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Publications of Blair H. Sheppard    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds350631,
   Author = {Desanctis, G and Sheppard, B},
   Title = {Bridging Distance, Time, and Culture in Executive MBA
             Education},
   Journal = {Journal of Education for Business},
   Volume = {74},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {157-160},
   Year = {1999},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08832329909601679},
   Abstract = {This article summarizes student and instructor experiences
             in an innovative MBA program designed for working
             executives. We describe the social aspects of this learning
             process, especially with regard to learning in the distance
             mode. We note the challenges and opportunities of distance
             learning for students and faculty, and we identify critical
             components of learning success in programs that aim to link
             traditional university education with corporate life at an
             international level.},
   Doi = {10.1080/08832329909601679},
   Key = {fds350631}
}

@article{fds291343,
   Author = {Sheppard, BH and Sherman, DM},
   Title = {The grammars of trust: A model and general
             implications},
   Journal = {Academy of Management Review},
   Volume = {23},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {422-437},
   Publisher = {Academy of Management},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5465/AMR.1998.926619},
   Abstract = {In this article we contend that trust can be conceptualized
             as four distinct and ordered forms - shallow dependence,
             shallow interdependence, deep dependence, and deep
             interdependence - determined by the nature of the
             interdependence between trusting parties. We argue that both
             the risks that trusting parties assume and the mechanisms
             for mitigating those risks emerge as a function of the form
             of interdependence in the relationship. By reviewing
             research in which trust is a central component, we
             illustrate the elements of this model and examine its
             implications.},
   Doi = {10.5465/AMR.1998.926619},
   Key = {fds291343}
}

@article{fds315329,
   Author = {Sheppard, BH and Tuchinsky, M},
   Title = {Interfirm relationships: A grammar of pairs},
   Journal = {Research in Organizational Behavior},
   Volume = {18},
   Pages = {331-373},
   Publisher = {JAI PRESS INC},
   Year = {1996},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0191-3085},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1996BE88M00008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds315329}
}

@article{fds322131,
   Author = {Putallaz, M and Hellstern, L and Sheppard, BH and Grimes, CL and Glodis,
             KA},
   Title = {Conflict, Social Competence, and Gender: Maternal and Peer
             Contexts},
   Journal = {Early Education and Development},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {433-447},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {1995},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15566935eed0604_8},
   Abstract = {The current study was designed to address two major
             purposes. The first goal was to investigate the joint
             influence of children's sociometric status and sex on their
             conflict behavior, and the second goal was to explore the
             similarities and differences in children's conflict behavior
             across two contexts, specifically conflicts arising during
             interactions with mothers and with peers. Forty-two
             first-graders were videotaped playing with their mothers and
             then with an unfamiliar peer partner. Conflict behavior
             occurring in the mother-child context was quite different
             from that occurring between children, reflecting the
             contrast between the vertical and horizontal nature of these
             relationships. Most striking were the large number of
             sociometric status and sex differences in conflict behavior
             found across both contexts. Further, it appears that
             effective conflict behavior may differ for boys and girls.
             Implications for future research are discussed. © 1995,
             Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1207/s15566935eed0604_8},
   Key = {fds322131}
}

@article{fds315322,
   Author = {Sheppard, BH and Blumenfeld-Jones, K and Minton, JW and Hyder,
             E},
   Title = {Informal conflict intervention: Advice and
             dissent},
   Journal = {Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal},
   Volume = {7},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {53-72},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0892-7545},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02621060},
   Abstract = {A disparity appears to exist between how managers are
             advised to handle conflict and the intervention methods that
             they utilize in actual practice. Normative advice tends to
             agree that managers should adopt a facilitative,
             mediatorlike role (e.g., Walton, 1987; Tjosvold, 1990),
             while the empirical research suggests that managers are much
             more controlling, often deciding how to resolve the problem
             on their own (e.g., Kolb, 1986; Sheppard, 1983). The present
             study focuses on two potential reasons as to why managers
             utilize the methods they do: (1) They treat choices
             instrumentally to achieve key goals and (2) they interpret
             or frame conflicts in a form that suggests directive action.
             One hundred and eighty managers were interviewed about a
             recent effort to intervene in a dispute at work. The results
             confirm that managers are very controlling when intervening
             in disputes and relates this to both interpretive frame and,
             to a lesser extent, managerial goals. A canonical analysis
             appears to emphasize the pivotal role that frame plays in
             influencing whether or not managers choose the solution.
             Implications of these results for managerial action are
             discussed. © 1994, Plenum Publishing Corporation. All
             rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF02621060},
   Key = {fds315322}
}

