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Publications of Jocelyn Olcott    :chronological  alphabetical  combined listing:

%% Books in Progress   
@misc{fds50323,
   Author = {Jocelyn Olcott},
   Title = {"The Greatest Consciousness-Raising Event in History":
             International Women's Year and the Challenge of
             Transnational Feminism},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2006},
   Abstract = {In June 1975, thousands of people converged on Mexico City
             for the UN conference celebrating International Women’s
             Year (IWY). Billed as the “greatest consciousness-raising
             event in history,” it opened with considerable fanfare as
             both the official conference and the parallel tribune for
             nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) quickly became stages
             for political performances ranging from the sartorial to the
             ideological. Observers regard IWY as a watershed moment in
             transnational second-wave feminism. The formal conference
             offered an unprecedented opportunity to put women at the
             center of international policymaking, while the NGO
             forum’s chaotic atmosphere and frequent confrontation
             exposed the fault lines among those women most vocally
             committed to pursuing a transnational feminist
             agenda.},
   Key = {fds50323}
}


%% Edited Volumes   
@misc{fds360130,
   Author = {Flores, LA and Olcott, JH},
   Title = {The Academic's Handbook, Fourth Edition Revised and
             Expanded},
   Pages = {376 pages},
   Year = {2020},
   Month = {October},
   ISBN = {1478010061},
   Abstract = {A passionate and compassionate volume, The Academic's
             Handbook is an essential guide to navigating life in the
             academy. Contributors.},
   Key = {fds360130}
}

@misc{fds323461,
   Author = {Olcott, JH},
   Title = {International Women's Year: The Greatest
             Consciousness-Raising Event in History},
   Pages = {352 pages},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {July},
   ISBN = {0195327683},
   Abstract = {Amid the geopolitical and social turmoil of the 1970s, the
             United Nations declared 1975 as International Women's Year.
             The capstone event, a two-week conference in Mexico City,
             was dubbed by organizers and journalists as "the greatest
             consciousness-raising event in history." The event drew an
             all-star cast of characters, including Soviet cosmonaut
             Valentina Tereshkova, Iranian Princess Ashraf Pahlavi, and
             US feminist Betty Friedan, as well as a motley array of
             policymakers, activists, and journalists. International
             Women's Year, the first book to examine this critical moment
             in feminist history, starts by exploring how organizers
             juggled geopolitical rivalries and material constraints amid
             global political and economic instability. The story then
             dives into the action in Mexico City, including conflicts
             over issues ranging from abortion to Zionism. The United
             Nations provided indispensable infrastructure and support
             for this encounter, even as it came under fire for its own
             discriminatory practices. While participants expressed
             dismay at levels of discord and conflict, Jocelyn Olcott
             explores how these combative, unanticipated encounters
             generated the most enduring legacies, including women's
             networks across the global south, greater attention to the
             intersectionalities of marginalization, and the arrival of
             women's micro-credit on the development scene. This
             watershed moment in transnational feminism, colorfully
             narrated in International Women's Year, launched a new
             generation of activist networks that spanned continents,
             ideologies, and generations.},
   Key = {fds323461}
}

@misc{fds306101,
   Author = {Cano, G and Olcott, J and Vaughan, MK},
   Title = {Género, poder y politico en el México posrevolucionario},
   Publisher = {Fondo de Cultura Económica},
   Year = {2009},
   url = {http://www.fondodeculturaeconomica.com/librerias/Detalle.aspx?ctit=003617R},
   Key = {fds306101}
}

@misc{fds306102,
   Author = {Olcott, J and Vaughan, MK and Cano, G},
   Title = {Sex in Revolution: Gender, Politics, and Power in Modern
             Mexico},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2006},
   url = {http://www.dukeupress.edu/Catalog/ViewProduct.php?productid=9347},
   Key = {fds306102}
}

