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John J. Martin, Professor and Chair

John J. Martin

John Jeffries Martin, Chair of the Department of History, is a historian of early modern Europe, with particular interests in the social, cultural, and intellectual history of Italy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. He is the author of Venice’s Hidden Enemies: Italian Heretics in a Renaissance City (1993), winner of the Herbert Baxter Adams Prize of the American Historical Association, and Myths of Renaissance Individualism (2004). In addition, he is the editor or co-editor of several volumes: Venice Reconsidered: The History and Civilization of an Italian City State (2002); The Renaissance: Italy and Abroad (2002); Heresy, Culture and Religion in Early Modern Italy: Contexts and Contestations (2006); and The Renaissance World (2007) as well as some fifty articles and essays. He is currently completing Crossing the Boundaries of Hercules: Europe's Provincial Modernity, 1492-1648. Martin’s further research focuses on the history of torture in early modern Italy, a topic he is pursuing through a study of Francesco Casoni, a provincial intellectual, whose writings on evidence and the art of conjecture did much to undermine the need for the use of torture in the courts of Europe in the early modern period.

Martin has been a fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, twice of the National Endowment of the Humanities, and has received support for his research from the American Philosophical Association, the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, and the Renaissance Society of America. He has lectured, as the Alphonse Dupront Chair, at the University of Paris-Sorbonne and, as Distinguished Visiting Scholar, at Victoria College, the University of Toronto. He also lectures frequently to broader publics, most recently through a series of presentations on early modern Europe through the Program in the Humanities and Human Values at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

With Richard Newhauser, Martin is editor of the series Vices & Virtues for Yale University Press.
Martin teaches courses in Italian and European history. His most recent courses include a graduate seminar on the history of the early modern Mediterranean and an undergraduate seminar on the history of torture in the West. In the spring of 2013 he offered, together with Sara Galletti, a course entitled “Mapping Knowledge in the Renaissance: Raphael’s School of Athens,” a collaborative that investigated the epistemologies of various disciplines in Rome in the High Renaissance. The course was funded by a grant from the Humanities Writ Large initiative at Duke.

Before joining the history faculty at Duke in 2007, Martin taught at Trinity University in San Antonio, where he also served as Chair of the History Department (2004-2007). Martin grew up on St. Simons Island, Georgia, attended St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire, and received both his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Harvard.

Contact Info:
Office Location:  323A Carr Bldg., 114 Campus Drive, Durham, NC 27708
Office Phone:  (919) 681-5499
Email Address: send me a message

Teaching (Fall 2017):

  • HISTORY 101.01, PROBLEMS IN HIST GLOBALIZATION Synopsis
    East Duke 209, MW 10:05 AM-11:20 AM
Teaching (Spring 2018):

  • HISTORY 258S.01, WOMEN/POWER RENAISSANCE Synopsis
    Carr 229, Th 06:15 PM-08:45 PM
    (also cross-listed as GSF 258S.01, MEDREN 248S.01, ROMST 258S.01)
Office Hours:

by appointment -- please contact Ms. Carla Ivey at carla.ivey@duke.edu
Education:

Ph.D.Harvard University1982
Ph.D.Harvard University1982
BAHarvard University1975
A.B.Harvard University1975
Specialties:

Medieval and Early Modern History
Legal History
Intellectual History
European and Russia
Global and Comparative
Research Interests:

Current projects: Crossing the Boundaries of Hercules: Knowledge, Faith, and Power in Early Modern Europe, nearing completion.

John Jeffries Martin, Chair of the Department of History, is a historian of early modern Europe, with particular interests in the social, cultural, and intellectual history of Italy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. He is the author of Venice’s Hidden Enemies: Italian Heretics in a Renaissance City (1993), winner of the Herbert Baxter Adams Prize of the American Historical Association, and Myths of Renaissance Individualism (2004). In addition, he is the editor or co-editor of several volumes: Venice Reconsidered: The History and Civilization of an Italian City State (2002); The Renaissance: Italy and Abroad (2002); Heresy, Culture and Religion in Early Modern Italy: Contexts and Contestations (2006); and The Renaissance World (2007) as well as some fifty articles and essays. He is currently completing Crossing the Boundaries of Hercules: Knowledge, Faith, and Power in Early Modern Europe, a history of Europe from the late fifteenth to the early nineteenth century. Martin’s current research focuses on the history of torture in early modern Italy, a topic he is pursuing through a study of Francesco Casoni, a provincial intellectual, whose writings on evidence and the art of conjecture did much to undermine the need for the use of torture in the courts of Europe in the early modern period. Martin has been a fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, twice of the National Endowment of the Humanities, and has received support for his research from the American Philosophical Association, the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, and the Renaissance Society of America. He has lectured, as the Alphonse Dupront Chair, at the University of Paris-Sorbonne and, as Distinguished Visiting Scholar, at Victoria College, the University of Toronto. He also lectures frequently to broader publics, most recently through a series of presentations on early modern Europe through the Program in the Humanities and Human Values at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. With Richard Newhauser, Martin is editor of the series Vices & Virtues for Yale University Press.

Keywords:

Confession • History • History, Early Modern 1451-1600 • Italy • Prayer • Renaissance • Repentance • Self • Sexuality • Sincerity • Torture • venice (italy)--history--1508-1797 • Venice (italy)--history--1508-1797

Bio

Current Ph.D. Students  

Recent Publications   (More Publications)

  1. Martin, JJ, “Et nulle autre me faict plus proprement homme que cette cy :” Michel de Montaigne's embodied masculinity, European Review of History / Revue européenne d'histoire, vol. 22 no. 4 (July, 2015), pp. 563-578 [doi]
  2. Martin, JJ, Francesco Casoni and the Rhetorical Forensics of the Body, Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, vol. 45 no. 1 (January, 2015), pp. 103-130 [doi]
  3. Martin, JJ, Manzoni and the Making of Italy, in Claudio Povolo, The Novelist and the Archivist (2014), Palgrave
  4. Newhauser, RG; Martin, JJ, Foreward, in Friendship by A. C. Graylng (2013), pp. x-xii, Yale University Press, ISBN 978-0-300-17535-6 (Vices and Virtues, a series edited by John Jeffries Martin and Richard G. Newhauser.)
  5. John J. Martin, Jack Goody, Renaissances: The One or the Many? (Cambridge University Press, 2010), The Journal of Early Modern History, vol. 16 no. 6 (December, 2012)


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