@article{fds315324,
   Author = {Minton, JW and Lewicki, RJ and Sheppard, BH},
   Title = {Unjust Dismissal in the Context of Organizational
             Justice},
   Journal = {The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social
             Science},
   Volume = {536},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {135-148},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {1994},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0002-7162},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1994PM42200011&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The issue of unjust dismissal is best understood by placing
             it in the broader context of a comprehensive model of
             organizational justice. This article presents such a model
             based on the application of two perceived principles of
             justice (balance and correctness) in an organization’s
             pursuit of three goals (performance, community, and
             dignity), at three organizational levels (outcome,
             procedure, and system). For perceived fairness to exist, the
             system must be adequate at each level. The theory of
             organizational justice is applied to the creation,
             implementation, and interpretation of disciplinary policies
             and rules. The article concludes by providing prescriptive
             advice for the design and operation of discipline and
             discharge systems, based on the model presented, and
             suggests that they include written warnings, the opportunity
             of a hearing, the right to be represented, the right to
             appeal, and reinforcement of the system through a broad
             statutory framework. © 1994, SAGE Periodicals Press. All
             rights reserved.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0002716294536001011},
   Key = {fds315324}
}

@article{fds291342,
   Author = {Shapiro, DL and Sheppard, BH and Cheraskin, L},
   Title = {Business on a Handshake},
   Journal = {Negotiation Journal},
   Volume = {8},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {365-377},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0748-4526},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1992KB61800006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1571-9979.1992.tb00679.x},
   Key = {fds291342}
}

@article{fds291341,
   Author = {Saunders, DM and Sheppard, BH and Knight, V and Roth,
             J},
   Title = {Employee voice to supervisors},
   Journal = {Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal},
   Volume = {5},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {241-259},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {September},
   ISSN = {0892-7545},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01385051},
   Abstract = {This article reports the results of two studies examining
             some factors that increase the likelihood that employees
             will voice to their supervisors. The way employees perceive
             that their supervisors manage employee voice was identified
             as a major cause of the likelihood that employees will voice
             upward. The Supervisor as Voice Manager Scale is presented
             along with data demonstrating its reliability and validity.
             Theoretical and applied implications of the results are
             discussed. © 1992 Plenum Publishing Corporation.},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF01385051},
   Key = {fds291341}
}

@article{fds315328,
   Author = {Sheppard, BH},
   Title = {Conflict research as schizophrenia: The many faces of
             organizational conflict},
   Journal = {Journal of Organizational Behavior},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {325-334},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1992},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0894-3796},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1992HX07900013&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1002/job.4030130314},
   Key = {fds315328}
}

@article{fds315331,
   Author = {Putallaz, M and Sheppard, BH},
   Title = {Social Status and Children's Orientations to Limited
             Resources},
   Journal = {Child Development},
   Volume = {61},
   Number = {6},
   Pages = {2022-2027},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1990},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0009-3920},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1990EU58300028&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {6‐year‐old children were paired according to their
             sociometric status and then confronted with 3 situations in
             which there was only 1 toy for the 2 children. Children's
             responses to these limited‐resource situations were coded
             in terms of a scheme reflecting the degree to which each
             child focused on his or her own concerns and/or those of the
             other child. Low status dyads were found to compete (i.e.,
             focus on their own interests) more than high status dyads,
             who exhibited orientations focused more on mutual benefit.
             The implications of these results as well as the relations
             among general orientations and dyadic affect are discussed.
             Copyright © 1990, Wiley Blackwell. All rights
             reserved},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8624.1990.tb03583.x},
   Key = {fds315331}
}

@article{fds291339,
   Author = {Vollrath, DA and Sheppard, BH and Hinsz, VB and Davis,
             JH},
   Title = {Memory performance by decision-making groups and
             individuals},
   Journal = {Organizational Behavior and Human Decision
             Processes},
   Volume = {43},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {289-300},
   Publisher = {Elsevier BV},
   Year = {1989},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0749-5978},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0749-5978(89)90040-X},
   Abstract = {Four-person groups and individuals performed memory and
             decision tasks in an investigation of the social processing
             of information. As predicted, groups recalled and recognized
             information better than individuals across a variety of
             measures and decision conditions. Predictions from various
             models of group decision-making and problem-solving were
             compared to group and individual memory responses. No set of
             predictions closely matched the observed data, suggesting
             that memory tasks may foster a social process unlike those
             observed heretofore. Memory responses also indicated that
             groups check individual errors and exaggerate individual
             response tendencies. © 1989.},
   Doi = {10.1016/0749-5978(89)90040-X},
   Key = {fds291339}
}