@misc{fds295587,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Revolutionary Women in Postrevolutionary
             Mexico},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2005},
   url = {http://www.dukeupress.edu/Catalog/ViewProduct.php?productid=9940},
   Abstract = {Revolutionary Women in Postrevolutionary Mexico investigates
             women’s political organizing during a critical stage of
             regime consolidation. Rebutting the image of Mexican women
             as conservative and anti-revolutionary, this book shows
             women activists challenging prevailing beliefs about the
             masculine foundations of citizenship. Piecing together
             material from national and regional archives, popular
             journalism, and oral histories, it examines how women
             inhabited the conventionally manly role of citizen by
             weaving together its quotidian and formal traditions,
             drawing strategies from local political struggles and
             competing gender ideologies. Revolutionary Women in
             Postrevolutionary Mexico explores the complexity of
             postrevolutionary Mexican politics, exploring the goals and
             outcomes of women’s organizing in Mexico City and the port
             city of Acapulco as well as in three rural locations: the
             southeastern state of Yucatán, the central state of
             Michoacán, and the northern region of the Comarca Lagunera.
             Combining the strengths of national and regional approaches,
             this comparative perspective sets in relief the
             specificities of citizenship as a lived experience.},
   Key = {fds295587}
}


%% Journal Articles   
@article{fds335514,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Public in a domestic sense: Sex work, nation-building, and
             class identification in modern Europe},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Volume = {123},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {124-131},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press (OUP)},
   Year = {2018},
   Month = {February},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ahr/123.1.124},
   Abstract = {In their contributions to this AHR Forum, Joanne M. Ferraro,
             Emma Griffin, and Rebecca Jinks explore intimate and
             affective aspects of women's lives in three European
             settings over two centuries, taking on the formidable task
             of investigating the thoughts and emotions of subjects who
             themselves are no longer alive and left no archival traces
             of their own. The articles range in geographic area-from
             Britain to Venice to Armenia- and in topical focus-from
             labor and commerce to emotions and families to
             nation-building and humanitarianism. They also range
             methodologically, drawing on autobiographies, semi-judicial
             cases, and relief workers' reports. Ultimately, though, the
             authors are left attempting to discern the voices of
             refugees, sex workers, and working-class mothers through the
             mediations of reformers, notaries, and the women's own
             children.1 All three of these essays continue a return to
             materiality, not in the sense of the neo-materialist
             critique of anthropocentrism, but rather in the sense of
             highlighting actions, experiences, and structures more than
             discursive, cultural, or symbolic aspects of human
             experience. None of the authors ignores these latter
             elements, but they all understand such factors as
             inextricable from more quotidian considerations such as
             violence, budgets, commercial relations, and labor
             conditions.},
   Doi = {10.1093/ahr/123.1.124},
   Key = {fds335514}
}

@article{fds329583,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {A plague of salaried marxists: Sexuality and subsistence in
             the revolutionary imaginary of concha michel},
   Journal = {Journal of Contemporary History},
   Volume = {52},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {980-998},
   Publisher = {SAGE Publications},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {October},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022009417723977},
   Abstract = {This article examines work of Mexican singer and activist
             Concha Michel, particularly the pamphlet Marxistas y
             ‘marxistas’ that sealed her expulsion from the Mexican
             Communist Party (Partido Comunista de México, PCM). Michel
             wrote the pamphlet after her return from the Soviet Union,
             where her experiences only confirmed her belief that
             revolutionary governments in Mexico and the Soviet Union
             alike had failed to attend to the massive amounts of social
             and cultural labor performed overwhelmingly by women. In
             particular, Communists’ emphasis on modernization and
             scientific theory privileged the ‘social economy’ of
             commodified production and devalued what she dubbed the
             ‘natural economy’ of subsistence, reproduction, and
             artistic labors. The pamphlet draws parallels with the
             capitalist exploitation of laborers and the sexual
             exploitation of women perpetrated even by Communist Party
             leaders. Michel’s refusal to submit to the Party line
             resulted in her high-profile expulsion from the party, a
             fate that befell much of her social circle. Over subsequent
             decades, however, her commitment to activism on behalf of
             women, celebration of Mexico’s indigenous cultures, and
             persistent critique of the elision of subsistence labors
             would earn her celebrity among Mexican maternalist
             feminists.},
   Doi = {10.1177/0022009417723977},
   Key = {fds329583}
}

