of offenses
             during adolescence, whereas for girls only peer rejection
             predicted involvement in minor assault. Results are
             discussed in terms of the early starter pathway of
             antisocial behavior as it relates to peer rejection and
             aggression for boys, differing predictive patterns for
             girls, and implications for intervention with children with
             emotional and behavioral disorders.},
   Doi = {10.1177/106342669900700302},
   Key = {fds334954}
}

@article{fds334958,
   Author = {Stormshak, EA and Bierman, KL and Bruschi, C and Dodge, KA and Coie,
             JD},
   Title = {The relation between behavior problems and peer preference
             in different classroom contexts. Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {70},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {169-182},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00013},
   Abstract = {This study tested two alternative hypotheses regarding the
             relations between child behavior and peer preference. The
             first hypothesis is generated from the person-group
             similarity model, which predicts that the acceptability of
             social behaviors will vary as a function of peer group
             norms. The second hypothesis is generated by the social
             skill model, which predicts that behavioral skill
             deficiencies reduce and behavioral competencies enhance peer
             preference. A total of 2895 children in 134 regular
             first-grade classrooms participated in the study.
             Hierarchical linear modeling was used to compare four
             different behaviors as predictors of peer preference in the
             context of classrooms with varying levels of these behavior
             problems. The results of the study supported both predictive
             models, with the acceptability of aggression and withdrawal
             varying across classrooms (following a person-group
             similarity model) and the effects of inattentive/hyperactive
             behavior (in a negative direction) and prosocial behavior
             (in a positive direction) following a social skill model and
             remaining constant in their associations with peer
             preference across classrooms. Gender differences also
             emerged, with aggression following the person-group
             similarity model for boys more strongly than for girls. The
             effects of both child behaviors and the peer group context
             on peer preference and on the trajectory of social
             development are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8624.00013},
   Key = {fds334958}
}

@article{fds334957,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, S and Winn, DM and Coie, J and Maumary-Gremaud, A and Hyman, C and Terry, R and Lochman, J},
   Title = {Motherhood during the teen years: a developmental
             perspective on risk factors for childbearing.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {11},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {85-100},
   Year = {1999},
   Abstract = {The role of peer relations in childhood and behavioral and
             family characteristics in early adolescence as risk factors
             for adolescent childbearing was investigated. Sociometric
             surveys across third, fourth, and fifth grade and parent and
             child measures of behavioral and family functioning at sixth
             and eighth grade were collected in a lower income, urban
             sample of 308 African American females. Results replicated
             earlier findings on the role of childhood aggression as a
             predictor of teen motherhood. In addition, girls who
             displayed stable patterns of childhood aggression were at
             significantly higher risk not only to have children as
             teenagers but to have more children and to have children at
             younger ages. Results also indicated that females who were
             depressed in midadolescence were at greater risk to become
             parents between age 15 and 19 years. These findings
             demonstrate the need to take a differentiated approach to
             understanding teen childbearing and varying developmental
             pathways in the prediction of teen motherhood.},
   Key = {fds334957}
}

@article{fds334959,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and Coie, JD and Hubbard, JA and Cillessen,
             AH and Lemerise, EA and Bateman, H},
   Title = {Social-cognitive and behavioral correlates of aggression and
             victimization in boys' play groups.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {431-440},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1022695601088},
   Abstract = {A contrived play group procedure was utilized to examine the
             behavioral and social-cognitive correlates of reactive
             aggression, proactive aggression, and victimization via
             peers. Eleven play groups, each of which consisted of six
             familiar African-American 8-year-old boys, met for 45-min
             sessions on five consecutive days. Social-cognitive
             interviews were conducted following the second and fourth
             sessions. Play group interactions were videotaped and
             examined by trained observers. High rates of proactive
             aggression were associated with positive outcome
             expectancies for aggression/assertion, frequent displays of
             assertive social behavior, and low rates of submissive
             behavior. Reactive aggression was associated with hostile
             attributional tendencies and frequent victimization by
             peers. Victimization was associated with submissive
             behavior, hostile attributional bias, reactive aggression,
             and negative outcome expectations for aggression/assertion.
             These results demonstrate that there is a theoretically
             coherent and empirically distinct set of correlates
             associated with each of the examined aggression subtypes,
             and with victimization by peers.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1022695601088},
   Key = {fds334959}
}

@article{fds334960,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, S and Lochman, JE and Coie, JD and Terry, R and Hyman,
             C},
   Title = {Comorbidity of conduct and depressive problems at sixth
             grade: substance use outcomes across adolescence.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {221-232},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1022676302865},
   Abstract = {The comorbidity of conduct and depressive problems and
             substance use outcomes were examined in a community-based
             sample of 340 African American males and females. Alcohol,
             tobacco, and marijuana use were examined at Grades 6, 8, and
             10 based on the following group membership at sixth grade:
             (a) comorbid conduct and depressive problems; (b) conduct
             problems only; (c) depressive problems only; (d) neither
             conduct nor depressive problems. Overall, the two conduct
             problem groups displayed the highest levels of substance
             use, although at some time points, comorbid youth displayed
             significant higher substance use levels. Subjects with
             depressive problems only displayed levels of substance use
             that were equivalent to subjects in the nonproblem group.
             Results highlight the importance of controlling for comorbid
             symptoms, possible interactive effects between conduct and
             depressive problems, and implications for treatment and
             prevention of substance use.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1022676302865},
   Key = {fds334960}
}

@article{fds334961,
   Author = {Coie, J and Terry, R and Lenox, K and Lochman, J and Hyman,
             C},
   Title = {Erratum: Childhood peer rejection and aggression as
             predictors of stable patterns of adolescent disorder:
             (Development and Psychopathology (1995) 7(4) (697-713)
             (10.1017/s0954579400006799))},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {587-588},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s095457949800176x},
   Abstract = {The following paragraphs were missing from the original
             article published in 1995. Beginning with the last paragraph
             on page 706, the text to the end of the section is here
             reprinted. We regret the omission and any problems it may
             have caused. © 1998, Cambridge University Press. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s095457949800176x},
   Key = {fds334961}
}