@article{fds315330,
   Author = {Sheppard, BH and Hartwick, J and Warshaw, PR},
   Title = {The Theory of Reasoned Action: A Meta-Analysis of Past
             Research with Recommendations for Modifications and Future
             Research},
   Journal = {Journal of Consumer Research},
   Volume = {15},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {325-325},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {December},
   ISSN = {0093-5301},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1988R287500004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1086/209170},
   Key = {fds315330}
}

@article{fds315326,
   Author = {Sheppard, BH},
   Title = {The art and science of mediation},
   Journal = {Negotiation Journal},
   Volume = {4},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {161-170},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {April},
   ISSN = {0748-4526},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1988N998300008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Doi = {10.1007/bf01000577},
   Key = {fds315326}
}

@article{fds291340,
   Author = {Sheppard, BH and Saunders, DM and Minton, JW},
   Title = {Procedural Justice From the Third-Party Perspective},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {54},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {629-637},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1988},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.54.4.629},
   Abstract = {We examined the effect of a concern for fairness on the
             dispute intervention behavior of lay third parties. Three
             hundred subjects, including parents, students, and managers,
             participated in structured interviews probing their most
             recent intervention in a dispute. Results suggest that lay
             third parties are particularly likely to vary their behavior
             at the early stages of the dispute resolution process as a
             function of their concern for fairness. However, the
             particular activities on which third parties with a high
             concern for fairness focus appear to vary as a function of
             the type of dispute in which they are involved. Theoretical
             and practical implications are discussed.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-3514.54.4.629},
   Key = {fds291340}
}

@article{fds291338,
   Author = {Sheppard, BH and Lewicki, RJ},
   Title = {Toward general principles of managerial fairness},
   Journal = {Social Justice Research},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {161-176},
   Publisher = {Springer Nature},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {June},
   ISSN = {0885-7466},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01048014},
   Abstract = {The present study identified the principles employees use
             for judging a broad range of managerial actions. A
             cross-sectional sample of 44 executives were asked to
             describe recent fair and unfair treatment in seven areas of
             management responsibility: planning, staff development,
             delegating, motivating, coordinating, daily activities, and
             representing the organization to the public. These responses
             were coded to yield 16 rules guiding judgments about
             perceived managerial fairness. Aggregation of these rules
             yielded six major clusters of fairness concerns. The paper
             describes these clusters in detail and highlights their
             potential usefulness to a broader understanding of the
             complex nature of procedural fairness judgments in
             organizations. © 1987 Plenum Publishing
             Corporation.},
   Doi = {10.1007/BF01048014},
   Key = {fds291338}
}

@article{fds291344,
   Author = {Dunn, SE and Putallaz, M and Sheppard, BH and Lindstrom,
             R},
   Title = {Social Support and Adjustment in Gifted Adolescents},
   Journal = {Journal of Educational Psychology},
   Volume = {79},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {467-473},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1987},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-0663},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.79.4.467},
   Abstract = {We investigated the role of perceived social support in
             facilitating adjustment to a residential high school for the
             gifted in science and math. The relation between social
             support and adjustment appeared to depend on the sex of the
             student and the source of support, and the specific type of
             adjustment examined. Successful overall adjustment to the
             school environment was related to perceived support from
             family, whereas psychological adjustment showed a clear
             relation to perceived support in general. Perceived support
             from peers related to psychological adjustment only for male
             adolescents. Female adolescents appeared to seek other
             sources of support when they perceived support from a
             particular source to be low. Thus, adjustment problems for
             female adolescents appeared to result only when they were
             unable to locate other sources. © 1987 American
             Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-0663.79.4.467},
   Key = {fds291344}
}