@article{fds295588,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Empires of Information: Media Strategies for 1975
             International Women’s Year},
   Journal = {Journal of Women’S History},
   Volume = {24},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {24-48},
   Publisher = {Johns Hopkins University Press},
   Year = {2012},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/jowh.2012.0041},
   Abstract = {The 1975 United Nations International Women's Year (IWY)
             Conference in Mexico City took place amid heightened
             attention to media coverage as a human rights issue as
             feminists highlighted the ways popular cultural
             representations limited women's opportunities. Third World
             leaders objected to depictions of postcolonial nations as
             spaces of endemic violence and ungovernability, and
             journalists decried efforts to censor their reporting. This
             article draws on political theorist Nancy Fraser's concept
             of contestatory counterpublics, particularly her attention
             to power differentials in spaces of apparent equality. At
             the IWY meetings, participants and journalists alike
             deliberated over the relative importance of cultural and
             structural factors and the proper balance between press
             freedoms and ethical reporting. Both official organizers and
             energetic activists endeavored to shape media coverage of
             IWY, but conflicts arose over where the dividing line lay
             between politics and women's issues-or between ideological
             propaganda and disinterested information.},
   Doi = {10.1353/jowh.2012.0041},
   Key = {fds295588}
}

@article{fds295589,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Introduction: Research and Rethinking the Labors of
             Love},
   Journal = {Hispanic American Historical Review},
   Volume = {91},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {1-27},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Year = {2011},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1215/00182168-2010-085},
   Doi = {10.1215/00182168-2010-085},
   Key = {fds295589}
}

@article{fds295590,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Cold War Conflicts and Cheap Cabaret: Performing Politics at
             the 1975 United Nations International Women’s Year
             Conference in Mexico City},
   Journal = {Gender and History},
   Volume = {22},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {733-754},
   Publisher = {WILEY},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {November},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0424.2010.01614.x},
   Abstract = {In a widely read memoir, a Bolivian union militant signals
             the moment of her alienation from the nongovernmental
             organisation tribune of the United Nations' 1975
             International Women's Year (IWY) conference in Mexico City
             by describing her dismay when she encountered a group of
             women clamouring for sexual rights, reiterating a persistent
             narrative about a trade-off between sexual rights and other
             forms of social justice.? Drawing on feminist performance
             theory, this article examines the political performances of
             three central figures at IWY - Domitila Barrios de Chungara,
             Betty Friedan and Mexican theatre director Nancy Cárdenas -
             to explore the ways that political performances rooted in
             distinct scenarios, or historical contexts, generated a
             confusion of meanings around campaigns for sexual rights. ©
             2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd..},
   Doi = {10.1111/j.1468-0424.2010.01614.x},
   Key = {fds295590}
}

@article{fds295593,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {‘Take Off That Streetwalker’s Dress’: Concha Michel
             and the Cultural Politics of Gender in Postrevolutionary
             Mexico},
   Journal = {Journal of Women’S History},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {36-59},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {Fall},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/6278 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {Remembered as the constant companion of Mexican artists
             Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, the folksinger Concha Michel
             achieved notoriety for providing the soundtrack of Mexico's
             cultural Left. However, she also authored many works of
             poetry and prose that critiqued liberal, Marxist, and
             Catholic universalisms - all while maintaining a tireless
             pace as a teacher and activist. This article offers a
             methodological exploration of how Michel used personal
             anecdotes to fashion a universal cosmology and political
             philosophy grounded in gender complementarity and indigenous
             authenticity. © 2009 Journal of Women's
             History.},
   Doi = {10.1353/jowh.0.0098},
   Key = {fds295593}
}

@article{fds295592,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Miracle Workers: Gender and State Mediation among Textile
             and Garment Workers in Mexico’s Transition to Industrial
             Development},
   Journal = {International Labor and Working Class History},
   Volume = {63},
   Number = {63},
   Pages = {45-62},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {December},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/6638 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {In the 1930s, the Mexican federal government consolidated
             political control following the chaos of the revolution and
             developed strategies for industrial development and economic
             growth. In 1936, at the height of the Popular Front and amid
             unabashedly progressive declarations by Mexican President
             Lázaro Cárdenas, the Department of Labor ordered an
             investigation to insure the protection of women's and
             children's labor rights. The "new woman" in
             postrevolutionary Mexico would be both a conscientious
             mother (protected by her husband) and a productive wage
             laborer (protected by the paterfamilias of the federal
             government). Two years later, confronting political and
             economic realities within Mexico, the Cárdenas government
             all but abandoned this agenda, turning a blind eye to labor
             abuses as labor-intensive enterprises leaned on underpaid
             women workers to facilitate the transition to industrial
             production.},
   Doi = {10.1017/s0147547903000085},
   Key = {fds295592}
}