@article{fds334962,
   Author = {Stormshak, EA and Bierman, KL},
   Title = {The implications of different developmental patterns of
             disruptive behavior problems for school adjustment. Conduct
             Problems Prevention Research Group.},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {451-467},
   Year = {1998},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0954579498001692},
   Abstract = {Based upon developmental models of disruptive behavior
             problems, this study examined the hypothesis that the nature
             of a child's externalizing problems at home may be important
             in predicting the probability of and nature of school
             adjustment problems at school entry. Parent ratings were
             collected for a sample of 631 behaviorally disruptive
             children using the Child Behavior Checklist. Confirmatory
             factor analyses revealed differentiated ratings of
             oppositional, aggressive, and hyperactive/inattentive
             behaviors at home. Teacher and peer nominations assessed
             school adjustment at the end of first grade. As expected
             from a developmental perspective, aggressive behaviors
             indicated more severe dysfunction and were more likely to
             generalize to the school setting than were oppositional
             behaviors. Hyperactive/inattentive behaviors at home led to
             more classroom disruption than did aggressive or
             oppositional behaviors. Co-occurring patterns of
             oppositional/aggressive and hyperactive/inattentive
             behaviors were more common than were single-problem
             patterns, and were associated with broad dysfunction in the
             social and classroom contexts. The results were interpreted
             within a developmental framework, in which oppositional,
             aggressive, and hyperactive/inattentive behaviors may
             reflect distinct (as well as shared) developmental processes
             that have implications for the home-to-school generalization
             of behavior problems and subsequent school
             adjustment.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0954579498001692},
   Key = {fds334962}
}

@article{fds334964,
   Author = {Poulin, F and Cillessen, AHN and Hubbard, JA and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Schwartz, D},
   Title = {Children's friends and behavioral similarity in two social
             contexts},
   Journal = {Social Development (Oxford, England)},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {224-235},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9507.1997.tb00103.x},
   Abstract = {The general purpose of this study was to examine similarity
             between friends with respect to behavior. The specific goals
             were to consider; 1) different sources of evaluation (peer
             ratings and direct observations); 2) different social
             contexts (classroom and play group); and 3) different
             subtypes of aggressive behavior (proactive and reactive
             aggression). In the first phase of the study, sociometric
             assessments and peer evaluations of behavior were conducted
             in the school setting with third-grade boys and girls (n =
             268). In the second phase, a subsample of boys participated
             in a series of play group sessions (n = 66). Direct
             observations and peer ratings of children's behavior were
             conducted in those sessions. Results showed in both social
             contexts a tendency towards similarity among friends,
             especially with respect to aggressive behavior. Separate
             analyses for subtypes of aggressive behavior revealed that
             the similarity hypothesis applied for proactive aggression
             but not for reactive aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-9507.1997.tb00103.x},
   Key = {fds334964}
}

@article{fds334963,
   Author = {Bierman, KL},
   Title = {Implementing a comprehensive program for the prevention of
             conduct problems in rural communities: the Fast Track
             experience. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {493-514},
   Year = {1997},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1024659622528},
   Abstract = {Childhood conduct problems are predictive of a number of
             serious long-term difficulties (e.g., school failure,
             delinquent behavior, and mental health problems), making the
             design of effective prevention programs a priority. The Fast
             Track Program is a demonstration project currently underway
             in four demographically diverse areas of the United States,
             testing the feasibility and effectiveness of a
             comprehensive, multicomponent prevention program targeting
             children at risk for conduct disorders. This paper describes
             some lessons learned about the implementation of this
             program in a rural area. Although there are many areas of
             commonality in terms of program needs, program design, and
             implementation issues in rural and urban sites, rural areas
             differ from urban areas along the dimensions of geographical
             dispersion and regionalism, and community stability and
             insularity. Rural programs must cover a broad geographical
             area and must be sensitive to the multiple, small and
             regional communities that constitute their service area.
             Small schools, homogeneous populations, traditional values,
             limited recreational, educational and mental health
             services, and politically conservative climates are all more
             likely to emerge as characteristics of rural rather than
             urban sites (Sherman, 1992). These characteristics may both
             pose particular challenges to the implementation of
             prevention programs in rural areas, as well as offer
             particular benefits. Three aspects of program implementation
             are described in detail: (a) community entry and program
             initiation in rural areas, (b) the adaptation of program
             components and service delivery to meet the needs of rural
             families and schools, and (c) issues in administrative
             organization of a broadly dispersed tricounty rural
             prevention program.},
   Doi = {10.1023/a:1024659622528},
   Key = {fds334963}
}

@article{fds336506,
   Author = {Underwood, MK and Kupersmidt, JB and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Childhood peer sociometric status and aggression as
             predictors of adolescent childbearing},
   Journal = {Journal of Research on Adolescence},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {201-223},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {December},
   Abstract = {This prospective, longitudinal investigation examined the
             predictive relation among childhood sociometric status,
             aggression, and subsequent adolescent childbearing. Peer
             sociometric data were collected for 285 female participants
             from five schools in 1979, when the girls were in the fourth
             grade. In 1990, the birth certificates for the county were
             examined for the period 1980-1990 for 226 girls (79%) who
             remained in the sample. Analyses indicated significant
             differences in prevalence of births among peer sociometric
             status groups; controversial girls were most likely to
             become adolescent mothers (50%, in contrast to the base rate
             for the sample of 26%). Fifty percent of aggressive girls in
             the sample became adolescent mothers, in contrast to 25% of
             the nonaggressive girls. Controversial girls had more
             children than girls in other status groups; aggressive girls
             had more children than nonaggressive girls. Survival and
             hazard analyses indicated that controversial and aggressive
             girls gave birth earlier in adolescence than other girls.
             Copyright © 1996, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates,
             Inc.},
   Key = {fds336506}
}

@article{fds334966,
   Author = {Bierman, KL},
   Title = {Integrating social-skills training interventions with parent
             training and family-focused support to prevent conduct
             disorder in high-risk populations. The Fast Track Multisite
             Demonstration Project. The Conduct Problems Prevention
             Research Group.},
   Journal = {Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
   Volume = {794},
   Pages = {256-264},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1996.tb32526.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1749-6632.1996.tb32526.x},
   Key = {fds334966}
}

