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Research Interests for Brian Hare

Research Interests: Human Cognitive Evolution

Keywords:
Adult, Africa, Age Factors, Altruism, Animals, Ape, Appetitive Behavior, Attention, Behavior, Animal, Behavioral Research, Biological Evolution, Bonobo, Brain, Chimpanzee, Chimpanzees, Cognition, Congo, Conservation of Natural Resources, Cooperative Behavior, Decision Making, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Diet, Dog, Domestication, Ecology, Emotions, Endangered Species, Energy Metabolism, Environment, Executive Function, Eye Movements, Feeding Behavior, Female, Food, Food Preferences, Helping Behavior, Hominidae, Humans, Imitative Behavior, Inhibition (Psychology), Learning, Leisure Activities, Lemurs, Life Cycle Stages, Linear Models, Male, Mass Media, Memory, Models, Psychological, Models, Statistical, Motivation, Orangutans, Orientation, Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Perception, Pets, Phylogeny, Primates, Psychology, Psychology, Comparative, Psychomotor Performance, Questionnaires, Reward, Risk-Taking, Science, Selection, Genetic, Sexual Behavior, Social Behavior, Social Perception, Space Perception, Species Specificity, Theory of Mind, Time Factors
Recent Publications   (search)
  1. Horschler, DJ; Hare, B; Call, J; Kaminski, J; Miklósi, Á; MacLean, EL, Absolute brain size predicts dog breed differences in executive function., Animal Cognition, vol. 22 no. 2 (March, 2019), pp. 187-198 [doi[abs].
  2. Krupenye, C; Tan, J; Hare, B, Bonobos voluntarily hand food to others but not toys or tools., Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 285 no. 1886 (September, 2018) [doi[abs].
  3. Lucca, K; MacLean, EL; Hare, B, The development and flexibility of gaze alternations in bonobos and chimpanzees., Developmental Science, vol. 21 no. 4 (July, 2018), pp. e12598 [doi[abs].
  4. Hare, B, Domestication experiments reveal developmental link between friendliness and cognition, Journal of Bioeconomics, vol. 20 no. 1 (April, 2018), pp. 159-163, Springer Nature [doi[abs].
  5. Krupenye, C; Hare, B, Bonobos Prefer Individuals that Hinder Others over Those that Help., Current Biology : Cb, vol. 28 no. 2 (January, 2018), pp. 280-286.e5 [doi[abs].

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