@article{fds295591,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {’Worthy Wives and Mothers’: State-Sponsored Women’s
             Organizing in Postrevolutionary Mexico},
   Journal = {The Journal of Women’S History},
   Volume = {13},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {106-131},
   Publisher = {Johns Hopkins University Press},
   Year = {2002},
   Month = {Winter},
   url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10161/6924 Duke open
             access},
   Abstract = {During the mid-1930s, as the postrevolutionary Mexican
             government embarked on its modernization project, women
             mobilized for rights ranging from suffrage to religious
             freedom. In an effort to control and direct women's
             organizing energies, the regime established a network of
             official women's leagues, which policymakers hoped would
             attract women away from both left- and right-wing movements.
             Although these leagues sought to circumscribe women's
             activism, they also created an organizing infrastructure
             that women instrumentalized. This article examines women's
             leagues as both an explicitly gendered instance of state
             formation and a historical case study in women's organizing.
             © 2002 Journal of Women's History.},
   Doi = {10.1353/jowh.2002.0011},
   Key = {fds295591}
}


%% Book Chapters   
@misc{fds357909,
   Author = {Flecha, R and Dels Àngels Garcia and V and Olcott,
             J},
   Title = {Mirrors, paintings, and romances},
   Pages = {131-156},
   Booktitle = {A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching
             of Cultural Studies},
   Year = {2019},
   Month = {January},
   ISBN = {0813325390},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9780429039935-8},
   Abstract = {This chapter is concerned with questions of pedagogy and
             power as they are played out in the context of Cultural
             Studies taught within an Adult Education (AE) programme
             across several European countries. The linguistic diversity
             of the AE workers of Barcelona centered on Latin-based
             languages. One of the two-week modules, representing a fifth
             of the programme as a whole, is 'Intercultural Relations in
             Europe and AE. This subject provides an excellent mirror for
             reflection about both the power and solidarity claims made
             by Cultural Studies and the power and solidarity claims that
             operate in the processes of knowledge production and
             teaching/learning of Cultural Studies. In the distorting
             mirrors, stereotypes such as the 'flamenco gypsy' deformed
             the image of Spanish culture. In the distorting mirrors,
             stereotypes such as the 'flamenco gypsy' deformed the image
             of Spanish culture. The deficit theory of southern cultures
             was deeply rooted in northernist professors and
             students.},
   Doi = {10.4324/9780429039935-8},
   Key = {fds357909}
}

@misc{fds329586,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Mujeres, historias y sociedades: Latinamérica siglos XVI al
             XXI},
   Publisher = {Fondo Editorial Estado de México},
   Editor = {Moroni Spencer Hernández de Olarte, and Natalia Montes
             Marín},
   Year = {2016},
   Key = {fds329586}
}

@misc{fds329587,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Dictionary of American History, Supplement: America in the
             World 1776 to the Present on “Feminism, Women’s
             Rights” and “International Women’s Year,
             1975},
   Publisher = {Charles Scribner’s Sons and Gale Cengage
             Learning},
   Editor = {Blum, Edward},
   Year = {2016},
   Key = {fds329587}
}

@misc{fds323462,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {From the time of creation: Legacies and unfinished business
             from the first International Women's Year
             Conference},
   Pages = {21-31},
   Booktitle = {Women and Girls Rising: Progress and Resistance around the
             World},
   Publisher = {Routledge},
   Year = {2015},
   Month = {June},
   ISBN = {9781138898769},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315708379},
   Doi = {10.4324/9781315708379},
   Key = {fds323462}
}

@misc{fds295585,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {A happier marriage? Feminist history takes the transnational
             turn},
   Pages = {237-258},
   Booktitle = {Making Women's Histories: Beyond National
             Perspectives},
   Publisher = {New York University Press},
   Editor = {Nadell, P and Haulman, K},
   Year = {2013},
   Month = {December},
   ISBN = {0814758908},
   Key = {fds295585}
}