@article{fds336507,
   Author = {Zakriski, AL and Coie, JD},
   Title = {A comparison of aggressive-rejected and nonaggressive-rejected
             children's interpretations of self-directed and
             other-directed rejection.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {67},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {1048-1070},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/1131879},
   Abstract = {The hypothesis that aggressive-rejected children are unaware
             of their social status because they are self-protective when
             processing negative peer feedback was tested in 3 studies.
             In Study 1, fourth-grade girls and boys were asked to name
             peers they liked or disliked, as well as peers they thought
             liked or disliked them. Comparisons of aggressive-rejected,
             nonaggressive-rejected, and average status groups revealed
             that aggressive-rejected children were more unrealistic in
             their assessments of their social status than were
             nonaggressive-rejected children. In Study 2, rejected and
             average boys identified in Study 1 were asked to name who
             they thought liked or disliked other children from their
             classroom. Comparisons of perceived and actual nominations
             for peers revealed that aggressive-rejected children were
             able to assess the social status of others as well as did
             nonaggressive-rejected and average status children. Because
             the difficulties aggressive-rejected children demonstrated
             in Study 1 did not generalize to judging the status of
             others in Study 2, the self-protective hypothesis was
             supported. Study 3 provided a parallel test of this
             hypothesis under more controlled conditions. Subjects from
             Study 2 viewed other children receiving rejection feedback
             from peers in videotaped interactions and received similar
             feedback themselves from experimental confederates. While
             all subjects rated self-directed feedback somewhat more
             positively than other-directed feedback, aggressive-rejected
             subjects had the largest self-favoring discrepancy between
             their judgments of self- and other-directed feedback. These
             findings also suggest that aggressive-rejected children may
             make self-protective "errors" when judging other children's
             negative feelings about them. Ethnicity differences in
             evaluating peer feedback emerged in Studies 1 and 3, raising
             questions about the impact of minority status on children's
             evaluations of rejection feedback.},
   Doi = {10.2307/1131879},
   Key = {fds336507}
}

@article{fds334965,
   Author = {Stormshak, EA and Bellanti, CJ and Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge,
             KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman, JE and McMahon,
             RJ},
   Title = {The quality of sibling relationships and the development of
             social competence and behavioral control in aggressive
             children},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {32},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {79-89},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.32.1.79},
   Abstract = {To understand the relations between sibling interactions and
             the social adjustment of children with behavior problems, 53
             aggressive 1st- and 2nd-grade children, their mothers, and
             their siblings were interviewed about positive and negative
             aspects of the sibling relationship. When conflict and
             warmth were considered together, 3 types of sibling dyads
             emerged: conflictual (high levels of conflict, low levels of
             warmth), involved (moderate levels of conflict and warmth),
             and supportive (low levels of conflict, high levels of
             warmth). On most measures of social adjustment at school,
             children in involved sibling relationships showed better
             adjustment than did children in conflictual relationships.
             Results are discussed in terms of a developmental model for
             at-risk children in which some sibling relationships may
             foster the development of social skills in addition to
             providing emotional support, which may enhance adjustment at
             school. Copyright 1996 by the American Psychological
             Association, Inc.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.32.1.79},
   Key = {fds334965}
}

@article{fds334968,
   Author = {Boivin, M and Dodge, KA and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Individual-group behavioral similarity and peer status in
             experimental play groups of boys: the social misfit
             revisited.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {69},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {269-279},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-3514.69.2.269},
   Abstract = {This study evaluated individual-group similarity and
             dissimilarity hypotheses generally stipulating that the
             behavioral correlates of status are moderated by the peer
             group context in which they are displayed. Thirty play
             groups of 5 or 6 unacquainted same-age boys participated in
             five 45-min sessions. Five behaviors described group and
             individual characteristics: reactive aggression, proactive
             aggression, solitary play, rough-and-tumble play, and
             positive interactive behavior. Individual social preference
             scores were computed following a variant of the J. D. Coie
             and K. A. Dodge (1983) procedure. The behavioral correlates
             of emerging peer status were examined as a function of the
             group's behavioral norms. Evidence of a dissimilarity effect
             was found for solitary play and reactive aggression whereas
             positive interactive behavior followed a rule of
             similarity.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.69.2.269},
   Key = {fds334968}
}

@article{fds334969,
   Author = {Lochman, JE},
   Title = {Screening of child behavior problems for prevention programs
             at school entry. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research
             Group.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {549-559},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-006x.63.4.549},
   Abstract = {Targeted programs designed to prevent conduct problems in
             childhood and adolescence rely on screening systems to
             identify high-risk individuals. This study examines the
             proximal usefulness of a multiple-gating approach to
             screening, using teacher and parent ratings in a 2-step
             procedure with a sample of 382 kindergarten children. The
             study explored differences in the accuracy of the 2 steps of
             screening information and whether parents' reports of
             parenting practices augments the prediction of negative
             outcomes. The 2-step screening system was found to
             effectively predict negative behavior outcomes over 1 year
             later, although some false-positive and false-negative
             predictions were evident. The Parenting Practices Screen did
             not substantially add to prediction accuracy. The discussion
             emphasizes the potential contributions and problems of using
             screening measures.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-006x.63.4.549},
   Key = {fds334969}
}

@article{fds334967,
   Author = {Coie, J and Terry, R and Lenox, K and Lochman, J and Hyman,
             C},
   Title = {Childhood peer rejection and aggression as predictors of
             stable patterns of adolescent disorder},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {697-713},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579400006799},
   Abstract = {The significance of childhood peer rejection and aggression
             as predictors of adolescent disorder was tested on 1147
             children who were followed longitudinally from Grade 3
             through Grade 10. Growth curve analyses of parent- and
             self-reported problems suggested that boys who were both
             aggressive and rejected in third grade had profiles of
             increasingly severe internalizing and externalizing problems
             across three assessment points in adolescence. Other groups
             showed either decreasing symptom patterns from Grade 6 to 10
             or had consistently lower problem profiles. The longitudinal
             patterns were more complex for the girls. Childhood peer
             rejection was the only predictor of stable disorder as
             reported by parents, whereas self-reported externalizing
             problems were best predicted by childhood aggression. ©
             1995, Cambridge University Press. All rights
             reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400006799},
   Key = {fds334967}
}

@article{fds334970,
   Author = {DeRosier, ME and Cillessen, AH and Coie, JD and Dodge,
             KA},
   Title = {Group social context and children's aggressive
             behavior.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {65},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {1068-1079},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1994.tb00803.x},
   Abstract = {Very little is known about the influence of the
             social-psychological context on children's aggressive
             behavior. The purpose of this research was to examine the
             interrelations of group contextual factors and the
             occurrence of aggressive behavior in 22 experimental play
             groups of 7- and 9-year-old African-American boys. Group
             context was examined before, during, and after an aggressive
             act as well as during nonaggressive periods. The results
             showed that there are dimensions of group context (i.e.,
             negative affect, high aversive behavior, high activity
             level, low group cohesion, competitiveness) that were
             related to the occurrence of aggressive behavior between 2
             children in the group. Group context influenced how children
             reacted to aggression between its members (e.g., siding with
             the victim), which in turn influenced the quality of the
             postaggression group atmosphere. This study suggests that
             individual-within-context information be incorporated into
             theories of aggression among children.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1994.tb00803.x},
   Key = {fds334970}
}