@article{fds291335,
   Author = {Sheppard, BH},
   Title = {Justice Is No Simple Matter. Case for Elaborating Our Model
             of Procedural Fairness},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {49},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {953-962},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1985},
   Month = {October},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.49.4.953},
   Abstract = {Past research has demonstrated that autocratic dispute
             intervention procedures (i.e., when a third party actively
             seeks out information about the dispute and then decides how
             it ought to be resolved) are perceived as less fair than
             arbitration procedures (i.e., when the third party makes a
             decision based only on arguments and evidence given to them
             by the disputants). From these findings, Thibaut and Walker
             (1975)concluded that the North American legal system, which
             is most similar to arbitration, should be perceived as more
             fair than the continental European legal system, which is
             purportedly most similar to autocratic procedures. Three
             studies reported here test the effects of two features of
             European legal systems that Damaska (1975)suggested mitigate
             some of the problems with autocratic procedures. The results
             suggest that (a) permitting disputants an opportunity to
             present their positions and (b) the presence of an option to
             appeal an unfair decision dramatically improve the perceived
             fairness of the autocratic procedure. Implications of these
             results for the study of procedural fairness and legal
             procedure are discussed. © 1985 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-3514.49.4.953},
   Key = {fds291335}
}

@article{fds291337,
   Author = {Kolb, DM and Sheppard, BH},
   Title = {Do Managers Mediate, Or Even Arbitrate?},
   Journal = {Negotiation Journal},
   Volume = {1},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {379-388},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1985},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0748-4526},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1571-9979.1985.tb00328.x},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1571-9979.1985.tb00328.x},
   Key = {fds291337}
}

@article{fds315327,
   Author = {Lewicki, RJ and Sheppard, BH},
   Title = {Choosing how to intervene: Factors affecting the use of
             process and outcome control in third party dispute
             resolution},
   Journal = {Journal of Organizational Behavior},
   Volume = {6},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {49-64},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1985},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0142-2774},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1985ABX4700004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Abstract = {The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of three
             situational variables‐time pressure to resolve the
             dispute, expectation of future relations between disputants
             and range of impact of the settlement on future
             conflicts—on a third party's style of managing a dispute.
             These variables were systematically manipulated in two
             different case scenarios and presented to respondents in
             questionnaire form. It was hypothesized that these variables
             would differentially affect the parties' willingness to
             exert control over the outcome of the conflict and the
             process by which the parties attempted to achieve
             resolution. The predisposition of the respondents to adopt
             one of four specific third party styles (adversarial
             intervention, inequisitorial intervention, mediation and
             providing impetus) was also measured, to determine both
             overall preference for each style and preference as a
             function of the independent variables. The results
             demonstrate that respondents were significantly more likely
             to employ outcome control strategies when they were under
             time pressure, when the disputants would not be likely to
             work together in the future, and when the settlement would
             have broad impact on the resolution of other disputes.
             Differences for the two case scenarios were also noted. The
             disposition to use process control was stronger when the
             third party did not expect the disputants to interact in the
             future; the results for time pressure were less clear.
             Finally, expressed preferences for particular third party
             styles were consistent with the main effects noted for
             outcome control, and ambiguous with regard to the effects
             for process control. Respondents said that they clearly
             preferred mediation as a third party style, but it is not
             clear that the parties truly understood mediation versus
             other forms of dispute management. Implications are drawn
             for further examination of those factors which predispose
             managers to use outcome or process control in dispute
             intervention. Copyright © 1985 John Wiley & Sons,
             Ltd.},
   Doi = {10.1002/job.4030060105},
   Key = {fds315327}
}

@article{fds315325,
   Author = {SHEPPARD, BH},
   Title = {3RD PARTY CONFLICT INTERVENTION - A PROCEDURAL
             FRAMEWORK},
   Journal = {Research in Organizational Behavior},
   Volume = {6},
   Pages = {141-190},
   Publisher = {ACADEMIC PRESS INC JNL-COMP SUBSCRIPTIONS},
   Year = {1984},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0191-3085},
   url = {http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:A1984SA57200004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=47d3190e77e5a3a53558812f597b0b92},
   Key = {fds315325}
}