@misc{fds305703,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Transnational Feminism: Event, Temporality, and Performance
             at the 1975 International Women’s Year
             Conference},
   Booktitle = {Cultures in Motion},
   Publisher = {Princeton University Press},
   Editor = {Rodgers, DT},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds305703}
}

@misc{fds323464,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {The Battle within the Home},
   Pages = {194-210},
   Booktitle = {Workers Across the Americas: The Transnational Turn in Labor
             History},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Year = {2011},
   Month = {May},
   ISBN = {9780199731633},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199731633.003.0015},
   Abstract = {Transnational labor history-and labor history more
             generally-has focused overwhelmingly on commodified labor,
             but the vast majority of the labor performed by women
             historically has been uncommodified. Most of this labor
             falls under the rubric of reproductive labor, the "caring"
             work that generally includes child care, housekeeping, food
             provision (often including subsistence agricultural
             production), and the maintenance of critical community
             networks. This chapter examines debates at the 1975 United
             Nations International Women's Year Conference, where policy
             makers and activists alike agreed that these labors remained
             the most imposing obstacle to women's emancipation. In the
             end, however, the Marxist and liberal perspectives that
             dominated the conference focused almost entirely on how to
             incorporate women into the "productive life" of commodified
             labor, failing to address the more challenging problem of
             alleviating women's reproductive-labor burden.},
   Doi = {10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199731633.003.0015},
   Key = {fds323464}
}

@misc{fds305489,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {The Battle within the Home: Development Strategies and the
             Commodification of Caring Labors at the 1975 International
             Women’s Year Conference},
   Booktitle = {Workers Across the Americas: The Transnational Turn in Labor
             History},
   Publisher = {Oxford University Press},
   Editor = {Fink, L and al, E},
   Year = {2011},
   url = {http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/HistoryAmerican/?view=usa&ci=9780199778553},
   Key = {fds305489}
}

@misc{fds305486,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Mueras y Mantanzas: Spectacles of Terror and Violence in
             Postrevolutionary Mexico},
   Booktitle = {A Century of Revolution: Insurgent and Counterinsurgent
             Violence during Latin America’s Long Cold
             War},
   Publisher = {Duke University Press},
   Editor = {Grandin, G and Joseph, GM},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://www.dukeupress.edu/Catalog/ViewProduct.php?productid=13206},
   Key = {fds305486}
}

@misc{fds305487,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Globalizing Sisterhood: International Women’s Year and the
             Limits of Identity Politics},
   Booktitle = {Shock of the Global},
   Publisher = {Harvard University Press},
   Editor = {Ferguson, N and Maier, C and Manela, E and Sargent,
             D},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?recid=29768},
   Key = {fds305487}
}

@misc{fds305488,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {The Politics of Opportunity: Mexican Populism under Lázaro
             Cárdenas and Luis Echeverría},
   Booktitle = {Gender and Populism in Latin America: Passionate
             Politics},
   Publisher = {Pennsylvania State University Press},
   Editor = {Kampwirth, K},
   Year = {2010},
   url = {http://www.psupress.org/books/titles/978-0-271-03709-7.html},
   Key = {fds305488}
}


%% Book Reviews   
@article{fds329584,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Megan Threlkeld, Pan American Women: U.S. Internationalists
             and Revolutionary Mexico, reviewed for Diplomatic
             History},
   Journal = {Diplomatic History},
   Volume = {41},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {659-662},
   Year = {2017},
   Month = {March},
   Key = {fds329584}
}

@article{fds329585,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Heidi Tinsman, Buying into the Regime: Grapes and
             Consumption in Cold War Chile and the United
             States},
   Journal = {Women’S Studies},
   Volume = {45},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {415-418},
   Publisher = {Informa UK Limited},
   Year = {2016},
   url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00497878.2016.1162622},
   Doi = {10.1080/00497878.2016.1162622},
   Key = {fds329585}
}

@article{fds295579,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Review of Sonia Lipsett-Rivera, Gender and the Negotiation
             of Daily Life in Mexico, 1750-1865},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds295579}
}

@article{fds295580,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Review of Rosana Blanco Cano, Cuerpos disidentes del México
             imaginado},
   Journal = {Estudios Interdisciplinarios De América Latina Y El
             Caribe},
   Year = {2013},
   Key = {fds295580}
}