@article{fds336508,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Lenox, KF},
   Title = {The development of antisocial individuals.},
   Journal = {Progress in Experimental Personality & Psychopathology
             Research},
   Pages = {45-72},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds336508}
}

@article{fds334972,
   Author = {Lochman, JE and Coie, JD and Underwood, MK and Terry,
             R},
   Title = {Effectiveness of a social relations intervention program for
             aggressive and nonaggressive, rejected children.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1053-1058},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-006x.61.6.1053},
   Abstract = {A sample of 52 Black aggressive, rejected and nonaggressive,
             rejected children were randomly assigned to receive a social
             relations intervention or to be in a nonintervention control
             group. The school-based intervention for fourth-grade
             children focused on positive social skill training and
             cognitive-behavioral strategies to promote deliberate,
             nonimpulsive problem solving. At both the post-treatment and
             the 1-year follow-up assessments, the social relations
             intervention was found to be effective only with the
             aggressive, rejected children. Implications for the
             importance of assessing subtypes of rejected children are
             discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-006x.61.6.1053},
   Key = {fds334972}
}

@article{fds334971,
   Author = {Schwartz, D and Dodge, KA and Coie, JD},
   Title = {The emergence of chronic peer victimization in boys' play
             groups.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {64},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1755-1772},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1993.tb04211.x},
   Abstract = {This investigation utilized a contrived play group procedure
             to examine the behavioral patterns leading to chronic
             victimization by peers in middle childhood. 30 play groups,
             each of which consisted of 6 unacquainted African-American
             6-year-old or 8-year-old boys, met for 45-min sessions on 5
             consecutive days. Play group interactions were videotaped
             and then examined. 13 boys who came to be chronically
             victimized by their play group peers were identified, along
             with matched nonvictim contrasts. Victims demonstrated lower
             rates of assertive behaviors, such as persuasion attempts
             and social conversation initiatives, and higher rates of
             nonassertive behaviors, such as submissions to peers' social
             initiatives, than contrasts. This nonassertive behavior
             pattern appears to have preceded the development of chronic
             victimization. Children who eventually emerged as victims
             were pervasively submissive, beginning in the initial 2
             sessions. However, marked individual differences in
             victimization by peers did not become apparent until the
             final 3 sessions. These data provide evidence of strong
             linkages between submissive social behavior and the
             emergence of chronic victimization by peers.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1993.tb04211.x},
   Key = {fds334971}
}

@article{fds334973,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Watt, NF and West, SG and Hawkins, JD and Asarnow, JR and Markman, HJ and Ramey, SL and Shure, MB and Long,
             B},
   Title = {The science of prevention. A conceptual framework and some
             directions for a national research program.},
   Journal = {American Psychologist},
   Volume = {48},
   Number = {10},
   Pages = {1013-1022},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0003-066x.48.10.1013},
   Abstract = {A conceptual framework for studying the prevention of human
             dysfunction is offered. On the basis of recent advances in
             research on the development of psychological disorders and
             methods of preventive intervention, generalizations about
             the relation of risk and protective factors to disorder are
             put forward, along with a set of principles for what may be
             identified as the science of prevention. Emerging themes
             from the study of human development, in general, need to be
             incorporated in the models for explaining and preventing
             serious problems of human adaptation. The article concludes
             with a set of recommendations for a national prevention
             research agenda.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0003-066x.48.10.1013},
   Key = {fds334973}
}

@article{fds336509,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Cillessen, AHN},
   Title = {Peer Rejection: Origins and Effects on Children's
             Development},
   Journal = {Current Directions in Psychological Science},
   Volume = {2},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {89-93},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-8721.ep10770946},
   Doi = {10.1111/1467-8721.ep10770946},
   Key = {fds336509}
}

@article{fds336510,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Jacobs, MR},
   Title = {The role of social context in the prevention of conduct
             disorder},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {1-2},
   Pages = {263-275},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1993},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579400004387},
   Abstract = {Two major transitions ” initial school entry and
             transition to middle school ” are emphasized as the points
             in development most amenable to preventing conduct disorder.
             As a complement to Reid's analysis of the child and family
             foci for prevention efforts, this paper discusses the
             importance of considering social context factors in
             prevention. In the early school years, peers inadvertently
             reinforce aggressive and coercive behavior and, thus,
             contribute to the coercive cycle Patterson describes in
             families. Middle schools in inner-city contexts have peer
             social network characteristics that also support delinquent
             and violent behavior more directly, in contrast to the
             general suppositions of social control theories of
             delinquency. The impact of neighborhoods and the larger
             societal tolerance of violence reflected in the media are
             also discussed. Prevention strategies for addressing these
             contextual factors at both developmental periods are
             outlined in the paper. © 1993, Cambridge University Press.
             All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400004387},
   Key = {fds336510}
}

@article{fds334974,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Lochman, JE and Terry, R and Hyman, C},
   Title = {Predicting early adolescent disorder from childhood
             aggression and peer rejection.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {60},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {783-792},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-006x.60.5.783},
   Abstract = {Two large cohorts of Black 3rd-grade children from
             low-income families were followed into early adolescence.
             Adjustment at the end of the 1st year of middle school was
             assessed by teacher and parent ratings and by adolescent
             self-reports. Childhood peer social status predicted
             parent-reported externalized and internalized disorder and
             self-reported internalized disorder. Childhood aggression
             predicted self-reported externalized and internalized
             disorder and parent-reported externalized disorder. Teacher
             ratings of school adjustment were predicted by aggression,
             rejection, and sex of the child. Consensus judgments of poor
             adjustment were predicted by both aggression and peer
             rejection, with sex moderating the effect of peer rejection.
             Both childhood aggression and peer rejection appear to be
             significant predictors of adolescent disorder, with each
             making a predictive contribution uniquely its
             own.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-006x.60.5.783},
   Key = {fds334974}
}