@article{fds322770,
   Author = {Lissak, RI and Sheppard, BH},
   Title = {Beyond Fairness: The Criterion Problem in Research on
             Dispute Intervention},
   Journal = {Journal of Applied Social Psychology},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {45-65},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {1983},
   Month = {January},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-1816.1983.tb00886.x},
   Abstract = {Recent research has demonstrated that parties to a dispute
             attend to, and make evaluations of, the procedures that are
             used to resolve disputes. A central focus of this research
             has been on procedural and distributive fairness. Two
             studies were conducted in an attempt to identify criteria
             used by parties to organizational disputes to choose and
             evaluate dispute resolution procedures. Sixteen criteria
             were identified, including fairness. In a third study, these
             criteria were also found to be relevant to police officers
             involved in crisis intervention. Discussion focuses on the
             implication of these findings for theories of dispute
             resolution, for general issues in the psychology of
             fairness, and for practical concerns. Copyright © 1983,
             Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1559-1816.1983.tb00886.x},
   Key = {fds322770}
}

@article{fds291336,
   Author = {Vidmar, N and Sheppard, B},
   Title = {Adversary Pretrial Procedures and Testimonial Evidence:
             Effects of Lawyer's Role and Machavellianism},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality & Social Psychology},
   Volume = {39},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {320-332},
   Year = {1980},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037//0022-3514.39.2.320},
   Abstract = {Examined in 2 studies the relative fact-finding efficacy of
             2 legal procedural systems: adversary and nonadversary. 206
             undergraduates played the roles of lawyers or witnesses in a
             simulation of the pretrial processes. The witnesses saw a
             fight, were subsequently interviewed by an adversary or
             nonadversary lawyer, and testified 1 wk later about the
             incident. Results support the prediction that witnesses
             interviewed by adversary lawyers would bias their testimony
             in favor of the lawyer's client, although lawyer
             Machiavellianism served as an important moderating variable.
             The bias transmitted in oral testimony had an influence on
             the impressions of the factual evidence and responsibility
             judgments of naive adjudicators, indicating a 3rd-order
             (lawyer to witness to adjudicator) role-playing effect. (43
             ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights
             reserved). © 1980 American Psychological
             Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037//0022-3514.39.2.320},
   Key = {fds291336}
}

@article{fds291334,
   Author = {Sorrentino, RM and Sheppard, BH},
   Title = {Effects of affiliation-related motives on swimmers in
             individual versus group competition: A field
             experiment},
   Journal = {Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
   Volume = {36},
   Number = {7},
   Pages = {704-714},
   Publisher = {American Psychological Association (APA)},
   Year = {1978},
   Month = {January},
   ISSN = {0022-3514},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.36.7.704},
   Abstract = {76 intercollegiate swimmers from 3 universities participated
             in both an individual and group competition 200-yd freestyle
             swim. Hypotheses were based on an expectancy-value approach,
             which emphasizes the negative as well as positive
             consequences of undertaking an activity. Achievement and
             affiliation motives were assessed by J. W. Atkinson's
             projective measures; Ss also completed the Test Anxiety
             Scale and the Interpersonal Opinion Questionnaire, a
             fear-of-social-rejection measure. It was found, as
             predicted, that while approval-oriented swimmers had faster
             swimming speeds in group than in individual competition,
             rejection-threatened swimmers actually had slower swimming
             speeds in group than in individual competition. This
             significant Affiliation-Related Motives by Experimental
             Conditions interaction was also greater for success-oriented
             than failure-threatened swimmers and for males than females.
             These latter differences and the advantages of the
             field-experimental situation are discussed in light of
             current findings in the motivation area. (38 ref) (PsycINFO
             Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). © 1978
             American Psychological Association.},
   Doi = {10.1037/0022-3514.36.7.704},
   Key = {fds291334}
}


%% Chapters in Books   
@misc{fds315323,
   Author = {Houde, LD and Sherman, DM and White, TB and Sheppard,
             BH},
   Title = {The four faces of trust: An empirical study of the nature of
             trust in relational forms},
   Pages = {287-308},
   Booktitle = {Relational Models Theory: A Contemporary
             Overview},
   Publisher = {PSYCHOLOGY PRESS},
   Year = {2004},
   Month = {July},
   ISBN = {9781410611413},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781410611413},
   Doi = {10.4324/9781410611413},
   Key = {fds315323}
}

@misc{fds338634,
   Author = {Lind, EA},
   Title = {Social Involvement, Justice Judgments, and the Psychology of
             Negotiation},
   Pages = {125-139},
   Booktitle = {Research on Negotiation in Organizations},
   Publisher = {Jai Press},
   Editor = {Lewicki, R and Bies, R and Sheppard, B},
   Year = {1999},
   Key = {fds338634}
}


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