@article{fds295578,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Review of Stephanie Smith, Gender and the Mexican
             Revolution: Yucatán Women and the Realities of
             Patriarchy},
   Journal = {The Americas},
   Volume = {66},
   Number = {3},
   Pages = {401-402},
   Year = {2010},
   Month = {January},
   Key = {fds295578}
}

@article{fds295577,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Empire in Exile: Transnationalizing the Cultural Production
             of Resistance},
   Journal = {Diplomatic History},
   Year = {2010},
   Key = {fds295577}
}

@article{fds295575,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Historia de las mujeres en España y América Latina (4
             vols.)},
   Journal = {Gender and History},
   Volume = {21},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {220-22},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {fds295575}
}

@article{fds295576,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Review of Joanne Hershfield, Imagining la Chica Moderna:
             Women, Nation, and Visual Culture in Mexico,
             1917–1936.},
   Journal = {American Historical Review},
   Volume = {114},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {463–464-463–464},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {April},
   Key = {fds295576}
}

@article{fds151741,
   Author = {Jocelyn Olcott},
   Title = {Stephanie Mitchell and Patience A. Schell, eds., "The
             Women’s Revolution in Mexico, 1910-1953"},
   Journal = {Hispanic American Historical Review},
   Volume = {89},
   Number = {1},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds151741}
}

@article{fds295574,
   Author = {Olcott, J},
   Title = {Review of Stephanie Mitchell and Patience A. Schell, eds.,
             "The Women’s Revolution in Mexico, 1910-1953"},
   Journal = {Hispanic American Historical Review},
   Volume = {89},
   Year = {2009},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds295574}
}

@article{fds295573,
   Author = {Francois, ME and Olcott JH},
   Title = {A Culture of Everyday Credit: Housekeeping, Pawnbroking, and
             Governance in Mexico City, 1750-1920},
   Journal = {Journal of Latin American Studies},
   Year = {2007},
   Key = {fds295573}
}

@article{fds295572,
   Author = {Grever, M and Waaldijk, B and Olcott JH},
   Title = {Transforming the Public Sphere: The Dutch National
             Exhibition of Women’s Labor in 1898},
   Journal = {Labor History},
   Volume = {47},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {138-40},
   Year = {2006},
   Month = {February},
   Key = {fds295572}
}

@article{fds295571,
   Author = {Olcott, JH},
   Title = {The Passion of María Elena},
   Journal = {The Americas},
   Volume = {62},
   Number = {1},
   Pages = {147-49},
   Year = {2005},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {fds295571}
}

@article{fds295570,
   Author = {Porter, SS and Olcott JH},
   Title = {Working Women in Mexico City: Public Discourses and Material
             Conditions, 1879-1931},
   Journal = {Journal of Latin American Studies},
   Year = {2005},
   Key = {fds295570}
}

@article{fds295568,
   Author = {Olcott, JH},
   Title = {Review Essay: Exploring Identity in Latin American
             History},
   Journal = {Latin American Perspectives},
   Volume = {30},
   Number = {4},
   Pages = {107-119},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {July},
   Key = {fds295568}
}

@article{fds295567,
   Author = {Bliss, KE and Olcott JH},
   Title = {Prostitution, Public Health, and Gender Politics in
             Revolutionary Mexico City},
   Journal = {Social History},
   Volume = {28},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {288-290},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {fds295567}
}

@article{fds295569,
   Author = {Olcott, JH},
   Title = {Crime and Punishment in Latin America: Law and Society since
             Late Colonial Times},
   Journal = {Estudios Interdisciplinarios De America Latina Y El
             Caribe},
   Volume = {14},
   Number = {2},
   Editor = {Salvatore, RD and Aguirre, C and Joseph, GM},
   Year = {2003},
   Month = {Fall},
   Key = {fds295569}
}

@article{fds295566,
   Author = {Olcott, JH},
   Title = {Review of Sex and Sexuality in Latin America, Daniel
             Balderston and Donna Guy, eds.},
   Journal = {Hispanic American Historical Review},
   Volume = {78},
   Number = {2},
   Pages = {325-6},
   Year = {1998},
   Month = {May},
   Key = {fds295566}
}


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