@article{fds334975,
   Author = {Bierman, KL and Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Greenberg, MT and Lochman,
             JE and Mcmahon, RJ},
   Title = {A developmental and clinical model for the prevention of
             conduct disorder: The FAST Track Program},
   Journal = {Development and Psychopathology},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {509-527},
   Publisher = {Cambridge University Press (CUP)},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579400004855},
   Abstract = {This paper presents a developmental and a clinical model for
             the treatment of conduct disorder through the strategy of
             preventive intervention. The theoretical principles and
             clinical strategies utilized in the FAST Track (Families and
             Schools Together) Program are described. We indicate how the
             clinical model is derived from both our developmental model
             and previous findings from prevention trials. The FAST Track
             Program integrates five intervention components designed to
             promote competence in the family, child, and school and thus
             prevent conduct problems, poor social relations, and school
             failure. It is our belief that testing the effects of such a
             comprehensive approach is a necessary step in developing new
             intervention models for this population. © 1992, Cambridge
             University Press. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1017/S0954579400004855},
   Key = {fds334975}
}

@article{fds336511,
   Author = {Underwood, MK and Coie, JD and Herbsman, CR},
   Title = {Display rules for anger and aggression in school-age
             children.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {366-380},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {April},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1992.tb01633.x},
   Abstract = {2 related studies addressed the development of display rules
             for anger and the relation between use of display rules for
             anger and aggressiveness as rated by school peers. Third,
             fifth, and seventh graders (ages 8.4, 10.9, and 12.8,
             respectively) gave hypothetical responses to videotaped,
             anger provoking vignettes. Overall, regardless of how
             display rules were defined, subjects reported display rules
             more often with teachers than with peers for both facial
             expressions and actions. Reported masking of facial
             expressions of anger increased with age, but only with
             teachers. Girls reported masking of facial expressions of
             anger more than boys. There was a trend for aggressive
             subjects to invoke display rules for anger less than
             nonaggressive subjects. The phenomenon of display rules for
             anger is complex and dependent on the way display rules are
             defined and the age and gender of the subjects. Most of all,
             whether children say they would behave angrily seems to be
             determined by the social context for revealing angry
             feelings; children say they would express anger genuinely
             much more often with peers than with teachers.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1992.tb01633.x},
   Key = {fds336511}
}

@article{fds336512,
   Author = {Underwood, MK and Coie, JD and Herbsman, CR},
   Title = {Display Rules for Anger and Aggression in School‐Age
             Children},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {366-380},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1992.tb01633.x},
   Abstract = {2 related studies addressed the development of display rules
             for anger and the relation between use of display rules for
             anger and aggressiveness as rated by school peers. Third,
             fifth, and seventh graders (ages 8.4, 10.9, and 12.8,
             respectively) gave hypothetical responses to videotaped,
             anger provoking vignettes. Overall, regardless of how
             display rules were defined, subjects reported display rules
             more often with teachers than with peers for both facial
             expressions and actions. Reported masking of facial
             expressions of anger increased with age, but only with
             teachers. Girls reported masking of facial expressions of
             anger more than boys. There was a trend for aggressive
             subjects to invoke display rules for anger less than
             nonaggressive subjects. The phenomenon of display rules for
             anger is complex and dependent on the way display rules are
             defined and the age and gender of the subjects. Most of all,
             whether children say they would behave angrily seems to be
             determined by the social context for revealing angry
             feelings; children say they would express anger genuinely
             much more often with peers than with teachers. Copyright ©
             1992, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1992.tb01633.x},
   Key = {fds336512}
}

@article{fds334976,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Terry, R and Wright, V},
   Title = {The role of aggression in peer relations: an analysis of
             aggression episodes in boys' play groups.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {812-826},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {August},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1991.tb01571.x},
   Abstract = {Although aggression is frequently cited as a major cause of
             peer social rejection, no more than half of all aggressive
             children are rejected. Aggressive episode data from
             experimental play groups of 7- and 9-year-old black males
             were coded to examine whether qualitative aspects of
             aggressive behavior, as well as frequency of aggression,
             determine the relation between aggressiveness and peer
             rejection. Reactive aggression and bullying were related to
             peer status among 9-year-olds, but not 7-year-olds, whereas
             instrumental aggression was characteristic of highly
             aggressive, rejected boys at both ages. Qualitative features
             of aggressive interaction suggested a greater level of
             hostility toward peers and a tendency to violate norms for
             aggressive exchange among rejected, aggressive boys at both
             ages in contrast to other groups of boys. The descriptive
             data provide a distinctive picture of reactive,
             instrumental, and bullying aggression as well as differing
             social norms for target and aggressor behavior in each of
             these 3 types of aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1991.tb01571.x},
   Key = {fds334976}
}

@article{fds334977,
   Author = {Terry, R and Coie, JD},
   Title = {A Comparison of Methods for Defining Sociometric Status
             Among Children},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {27},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {867-880},
   Year = {1991},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.27.5.867},
   Abstract = {Four of the most commonly used procedures for classifying
             children into social status groups were compared on such
             psychometric properties as temporal stability and
             discriminant validity. The degree of concordance in
             assigning subjects to status groups by the 4 procedures was
             also examined. Two samples N = 571 and N = 548 of boys and
             girls were followed from Grade 3 to Grade 5. The results
             indicated that the choice of a particular sociometric
             measure and method depended largely on the researcher's
             goals, because each system maximized different properties;
             however, 2-dimensional systems yielded better behavioral
             discriminability. The research paradigms in which each
             system will be most useful are outlined, as well as the
             consequences of using each system.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.27.5.867},
   Key = {fds334977}
}

@article{fds336513,
   Author = {Kupersmidt, JB and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Preadolescent peer status, aggression, and school adjustment
             as predictors of externalizing problems in
             adolescence.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1350-1362},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1990.tb02866.x},
   Abstract = {The comparative effectiveness of preadolescent aggressive
             behavior, peer rejection, and school functioning were
             evaluated in the prediction of adolescent delinquency and
             school maladjustment. Fifth-grade children (n = 112, 69%
             white, 53% male, M = 11 years old) were followed forward for
             7 years until the end of high school. Rejected children were
             more likely to have a nonspecific negative outcome and more
             types of negative outcomes than average, popular, or
             neglected children, particularly among the white students.
             However, in regression models containing sex, race,
             aggression, frequent school absences, low grades, and
             rejection, the only significant predictor of juvenile
             delinquency or of a nonspecific negative outcome was
             aggression toward peers. Both aggression and frequent school
             absences were significant predictors of early school
             withdrawal. Analyses for the white children in the sample
             revealed that both rejection and aggression best predicted
             to the nonspecific negative outcome, whereas aggression
             alone best predicted to school dropout and to having one or
             more police contacts. Implications for future longitudinal
             outcome research and for risk-group identification in
             racially heterogeneous samples are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1990.tb02866.x},
   Key = {fds336513}
}

@article{fds334978,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Coie, JD and Pettit, GS and Price, JM},
   Title = {Peer status and aggression in boys' groups: developmental
             and contextual analyses.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1289-1309},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1990.tb02862.x},
   Abstract = {The social transactions of popular, rejected, neglected, and
             average first- and third-grade boys were examined during
             their initial encounters with peers. 23 groups of 5 or 6
             boys each were observed for 45-min free-play sessions
             conducted on 5 consecutive days, with sociometric interviews
             following each session. Social preference in the play groups
             correlated significantly with classroom social preference
             after the third and subsequent play sessions for the third
             graders, and after the fourth and subsequent sessions for
             the first graders. The observational coding system
             distinguished 4 types of aggressive behavior that were
             hypothesized to relate to peer status in different ways. The
             first, rough play, was not related to peer status. However,
             rejected boys at both ages displayed significantly higher
             rates of angry reactive aggression and instrumental
             aggression than average boys. The relation between bullying
             and peer status varied with the age of the child. Popular
             first graders engaged in more bullying than average first
             graders, but popular third graders did not differ from
             average in bullying. Other questions concerned the temporal
             relation between play group behaviors and social preference
             scores within the group. Socially interactive behaviors
             anteceded high preference by peers, and low preference in
             turn led to social isolation in subsequent
             sessions.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1990.tb02862.x},
   Key = {fds334978}
}

@article{fds336514,
   Author = {Kupersmidt, JB and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Preadolescent Peer Status, Aggression, and School Adjustment
             as Predictors of Externalizing Problems in
             Adolescence},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {1350-1362},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1990.tb02866.x},
   Abstract = {The comparative effectiveness of preadolescent aggressive
             behavior, peer rejection, and school functioning were
             evaluated in the prediction of adolescent delinquency and
             school maladjustment. Fifth‐grade children (n= 112, 69%
             white, 53% male, M= 11 years old) were followed forward for
             7 years until the end of high school. Rejected children were
             more likely to have a nonspecific negative outcome and more
             types of negative outcomes than average, popular, or
             neglected children, particularly among the white students.
             However, in regression models containing sex, race,
             aggression, frequent school absences, low grades, and
             rejection, the only significant predictor of juvenile
             delinquency or of a nonspecific negative outcome was
             aggression toward peers. Both aggression and frequent school
             absences were significant predictors of early school
             withdrawal. Analyses for the white children in the sample
             revealed that both rejection and aggression best predicted
             to the nonspecific negative outcome, whereas aggression
             alone best predicted to school dropout and to having one or
             more police contacts. Implications for future longitudinal
             outcome research and for risk‐group identification in
             racially heterogeneous samples are discussed. Copyright ©
             1990, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1990.tb02866.x},
   Key = {fds336514}
}

@article{fds334979,
   Author = {Pettit, GS and Bakshi, A and Dodge, KA and Coie, JD},
   Title = {The Emergence of Social Dominance in Young Boys' Play
             Groups: Developmental Differences and Behavioral
             Correlates},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {26},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1017-1025},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.26.6.1017},
   Abstract = {This study examined relations among dominance, sociometric
             preference, and social behavior in groups of 1st- and
             3rd-grade boys. Twenty groups of 6 unacquainted boys met for
             five 45-min semistructured play sessions on consecutive
             days. Sociometric interviews yielded daily social preference
             scores. Boys' social behaviors were coded from video records
             into discrete categories. Dominance hierarchies were formed
             on the basis of asymmetry (receiving vs. initiating) of
             peer-directed aggression or persuasion attempts. Group-level
             results indicated that the least coherently organized groups
             were those containing younger boys and those in which
             aggression occurred at a high rate. Individual-level results
             indicated that dominance was associated with social
             preference to a greater degree among younger than older
             boys. Dominance was more highly related to leadership in
             older than younger boys. Implications of these findings are
             discussed with respect to the role of aggression in the
             social organization of boys' peer groups.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.26.6.1017},
   Key = {fds334979}
}

@article{fds334980,
   Author = {Rabiner, D and Coie, J},
   Title = {Effect of Expectancy Inductions on Rejected Children's
             Acceptance by Unfamiliar Peers},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {25},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {450-457},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.25.3.450},
   Abstract = {Examined the role of interpersonal expectations in rejected
             children's social difficulties by inducing a positive
             expectancy prior to their joining unfamiliar peers and
             assessing whether this influenced their group entry behavior
             and the opinions that new peers formed of them. Rejected
             boys receiving the expectancy induction were preferred by
             new peers over control, rejected boys, but no behavioral
             effects were found. Rejected girls who received the
             induction were again better liked than controls and behaved
             more competently. These results indicate that rejected
             children can make better impressions on peers when they
             expect interpersonal success and suggest that rejected
             children's interpersonal expectations should be considered
             in interventions designed to improve their peer
             relationships.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.25.3.450},
   Key = {fds334980}
}

@article{fds334981,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Dodge, KA},
   Title = {Multiple sources of data on social behavior and social
             status in the school: a cross-age comparison.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {59},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {815-829},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1988.tb03237.x},
   Abstract = {Behavioral data relating to peer social status were
             collected from peers, teachers, and observers on both first-
             and third-grade boys (ages 6-7 and 8-9 years, respectively).
             Peer and teacher ratings had greater intermethod agreement
             than observer data, although all 3 sources provided evidence
             that rejected and controversial boys were more aggressive
             than other boys. However, relatively little aggression was
             observed among the older boys, indicating that peers and
             teachers may be better sources of information about
             aggression in this group. Observational data differentiated
             among status groups on measures of activity (on task vs.
             off-task, and prosocial play vs. solitary activity) for both
             age groups. Rejected boys displayed little prosocial
             behavior according to peers and teachers, but were not less
             often engaged in prosocial play, according to observers.
             Neglected boys were the most solitary group during play;
             however, teachers rated rejected boys as the most solitary,
             contrary to observations. Controversial boys were seen as
             highly aggressive by all sources but as highly prosocial
             only by peers and observers.},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1988.tb03237.x},
   Key = {fds334981}
}

@article{fds334982,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Social-information-processing factors in reactive and
             proactive aggression in children's peer groups.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {53},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {1146-1158},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-3514.53.6.1146},
   Abstract = {We examined social-information-processing mechanisms (e.g.,
             hostile attributional biases and intention-cue detection
             deficits) in chronic reactive and proactive aggressive
             behavior in children's peer groups. In Study 1, a
             teacher-rating instrument was developed to assess these
             behaviors in elementary school children (N = 259). Reactive
             and proactive scales were found to be internally consistent,
             and factor analyses partially supported convergent and
             discriminant validities. In Study 2, behavioral correlates
             of these forms of aggression were examined through
             assessments by peers (N = 339). Both types of aggression
             related to social rejection, but only proactively aggressive
             boys were also viewed as leaders and as having a sense of
             humor. In Study 3, we hypothesized that reactive aggression
             (but not proactive aggression) would occur as a function of
             hostile attributional biases and intention-cue detection
             deficits. Four groups of socially rejected boys (reactive
             aggressive, proactive aggressive, reactive-proactive
             aggressive, and nonaggressive) and a group of average boys
             were presented with a series of hypothetical videorecorded
             vignettes depicting provocations by peers and were asked to
             interpret the intentions of the provocateur (N = 117). Only
             the two reactive-aggressive groups displayed biases and
             deficits in interpretations. In Study 4, attributional
             biases and deficits were found to be positively correlated
             with the rate of reactive aggression (but not proactive
             aggression) displayed in free play with peers (N = 127).
             These studies supported the hypothesis that attributional
             biases and deficits are related to reactive aggression but
             not to proactive aggression.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.53.6.1146},
   Key = {fds334982}
}

@article{fds334983,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Coppotelli, H},
   Title = {"Dimensions and Types of Social Status: A Cross-Age
             Perspective": Correction},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {19},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {224},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1983},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.19.2.224},
   Abstract = {Reports and error in the original article by J. D. Coie et
             al (Developmental Psychology, 1982[Jul], Vol 18[4],
             557-570). One of the five social status groups was
             incorrectly described. The correct description of the
             average group in the second to last paragraph of the Method
             section is provided. (The following abstract of this article
             originally appeared in record 1982-27928-001.) In Exp I,
             peer perceptual correlates of social preference (SP) and
             social impact (SI) were investigated with 311 3rd, 5th, and
             8th graders. SP was highly positively related to
             cooperativeness, supportiveness, and physical attractiveness
             and negatively related to disruptiveness and aggression. SI
             was related to active, salient behaviors of both positive
             and negative valence. Whereas the correlates were found to
             be similar at each grade level, greater proportions of the
             variance in these dimensions could be predicted at younger
             than older ages. In Exp II, these dimensions were used to
             assign 531 Ss to 5 sociometric status groups: popular,
             rejected, neglected, controversial, and average. Peer
             perceptions of the behavioral correlates of these groups
             were solicited and found to reveal distinct profiles. A
             previously unidentified group of controversial children was
             perceived as disruptive and aggressive (like the rejected
             group), but also as social leaders (like popular Ss). It is
             suggested that researchers consider controversial children
             as a distinct group in future behavioral and epidemiological
             studies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights
             reserved). © 1983 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.19.2.224},
   Key = {fds334983}
}

@article{fds334984,
   Author = {Dodge, KA and Coie, JD and Brakke, NP},
   Title = {Behavior patterns of socially rejected and neglected
             preadolescents: the roles of social approach and
             aggression.},
   Journal = {Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology},
   Volume = {10},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {389-409},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00912329},
   Abstract = {Sociometric nominations were used to select groups of
             popular, average, rejected, and neglected third- and
             fifth-grade children. In two studies, the peer interactive
             behaviors of these children were naturalistically observed
             in their classrooms and on the playground. In contrast to
             popular children, rejected children displayed fewer
             task-appropriate behaviors and more task-inappropriate and
             aggressive behaviors. Whereas rejected children prosocially
             approached peers as frequently as did popular children, peer
             responses to the approaches of rejected children were more
             likely to be negative. Neglected children, on the other
             hand, displayed relatively few task-inappropriate and
             aggressive behaviors, and socially approached peers
             infrequently. Their approaches also met with frequent rebuff
             by peers. The findings were discussed in terms of the
             behavioral bases of sociometric status. Suggestions were
             made for clinical researchers interested in behavioral
             change with rejected and neglected children.},
   Doi = {10.1007/bf00912329},
   Key = {fds334984}
}

@article{fds334985,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Dodge, KA and Coppotelli, H},
   Title = {Dimensions and types of social status: A cross-age
             perspective},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {18},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {557-570},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1982},
   Month = {July},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.18.4.557},
   Abstract = {In Exp I, peer perceptual correlates of social preference
             (SP) and social impact (SI) were investigated with 311 3rd,
             5th, and 8th graders. SP was highly positively related to
             cooperativeness, supportiveness, and physical attractiveness
             and negatively related to disruptiveness and aggression. SI
             was related to active, salient behaviors of both positive
             and negative valence. Whereas the correlates were found to
             be similar at each grade level, greater proportions of the
             variance in these dimensions could be predicted at younger
             than older ages. In Exp II, these dimensions were used to
             assign 531 Ss to 5 sociometric status groups: popular,
             rejected, neglected, controversial, and average. Peer
             perceptions of the behavioral correlates of these groups
             were solicited and found to reveal distinct profiles. A
             previously unidentified group of controversial children was
             perceived as disruptive and aggressive (like the rejected
             group), but also as social leaders (like popular Ss). It is
             suggested that researchers consider controversial children
             as a distinct group in future behavioral and epidemiological
             studies. (32 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA,
             all rights reserved). © 1982 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0012-1649.18.4.557},
   Key = {fds334985}
}

@article{fds334986,
   Author = {Abram, RS and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Maternal reactions to problem behaviors and ordinal position
             of child.},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {450-467},
   Year = {1981},
   Month = {December},
   Abstract = {Mothers' reactions to problem behavior patterns were
             contrasted in a sample of mothers of first-born and
             later-born boys. Mothers of 8- and 14-year-old boys were
             presented with six hypothetical cases. Mothers of first-born
             boys described themselves as more likely to seek outside
             professional help for problems than did mothers of
             later-born boys. Similar results held true for those stories
             that mothers reported as descriptive of their own sons in
             recent weeks. Interestingly, no difference in the reported
             prevalence of such problems was found between the two birth
             order groups. These findings hold true for moderate severity
             problems, but not for severe problems. Mothers of first-born
             boys were more inclined to attribute the cause of problems
             to parent factors, while mothers of later-borns tended to
             focus more on the sons' skill deficits. The findings are
             interpreted in terms of the differential parenting
             experiences of the two groups and suggest an explanation for
             the greater incidence of clinic referral among first-borns
             compared to later-borns.},
   Key = {fds334986}
}

@article{fds334987,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Costanzo, PR and Cox, GB},
   Title = {Behavioral determinants of mental illness concerns: a
             comparison of community subcultures.},
   Journal = {American Journal of Community Psychology},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {537-555},
   Year = {1980},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00912591},
   Abstract = {A stratified sample (race, sex, and social class) of 469
             laymen from two North Carolina communities responded to a
             190-item MMPI-based questionnaire with the degree of mental
             illness concern evoked by each item. The results reflected
             systematic race and social class differences in the
             behavioral bases for mental illness attributions--differences
             not explainable by overall differences in toleration for
             deviance. Although laymen had roughly similar rank orderings
             for the 13 homogeneous clusters of items, blacks indicated
             greater concern over breakdowns in social orientation than
             whites, while the opposite pattern held for traditionally
             defined psychopathy (internal distresses). Upper-class
             concerns were, comparatively, with cognitive dysfunction,
             middle-class with moral and social responsibility, and
             lower-class with social inadequacies.},
   Doi = {10.1007/bf00912591},
   Key = {fds334987}
}

@article{fds334988,
   Author = {Cox, G and Costanzo, PR and Coie, JD},
   Title = {A survey instrument for the assessment of popular
             conceptions of mental illness.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {901-909},
   Year = {1976},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-006x.44.6.901},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-006x.44.6.901},
   Key = {fds334988}
}

@article{fds336515,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Pennington, BF},
   Title = {Children's perceptions of deviance and disorder.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {407-413},
   Year = {1976},
   Month = {June},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/1128795},
   Abstract = {First-, fourth-, seventh-, and eleventh-grade boys and girls
             were interviewed on the topic of deviant behavior among
             their peers. They were also asked to make deviance judgments
             on 2 story characters whose behaviors exemplified qualities
             that typically evoke an attribution of psychological
             disorder on the part of adult judges. 1 story described loss
             of control and aggression, the other a distorted and
             paranoid perception of social reality. The pattern of
             reaction to the stories was consistent with age-related
             shifts in the basic for deviant status. First graders
             largely failed to think in terms of group norms. The
             transition from the middle grades to adolescence was marked
             by greater emphasis on social consensus--both in
             psychological perspective and group behavior.},
   Doi = {10.2307/1128795},
   Key = {fds336515}
}

@article{fds334989,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Costanzo, PR and Cox, G},
   Title = {Behavioral determinants of mental illness concerns: a
             comparison of "gatekeeper" professions.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {5},
   Pages = {626-636},
   Year = {1975},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-006x.43.5.626},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-006x.43.5.626},
   Key = {fds334989}
}

@article{fds336516,
   Author = {Conger, AJ and Coie, JD},
   Title = {Who's crazy in Manhattan: a reexamination of "treatment of
             psychological disorders among urban children".},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {179-182},
   Year = {1975},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {fds336516}
}

@article{fds336517,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Pennington, BF and Buckley, HH},
   Title = {Effects of situational stress and sex roles on the
             attribution of psychological disorder.},
   Journal = {Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {559-568},
   Year = {1974},
   Month = {August},
   Key = {fds336517}
}

@article{fds336518,
   Author = {Coie, JD},
   Title = {An evaluation of the cross‐situational stability of
             children's curiosity},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality},
   Volume = {42},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {93-116},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1974},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6494.1974.tb00559.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-6494.1974.tb00559.x},
   Key = {fds336518}
}

@article{fds334991,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Costanzo, PR and Farnill, D},
   Title = {Specific transitions in the development of spatial
             perspective-taking ability},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {9},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {167-177},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {September},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0035062},
   Abstract = {90 5-11 yr olds were tested on 2 variations of Piaget's
             spatial perspective task. The predominance of each of 4
             kinds of spatial errors (interposition, aspect, distance,
             and right-left) was found to be differentially related both
             to age and overall task performance. The significance of
             this developmental sequence and the method of error analysis
             employed are discussed in the context of the earlier work of
             Piaget and B. Inhelder. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006
             APA, all rights reserved). © 1973 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0035062},
   Key = {fds334991}
}

@article{fds334990,
   Author = {Costanzo, PR and Coie, JD and Grumet, JF and Farnill,
             D},
   Title = {A reexamination of the effects of intent and consequence on
             children's moral judgments.},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {44},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {154-161},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {March},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.1973.tb02127.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1973.tb02127.x},
   Key = {fds334990}
}

@article{fds336519,
   Author = {Coie, JD and Dorval, B},
   Title = {Sex differences in the intellectual structure of social
             interaction skills},
   Journal = {Developmental Psychology},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {261-267},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1973},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0034142},
   Abstract = {Studied sex-related differences in the linkage between
             verbal and analytic intelligence and performance on tasks of
             social interaction. 90 boys and girls from 2nd, 3rd, and 4th
             grades served as Ss. Analytic intelligence was a good
             predictor of communication scores for boys but not for
             girls. Verbal ability was no better a predictor for girls
             than boys. The correlational evidence indicates that
             conventional intelligence tests predict social perspective
             taking as well as Piaget's measure of spatial
             perspective-taking ability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c)
             2006 APA, all rights reserved). © 1973 American
             Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/h0034142},
   Key = {fds336519}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds336503,
   Author = {Miller-Johnson, S and Moore, BL and Underwood, MK and Coie,
             JD},
   Title = {African-American girls and physical aggression: Does
             stability of childhood aggression predict later negative
             outcomes?},
   Pages = {75-96},
   Booktitle = {The Development and Treatment of Girlhood
             Aggression},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {August},
   ISBN = {9781410611307},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781410611307},
   Doi = {10.4324/9781410611307},
   Key = {fds336503}
}


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